Change search
Refine search result
45464748 2351 - 2367 of 2367
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 2351.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Being in for different reasons. Implementing robots into daily life of elderly people in multi-diciplinary collaboration2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2352.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Deconstructing the Path Towards “Homo Digitalis”2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2353.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Digitizing Health Care Welfare technology as a way to meet digital and demographic challenges in Sweden2017In: 2017 4th International Conference on Systems And Informatics (ICSAI), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, p. 78-83Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitizing health care takes place in parallel with demographic changes posing one of the greatest social changes of our time. Although modern elderly care has evolved closely related to technological development and evaluated by established methods, digitization places new demands on approaches as a result of its systemic characteristics and its potential to bridge different environments and social contexts and the involvement of elderly users. This paper is paying attention to three challenges: digitizing already existing technological environments; implementing technology in new arenas outside hospitals and laboratories; and the imbalance between perceptions of elderly users and their actual needs and demands. The conclusions point out that digitization provides opportunities to deepen or reflections on technology and implementation, develop multidisciplinary collaborations and enhance proactive engagements to make new technologies work.

  • 2354.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Final Evaluation Report with included Cross Cultural Analysis Report D6.3 for the EC Project GiraffPlus. Combining social interaction and long term monitoring for promoting independent living.2015Report (Other academic)
  • 2355.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Intermediate Evaulation Report D6.2 for the EC Project GiraffPlus. Combining social interaction and long term monitoring for promoting independent living.2014Report (Other academic)
  • 2356.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Kan gamla människor bo i nya IT-hus?1993In: Datorstod för hyresgäster i Stockholm / [ed] Peter, Benson; Ulf, Keijer; Elisabeth, Lillman; Sture, Samuelsson; Britt, Östlund, Stockholm: KTH , 1993Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2357.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    The benefits of involving older people in the design process2015In: 1st International Conference on Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population, ITAP 2015 Held as Part of 17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2015, Springer, 2015, p. 3-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The more experience we get of involving older people in innovation and design processes, the more we recognize the benefits of having to do with life experience as input to the development of digital products and services. Heterogeneity raises personalization as a key component in design. This paper argues that old people are an asset in innovation processes, which is illustrated by projects conducted in Sweden from 1992 to 2014. The aim is to present how older people contribute to the development and what hinders them. The goal of these projects was to promote participation of older people during the design process but to varying degrees depending on the question. Different degrees of participation and involvement are discussed based on the “participation ladder”, on an idea of Arnstein from 1969 and on conclusions from innovation research.

  • 2358.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    The benefits of involving oler people in the design process2015In: Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population. Design for Everyday Life / [ed] Zhou, J. & Salvendy, G., Springer , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2359.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    User Evaluation and Application Assessment Report D6.1 for the EC Project GiraffPlus: Combining social interaction and long term monitoring for promoting independent living2013Report (Other academic)
  • 2360.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Mattsson, Janet
    Stridh, Sara
    Sahlström, Madeleine
    Technology in Health Care.A new research and teaching subject in collaboration between nursing science and engineering2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2361.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Jonsson, Oskar
    Lunds universitet.
    Dalholm Hornyanszky, Elisabeth
    Lunds universitet.
    Warell, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Sperling, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Experiences of a User-Centered Approach to Relations between Ageing People and Furniture in the Home Environment2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2362.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Technology in Health Care.
    Kempinsky, Peter
    Cederberg, X
    Lindblom, B
    Testbäddar inom hälso- och sjukvård och äldreomsorg. Portföljutvärdering av VINNOVAs program.2017Report (Other academic)
  • 2363. Šarabon, N
    et al.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavic, IB
    Babič, J
    PlanHab: Effects of hypoxia and bed rest on postural stability2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2364. Šket, R
    et al.
    Treichel, N
    Debevec, T
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavic, IB
    Schloter, M
    Stres, B
    PlanHab: Human intestinal microflora dynamics in normoxic and hypoxic bedrest studies2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2365. Šket, Robert
    et al.
    Treichel, Nicole
    Debevec, Tadej
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, Igor
    Schloter, Michael
    Vital, Marius
    Chandler, Jenna
    Tiedje, James M.
    Murovec, Boštjan
    Prevoršek, Zala
    Stres, Blaž
    Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation) Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study2017In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the run-in (5 day) and experimental phases [21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR), hypoxic bedrest (HBR)], and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb) in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, balanced fluid, and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden, and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2) were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4,000 m simulated altitude), respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal transit spanning Bristol Stool Scale, defecation rates, zonulin, α1-antitrypsin, eosinophil derived neurotoxin, bile acids, reducing sugars, short chain fatty acids, total soluble organic carbon, water content, diet composition, and food intake were measured (167 variables). The abundance, structure, and diversity of butyrate producing microbial community were assessed using the two primary bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways, butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk) genes. Inactivity negatively affected fecal consistency and in combination with hypoxia aggravated the state of gut inflammation (p < 0.05). In contrast, gut permeability, various metabolic markers, the structure, diversity, and abundance of butyrate producing microbial community were not significantly affected. Rearrangements in the butyrate producing microbial community structure were explained by experimental setup (13.4%), experimentally structured metabolites (12.8%), and gut metabolite-immunological markers (11.9%), with 61.9% remaining unexplained. Many of the measured parameters were found to be correlated and were hence omitted from further analyses. The observed progressive increase in two immunological intestinal markers suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state toward the developed symptoms of low magnitude obesity-related syndromes was primarily driven by the onset of inactivity (lack of exercise in NBR) that were exacerbated by systemic hypoxia (HBR) and significantly alleviated by exercise, despite hypoxia (HAmb). Butyrate producing community in colon exhibited apparent resilience toward short-term modifications in host exercise or hypoxia. Progressive constipation (decreased intestinal motility) and increased local inflammation marker suggest that changes in microbial colonization and metabolism were taking place at the location of small intestine.

  • 2366. Šket, Robert
    et al.
    Treichel, Nicole
    Kublik, Susanne
    Debevec, Tadej
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavić, Igor
    Schloter, Michael
    Vital, Marius
    Chandler, Jenna
    Tiedje, James M.
    Murovec, Boštjan
    Prevoršek, Zala
    Likar, Matevž
    Stres, Blaž
    Hypoxia and inactivity related physiological changes precede or take place in absence of significant rearrangements in bacterial community structure: The PlanHab randomized trial pilot study2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0188556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the randomized crossover design of run-in (5 day) and experimental phases (21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR), hypoxic bed rest (HBR) and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb) in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, with balanced fluid and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2) were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4000 m simulated altitude), respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal environment such as defecation frequency, intestinal electrical conductivity (IEC), sterol and polyphenol content and diversity, indole, aromaticity and spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were measured (64 variables). The structure and diversity of bacterial microbial community was assessed using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Inactivity negatively affected frequency of defecation and in combination with hypoxia increased IEC (p < 0.05). In contrast, sterol and polyphenol diversity and content, various characteristics of DOM and aromatic compounds, the structure and diversity of bacterial microbial community were not significantly affected over time. A new in-house PlanHab database was established to integrate all measured variables on host physiology, diet, experiment, immune and metabolic markers (n = 231). The observed progressive decrease in defecation frequency and concomitant increase in IEC suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state towards the developed symptoms of low magnitude obesity-related syndromes was dose dependent on the extent of time spent in inactivity and preceded or took place in absence of significant rearrangements in bacterial microbial community. Species B. thetaiotamicron, B. fragilis, B. dorei and other Bacteroides with reported relevance for dysbiotic medical conditions were significantly enriched in HBR, characterized with most severe inflammation symptoms, indicating a shift towards host mucin degradation and proinflammatory immune crosstalk.

  • 2367. Švec, J.G.
    et al.
    Granqvist, Svante
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine. Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tutorial and guidelines on measurement of sound pressure level in voice and speech2018In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 441-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Sound pressure level (SPL) measurement of voice and speech is often considered a trivial matter, but the measured levels are often reported incorrectly or incompletely, making them difficult to compare among various studies. This article aims at explaining the fundamental principles behind these measurements and providing guidelines to improve their accuracy and reproducibility. Method: Basic information is put together from standards, technical, voice and speech literature, and practical experience of the authors and is explained for nontechnical readers. Results: Variation of SPL with distance, sound level meters and their accuracy, frequency and time weightings, and background noise topics are reviewed. Several calibration procedures for SPL measurements are described for stand-mounted and head-mounted microphones. Conclusions: SPL of voice and speech should be reported together with the mouth-to-microphone distance so that the levels can be related to vocal power. Sound level measurement settings (i.e., frequency weighting and time weighting/averaging) should always be specified. Classified sound level meters should be used to assure measurement accuracy. Head-mounted microphones placed at the proximity of the mouth improve signal-to-noise ratio and can be taken advantage of for voice SPL measurements when calibrated. Background noise levels should be reported besides the sound levels of voice and speech. 

45464748 2351 - 2367 of 2367
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf