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  • 251. Llop, Esteve
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Bacidia coprodes – resurrecting a misinterpreted species2007In: Lichenologist, Vol. 39, p. 251-257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 252. Llop, Esteve
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hladun, Nestor L.
    Bacidia thyrrenica (Ramalinaceae, lichenized Ascomycota), a new species from the Mediterranean region, and a comparison of European members of the Bacidia rubella group2007In: Nova Hedwigia, Vol. 85, no 3-4, p. 445-455Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 253. Lohtander, K
    et al.
    Källersjö, M
    Moberg, R
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Tehler, A
    The family Physciaceae in Fennoscandia: phylogeny inferred from ITS sequenses.2000In: Mycologia, Vol. 92, p. 728-735Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 254. Lohtander, Katileena
    et al.
    Myllys, Leena
    Källersjö, Mari
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Stenroos, Soili
    Tehler, Anders
    New entities in Physcia aipolia-P-caesia group (Physciaceae, Ascomycetes): an analysis based on mtSSU, ITS, group I intron and betatubulin sequences2009In: Annales Botanici Fennici, ISSN 0003-3847, E-ISSN 1797-2442, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have revisited the phylogenetic evaluation of the Physcia aipolia-P. caesia lichen group (sect. Caesiae; Physciaceae, Lecanorales) in order to investigate whether new sequence data and extensive sampling can help us to understand the phylogenetic relationships in that group. We combined partial mtSSU DNA data with two previously used nuclear gene regions (betatubulin, ITS) and a group I intron. We also compared the resulting phylogenies with chemical and morphological characters. Altogether 52 specimens of the P. aipolia-P. caesia group were analysed. Direct optimization of the molecular data revealed several well-supported groups. Our results essentially agreed with those of the earlier studies, and we were able to confirm the independent taxonomic status of some controversial morphotaxa. We also discovered at least two distinct clades that potentially represent species new to science. A new nomenclatural combination, Physcia alnophila (Vain.) Loht., Moberg, Myllys & Tehler, is proposed.

  • 255.
    Lu, Xinze
    et al.
    Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
    Kendall, Brian
    Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
    Li, Chao
    State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China.
    Stein, Holly
    AIRIE Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1482 USA.
    Hannah, Judith
    AIRIE Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1482 USA.
    Gordon, Gwyneth W.
    School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, USA.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Reconstruction of local and global marine redox conditions during deposition of Late Ordovician and Early Silurian organic-rich mudrocks in the Siljan ring district, central Sweden2015In: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. Vol. 47, No. 7,, 2015, Vol. 47, p. 698-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Siljan ring district in central Sweden was created by a bolide impact at 377±2 Ma that triggered oil generation from organic-richmudrocks (ORM) of the Late Ordovician (Katian) Fjäcka Shale and/or the Early Silurian (Rhuddanian-Telychian) Kallholn Formation.New drill cores obtained by Swedish private company IGRENE AB in 2011 provide an opportunity to significantly improve constraintson the global ocean redox conditions before and after the Late Ordovician Hirnantian glaciation using the U and Mo isotopepaleoredox proxies. Here, we analyzed δ238U (relative to standard CRM145 = 0‰) and δ98Mo (relative to standard NIST SRM 3134 =+0.25‰) of 26 ORM samples from the Fjäcka Shale, Kallholn Formation, and latter deposited Nederberga Formation. The extent ofRe, Mo, and U enrichment, Re/Mo and U/Mo ratios, and Fe speciation indicate euxinic and oxygenated bottom water conditions duringdeposition of the Fjäcka Shale and Nederberga Formation, respectively. The same proxies suggest that the Kallholn Formation wasdeposited under transiently euxinic conditions with the chemocline situated near the sediment-water interface.The most euxinic shales provide the most relevant estimates of global redox conditions. As expected, the euxinic Fjäcka Shale yieldsthe highest δ98Mo (~1.3‰) and δ238U (~0.1‰) of the studied units. High Mo/TOC ratios (>30 ppm/wt%) of the Fjäcka Shale indicateweak basin restriction and large amounts of Mo in the euxinic bottom waters, which could lead to Mo isotope fractionations betweenseawater and sediments due to incomplete formation/removal of tetrathiomolybdate. This interpretation is further supported by high Uisotope composition in the Fjäcka Shale, which is only slightly lower than the modeled value of 0.2‰ for modern open ocean euxinicsediments. Expanded ocean anoxia should lead to deposition of ORMs with low δ238U (<0‰) as observed during the Cenomanian-Turonian OAE2. Hence, the relatively high δ238U coupled with high Mo, Re, and U enrichments and Mo/TOC ratios in the Fjäcka Shalesuggest a more oxygenated ocean prior to the Hirnantian glaciation than previously thought, though the extent of oxygenation was lessthan today.

  • 256.
    Lu, Xinze
    et al.
    Univ Waterloo, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, 200 Univ Ave West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada..
    Kendall, Brian
    Univ Waterloo, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, 200 Univ Ave West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada..
    Stein, Holly J.
    Colorado State Univ, AIRIE Program, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.;Univ Oslo, Ctr Earth Evolut & Dynam, N-0315 Oslo, Norway..
    Li, Chao
    China Univ Geosci, State Key Lab Biogeol & Environm Geol, Wuhan 430074, Peoples R China..
    Hannah, Judith L.
    Colorado State Univ, AIRIE Program, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.;Univ Oslo, Ctr Earth Evolut & Dynam, N-0315 Oslo, Norway..
    Gordon, Gwyneth W.
    Arizona State Univ, Sch Earth & Space Explorat, Tempe, AZ USA..
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Marine redox conditions during deposition of Late Ordovician and Early Silurian organic-rich mudrocks in the Siljan ring district, central Sweden2017In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 457, p. 75-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Ordovician Period witnessed the second largest mass extinction in the Phanerozoic Eon and the Hirnantian glaciation. To infer ocean redox conditions across the Ordovician-Silurian transition, we measured the U (as δ238U relative to standard CRM145 = 0‰) and Mo (as δ98Mo relative to standard NIST SRM 3134 = +0.25‰) isotope compositions of 26 organic-rich mudrock samples from the Late Ordovician (Katian) Fjacka Shale and the Early Silurian (Aeronian-Telychian) Kallholn Formation (Siljan ring district, Sweden). The magnitude of Re, Mo, and U enrichments, ReEF/MoEF and UEF/MoEF ratios, and sedimentary Fe speciation point to locally euxinic bottom water conditions during deposition of the Fjacka Shale. The same proxies suggest that black shales of the Kallholn Formation were deposited under transiently euxinic conditions with the chemocline situated near the sediment-water interface, whereas gray shales stratigraphically equivalent to the upper Kallholn Formation were deposited from oxygenated bottom waters. These observations are consistent with higher δ98Mo and δ238U in the Fjacka Shale compared with the Kallholn Formation.

    Because the Fjacka Shale was deposited from persistently euxinic bottom waters, the Mo and U isotope compositions from these rocks can be used to estimate the extent of global ocean euxinia and ocean anoxia (euxinic plus ferruginous conditions), respectively. Elevated MoEF and Mo/TOC ratios in the euxinic Fjacka Shale suggest no more than moderate basin restriction from the open ocean as well as non-quantitative removal of Mo from the euxinic bottom waters, thus pointing to Mo isotope fractionation between seawater and the euxinic sediments. Hence, we infer that even the highest δ98Mo (+1.28‰) preserved in the Fjacka Shale is only a minimum estimate for the Mo isotope composition of coeval global seawater. Correcting for seawater-sediment Mo isotope fractionation, the δ98Mo of late Katian seawater may have been +1.4-2.1%0, which corresponds to similar to 10-70% Mo removal into the euxinic sink. The average authigenic δ238U of the Fjacka Shale is 0.05‰ to +0.02‰ after correcting for a range of possible detrital δ238U values, thus yielding an overall average of-0‰. Taking into account isotope fractionation during U removal to euxinic sediments, we infer that late Katian seawater δ238U was about 0.85‰ to 0.60‰. A steady-state U isotope mass balance model reveals that 46-63% of riverine U input was removed in anoxic settings. Based on the Mo and U isotope data, we infer that euxinic and anoxic waters may have covered <1% and at least 5% (potentially tens of percent) of the total seafloor area during the late Katian, respectively, based on previously published models that relate the magnitude of Mo and U burial fluxes to the areal extent of euxinic and anoxic seafloor. By comparison, only 021-035% and <1% of the total seafloor area was covered by anoxic waters today and during the Cenozoic, respectively. The difference between the estimated extent of ocean anoxia (euxinic plus ferruginous) and ocean euxinia points to an appreciable extent of ferruginous water masses during the late Katian. Integration of our data with previous studies thus supports the hypothesis that ocean oxygenation intensified during the subsequent Hirnantian glaciation (when seawater δ98Mo temporarily reached values similar to today). Hence, environmental stresses related to glaciation, not an expansion of ocean anoxia, may have triggered the first phase of the Hirnantian mass extinction.

  • 257.
    Lättman, Håkan
    et al.
    Södertörn University College.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Bergen.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University College.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University.
    Skage, Morten
    University of Oslo.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Estimating the dispersal capacity of the rare lichen Cliostomum corrugatum2009In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 142, no 8, p. 1870-1878Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to estimate the dispersal rate in an organism assumed to be confined totree stands with unbroken continuity. We used the lichen-forming ascomycete Cliostomum corrugatum,which is largely confined to old oak stands. Five populations, with pairwise distances ranging from 6.5to 83 km, were sampled in Östergötland, south-eastern Sweden. DNA sequence data from an intron inthe small subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA gene was obtained from 85 samples. Nearly all molecular variance(99.6%) was found within populations and there were no signs of isolation-by-distance. The absolutenumber of immigrants per population per generation (estimated to 30 years), inferred by BayesianMCMC, was found to be between 1 and 5. Altogether, evidence suggests abundant gene flow in the historyof our sample. A simulation procedure demonstrated that we cannot know whether effective dispersal isongoing or if it ceased at the time when oaks started to decrease dramatically around 400 years BP. However,a scenario where effective dispersal ceased already at the time when the postglacial reinvasion ofoak had reached the region around 6000 years BP is unlikely. Vegetation history suggests that the habitatof C. corrugatum was patchily distributed in the landscape since the early Holocene. Combined with thehigh dispersal rate estimate, this suggests that the species has been successful at frequently crossing distancesof at least several kilometres and possibly that it has primarily been limited by the availability ofhabitat rather than by dispersal.

  • 258.
    Lücking, R. & Santesson, R.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    On the Identity of Pyrenotrichum ‘ atrocyaneum’, P. ‘ mirum’, and P. ‘ podosphaera’, Campylidia of Lichenized Ascomycota (Lecanorales: Ectolechiaceae)2002In: Bryologist, Vol. 105, p. 57-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Lücking, R. Sérusiaux, E. & Santesson, R.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Ceratopycnidium citricola is Byssoloma lueckingii.2002In: Lichenologist, Vol. 34, p. 270-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 260.
    Malinky, JM
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    A revision of Holm's Early and early Mid Cambrian hyoliths of Sweden1999In: PALAEONTOLOGY, Vol. 42, p. 25-65Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Re-examination of type specimens of Early Cambrian and early Mid Cambrian hyoliths from Sweden confirms placement of Hyolithes teretiusculus Linnarsson in Hexitheca Syssoiev, and reassignment to the order Hyolithida rather than Orthothecida. Inclusion of

  • 261. Martinsson, Karin
    et al.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Botaniksektionen.
    Pelargonium x hortorum L. H. Bailey : sortiment i Sverige före 19502003Book (Other scientific)
  • 262.
    Martinsson, Karin
    et al.
    Bergianska Botaniska Trädgården, Stockholm.
    Ryman, Svengunnar
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Blomboken: Bilder ur Olof Rudbecks stora botaniska verk2008 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 263.
    Martinsson, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, The Linnean Gardens of Uppsala, Botanical Garden.
    Ryman, Svengunnar
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hortus Rudbeckianus: An enumeration of plants cultivated in the Botanical Garden of Uppsala University during the Rudbeckian period 1655-17022007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 264.
    McKenzie, Robert J.
    et al.
    Rhodes University, Grahamstown, Sydafrika.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Barker, Nigel B.
    Rhodes University, Grahamstown, Sydafrika.
    Typification of Arctotis plantaginea and names in the Arctotis semipapposa species complex (Asteraceae, Arctotideae)2008In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 1341-1346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent floristic treatment, Haplocarpha thunbergii Less. was considered to be the correct name for H. scaposa Harv. The name H. thunbergii is a substitute name for Arctotis lanata Thunb. Examination of the original material in the Thunberg herbarium proved that Thunberg based the name A. lanata on three specimens each belonging to different species (those currently known as A. acaulis L., H. lanata Less. and H. parvifolia (Schltr.) Beauverd). Our identifications of these specimens proved that the names A. lanata and H. scaposa are not conspecific and H. scaposa is not a homotypic synonym of H. thunbergii. Herein a lectotype for H. scaposa is designated from the syntypes specified by Harvey. With the objective of maintaining nomenclatural stability, we lectotypify A. lanata and place it in synonymy of A. acaulis, thus preserving usage of the name H. parvifolia. An updated synonymy for A. acaulis is provided. In addition, lectotypes are designated for A. fosteri N.E. Br., A. oocephala DC., A. parvifolia Schltr., H. lyrata Harv. and H. transvaalensis Gand.

  • 265. McKenzie, Robert J.
    et al.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Barker, Nigel P.
    Typification of the name Arctotis lanata and those of some southern African Haplocarpha species (Asteraceae, Arctotideae)2008In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 612-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent floristic treatment, Haplocarpha thunbergii Less. was considered to be the correct name for H. scaposa Harv. The name H. thunbergii is a substitute name for Arctotis lanata Thunb. Examination of the original material in the Thunberg herbarium proved that Thunberg based the name A. lanata on three specimens each belonging to different species (those currently known as A. acaulis L., If. lanata Less. and If. parvifolia (Schltr.) Beauverd). Our identifications of these specimens proved that the names A. lanata and H. scaposa are not conspecific and H. scaposa is not a homotypic synonym of H. thunbergii. Herein a lectotype for H. scoposa is designated from the syntypes specified by Harvey. With the objective of maintaining nomenclatural stability, we lectotypify A. lanata and place it in synonymy of A. acaulis, thus preserving usage of the name H. parvifolia. An updated synonymy for A. acaulis is provided. In addition, lectotypes are designated for A. fosteri N.E. Br., A. oocephala DC., A. parvifolia Schltr., H. lyrata Harv. and H. transvaalensis Gand.

  • 266. McLoughlin, Stephen
    et al.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Gondwanan Mesozoic biotas and bioevents2015In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 905-910Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 267.
    Meinhold, Guido
    et al.
    Keele Univ, Sch Geog Geol & Environm, Keele ST5 5BG, Staffs, England;Univ Gottingen, Dept Sedimentol & Environm Geol, Goldschmidtstr 3, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany.
    Jensen, Soren
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, Fac Ciencias, Ave Fis, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Hoyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Arslan, Arzu
    Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire ST5 2ND, UK.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Arctic Univ Museum Norway, N-9037 Tromso, Norway.
    Palacios, Teodoro
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, Fac Ciencias, Ave Fis, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Agic, Heda
    Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Dept Earth Sci, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Geol Sci, Private Bag X3, ZA-7701 Rondebosch, South Africa.
    First record of carbonates with spherulites and cone-in-cone structures from the Precambrian of Arctic Norway, and their palaeoenvironmental significance2019In: Precambrian Research, ISSN 0301-9268, E-ISSN 1872-7433, Vol. 328, p. 99-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report for the first time carbonates from the upper Ediacaran sedimentary succession of Finnmark, Arctic Norway. Carbonates occur as calcareous siliciclastic beds, lenses, and concretions, some with calcite spherulites and cone-in-cone (CIC) calcite, in a mudrock to fine-grained sandstone succession from approximately 3 m to 26 m above the base of the 2nd cycle of the Manndrapselva Member of the Stahpogieddi Formation (Vestertana Group). They occur c. 40 m below the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary, which is well defined by trace fossils. Thin-section petrography and scanning micro X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping reveal a layered composition of the calcareous sedimentary rocks. In some of those, well-developed nested cones of CIC calcite form the outer layer. Thin clay coatings outline individual cones. The inner layers are composed of (1) carbonate with calcite spherulites (grainstone) and (2) thinly laminated fine-grained calcareous siliciclastics (mudstone and wackestone) indicated by elevated concentrations of Al, Si, Fe, and Ti. The inner siliciclastic layers contain framboidal pyrite and probably organic matter. Formation of calcite spherulites took place probably at the sediment-water interface either in a coastal littoral environment or in situ in the sublittoral zone under high alkaline conditions whereas CIC calcite formed during burial diagenesis and clearly in pre-Caledonian time before metamorphism and cleavage formation. This new record of carbonates with calcite spherulites and CIC structures from the Ediacaran of Arctic Norway adds to their rare occurrences in the geological record.

  • 268.
    Meinhold, Guido
    et al.
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Perschl, Marlene
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Schröpfer, Marne
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Steichert, Annika
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Agic, Heda
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Composition and provenance of upper Neoproterozoic and Cambrian sediments from Finnmark, Arctic Norway: Insights from a multi-method approach on the Digermulen Peninsula2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The remote Digermulen Peninsula by the Tanafjorden of north-eastern Finnmark, Arctic Norway, contains an almost complete sedimentary record across the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition as well as microfossils, macrofossils and trace fossils for studying the Ediacaran biota and the Cambrian radiation. It is one of the few localities worldwide and the only locality in Scandinavia where Ediacara-type fossils have been found. The site was located at the edge of Baltica during the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition, where potentially the dramatic climatic turnover from icehouse to greenhouse conditions can be deduced and tied to large-scale plate tectonics. The Digermulen Peninsula was first studied in the 1930s by Sven Føyn, who also published a geological map in 1937, emended by Harold G. Reading in 1959. In the following years, more detailed mapping was carried out by students from Oxford University. The exposed rocks on the Digermulen Peninsula belong to the Vestertana and Digermulen groups of the Lower Allochthon overlying the Baltic Shield. The succession consists mainly of quartz-rich sandstones and mudrocks. Deposition took place in various environments including fluvial, shallow marine and deeper marine settings. As shown by previous studies using palaeocurrent data, sediment supply was from the Baltic Shield toward the passive margin of Baltica in pre-Ediacaran time. At one point within the Ediacaran succession, it shifted by 180 degrees due to the newly formed Timanian orogen. This orogen formed in north-eastern Baltica during the late Neoproterozoic. It caused a change in source area due to the formation of the Timanian foreland basin to the east of Digermulen Peninsula. Extensive field and laboratory work by the Digermulen Early Life Research Group, with funding from the Research Council of Norway, allows for the first time a detailed analysis of sediment supply and to test current palaeotectonic models based on a multi-method provenance approach on Neoproterozoic and Cambrian mudrocks and sandstones of the Digermulen Peninsula. The methods include, amongst others, thin-section petrography, bulk-rock geochemistry (XRF, ICP-MS), bulk-rock mineralogy (XRD), conventional heavy mineral analysis, single-grain geochemistry (EMP) and zircon U-Pb geochronology. We present and discuss the first results to decipher the sediment sources and to track changes of sediment supply through this critical time interval of Earth’s history.

  • 269.
    Meinhold, Guido
    et al.
    University of Keele, School of Geography, Geology and Environment.
    Perschl, Marlene
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Schröpfer, Marne
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Steichert, Annika
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Sediment provenance at the edge of Baltica during the late Neoproterozoicand Cambrian: Insights from a multi‐method approach on the Digermulen Peninsula (Finnmark, Arctic Norway)2018In: International Conference on Arctic Margins, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digermulen Peninsula contains an almost complete sedimentary record across the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition as well as microfossils, macrofossils and trace fossils for studying the Ediacaranbiota and the Cambrian radiation. The site was located at the edge of Baltica during the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition, where potentially the dramatic climatic turnover from icehouse to greenhouse conditions can be deduced and tied to large‐scale plate tectonics. The succession consists mainly of quartz‐rich sandstones and mudrocks. Deposition took place in various environments including fluvial, shallow marine and deeper marine settings. As shown by previous studies using palaeocurrent data, sediment supply was from the Baltic Shield toward the passive margin of Balticain pre‐Ediacaran time. At one point within the Ediacaran succession, it shifted by 180 degrees due tothe newly formed Timanian orogen. This orogen formed in north‐eastern Baltica during the late Neoproterozoic. It caused a change in source area due to the formation of the Timanian foreland basin to the east of Digermulen Peninsula. Extensive field and laboratory work by the Digermulen Early Life Research Group allows for the first time a detailed analysis of sediment supply and to test current palaeotectonic models based on a multi‐method provenance approach on Neoproterozoicand Cambrian sedimentary rocks of the Digermulen Peninsula. We present and discuss the first results to decipher the sediment sources and to track changes of sediment supply through thiscritical time interval of Earth history.

  • 270.
    Meinhold, Guido
    et al.
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Perschl, Marlene
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Schröpfer, Marne
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Steichert, Annika
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Novis, Linn K.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ou, Zhiji
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Changes of sediment composition at the dawn of animal life: Insights from the Ediacaran‒Cambrian boundary section of the Digermulen Peninsula (Finnmark, Arctic Norway)2016In: Abstract Volume of GeoTirol2016 - Annual Meeting of DGGV and PANGEO Austria, 25-28. September 2016, Innsbruck. / [ed] Ortner, H., 2016, p. 205-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digermulen Peninsula in northern Norway is the only fossiliferous site in Scandinavia with sedimentationacross the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition without a significant hiatus. Furthermore, it is the only locality inScandinavia where Ediacara-type fossils have been found. The site is located at the edge of Baltica during theEdiacaran–Cambrian transition, where potentially the dramatic climatic turnover from icehouse to greenhouseconditions can be deduced and tied to large-scale plate tectonics. Since 2011, studies by the Digermulen EarlyLife Research Group have recorded significant new finds, promising to establish the site as a significant Ediacaranbiota locality. The Ediacaran succession is about 1000 m thick. Ediacara-type fossils occur in the InnerelvaMember of the Stáhpogiedde Formation. Discoidal fossils dominate the Ediacaran assemblage, although apotentially much greater diversity is suggested because of the recent discovery of a frond-shaped fossil. TheEdiacaran–Cambrian boundary is located within the Manndraperelva Member of the Stáhpogiedde Formation,based on biostratigraphic age control, followed by the Lower Cambrian Breidvika Formation. The successionconsists mainly of quartz-rich sandstones and mudrocks. Deposition took place in various environments, includingfluvial, shallow marine and deeper marine settings. As shown by previous studies using palaeocurrent data,sediment supply was from the Baltic Shield toward the passive margin of Baltica in pre-Ediacaran time. At onepoint within the Ediacaran succession, it shifted by 180 degrees due to the newly formed Timanian orogen. Thisorogen formed in north-eastern Baltica during the late Neoproterozoic and caused a shift in sediment transportdirection and change in source area due to the formation of the Timanian foreland basin to the east of DigermulenPeninsula. In order to track sediment supply and to test current palaeotectonic models a multi-disciplinaryapproach on late Neoproterozoic and Cambrian sediments of the Digermulen Peninsula has been applied. Themethods include, amongst other things, thin section petrography, bulk rock geochemistry (XRF, ICP-MS, ICPOES),bulk rock mineralogy (XRD), heavy mineral analysis, single grain chemistry (EMP, LA-ICP-MS) and zirconU-Pb geochronology.

  • 271.
    Mejlon, Erica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    De Wit, Pierre
    Matamoros, Lisa
    Erseus, Christer
    DNA-based phylogeny of the marine genus Heterodrilus (Annelida, Clitellata, Naididae)2015In: Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, ISSN 0947-5745, E-ISSN 1439-0469, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 194-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterodrilus is a group of marine Naididae, common worldwide in subtropical and tropical areas, and unique among the oligochaetes by their tridentate chaetae. The phylogenetic relationships within the group are assessed from the nuclear 18S rDNA gene, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rDNA genes. Sequence data were obtained from 16 Heterodrilus species and 13 out-group taxa; 48 sequences are new for this study. The data were analysed by Bayesian inference. Monophyly of the genus is corroborated by the resulting tree, with Heterodrilus ersei (a taxon representing a small group of species with aberrant male genitalia) proposed to be outside all other sampled species. Although earlier regarded as a member of the subfamily Rhyacodrilinae, both molecular and morphological data seem to support that Heterodrilus is closely related to Phallodrilinae. However, the results are not conclusive as to whether the genus is the sister group of, or a group nested inside, or separate from this latter subfamily. The studied sample of species suggests at least two major clades in Heterodrilus with different geographical distributions, in one of the clades, most species are from the Indo-West Pacific Ocean, while in the other, the majority are from the Western Atlantic Ocean. Morphological characters traditionally used in Heterodrilus taxonomy are optimized on the phylogenetic tree, revealing a high degree of homoplasy.

  • 272.
    Mejlon, Hans
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Diel activity of Ixodes ricinus Acari: Ixodidæ at two locations near Stockholm, Sweden1997In: Experimental and Applied Acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 247-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diel 'activity', i.e. availability, of Ixodes ricinus larvae, nymphs and adults was investigated in a meadow and a forest habitat near Stockholm during 1991-1993. Generally, the immature ticks were more prevalent in the forest than in the meadow. In the meadow, the mean larval and adult numbers varied significantly between 4 h time intervals with the peak activity from 2300 to 0300 h. In the forest, tick numbers did not differ significantly between time intervals. The association of tick activity with certain meteorological variables was strongest in the meadow, where the mean numbers of all tick stages were negatively correlated with temperature.The relative humidity was positively correlated only with the mean numbers of larvae. In contrast, the larval activity in the forest was positively and negatively correlated with temperature and relative humidity, respectively, while the nymphal and adult activity showed no association with these climatic variables. The impact of host activity on tick diel activity is also discussed.

  • 273.
    Mejlon, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Zoology.
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Questing behaviour of Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae)1997In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 747-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vertical distribution in the vegetation of questing Ixodes ricinus ticks was investigated in two different vegetation types ('high' and 'low' vegetation) at two localities in south-central Sweden during 1992-1993 (Torö) and 1995 (Bogesund). Significant correlations were found between the vertical distribution of immature ticks and the height of the vegetation. The greatest mean availabilities of the larvae and nymphs in low vegetation were in the intervals 0-9 and 30-39 cm, respectively. The larval numbers were greatest close to the ground (0-29) in both high and low vegetation. The larval : nymphal ratio, at ground level at localities free of ground vegetation, varied between 8:1 and 32:1. In high vegetation, the greatest mean numbers of nymphal and adult ticks were at height intervals of 50-59 and 60-79 cm, respectively. These ranges are within the estimated height interval (40-100 cm) of the main part of the body surface of their 'preferred' host, the roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). The presence of most questing I. ricinus larvae at ground level would favour the transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., since this is where the highly reservoir-competent rodents and shrews usually occur.

  • 274.
    Mejlon, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Seasonal prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi in Ixodes ricinus in different vegetation types in Sweden1993In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 449-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to estimate the seasonal risk of contracting human Lyme disease in different vegetation types in southern Sweden. Host-seeking Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) were collected with standardized methods during May-September 1988 and March-October 1989 at 10 different sampling sites. Tick abundance was greatest during May-June and August-September. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection of the ticks was assessed by phase-contrast microscopy complemented by immunology. Spirochetal infection of tick larvae was not detected. The prevalence of infection among nymphal ticks differed significantly between years and between sampling sites. Infection prevalence was greater in adult females than in nymphs, but was similar in female and male ticks. Among all vegetation types studied, the greatest Lyme disease risk was deemed to be from I. ricinus nymphs during May and September in mixed forest vegetation.

  • 275. Millanes, Ana M.
    et al.
    Diederich, Paul
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Wedin, Mats
    Phylogeny and character evolution in the jelly fungi (Tremellomycetes, Basidiomycota, Fungi)2011In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 12-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Tremellomycetes (Agaricomycotina, Basidiomycota, Fungi) are a nutritionally heterogeneous group comprising saprotrophs, animal parasites, and fungicolous species (fungal-inhabiting, including lichen-inhabiting). The relationships of many species, particularly those with a lichenicolous habit, have never been investigated by molecular methods. We present a phylogeny of the Tremellomycetes based on three nuclear DNA ribosomal markers (nSSU, 5.8S and nLSU), representing all main taxonomic groups and life forms, including lichenicolous taxa. The Cystofilobasidiales, Filobasidiales, Holtermanniales, and Tremellales (including the Trichosporonales) are recovered as monophyletic, but this is not the case for the Tremellomycetes. We suggest, however, that the Cystofilobasidiales tentatively continue to be included in the Tremellomycetes. As currently circumscribed, the Filobasidiaceae, Sirobasidiaceae, Syzygosporaceae and Tremellaceae are non-monophyletic. Cuniculitremaceae, Sirobasidiaceae and Tetragoniomycetaceae are nested within Tremellaceae. The lichenicolous species currently included within the Tremellomycetes belong in this group, distributed across the Filobasidiales and Tremellales. Lichen-inhabiting taxa do not form a monophyletic group; they are distributed in several clades and sometimes intermixed with taxa of other nutritional habits. Character state reconstruction indicates that two morphological traits claimed to characterize groups in the Tremellomycetes (the basidium habit and basidium septation) are highly homoplastic. Comparative phylogenetic methods suggest that the transitions between single and catenulate basidia in the Tremellales are consistent with a punctuational model of evolution whereas basidium septation is likely to have evolved under a graduational model in the clade comprising the Holtermanniales, Filobasidiales, and Tremellales.

  • 276.
    Millanes, Ana M.
    et al.
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Dept Biol & Geol, Fis & Quim Inorgan, Tulipan S-N, Mostoles 28933, Mostoles, Spain..
    Diederich, Paul
    Musee Natl Hist Nat, 25 Rue Munster, L-2160 Luxembourg, Luxembourg..
    Westberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bot, POB 50007, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Three new species in the Biatoropsis usnearum complex2016In: Herzogia, ISSN 0018-0971, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 337-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three new species of Biatoropsis are formally described based on our previous molecular studies, and on additional molecular, morphological, and ecological data. Biatoropsis protousneae sp. nov. is confined to Protousnea dusenii. Biatoropsis minuta sp. nov. is characterized by the small and brown to black basidiomatal galls, and by growing on Usnea barbata and U. lapponica. Biatoropsis hafellneri sp. nov. is distinguished by 2-celled basidia with cells that elongate laterally at maturity, and by growing on species of the Usnea fragilescens aggregate. A fourth Biatoropsis species is left unnamed, and two other lineages are not described, all waiting for the study of additional material.

  • 277.
    Moberg et al., Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Nordic Lichen Flora: Calicioid lichens and fungi1999Book (Refereed)
  • 278.
    Moberg et al., Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Nordic Lichen Flora: Physciaceæ2002Book (Refereed)
  • 279.
    Moberg, R.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Physcia2002In: Lichen flora of the greater Sonoran Desert Region, Vol. 1, p. 358-373Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Moberg, R. et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Physciaceae2002In: Nordic Lichen Flora, Vol. 2, p. 7-115Book (Refereed)
  • 281.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Botaniksektionen.
    Lichenes Selecti Exsiccati Upsalienses. Fasc. 13–142003In: Thunbergia, ISSN 0283-2275, Vol. 34, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fascicles 13 & 14 contain material from riverbanks and lakeshores in northern Sweden collected by G. E. Du Rietz 1956–1965 and worked up by Anders Nordin. They also contain collections from Australia, Austria, The Azores, Canary Islands, Costa Rica, Fiji, France, Lithuania, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Sweden, and USA. A new combination, Neuropogon durietzii (Mot.) Articus & Moberg is presented. Material of the recently described species Dermatocarpon taminium (isotype) and Physcia jackii (isotype) is included.

  • 282.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Material with Linnaeus' hand in Linnémuseet2010In: Svenska Linnésällskapets årsskrift, ISSN 0375-2038, p. 145-157Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 283.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Notes on foliose species of the lichen family Physciaceæ in southern Africa2004In: Contributions to lichen taxonomy and biogeography: Dedicated to Leif Tibell, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2004, p. 257-288Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-two species of the lichen family Physciaceae in southern Africa are treated, sixteen Heterodermia, seven Hyperphyscia, eight Phaeophyscia, fifteen Physcia and six Pyxine. Short descriptions of genera and species are given and keys are provided. One species, Heterodermia subcinerea, is described as new. Hyperphyscia coralloidea and Physcia jackii are reported as new to Africa. Maps of the known world distribution of Heterodermia spathulifera and Pyxine nubila are presented.

  • 284.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Botaniksektionen.
    Studies on Physciaceae (Lichens) 1. A new species of Pyxine1980In: Norwegian J. Bot., ISSN 0300-1156, Vol. 27, p. 189-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pyxine nubila Moberg is described and discussed. A map of its known distribution is presented.

  • 285.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The lichen genus Heterodermia in Europe and the Macaronesian Islands2004In: Contribution to Lichenology: Festschrift in honour of Hannes Hertel, Cramer, Berlin Stuttgart , 2004, p. 453-463Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 286.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    The lichen genus Heterodermia (Physciaceae) in South America - a contribution including five new species2011In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 129-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-three species of the lichen genus Heterodermia in South America, mainly from Ecuador and Peru, are defined. Morphology, anatomy, chemistry, habitat, distribution and interrelation between the species are discussed. A key to the treated species is presented. Five species are described as new; Heterodermia andina, H. arvidssonii, H. badia, H. fertilis and H. parva. One new combination is proposed; H. spinigera. Two species are reported as new to South America, H. spathulifera and H subcitrina, and H. palpebrata is reported as new to USA.

  • 287.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The lichen genus Phaeophyscia in China and Russian Far East1995In: Nord. J. Bot., ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 319-335Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen species, more than half of the total known species in the lichen genus Phaeophyscia, are shown to be present in China and Russian Far East. Morphology, anatomy, chemistry, distribution, habitat, relations to other taxa and some evolutionary trends

  • 288.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Botaniksektionen.
    The lichen genus Physcia in Australia2001In: Lichenological Contributions in Honour of Jack Elix, 2001, p. 289-311Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seventeen species of the lichen genus Physcia (Schreb.) Mich. (Ascomycotina, Physciaceae) are reported from Australia. One species P. jackii MOBERG, is described as new and ten others are recorded for the first time from the continent, P. atrostriata, P. biziana, P. crispa, P. decorticata, P. nubila, P. phaeocarpa, P. poncinsii, P. sorediata, P. undulata and P. verrucosa. Physcia albo-plumbia is synonymized with P. albata. Some morphological and anatomical character are assessed, and a key to the species is presented. Biogeographical affinities and distribution patterns within Australia are discussed.

  • 289.
    Moberg, Roland
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The Linnean collections at Uppsala University2008In: The Linnaean legacy: three centuries after his birth / [ed] Mary J. Morris and Leonie Berwick, London: The Linnean Society of London , 2008, Vol. 8, p. 141-143Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 290.
    Moberg, Roland
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Carlin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Placopsis lambii, new to Africa1999In: Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, Vol. 31, p. 647-648Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 291.
    Moberg, Roland
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Purvis, William
    Studies on the lichens of the Azores. Part 4: The genus Heterodermia1997In: Lichen studies: Dedicated to Rolf Santesson, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 1997, p. 187-194Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 292.
    Moberg, Roland
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Windahl Pontén, Annika
    Uppsala University, University Administration.
    Linnéjubileet 20072011In: Det goda universitetet: rektorsperioden 2006-2011. Festskrift till Anders Hallberg / [ed] Pernilla Björk, Mattias Bolkéus Blom & Per Ström, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2011, p. 367-384Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 293. Moncalvo, Jean-Marc
    et al.
    Nilsson, R. Henrik
    Koster, Brenda
    Dunham, Susie M.
    Bernauer, Torsten
    Matheny, P. Brandon
    Porter, Teresita M.
    Margaritescu, Simona
    Weiss, Michael
    Garnica, Sigisfredo
    Danell, Eric
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Langer, Gitta
    Langer, Ewald
    Larsson, Ellen
    Larsson, Karl-Henrik
    Vilgalys, Rytas
    The cantharelloid clade: dealing with incongruent gene trees and phylogenetic reconstruction methods2006In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 98, no 6, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reassessed the circumscription of the cantharelloid clade and identified monophyletic groups by using nLSU, nSSU, mtSSU and RPB2 sequence data. Results agreed with earlier studies that placed the genera Cantharellus, Craterellus, Hydnum, Clavulina, Membranomyces, Multiclavula, Sistotrema, Botryobasidium and the family Ceratobasidiaceae in that clade. Phylogenetic analyses support monophyly of all genera except Sistotrema, which was highly polyphyletic. Strongly supported monophyletic groups were: (i) Cantharellus-Craterellus, Hydnum, and the Sistotrema confluens group; (ii) Clavulina-Membranomyces and the S. brinkmannii-oblongisporum group, with Multiclavula being possibly sister of that clade; (iii) the Sistotrema eximum-octosporum group; (iv) Sistotrema adnatum and S. coronilla. Positions of Sistotrema raduloides and S. athelioides were unresolved, as were basal relationships. Botryobasidium was well supported as the sister taxon of all the above taxa, while Ceratobasidiaceae was the most basal lineage. The relationship between Tulasnella and members of the cantharelloid clade will require further scrutiny, although there is cumulative evidence that they are probably sister groups. The rates of molecular evolution of both the large and small nuclear ribosomal RNA genes (nuc-rDNA) are much higher in Cantharellus, Craterellus and Tulasnella than in the other cantharelloid taxa, and analyses of nuc-rDNA sequences strongly placed Tulasnella close to Cantharellus-Craterellus. In contrast analyses with RPB2 and mtSSU sequences placed Tulasnella at the base of the cantharelloid clade. Our attempt to reconstruct a "supertree" from tree topologies resulting from separate analyses that avoided phylogenetic reconstruction problems associated with missing data and/or unalignable sequences proved unsuccessful.

  • 294.
    Negrean, G. & Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Melanotaenium adoxae revisited1997In: Mycotaxon, Vol. 61, p. 359-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rare smut Melanotaenium adoxae (Brefeld) S. Ito parasitic on Adoxa moschatellina L. is redescribed, illustrated and neotypified from recent collections in Romania. Attempts to germinate ustilospores of M. adoxae and M. ari were unsuccessful. Due to th

  • 295.
    Niedzwiedzki, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Bajdek, Piotr
    Aleja Najswietszej Maryi Panny 20-20A, PL-42200 Czestochowa, Poland..
    Owocki, Krzysztof
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Paleobiol, Twarda 51-55, PL-00818 Warsaw, Poland..
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    An Early Triassic polar predator ecosystem revealed by vertebrate coprolites from the Bulgo Sandstone (Sydney Basin) of southeastern Australia2016In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 464, p. 5-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vertebrate trace fossils often provide a measure of cryptic biodiversity, and are especially pertinent when skeletal remnants are exceptionally rare. The Lower Triassic (lower Olenekian) Bulgo Sandstone at Long Reef in the Sydney Basin of southeastern Australia constitutes just such a deposit, having yielded isolated bones of giant capitosaurian temnospondyls and proterosuchid archosauriforms, together with abundant coprolites that are geochemically rich in elemental phosphate and carbon denoting vertebrate predators. Microstructural analysis of these preserved droppings reveals occasional bone fragments, fish scales, insect cuticles, plant material and bacterial traces (pseudomorph voids), as well as silicate mineral particles. REE concentrations indicate that burial and early diagenesis occurred explicitly within fluvial sediments. Furthermore, external morphological characterization permits attribution of spiral coprolites to chondrichthyan or osteichthyan fishes, polygonal, ovoid spherical and typically flattened feces to temnospondyls, and conspicuously large cylindrical droppings to archosauriforms or other amniote apex predators. Collectively, the Bulgo Sandstone coprolite assemblage thus offers new insights into ecosystem structure and palaeoenvironment in what was an earliest Triassic near polar setting. Such data compliments the documented skeletal record, but indicates a greater range of aquatic and possibly terrestrial carnivores the latter being enigmatically sparse in the Australian Triassic and yet detected here via the hitherto underexplored trace fossil evidence of their ecological presence.

  • 296. Nishimura, Takeshi D.
    et al.
    Ito, Tsuyoshi
    Yano, Wataru
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Takai, Masanaru
    Nasal architecture in Procynocephalus wimani (Early Pleistocene, China) and implications for its phyletic relationship with Paradolichopithecus2014In: Anthropological Science, ISSN 0918-7960, E-ISSN 1348-8570, Vol. 122, no 2, p. 101-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Procynocephalus and Paradolichopithecus are large Eurasian papionins from the Middle Pliocene to Early Pleistocene. The two genera are regarded as being phylogenetically close, but their phyletic position is still disputed, in particular regarding to which subtribe, Papionina or Macacina, they are close to. Many fragile structures of the nasal region are well preserved in the type specimen of Procynocephalus wimani from the Xin'an locality in China. Computed tomography scans showed that the Xin'an specimen has no maxillary sinus, an inferior meatus extending medially from the slightly superior portion of the maxillary body, and a thick maxillary body with no maxillary fossa. Morphological variation in the nasal region was surveyed in extant papionins. Our analysis showed that the maxillary sinus is found even in Papio/Theropithecus and that its formation is confirmed for all Macaca. The inferior conchae are suspended from the superior portion of the nasal cavity in Papio/Theropithecus and Mandrillus, and the maxillary fossa is developed by major absorption of the maxillary cancellous bone in Papionina. These findings indicate that a given fossil specimen having a maxillary sinus does not always belong to the Macacina lineage, and that a given specimen having a thin maxillary body is closer to the Papionina. Despite the paucity of evidence definitive of its phyletic position, these morphological examinations suggest that Procynocephalus is closer to the lineage of Macacina though it lacks the maxillary sinus. Whereas Paradolichopithecus arvernensis and Paradolichopithecus sushkini show some morphological similarities to and differences from each other and Procynocephalus, their nasal architecture is similar to that seen in the Macacina rather than in the Papionina. The morphological evaluations of the nasal region in African forms are expected to contribute to our understanding of the phyletic relationships and adaptive radiation of the large Eurasian papionins in the Plio-Pleistocene.

  • 297.
    Nordin, A.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Collemopsidium angermannicum, a widespread but rarely collected aquatic lichen.2002In: Graphis Scripta, Vol. 13, p. 39-41Article in journal (Refereed)
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    Nordin, A.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Du Rietz’s lichen collections 1956–1965 from riverbanks and shores of lakes in connection with planned water regulations.2002In: Thunbergia, Vol. 32, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
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    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Apropå sotlavens rätta substrat2006In: Växter i Hälsingland och Gästrikland, Vol. 1, p. 3-Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
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    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Chaenothecopsis ochroleuca, ny för Skandinavien, funnen i Hälsingland2007In: Växter i Hälsingland och Gästrikland, no 1, p. 3-Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
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