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  • 251.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Systematic Injury Prevention in Traditional Process Monitoring Work2004In: Occupational Risk Prevention / [ed] Mondelo,P, Mattila,M, Karwowski, W, Hale, A (Eds), 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 252.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Systematic Safety Management: the challenge of development2002In: The 68th International conference on the prevention of occupational accidents: Invited keynote lecture, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 253.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The logistics of distributed aged care in a local Swedish community2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to map the pattern of care contacts between +65 year olds with multiple medical diagnoses living at home and their formal and informal care and service providers, 62 persons in the local council of Haninge agreed to keep a diary of all their health related contact events for a period of 6 months. The participants were visited once a fortnight and their diary inputs were recorded. The data was collected during 2011, 2012 and 2013. 20 000 contact events and 28 000 activities were recorded over 10620 participant days. Background variables like marital status, type of dwelling, type of medical problems were  related to patterns of contact with health care staff, transport services, type of care services provided, importance of family and informal care providers. The result is a fairly detailed description of the logistics requirements in a system of distributed aged care with high accessibility and retained independence.

  • 254.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Politics of Risk2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 255.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The subculture of care and care-related infections: Invited paper to Occupational Risk Prevention Conference 20142014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, 10% of all hospitalised patients acquire a care-related infection; between 25 - 35000 patients annually are severely injured due to medical mistakes and between 3000 and 4000 die from erroneous procedures or acquired infections. In a study of the risk of care-related infections in an institution of special accommodation for the aged, journal data and participant observation showed a low level of infection risk, but the risk levels varied significantly between wards and the understanding of hygiene routines varied between staff. It is suggested that hygiene routines be taught as a technical professional skill for physicians, nurses and nursing aides alike.

  • 256.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Swedish Example2001In: : Invited paper / [ed] Victorian WorkCover Corporation, Melbourne, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 257.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    To target prevention and support the management of occupational risk: Invited Keynote Lecture2005In: Bold Perspectives, Shared Objectives, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    The prevention of occupationally related trauma and disease requires reliable measurement systems in order to target the relevant exposures and injury problems and prioritise resources. Social and workers' compensation insurance data, with exposure, coverage, accident process, medical severity and other outcome information, represents the most credible basis for decisions on preventative action.

    The registration and measurement system for occupational trauma and disease, based on the ACC New Zealand paradigm, has been developed by the Swedish Labour Market Insurances, and is also the basis for the new EU occupational injury registration system

    Some different target areas for occupational injury prevention, and examples of successful intervention activities, are reported from Swedish and Australian systems.

    To support the industrial management of safety requires good and industry-relevant measurement systems for occupational risk and the consequences of occupational trauma and disease. The development of such specific recording and measurement systems in Swedish branches of industry is based on union-employer consensus about occupational risk and a joint approach to safety management. Aggregate statistical information is of limited use for applied prevention; the accident and injury data must be more specific and detailed in order to be turned into credible decision support systems (DSS).

    Some different examples of industry-based safety management and decision support systems from Sweden are presented.

    Results from a study on the relation between best-of-sector industrial safety management and shareholder value on the ASX are also presented.

    1

  • 258.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Aminoff, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Mridha, Mannan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A consumers´testing approach to the usability of medical technology: Insulin pumps and CGM systems2014In: Advances in Safety Management and Human Factors, 2014, p. 117-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five different insulin pumps and three systems for continuous glucose monitoring were subjected to usability tests at the School of Technology and Health. Each pump was trialed and rated by 30 respondents; 20 students with no experience of diabetes and 10 diabetic pump users. Each of the CGM systems was trialed and rated by 10 non-diabetic students. All participating students were enrolled in Medical Technology (Royal Institute of Technology) or Occupational Therapy (Karolinska Institute). The technical performance of pumps and CGM systems was tested independently. The respondents handled the insulin container, the oftware, the buttons, the screen and the manual through five scenario-based tasks. The trials and the accompanying attitude items were based on the ISO definition of usability. Efficiency was measured as the proportion of respondents succeeding to perform the tasks in less than 15 minutes, combined with the average time to do so. Effectiveness was the quotient of success frequency over average performance time. Satisfaction was the average distribution on the attitude items related to software, screen, buttons and manual. All products were ranked against each other within each separate test and the rank scores accumulated. There  were significant differences in the scoring of the individual insulin pumps and CGM systems.

  • 259.
    Li, Xiaogai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Ho, Johnson
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    3-D Finite Element Modeling of Brain Edema: Initial Studies on Intracranial Pressure Using COMSOL Multiphysics2009In: COMSOL Conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain edema is one of the most common consequences of serious traumatic brain injuries which is usually accompanied with increased Intracranial Pressure (ICP) due to water content increment. A three dimensional finite element model of brain edema is used to study intracranial pressure in this paper. Three different boundary conditions at the end of Cerebral Spinal Fluid (CSF) were used to investigate the boundary condition effects on the volume-pressure curve based on the current model. Compared with the infusion experiments, results from the simulations show that exponential pressure boundary condition model corresponds well with the experiment

  • 260.
    Li, Xiaogai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Ho, Johnson
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Three Dimensional Poroelastic Simulation of Brain Edema: Initial studies on intracranial pressure2010In: IFMBE Proceedings, 2010, 2010, p. 1478-1481Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain edema is one of the most common consequences of serious head injury because of the enhancement of water content and thus the increased brain volume. Once the brain compensation mechanisms have been exhausted, the intracranial pressure (ICP) will increase exponentially because the brain is enclosed in the rigid skull. Previous research suggests that the poroelastic theory provides a solution for studying the fluid flow in the brain. In this paper, poroelastic theory is used to study the intracranial pressure distribution due to traumatic brain edema by a detailed 3D finite element brain model.

  • 261.
    Li, Xiaogai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Ho, Johnson
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Three Dimensional Poroelastic Simulation of Brain Edema: Initial Studies on Intracranial Pressure Using Comsol Multiphysics2009In: Proceedings of European Comsol Conference, Milan, Italy, October 7 - 9, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 262. Lidayová, K.
    et al.
    Betancur, D. A. G.
    Frimmel, H.
    Hoyos, M. H.
    Orkisz, M.
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Image Processing and Visualization.
    Airway-tree segmentation in subjects with acute respiratory distress syndrome2017In: 20th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis, SCIA 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 10270, p. 76-87Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with a high mortality rate in intensive care units. To lower the number of fatal cases, it is necessary to customize the mechanical ventilator parameters according to the patient’s clinical condition. For this, lung segmentation is required to assess aeration and alveolar recruitment. Airway segmentation may be used to reach a more accurate lung segmentation. In this paper, we seek to improve lung segmentation results by proposing a novel automatic airway-tree segmentation that is able to address the heterogeneity of ARDS pathology by handling various lung intensities differently. The method detects a simplified airway skeleton, thereby obtains a set of seed points together with an approximate radius and intensity range related to each of the points. These seeds are the input for an onion-kernel region-growing segmentation algorithm where knowledge about radius and intensity range restricts the possible leakage in the parenchyma. The method was evaluated qualitatively on 70 thoracic Computed Tomography volumes of subjects with ARDS, acquired at significantly different mechanical ventilation conditions. It found a large proportion of airway branches including tiny poorly-aerated bronchi. Quantitative evaluation was performed indirectly and showed that the resulting airway segmentation provides important anatomic landmarks. Their correspondences are needed to help a registration-based segmentation of the lungs in difficult ARDS cases where the lung boundary contrast is completely missing. The proposed method takes an average time of 43 s to process a thoracic volume which is valuable for the clinical use.

  • 263. Lidayová, K.
    et al.
    Gupta, A.
    Frimmel, H.
    Sintorn, I. -M
    Bengtsson, E.
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Image Processing and Visualization.
    Classification of cross-sections for vascular skeleton extraction using convolutional neural networks2017In: 21st Annual Conference on Medical Image Understanding and Analysis, MIUA 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 723, p. 182-194Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in Computed Tomography Angiography provide high-resolution 3D images of the vessels. However, there is an inevitable requisite for automated and fast methods to process the increased amount of generated data. In this work, we propose a fast method for vascular skeleton extraction which can be combined with a segmentation algorithm to accelerate the vessel delineation. The algorithm detects central voxels - nodes - of potential vessel regions in the orthogonal CT slices and uses a convolutional neural network (CNN) to identify the true vessel nodes. The nodes are gradually linked together to generate an approximate vascular skeleton. The CNN classifier yields a precision of 0.81 and recall of 0.83 for the medium size vessels and produces a qualitatively evaluated enhanced representation of vascular skeletons.

  • 264. Lidayová, Kristína
    et al.
    Lindblad, Joakim
    Sladoje, Nataša
    Frimmel, Hans
    Wang, Chunliang
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Image Processing and Visualization.
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Image Processing and Visualization.
    Coverage segmentation of 3D thin structures2015In: Image Processing Theory, Tools and Applications (IPTA), 2015 International Conference on, IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, p. 23-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a coverage segmentation method for extracting thin structures in three-dimensional images. The proposed method is an improved extension of our coverage segmentation method for 2D thin structures. We suggest implementation that enables low memory consumption and processing time, and by that applicability of the method on real CTA data. The method needs a reliable crisp segmentation as an input and uses information from linear unmixing and the crisp segmentation to create a high-resolution crisp reconstruction of the object, which can then be used as a final result, or down-sampled to a coverage segmentation at the starting image resolution. Performed quantitative and qualitative analysis confirm excellent performance of the proposed method, both on synthetic and on real data, in particular in terms of robustness to noise.

  • 265.
    Liljemalm, Rickard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Nyberg, Tobias
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Heating during optical stimulation of neurons2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 266.
    Liljemalm, Rickard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Nyberg, Tobias
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Optical Stimulation of Neurons2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 267.
    Lind, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Rose, Linda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    A practitioner model for assessing manual lifting and lowering operations: included in the RAMP tool2015In: The 19th Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently developed model intended to be used by practitioners and ergonomists in themanufacturing and logistics industry for assessment of physical ergonomic risks related to manuallifting and lowering operations is presented. The model is constructed using the revised NIOSH liftingequation (RNLE) as a basis, but it has been modified to enhance its usability, regarding (1)simplifications of the existing factors in the RNLE, (2) adding new factors and (3) a more conservativejudgment of lifts performed at low and high vertical heights. In addition, a survey regarding theusability of the new lifting model including twenty-two ergonomists/physiotherapists is presented,

  • 268.
    Lind, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SWEDEN.
    Accuracy of a posture measurement system for practitioners2015In: The 47th International the Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference.: Creating Sustainable work-environments / [ed] Fostervild, K.I., Johnsen, S.Å., Rydstedt, L., WAtten, R.G., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an evaluation of a feasible inclinometer system, for measurement of static and dynamic body postures, which can be used by practitioners. The system, an inclinometer based on a triaxial USB-accelerometer and an analysis program (Excel Macro), was compared with measurements obtained with a gold standard, i.e. an optical 3D motion capture system. The angles obtained with the inclinometer, had a high correlation with the corresponding angles of the optical motion capture system, for static upper arm postures above 0.997 for both abduction and flexion. At fast arm movements, the absolute difference in angles between the two systems was low, 4.1°, 5.4° and 3.6° at the 10th, 50th and 90th percentile respectively. This study indicates that this feasible and inexpensive ($140) inclinometer system (USB-accelerometer and Excel Macro), can be used to obtain upper arm inclination data of quality comparable to that of many research studies where direct measurements have been used.

  • 269.
    Lind, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Rose, Linda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Franzon, Helena
    W Global Employee Cooperation, GEC H&S manager, Arla Foods, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nord-Nilsson, Lena
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Safety, Health and Environment Global Support, Scania CV AB Södertälje, Sweden.
    RAMP: Risk Management Assessment Tool for Manual Handling Proactively2014In: HUMAN FACTORS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT – XINORDIC ERGONOMICS SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE – 46 / [ed] O. Broberg, N. Fallentin, P. Hasle, P.L. Jensen, A. Kabel, M.E. Larsen, T. Weller, 2014, p. 107-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an IT-based risk management tool called RAMP, risk assessment management tool for manual handling proactively. The tool consists of a checklist (RAMP I) and an assessment tool (RAMP II) which can be used to assess physicalrisk factors associated with manual handling activities in the production industry. The tool provides guidance for action plans and evaluations to promote improvement of occupational health and safety work at company level. Examples of the tool, its development and evaluation are presented.

  • 270.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Pineiro, Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Clinical Innovation Fellowship: an innovation / education initiative for medtech2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, highly based on collaboration betweenstakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. Key areas of development are; overallprinciples of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation process as educationand practice, needs in healthcare & medtech industry.This paper presents a Swedish initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, which is highly based oncollaboration between stakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. The goal of this post-graduate education in clinic-centered innovation is to contribute to the development of a regional medical device cluster, toeducate the health care and medical device innovators and leaders for the future and to develop technical and organizational tools and solutions for the participating clinics.A few years ago some individuals at the Center for Technology, Medicine and Health, CTMH, got in contact with theStanford Biodesign Innovation program. Since the need for collaboration across boundaries and silos had been identified there was almost an instant initiative to try this model in Sweden. A dedicated effort to get funding and buildingresearch capacity started in parallel. A joint project for designing and developing a Swedish variation of the programwas set up.The paper presents examples of an existing innovation research education program at Stanford University and thenthe Swedish initiative that starts in the fall of 2010. Then issues and key areas of interest that have been identified indevelopment of the Swedish initiative are presented.These are; overall principles of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation processas education and practive, and finally particular needs in Swedish health care and medical technology industry. Animportant difference between the programs at Stanford and Stockholm is the inclusion in the Swedish initiative of theorganizational issues faced by the clinics. These issues are exemplified with leadership and management theoriesidentifying health care as a technology intensive and safety critical socio-technical system. Finally these key areas of interest are then consolidated in designing the overall approach to the Swedish initiative and the curriculum in the fellowsspecialized training.The paper reports findings from an ongoing research project whose aim is to identify obstacles and success factorsfor initiating such an initiative within Swedish university and healthcare structures. The research project also aims toevaluate at least three cycles of the program.

  • 271.
    Lindberg, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Grönlund, C.
    Granåsen, G.
    Karlsson, J. S.
    Peolsson, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Tissue strain from Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI) during sub-maximal isotonic muscle contractions2010In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September 7 - 12, 2009, Munich, Germany: Vol. 25/4 Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics, Springer Publishing Company, 2010, Vol. 25/4, p. 1554-1556Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI) as a method to quantify the deformation of skeletal muscle tissue during contraction. The parameters used to describe tissue dynamics in this study were strain and strain rate, respectively. Eight subjects were evaluated performing submaximal isotonic contractions of biceps brachii before and after muscle fatigue.

  • 272. Lindblad, M
    et al.
    Cook, Richard
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Creating Safe Care in the Private Homes of People with Complex Care Needs: A systems perspective2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 273.
    Lindh, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Performance Control in Wireless Sensor Networks2009In: Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare, 2009. PervasiveHealth 2009. 3rd International Conference on, IEEE , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an implementation of a method for performance control in wireless body sensor networks based on measurement feedback, especially targeted for demanding healthcare applications.

  • 274.
    Lindh, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Performance Measurements and Control in Contention-Based Wireless Sensor Networks2009In: 6th Swedish National Computer Networking Workshop (SNCNW 2009), 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an implementation of a method for performance control in wireless body sensor networks based on measurement feedback, especially targeted for demanding healthcare applications.

  • 275.
    Lindh, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Performance Monitoring and Control in Contention-Based Wireless Sensor Networks2009In: Proceedings of the 2009 6th International Symposium on Wireless Communication Systems, ISWCS'09, NEW YORK: IEEE conference proceedings, 2009, p. 507-511Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a method for performance monitoring and control in wireless body sensor networks based on measurement feedback. Test results using a prototype implementation of the method are also analyzed. The method has been evaluated for demanding healthcare related applications in wireless personal area networks.

  • 276.
    Lindh, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Gonga, Antonio
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    A performance monitoring method for wireless sensor networks2008In: PETRA '08 Proceedings of the 1st international conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, New York: ACM , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a monitoring method and its implementation as a light-weight end-to-end performance meter for quality-demanding applications in wireless sensor networks. The use of performance feedback information for control and management is also considered. The method is evaluated in a wireless sensor network testbed for healthcare applications.

  • 277.
    Lindh, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks.
    Roos, Emma
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Monitoring of SIP-based communication using signalling information for performance measurements2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a prototype implementation of end-to-end monitoring of performance parameters in SIP-based communication. The approach is to integrate signalling information and measurements of user data traffic. Test measurements illustrate some results that can be obtained per session; packet loss, roundtrip delays and their variation, inter-arrival jitter and throughput.

  • 278. Lindqvist, E.
    et al.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Borell, L.
    Usability and usefulness in assistive technology for cognitive support in respect to user goals2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the usability of different assistive technology (AT) products for cognitive support by identifying features that promoted and/or impeded cognitively impaired users' performance of tasks that were identified as hindering engagement in valued activities. An additional aim was to examine how the users could reach their goals and expected gains as a result of the support of the AT, that is, the usefulness of the AT. During two six month interventions, persons who had experienced a stroke or had Alzheimer's disease tried out AT for cognitive support that intended to meet their needs and desires. Data from interviews and field notes collected during the intervention periods were analysed. One hundred identified factors judged as promoting or impeding the performance of the tasks and/or the user goals, were categorised. The findings are shown in seven preliminary themes that focus on the interaction between the user and the AT and, further, on how the AT is customised to the user's needs and incorporated into the user's own everyday context.

  • 279.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Digitala larmsystemets möjligheter och hinder2014In: Samverkan för Hälsa, Vård och Omsorg, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 280.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    FTTH in the Service of Medical and Health Care2014In: Showcasing a brighter future, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 281.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Inclusive Design Instead of Assistive Technology in Housing2008In: Proceedings of the 4th Cambridge Workshop on Universal Access and Assistive Technology / [ed] Clarkson, PJ et al ( Eds), 2008, p. 107-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The growing number of inhabitants in need of care and rehabilitation is a common problem in most industrialised countries. More medical conditions can be treated, but often at increasing costs. Care and housing are often interlinked and more interest is being paid to the possibility of offering care to elderly in their own homes. It is not only technology and care that matter; an equally important issue is how well the dwellings are adapted to care, both from a spatial perspective and in supporting new technology. It is a relatively widespread opinion that ICT (Information and Communication Technology) has the potential to support the resources of the caring professions without reducing the quality of the care itself. The complexity of relatively simple technology in use with Home Care and Telemedicine is often underestimated; there are many obstacles.

    In order to conduct applied research about assistive technologies and ergonomics when an apartment is also a work place for professionals giving care and assistance to people in their own home, the University has decided to construct a full scale laboratory in the form of two complete, self-contained and fully equipped apartments. The laboratory will be used to study and develop new technologies and work processes in the home. In different zones such as the kitchen, the bedroom, the living room, the hallway, the cloakroom and the bathroom, there will be different research projects implemented. Subjects and professional care staff will be invited to participate in the studies.

     In different zones there will be different research project implemented:

     In the bathroom we will develop design for assistive work respectively design for independent intimate hygiene. The Japanese toilet style which include cleaning and drying system will be tested.

    In the bedroom we are planning a lightning system for light close to the floor as a guide when one goes up in the night time.

    In the kitchen we will investigate how to create good lighting and storage conditions while preventing old people from falling when trying to replace a bulb or climb to high cupboards.

    In the kitchen new approaches to deal with fire risk and the stove and oven will be studied.

    In one project we have planned to study how the access to the apartment can be dealt with in ways that support the elderly person with memory problems and the healthcare provider.

     

    By using a full scale laboratory where tenants and caring professionals as well as facilities managers are included, all aspects of the apartment can be scrutinized. Instead of assistive technologies the goal is to develop and test solutions based on the concept of inclusive design.

     

  • 282. MacDonnell, A.
    et al.
    Pavlinič, D.
    Ciuha, U.
    Kölegård, Roger
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, I.
    The correlation between the cold-induced vasodilatation response and toe skin temperature during winter hikes in the alps2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Maksuti, Elira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Larsson, David
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Urban, M. W.
    Caidahl, K.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Strain and strain rate generated by shear wave elastography in ex vivo porcine aortas2017In: IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS, IEEE Computer Society , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In shear wave elastography (SWE), acoustic radiation forces (ARF) are employed to generate shear waves within the tissue. Although the transmitted pulses are longer than those in conventional clinical ultrasound, they typically obey the mechanical and thermal regulatory limits. In arterial applications, specific safety concerns may arise, as ARF-induced stresses and strain rates could potentially affect the arterial wall. A previous simulation study (Doherty et al., J Biomech, 2013 Jan; 46(1):83-90) showed that stresses imposed by the ARF used in SWE are orders of magnitude lower than those caused by blood pressure. ARF-induced strain rates have not been investigated yet, therefore the aim of this study was to assess such strain rates in an ex vivo setup.

  • 284.
    Maria, Asplund
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Thaning, Elin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Biomolecular and Organic Electronics IFM, and Center of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Electroactive Polymers for Neural Interfaces: New Materials2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 285.
    Marquez, Juan Carlos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Ferreira, Javier
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Buendia, Ruben
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Textile electrode straps for wrist-to-ankle bioimpedance measurements for Body Composition Analysis: Initial validation & experimental results2010In: 2010 ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY (EMBC), IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society , 2010, p. 6385-6388Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) is one of the non-invasive monitoring technologies that could benefit from the emerging textile based measurement systems. If reliable and reproducible EBI measurements could be done with textile electrodes, that would facilitate the utilization of EBI-based personalized healthcare monitoring applications. In this work the performance of a custom-made dry-textile electrode prototype is tested. Four-electrodes ankle-to-wrist EBI measurements have been taken on healthy subjects with the Impedimed spectrometer SFB7 in the frequency range 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The EBI spectroscopy measurements taken with dry electrodes were analyzed via the Cole and Body Composition Analysis (BCA) parameters, which were compared with EBI measurements obtained with standard electrolytic electrodes. The analysis of the obtained results indicate that even when dry textile electrodes may be used for EBI spectroscopy measurements, the measurements present remarkable differences that influence in the Cole parameter estimation process and in the final production of the BCA parameters. These initial results indicate that more research work must be done to in order to obtain a textile-based electrode that ensures reliable and reproducible EBI spectroscopy measurements.

  • 286.
    Marquez, Juan Carlos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Skin-electrode contact area in electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy. Influence in total body composition assessment2011In: Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS, IEEE Engineering In Medicine and Biology Society , 2011, Vol. 2011, p. 1867-1870Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) has been widely used for assessment of total body composition and fluid distribution. (EBIS) measurements are commonly performed with electrolytic electrodes placed on the wrist and the ankle with a rather small skin-electrode contact area. The use of textile garments for EBI requires the integration of textrodes with a larger contact area surrounding the limbs in order to compensate the absence of electrolytic medium commonly present in traditional Ag/AgCl gel electrodes. Recently it has been shown that mismatch between the measurements electrodes might cause alterations on the EBIS measurements. When performing EBIS measurements with textrodes certain differences have been observed, especially at high frequencies, respect the same EBIS measurements using Ag/AgCl electrodes. In this work the influence of increasing the skin-electrode area on the estimation of body composition parameters has been studied performing experimental EBIS measurement. The results indicate that an increment on the area of the skin-electrode interface produced noticeable changes in the bioimpedance spectra as well as in the body composition parameters. Moreover, the area increment showed also an apparent reduction of electrode impedance mismatch effects. This influence must be taken into consideration when designing and testing textile-enable EBIS measurement systems.

  • 287. Marquez, Juan Carlos
    et al.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Välimäki, Elina
    University of Borås.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Comparison of dry-textile electrodes for electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile Electrodes have been widely studied for biopotentials recordings, specially for monitoring the cardiac activity. Commercially available applications, such as Adistar T-shirt and Textronics Cardioshirt, have proved a good performance for heart rate monitoring and are available worldwide. Textile technology can also be used for Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy measurements enabling home and personalized health monitoring applications however solid ground research about the measurement performance of the electrodes must be done prior to the development of any textile-enabled EBI application. In this work a comparison of the measurement performance of two different types of dry-textile electrodes and manufacturers has been performed against standardized RedDot 3M Ag/AgCl electrolytic electrodes. 4-Electrode, whole body, Ankle-to-Wrist EBI measurements have been taken with the Impedimed spectrometer SFB7 from healthy subjects in the frequency range of 3kHz to 500kHz. Measurements have been taken with dry electrodes at different times to study the influence of the interaction skin-electrode interface on the EBI measurements. The analysis of the obtained complex EBI spectra shows that the measurements performed with textile electrodes produce constant and reliable EBI spectra. Certain deviation can be observed at higher frequencies and the measurements obtained with Textronics and Ag/AgCl electrodes present a better resemblance. Textile technology, if successfully integrated it, may enable the performance of EBI measurements in new scenarios allowing the rising of novel wearable monitoring applications for home and personal care as well as car safety.

  • 288. Marreiros, Filipe M. M.
    et al.
    Wang, Chunliang
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Image Processing and Visualization. Linköping Univ, Sweden.
    Rossitti, Sandro
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Image Processing and Visualization. Linköping Univ, Sweden.
    Non-rigid point set registration of curves: registration of the superficial vessel centerlines of the brain2016In: MEDICAL IMAGING 2016: IMAGE-GUIDED PROCEDURES, ROBOTIC INTERVENTIONS, AND MODELING, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2016, article id UNSP 978611Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we present a non-rigid point set registration for 3D curves (composed by 3D set of points). The method was evaluated in the task of registration of 3D superficial vessels of the brain where it was used to match vessel centerline points. It consists of a combination of the Coherent Point Drift (CPD) and the Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) semilandmarks. The CPD is used to perform the initial matching of centerline 3D points, while the semilandmark method iteratively relaxes/slides the points. For the evaluation, a Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) dataset was used. Deformations were applied to the extracted vessels centerlines to simulate brain bulging and sinking, using a TPS deformation where a few control points were manipulated to obtain the desired transformation (T-1). Once the correspondences are known, the corresponding points are used to define a new TPS deformation(T-2). The errors are measured in the deformed space, by transforming the original points using T-1 and T-2 and measuring the distance between them. To simulate cases where the deformed vessel data is incomplete, parts of the reference vessels were cut and then deformed. Furthermore, anisotropic normally distributed noise was added. The results show that the error estimates (root mean square error and mean error) are below 1 mm, even in the presence of noise and incomplete data.

  • 289. McDonnell, A. C.
    et al.
    Mekjavic, I. B.
    Dolenc-Grošelj, L.
    Mekjavic, P. J.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Effect of hypoxia and bedrest on peripheral vasoconstriction2013In: Proceedings of Life in space for life on earth, 18-22 June 2012, Aberdeen, ESA Communications , 2013, p. 1-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future planetary habitats may expose astronauts to both microgravity and hypobaric hypoxia, both inducing a reduction in peripheral perfusion. Peripheral temperature changes have been linked to sleep onset and quality [5]. However, it is still unknown what effect combining hypoxia and bedrest has on this relationship. Eleven male participants underwent three 10-day campaigns in a randomized manner: 1) normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAmb); 2) normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR); 3) normobaric normoxic bed rest (NBR). There was no change in skin temperature gradient between the calf and toes, an index of peripheral perfusion (ΔTc-t), over the 10-d period in the HAmb trial. However, there was a significant increase (p< 0.001) in daytime (9am-9pm) ΔTc-t on day 10 of the inactivity/unloading periods (HBR and NBR trials). This reduction in the perfusion of the toes during the daytime was augmented during the HBR trial compared to NBR (p< 0.001). Before and on day 10 of the interventions we conducted polysomnographic assessment, which revealed no changes in sleep onset and/or architecture. These data support the theory that circadian changes in temperature are functionally linked to sleepiness [1].

  • 290. McDonnell, A
    et al.
    Stavrou, N
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavic, IB
    PlanHab: The effect of activity during hypoxic confinement on emotional state2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 291. McDonnell, AC
    et al.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavic, IB
    Peripheral Perfusion and Acute Mountain Sickness: Is There a Link?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 292. McDonnell, AC
    et al.
    Stavrou, N
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavic, IB
    The Effect of a Live-High/Train-High Regimen on Emotional State2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 293. Mekjavic, I.
    et al.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, L.
    Jaki Mekjavic, P.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Mild dehydration per se does not increase the risk of decompression sickness2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 294. Mekjavic, IB
    et al.
    Bali, T
    McDonnell, AC
    Debevec, T
    Simpson, EJ
    MacDonald, IA
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    FemHab: Effects of 10-day planetary habitation simulation on body composition and resting energy expenditure in females2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 295. Mekjavic, I.B.
    et al.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    Amon, M.
    Debevec, T.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology (Closed 20130701).
    Jaki-Mekjavic, P.
    Kounalakis, S.N.
    Evaluation of hypoxic training regimens2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 296. Mekjavic, IB
    et al.
    MacDonald, IA
    Chouker, A
    Rittweger, J
    Grassi, B
    Aliverti, A
    Biolo, G
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    The Planetary Habitat project2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 297.
    Moghaddam, Mandana Javanshir
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Eslami, Abouzar
    Navab, Nassir
    DEeP Random Walks2013In: Medical Imaging 2013: Image Processing, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2013, p. 86693O-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we proposed distance enforced penalized (DEeP) random walks segmentation framework to delineate coupled boundaries by modifying classical random walks formulations. We take into account curves inter-dependencies and incorporate associated distances into weight function of conventional random walker. This effectively leverages segmentation of weaker boundaries guided by stronger counterparts, which is the main advantage over classical random walks techniques where the weight function is only dependent on intensity differences between connected pixels, resulting in unfavorable outcomes in the context of poor contrasted images. First, we applied our developed algorithm on synthetic data and then on cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images for detection of myocardium borders. We obtained encouraging results and observed that proposed algorithm prevents epicardial border to leak into right ventricle or cross back into endocardial border that often observe when conventional random walker is used. We applied our method on forty cardiac MR images and quantified the results with corresponding manual traced borders as ground truths. We found the Dice coefficients 70% +/- 14% and 43% +/- 14% respectively for DEeP random walks and conventional one.

  • 298. Mordaka, J.
    et al.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Van Schijndel-De Nooij, M.
    De Lange, R.
    Casanova, L. J. G.
    Carter, E. L.
    Von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    The importance of rotational kinematics in pedestrian head to windshield impacts2007In: International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury - 2007 International IRCOBI Conference on the Biomechanics of Injury, Proceedings, 2007, p. 83-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the effect of angular kinematics on head injury in pedestrian head-to-windshield impacts. Three cases of pedestrian head impacts were simulated with FE head and windshield models. The initial impact conditions were obtained from pedestrian accident reconstructions carried out using multi-body pedestrian and car models. The results from the FE head model were compared with injuries reported in the database. Maximum principal strain was chosen as the injury indicator. After successful head injury predictions, the initial velocities were varied and as a result different peak angular velocities and accelerations were simulated. The results showed that increased peak change in angular velocity caused higher maximal principal strain in the brain and in consequence higher probability of Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI), and Acute Subdural Haematoma (ASDH). A dramatic, three-fold increase in the strain levels in the brain was found when doubling the impact velocity. This paper presents work performed within the framework of a European Commission 6 th framework project (APROSYS).

  • 299. Mordaka, Justyna
    et al.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    van Schijndel-de Nooij, M.
    de Lange, R.
    Guerra Casanova, L.J.
    Carter, E.L.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of rotational kinematics on pedestrian head injuries2007In: Proc. IRCOBI Conf. International Research Council On the Biomechanics of Impact, 2007, p. 83-94Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 300.
    Moreno, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Image Processing and Visualization.
    Vesselness Estimation through Higher-Order Orientation Tensors2016In: International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), IEEE Computer Society, 2016, p. 1139-1142Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently proposed a method for estimating vesselness based on detection of ring patterns in the local distribution ofthe gradient. This method has a better performance than other state-of-the-art algorithms. However, the original implementation of the method makes use of the spherical harmonics transform locally, which is time consuming. In this paper we propose an equivalent formulation of the method based on higher-order tensors. A linear mapping between the spherical harmonics transform and higher-order orientation tensors is used in order to reduce the complexity of the method. With the new implementation, the analysis of computed tomography angiography data can be performed 2.6 times faster compared with the original implementation.

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