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  • 201.
    Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, New York, NY 10461 USA;Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England;Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, 1300 Morris Pk, Bronx, NY 10461 USA.
    Møller, Henrik
    Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England;Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Häggström, Christel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Umea Univ, Dept Biobank Res, Umea, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Malmström, Håkan
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Orphan Biovitrum Sobi, Biostat Data Management & Med Writing, Res & Dev, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lambe, Mats
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hammar, Niklas
    AstraZeneca, Med Evidence & Observat Res, Global Med Dev, Molndal, Sweden.
    Walldius, Göran
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Robinson, David
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;CALAB Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England.
    Serum glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol in relation to prostate cancer death in the Swedish AMORIS study2019In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 195-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Lifestyle-related conditions such as obesity are associated with prostate cancer progression, but the associations with hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are unclear. This study, therefore, aims to examine the association of glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol with prostate cancer death

    Methods: From the Swedish AMORIS cohort, we selected 14,150 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1996 and 2011 who had prediagnostic measurements of serum glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regressionmodels were used to determine the hazard ratios for death in relation to the aforementioned metabolic markers.

    Results: Using clinical cut-off points, a non-significant positive association was observed between glucose and prostate cancer death. When compared to those with glucose in the lowest quartile, those in the highest quartile had greater risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.19; 95% CI 1.02-1.39). However, neither total cholesterol nor triglycerides were associated with prostate cancer death. Glucose and triglycerides were positively associated with overall, cardiovascular, and other deaths. Hypercholesterolemia was only associated with risk of CVD death.

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that glucose levels may influence prostate cancer survival, but further studies using repeated measurements are needed to further elucidate how glucose levels may influence prostate cancer progression.

  • 202. Arts, F. A.
    et al.
    Chand, Damini
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Department of Medical Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Pecquet, C.
    Velghe, A. I.
    Constantinescu, S.
    Hallberg, B.
    Demoulin, J-B
    PDGFRB mutants found in patients with familial infantile myofibromatosis or overgrowth syndrome are oncogenic and sensitive to imatinib2016In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 35, no 25, p. 3239-3248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, germline and somatic heterozygous mutations in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRB) have been associated with familial infantile myofibromatosis (IM), which is characterized by soft tissue tumors, and overgrowth syndrome, a disease that predisposes to cancer. These mutations have not been functionally characterized. In the present study, the activity of three PDGFRB mutants associated with familial IM (R561C, P660T and N666K) and one PDGFRB mutant found in patients with overgrowth syndrome (P584R) was tested in various models. The P660T mutant showed no difference with the wild-type receptor, suggesting that it might represent a polymorphic variant unrelated to the disease. By contrast, the three other mutants were constitutively active and able to transform NIH3T3 and Ba/F3 cells to different extents. In particular, the germline mutant identified in overgrowth syndrome, P584R, was a stronger oncogene than the germline R561C mutant associated with myofibromatosis. The distinct phenotypes associated with these two mutations could be related to this difference of potency. Importantly, all activated mutants were sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib, nilotinib and ponatinib. In conclusion, the PDGFRB mutations previously identified in familial IM and overgrowth syndrome activate the receptor in the absence of ligand, supporting the hypothesis that these mutations cause the diseases. Moreover, imatinib seems to be a promising treatment for patients carrying these mutations. To our knowledge, these are the first confirmed gain-of-function point mutations of PDGFRB in human cancer.

  • 203. Arver, Brita
    et al.
    Isaksson, Karin
    Atterhem, Hans
    Baan, Annika
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Brandberg, Yvonne
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Emanuelsson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Hellborg, Henrik
    Henriksson, Karin
    Karlsson, Per
    Loman, Niklas
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Ringberg, Anita
    Askmalm, Marie Stenmark
    Wickman, Marie
    Sandelin, Kerstin
    Bilateral Prophylactic Mastectomy in Swedish Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer: A National Survey2011In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 253, no 6, p. 1147-1154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objective: This study attempted a national inventory of all bilateral prophylactic mastectomies performed in Sweden between 1995 and 2005 in high-risk women without a previous breast malignancy. The primary aim was to investigate the breast cancer incidence after surgery. Secondary aims were to describe the preoperative risk assessment, operation techniques, complications, histopathological findings, and regional differences. Methods: Geneticists, oncologists and surgeons performing prophylactic breast surgery were asked to identify all women eligible for inclusion in their region. The medical records were reviewed in each region and the data were analyzed centrally. The BOADICEA risk assessment model was used to calculate the number of expected/prevented breast cancers during the follow-up period. Results: A total of 223 women operated on in 8 hospitals were identified. During a mean follow-up of 6.6 years, no primary breast cancer was observed compared with 12 expected cases. However, 1 woman succumbed 9 years post mastectomy to widespread adenocarcinoma of uncertain origin. Median age at operation was 40 years. A total of 58% were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. All but 3 women underwent breast reconstruction, 208 with implants and 12 with autologous tissue. Four small, unifocal, invasive cancers and 4 ductal carcinoma in situ were found in the mastectomy specimens. The incidence of nonbreast related complications was low(3%). Implant loss due to infection/necrosis occurred in 21 women (10%) but a majority received a new implant later. In total, 64% of the women underwent at least 1 unanticipated secondary operation.

  • 204.
    Arving, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
    Rissanen, Ritva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
    Ahlgren, Johan
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
    Effects of a Stepped Care Stress Management Intervention on Cancer-Related Traumatic Stress Symptoms Among Breast Cancer Patients: A Randomized Study of Group Versus Individual Setting2014In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 23, no Suppl. 3, p. 171-171, article id P1-0300Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Arving, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Thormodsen, Inger
    Berntsen, Sveinung
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Identifying Variables Associated With the Course of Fatigue Among Cancer Patients During Adjuvant and Curative Treatment2014In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 23, p. 176-176Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 206.
    Arving, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Registered Nurses' Thoughts on Blended Learning in a Postgraduate Course in Cancer care: Content Analyses of Web Surveys and a Focus Group Interview2014In: Journal of Cancer Education, ISSN 0885-8195, E-ISSN 1543-0154, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 278-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the research was to describe registered nurses' (RNs) (n = 53) thoughts on the blended learning format in a 'specialist nursing programme in cancer care'. The study was conducted in autumn 2007 and 2008. A content analysis of answers to open-ended questions in a web-based questionnaire and a focus group interview were carried out. The analysis revealed that the RNs appreciated blended learning. The web lectures facilitated learning and gave RNs access to the education at any time. However, according to the RNs, knowledge is gained through interaction between RNs and teachers, and this aspect needed to be improved. The RNs also thought that the content of the seminars on campus should focus on evidence-based nursing knowledge and practical skills, not just taught as stable facts and procedures. The result from the present study could help to improve the design and content of advanced nursing courses using a blended learning format.

  • 207. Asciutto, Katrin C.
    et al.
    Kalapotharakos, Grigorios
    Löfgren, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hogberg, Thomas
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Robot-assisted surgery in cervical cancer patients reduces the time to normal activities of daily living2015In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 260-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo evaluate current surgical cervical cancer treatment in Sweden 2008-12. Design and settingAnalysis of data in the Swedish National Quality Register for Gynecological Surgery (GynOP). SampleA total of 249 cervical cancer patients undergoing surgery. MethodsAnalysis of prospectively gathered preoperative and postoperative data including patient-reported information. Main outcome measuresMean operating time, blood loss/transfusion, length of hospital stay, return to activities of daily living. ResultsThe patients undergoing laparoscopic robot-assisted surgery (n=64) or laparotomy (n=185) did not differ in age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage or mean operating time. Blood loss was higher in the laparotomy group (p<0.001). Thirteen patients in the laparotomy group (7%) received a blood transfusion, but none in the robot group. Intraoperative complications were more common in the laparotomy group (p=0.03). Re-admission or operations did not differ between the groups. The number of pelvic lymph nodes removed was significantly higher in the laparotomy group (median 31 vs. 24, p<0.001). There was no difference regarding the number of patients with lymph node metastases in the two groups. The postoperative length of hospital stay was longer in the laparotomy group compared with the robot group (6.1days vs. 2.1days, p=0.01). The patient-reported time to resume normal activities of daily living was longer in the laparotomy than the robot group (13.4days vs. 9.7days, p=0.04). ConclusionsLaparoscopic robotic-assisted surgery is preferable to laparotomy for cervical cancer patients because it entails a significantly shorter hospital stay, less blood loss, fewer intraoperative complications and shorter time to normal daily activities.

  • 208.
    Asem, Heba
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Abd El-Fattah, Ahmed
    Nafee, Noha
    Zhao, Ying
    Khalil, Labiba
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Kandil, Sherif
    Development and biodistribution of a theranostic aluminum phthalocyanine nanophotosensitizer2016In: Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy, ISSN 1572-1000, E-ISSN 1873-1597, Vol. 13, p. 48-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc) is an efficient second generation photosensitizer (PS) with high fluorescence ability. Its use in photodynamic therapy (PDT) is hampered by hydrophobicity and poor biodistribution. Methods: AlPc was converted to a biocompatible nanostructure by incorporation into amphiphilic polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone (PECL) copolymer nanoparticles, allowing efficient entrapment of the PS in the hydrophobic core, water dispersibility and biodistribution enhancement by PEG-induced surface characteristics. A series of synthesized PECL copolymers were used to prepare nanophotosensitizers with an average diameter of 66.5-99.1 nm and encapsulation efficiency (EE%) of 66.4-78.0%. One formulation with favorable colloidal properties and relatively slow release over 7 days was selected for in vitro photophysical assessment and in vivo biodistribution studies in mice. Results: The photophysical properties of AlPc were improved by encapsulating AlPc into PECL-NPs, which showed intense fluorescence emission at 687 nm and no AlPc aggregation has been induced after entrapment into the nanoparticles. Biodistribution of AlPc loaded NPs (AlPc-NPs) and free AlPc drug in mice was monitored by in vivo whole body fluorescence imaging and ex vivo organ imaging, with in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Compared to a AlPc solution in aqueous TWEEN 80 (2 w/v%), the developed nanophotosensitizer showed targeted drug delivery to lungs, liver and spleen as monitored by the intrinsic fluorescence of AlPc at different time points (1 h, 24 h and 48 h) post iv. administration. Conclusions: The AlPc-based copolymer nanoparticles developed offer potential as a single agent multifunctional theranostic nanophotosensitizer for PDT coupled with imaging-guided drug delivery and biodistribution, and possibly also fluorescence diagnostics.

  • 209. Ask, Anders
    et al.
    Björk-Eriksson, Thomas
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Blomquist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in head and neck cancer2005In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 876-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A group of Swedish oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. In head and neck cancer, including thyroid cancer, it is assessed that at least 300 patients annually will gain sufficiently from proton beam therapy, both to improve tumour control and to decrease toxicity to compensate for the increased treatment costs using protons.

  • 210. Ask, Anders
    et al.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in gastrointestinal cancer2005In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 896-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A group of Swedish oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. In gastrointestinal cancers, it is assessed that at least 345 patients, mainly non-resectable rectal cancers, oesophageal and liver cancers, are eligible. Great uncertainties do however exist both in the number of patients with gastrointestinal cancers suitable for radiation therapy, and in the proportion of those where proton beams may give sufficiently better results.

  • 211.
    Askling, Johan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    van Vollenhoven, Ronald F
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raaschou, Pauline
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fored, C Michael
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Baecklund, Eva
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dackhammar, Christina
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Feltelius, Nils
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cöster, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Geborek, Pierre
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lennart T
    Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Staffan
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Saxne, Tore
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cancer Risk in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated With Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha Therapies Does the Risk Change With the Time Since Start of Treatment?2009In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 60, no 11, p. 3180-3189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To determine the short-term and medium-term risks of cancer in patients receiving antitumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF alpha) therapies that have proven effective in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. Methods. By linking together data from the Swedish Biologics Register, Swedish registers of RA, and the Swedish Cancer Register, we identified and analyzed for cancer occurrence a national cohort of 6,366 patients with RA who first started anti-TNF therapy between January 1999 and July 2006. As comparators, we used a national biologics-naive RA cohort (n = 61,160), a cohort of RA patients newly starting methotrexate (n = 5,989), a cohort of RA patients newly starting disease-modifying antirheumatic drug combination therapy (n = 1,838), and the general population of Sweden. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using Cox regression analyses, examining overall RR as well as RR by time since the first start of anti-TNF therapy, by the duration of active anti-TNF therapy, and by the anti-TNF agent received. Results. During 25,693 person-years of followup in 6,366 patients newly starting anti-TNF, 240 first cancers occurred, yielding an RR of 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.15) versus the biologics-naive RA cohort, and similar RRs versus the other 2 RA comparators. RRs did not increase with increasing time since the start of anti-TNF therapy, nor with the cumulative duration of active anti-TNF therapy. During the first year following the first treatment start, but not thereafter, dissimilar cancer risks for adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab were observed. Conclusion. During the first 6 years after the start of anti-TNF therapy in routine care, no overall elevation of cancer risk and no increase with followup time were observed.

  • 212.
    Askling, Johan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    van Vollenhoven, Ronald F
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raaschou, Pauline
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fored, C Michael
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Baecklund, Eva
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dackhammar, Christina
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Feltelius, Nils
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cöster, Lars
    Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Geborek, Pierre
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lennart T
    Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Staffan
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Saxne, Tore
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Karolinska University Hospital at Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cancer risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapies: does the risk change with the time since start of treatment?2009In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 60, no 11, p. 3180-3189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the short-term and medium-term risks of cancer in patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha) therapies that have proven effective in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. METHODS: By linking together data from the Swedish Biologics Register, Swedish registers of RA, and the Swedish Cancer Register, we identified and analyzed for cancer occurrence a national cohort of 6,366 patients with RA who first started anti-TNF therapy between January 1999 and July 2006. As comparators, we used a national biologics-naive RA cohort (n = 61,160), a cohort of RA patients newly starting methotrexate (n = 5,989), a cohort of RA patients newly starting disease-modifying antirheumatic drug combination therapy (n = 1,838), and the general population of Sweden. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using Cox regression analyses, examining overall RR as well as RR by time since the first start of anti-TNF therapy, by the duration of active anti-TNF therapy, and by the anti-TNF agent received. RESULTS: During 25,693 person-years of followup in 6,366 patients newly starting anti-TNF, 240 first cancers occurred, yielding an RR of 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.15) versus the biologics-naive RA cohort, and similar RRs versus the other 2 RA comparators. RRs did not increase with increasing time since the start of anti-TNF therapy, nor with the cumulative duration of active anti-TNF therapy. During the first year following the first treatment start, but not thereafter, dissimilar cancer risks for adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab were observed. CONCLUSION: During the first 6 years after the start of anti-TNF therapy in routine care, no overall elevation of cancer risk and no increase with followup time were observed.

  • 213.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Björ, Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmström, Annika
    Blomquist, Erik
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Överlevnanden vid maligna gliom har ökat senaste tio åren. Analys av kvalitetsregisterdata.2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 17-18, p. 875-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The annual incidence rate of high grade malignant glioma (WHO grade III-IV) in Sweden is approximately 400 patients. The objective for the Swedish National CNS-tumor Group is to lay a foundation for research efforts and facilitate implementation and assessment of therapeutic strategies and health care for this patient group. In the analyses the diagnoses of high grade malignant gliomas are compared for the years 1999-2003, 2004-2006 and 2007-2009 for the Northern Region, the Uppsala Region and the South-east Region of Sweden, a population of 1844 patients. Survival was estimated from Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and a log-rank test was performed to assess whether the survival curves differed. The crude hazard ratio between years of diagnosis was estimated from a Cox regression model. Median survival for all patients 2004-2006 was 10.0 months (95 % confidence interval (CI) 8.9-10.9) compared to 8.1 months 1999-2003 (95 % CI 7.3-8.8). For patients 60-69 years of age almost a doubling of the survival rate has occurred during the last decade. Medan survival has increased from 5.8 months (95 % CI 5.1-7.5) 1999-2003 to 8.5 months (95 % CI 7.0-10.3) for 2004-2006 and to 10.5 months (95 % CI 9.0-12.6) for 2007-2009. Concomitant radiochemotherapy, but also the development of neurosurgical and radiotheraputic techniques and a more active therapeutic attitude, including the older patient groups, have probably contributed to the improved survival rate. A national population based registry, with a close to 100% registration compliance for important diagnostic and outcome parameters is probably an efficient instrument for evaluation of quality measures and implementation of new therapeutic strategies.

  • 214.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergström, Åsa
    Kasper, Maria
    Ögren, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Toftgård, Rune
    Riklund, Katrine Åhlström
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Early and persisting response to vismodegib in a patient with bone metastasizing medulloblastoma2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 862-865Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 215.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kvarnbrink, Samuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Holmlund, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wibom, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Synergistic Killing of Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells by Bortezomib and HADC Inhibitors.2012In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 2407-2413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The malignant brain tumour glioblastoma is a devastating disease that remains a therapeutic challenge. Materials and Methods: Effects of combinations of the US Food and Drug Administation (FDA) approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors vorinostat, valproic acid and sodium phenylbutyrate were studied on primary glioblastoma stem cell lines and conventional glioblastoma cell lines. Cell survival, proliferation and death were analyzed by fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA), propidium iodide labeling and flow cytometry, and cell cloning through limiting dilution and live-cell bright-field microscopy. Results: Bortezomib and the HDAC inhibitors showed synergistic cell killing at clinically relevant drug concentrations, while the conventional cell lines cultured in serum-containing medium were relatively resistant to the same treatments. Conclusion: These findings of synergistic glioblastoma stem cell killing by bortezomib and three different FDA-approved HDAC inhibitors confirm and expand previous observations on co-operative effects between these classes of drugs.

  • 216.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kvarnbrink, Samuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Holmlund, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wibom, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Synergistic killing of Glioblastoma Stem-like cells by Bortezomib and HDAC Inhibitors2012In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 32, no 7 ; Special Issue, p. 2407-2413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The malignant brain tumour glioblastoma is a devastating disease that remains a therapeutic challenge. Materials and Methods: Effects of combinations of the US Food and Drug Administation (FDA) approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors vorinostat, valproic acid and sodium phenylbutyrate were studied on primary glioblastoma stem cell lines and conventional glioblastoma cell lines. Cell survival, proliferation and death were analyzed by fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA), propidium iodide labeling and flow cytometry, and cell cloning through limiting dilution and live-cell bright-field microscopy. Results: Bortezomib and the HDAC inhibitors showed synergistic cell killing at clinically relevant drug concentrations, while the conventional cell lines cultured in serum-containing medium were relatively resistant to the same treatments. Conclusion: These findings of synergistic glioblastoma stem cell killing by bortezomib and three different FDA-approved HDAC inhibitors confirm and expand previous observations on co-operative effects between these classes of drugs.

  • 217. Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Malmstrom, Annika
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science.
    Bjor, Ove
    Henriksson, Roger
    Brain tumors in Sweden: Data from a population-based registry 1999-20122015In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 377-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The Swedish brain tumor registry has, since it was launched in 1999, provided significant amounts of data on histopathological diagnoses and on important aspects of surgical and medical management of these patients. The purpose is mainly quality control, but also as a resource for research. Methods. Three Swedish healthcare regions, constituting 40% of the Swedish population, have had an almost complete registration. The following parameters are registered: diagnosis according to SNOMED/WHO classification, symptoms, performance status, pre- and postoperative radiology, tumor size and localization, extent of surgery and occurrence of postoperative complications, postoperative treatment, such as radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, other treatments, complications and toxicity, occurrence of reoperation/s, participation in clinical trials, multidisciplinary conferences and availability of a contact nurse. Results. Surgical radicality has been essentially constant, whereas the use of early (within 72 hours) postoperative CT and MRI has increased, especially for high-grade glioma, which is a reflection of quality of surgery. Survival of patients with high-grade glioma has increased, especially in the age group 60-69. Patients aged 18-39 years had a five-year survival of 40%. Waiting times for the pathological report has been slightly prolonged. Geographical differences do exist for some of the variables. Conclusion. Population-based registration is valuable for assessment of clinical management, which could have impact on patient care. As a result of short survival and/or the propensity to affect cognitive functions this patient group has considerable difficulties to make their voices heard in society. We therefore believe that a report like the present one can contribute to the spread of knowledge and increase the awareness for this patient group among caregivers and policy makers.

  • 218.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmstrom, Annika
    Björ, Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Blomquist, Erik
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Considerable improvement in survival for patients aged 60-84 years with high grade malignant gliomas - Data from the Swedish Brain Tumour Population-based Registry2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 1043-1046Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 219.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Radiation Sciences and Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden .
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden; Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden .
    Björ, Ove
    Department of Radiation Sciences and Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden .
    Henriksson, Roger
    Department of Radiation Sciences and Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden: Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm, Gotland, Sweden .
    Brain tumors in Sweden: Data from a population-based registry 1999-2012.2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The Swedish brain tumor registry has, since it was launched in 1999, provided significant amounts of data on histopathological diagnoses and on important aspects of surgical and medical management of these patients. The purpose is mainly quality control, but also as a resource for research. Methods. Three Swedish healthcare regions, constituting 40% of the Swedish population, have had an almost complete registration. The following parameters are registered: diagnosis according to SNOMED/WHO classification, symptoms, performance status, pre- and postoperative radiology, tumor size and localization, extent of surgery and occurrence of postoperative complications, postoperative treatment, such as radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, other treatments, complications and toxicity, occurrence of reoperation/s, participation in clinical trials, multidisciplinary conferences and availability of a contact nurse. Results. Surgical radicality has been essentially constant, whereas the use of early (within 72 hours) postoperative CT and MRI has increased, especially for high-grade glioma, which is a reflection of quality of surgery. Survival of patients with high-grade glioma has increased, especially in the age group 60-69. Patients aged 18-39 years had a five-year survival of 40%. Waiting times for the pathological report has been slightly prolonged. Geographical differences do exist for some of the variables. Conclusion. Population-based registration is valuable for assessment of clinical management, which could have impact on patient care. As a result of short survival and/or the propensity to affect cognitive functions this patient group has considerable difficulties to make their voices heard in society. We therefore believe that a report like the present one can contribute to the spread of knowledge and increase the awareness for this patient group among caregivers and policy makers.

  • 220.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmström, Annika
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Björ, Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brain tumors in Sweden: Data from a population-based registry 1999-20122015In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 377-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The Swedish brain tumor registry has, since it was launched in 1999, provided significant amounts of data on histopathological diagnoses and on important aspects of surgical and medical management of these patients. The purpose is mainly quality control, but also as a resource for research.

    Methods. Three Swedish healthcare regions, constituting 40% of the Swedish population, have had an almost complete registration. The following parameters are registered: diagnosis according to SNOMED/WHO classification, symptoms, performance status, pre- and postoperative radiology, tumor size and localization, extent of surgery and occurrence of postoperative complications, postoperative treatment, such as radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, other treatments, complications and toxicity, occurrence of reoperation/s, participation in clinical trials, multidisciplinary conferences and availability of a contact nurse.

    Results. Surgical radicality has been essentially constant, whereas the use of early (within 72 hours) postoperative CT and MRI has increased, especially for high-grade glioma, which is a reflection of quality of surgery. Survival of patients with high-grade glioma has increased, especially in the age group 60-69. Patients aged 18-39 years had a five-year survival of 40%. Waiting times for the pathological report has been slightly prolonged. Geographical differences do exist for some of the variables.

    Conclusion. Population-based registration is valuable for assessment of clinical management, which could have impact on patient care. As a result of short survival and/or the propensity to affect cognitive functions this patient group has considerable difficulties to make their voices heard in society. We therefore believe that a report like the present one can contribute to the spread of knowledge and increase the awareness for this patient group among caregivers and policy makers.

  • 221.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyholm, Tufve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Garpebring, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hauksson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Brynolfsson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Evaluation of advanced MR techniques for development of early biomarkers for treatment efficacy in malignant brain tumors2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sandström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Shahidi, Saeed
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Durable stabilization of three chordoma cases by bevacizumab and erlotinib2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 980-984Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Aspenström, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Activated Rho GTPases in Cancer-The Beginning of a New Paradigm2018In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 19, no 12, article id 3949Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involvement of Rho GTPases in cancer has been a matter of debate since the identification of the first members of this branch of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases. The Rho GTPases were ascribed important roles in the cell, although these were restricted to regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics, cell morphogenesis, and cell locomotion, with initially no clear indications of direct involvement in cancer progression. This paradigm has been challenged by numerous observations that Rho-regulated pathways are often dysregulated in cancers. More recently, identification of point mutants in the Rho GTPases Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42 in human tumors has finally given rise to a new paradigm, and we can now state with confidence that Rho GTPases serve as oncogenes in several human cancers. This article provides an expose of current knowledge of the roles of activated Rho GTPases in cancers.

  • 224.
    Assadian, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Sandström, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Bondeson, Kåre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infection medicine.
    Laurell, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Lidian, Adnan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Svensson, Catharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Akusjärvi, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Bergqvist, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Punga, Tanel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Distribution and Molecular Characterization of Human Adenovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus Infections in Tonsillar Lymphocytes Isolated from Patients Diagnosed with Tonsillar Diseases2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0154814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surgically removed palatine tonsils provide a conveniently accessible source of T and B lymphocytes to study the interplay between foreign pathogens and the host immune system. In this study we have characterised the distribution of human adenovirus (HAdV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in purified tonsillar T and B cell-enriched fractions isolated from three patient age groups diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy and chronic/recurrent tonsillitis. HAdV DNA was detected in 93 out of 111 patients (84%), while EBV DNA was detected in 58 patients (52%). The most abundant adenovirus type was HAdV-5 (68%). None of the patients were positive for HCMV. Furthermore, 43 patients (39%) showed a co-infection of HAdV and EBV. The majority of young patients diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy were positive for HAdV, whereas all adult patients diagnosed with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis were positive for either HAdV or EBV. Most of the tonsils from patients diagnosed with either tonsillar hypertrophy or chronic/recurrent tonsillitis showed a higher HAdV DNA copy number in T compared to B cell-enriched fraction. Interestingly, in the majority of the tonsils from patients with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis HAdV DNA was detected in T cells only, whereas hypertrophic tonsils demonstrated HAdV DNA in both T and B cell-enriched fractions. In contrast, the majority of EBV positive tonsils revealed a preference for EBV DNA accumulation in the B cell-enriched fraction compared to T cell fraction irrespective of the patients' age.

  • 225. Assi, Nada
    et al.
    Moskal, Aurelie
    Slimani, Nadia
    Viallon, Vivian
    Chajes, Veronique
    Freisling, Heinz
    Monni, Stefano
    Knueppel, Sven
    Foerster, Jana
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Amiano, Pilar
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Salmeron, Diego
    Ramon Quiros, Jose
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Dossus, Laure
    Fournier, Agnes
    Baglietto, Laura
    Fortner, Renee Turzanski
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Orfanos, Philippos
    De Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Masala, Giovanna
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Tumino, Rosario
    de Mesquita, H. Bas Bueno
    Bakker, Marije F.
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Skeie, Guri
    Braaten, Tonje
    Winkvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Key, Tim
    Travis, Ruth
    Schmidt, Julie A.
    Merritt, Melissa A.
    Riboli, Elio
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Ferrari, Pietro
    A treelet transform analysis to relate nutrient patterns to the risk of hormonal receptor-defined breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)2016In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 242-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Pattern analysis has emerged as a tool to depict the role of multiple nutrients/foods in relation to health outcomes. The present study aimed at extracting nutrient patterns with respect to breast cancer (BC) aetiology. Design Nutrient patterns were derived with treelet transform (TT) and related to BC risk. TT was applied to twenty-three log-transformed nutrient densities from dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals computed using Cox proportional hazards models quantified the association between quintiles of nutrient pattern scores and risk of overall BC, and by hormonal receptor and menopausal status. Principal component analysis was applied for comparison. Setting The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Subjects Women (n 334 850) from the EPIC study. Results The first TT component (TC1) highlighted a pattern rich in nutrients found in animal foods loading on cholesterol, protein, retinol, vitamins B-12 and D, while the second TT component (TC2) reflected a diet rich in -carotene, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamins C and B-6, fibre, Fe, Ca, K, Mg, P and folate. While TC1 was not associated with BC risk, TC2 was inversely associated with BC risk overall (HRQ5 v. Q1=089, 95 % CI 083, 095, P-trend<001) and showed a significantly lower risk in oestrogen receptor-positive (HRQ5 v. Q1=089, 95 % CI 081, 098, P-trend=002) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours (HRQ5 v. Q1=087, 95 % CI 077, 098, P-trend<001). Conclusions TT produces readily interpretable sparse components explaining similar amounts of variation as principal component analysis. Our results suggest that participants with a nutrient pattern high in micronutrients found in vegetables, fruits and cereals had a lower risk of BC.

  • 226. Astaraki, Mehdi
    et al.
    Wang, Chunliang
    Buizza, Giulia
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lazzeroni, Marta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Early survival prediction in non-small cell lung cancer from PET/CT images using an intra-tumor partitioning method2019In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 60, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To explore prognostic and predictive values of a novel quantitative feature set describing intra-tumor heterogeneity in patients with lung cancer treated with concurrent and sequential chemoradiotherapy.

    Methods

    Longitudinal PET-CT images of 30 patients with non-small cell lung cancer were analysed. To describe tumor cell heterogeneity, the tumors were partitioned into one to ten concentric regions depending on their sizes, and, for each region, the change in average intensity between the two scans was calculated for PET and CT images separately to form the proposed feature set. To validate the prognostic value of the proposed method, radiomics analysis was performed and a combination of the proposed novel feature set and the classic radiomic features was evaluated. A feature selection algorithm was utilized to identify the optimal features, and a linear support vector machine was trained for the task of overall survival prediction in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC).

    Results

    The proposed novel feature set was found to be prognostic and even outperformed the radiomics approach with a significant difference (AUROCSALoP = 0.90 vs. AUROCradiomic = 0.71) when feature selection was not employed, whereas with feature selection, a combination of the novel feature set and radiomics led to the highest prognostic values.

    Conclusion

    A novel feature set designed for capturing intra-tumor heterogeneity was introduced. Judging by their prognostic power, the proposed features have a promising potential for early survival prediction.

  • 227. Atienza-Párraga, Alba
    et al.
    Diamanti, Klev
    Nylund, Patrick
    Skaftason, Aron
    Ma, Anqi
    Jin, Jian
    Martín-Subero, José Ignacio
    Öberg, Fredrik
    Komorowski, Jan
    Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena
    Kalushkova, Antonia
    Epigenomic re-configuration of primary multiple myeloma underlies the synergistic effect of combined DNMT and EZH2 inhibition.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by an overexpression of EZH2 and a subsequent increase in H3K27me3-mediated silencing. However, the genome-wide redistribution of this mark in context with other epigenetic tags remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that EZH2 physically interacts with DNMT1 and that combined inhibition leads to a reduced G2/M arrest and increased apoptosis in MM. In addition, we present a catalogue of the genomic regulatory regions in normal plasma cells (NPC) as defined by their individual combination of histone marks. We used ChIP-seq and ATAC-seq data to generate whole-genome NPC chromatin annotations which we further analysed using DNA methylation arrays and RNA-seq. Comparison between NPC and MM demonstrated that, despite the global hypomethylation, enhancers show a tendency towards a higher DNA methylation levels in MM, whereas Polycomb and heterochromatic sites, highly methylated in NPC, show intermediate levels of the mark. Across all examined regulatory regions, 5-azacytidine treatment strongly reduced DNA methylation in MM. Furthermore, we find an extensive re-structuration of the global histone patterns in MM. We noticed a widespread increase in H3K27me3 except at active TSSs/promoters and enhancers, where we found a selective gain of the mark, suggestive of a directed silencing. In contrast, poised TSSs lose H3K27me3 and gain the activation mark H3K27ac, reflecting potential activation. Taken together, we present a comprehensive map of the epigenomic changes in MM as compared to NPC and provide insights into the interplay between EZH2 and DNMT1 in MM.

  • 228. Atkins, Isabelle
    et al.
    Kinnersley, Ben
    Ostrom, Quinn T.
    Labreche, Karim
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Armstrong, Georgina N.
    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.
    Schoemaker, Minouk J.
    Nothen, Markus M.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Simon, Matthias
    Rajaraman, Preetha
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Shildkraut, Joellen
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Hoffman, Per
    Jockel, Karl-Heinz
    Lai, Rose K.
    Claus, Elizabeth B.
    Olson, Sara H.
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Wrensch, Margaret R.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Sanson, Marc
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    Houlston, Richard S.
    Transcriptome-Wide Association Study Identifies New Candidate Susceptibility Genes for Glioma2019In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 79, no 8, p. 2065-2071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far identified 25 loci associated with glioma risk, with most showing specificity for either glioblastoma (GBM) or non-GBM tumors. The majority of these GWAS susceptibility variants reside in noncoding regions and the causal genes underlying the associations are largely unknown. Here we performed a transcriptome-wide association study to search for novel risk loci and candidate causal genes at known GWAS loci using Genotype-Tissue Expression Project (GTEx) data to predict cis-predicted gene expression in relation to GBM and non-GBM risk in conjunction with GWAS summary statistics on 12,488 glioma cases (6,183 GBM and 5,820 non-GBM) and 18,169 controls. Imposing a Bonferroni-corrected significance level of P < 5.69 x 10(-6), candidate novel risk locus for GBM (mean Z = 4.43; P = 5.68 x 10(-6)). GALNT6 resides at least 55 Mb away from any previously identified glioma risk variant, while all other 30 significantly associated genes were located within 1 Mb of known GWAS-identified loci and were not significant after conditioning on the known GWAS-identified variants. These data identify a novel locus (GALNT6 at 12q13.33) and 30 genes at 12 known glioma risk loci associated with glioma risk, providing further insights into glioma tumorigenesis.

    Significance: This study identifies new genes associated with glioma risk, increasing understanding of how these tumors develop.

  • 229.
    Attema, Joanne L.
    et al.
    Immunology Unit, Institution for Experimental Medical Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Pronk, Cornelis J. H.
    Immunology Unit, Institution for Experimental Medical Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Norddahl, Gudmundur L.
    Immunology Unit, Institution for Experimental Medical Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens Martin
    Immunology Unit, Institution for Experimental Medical Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bryder, David
    Immunology Unit, Institution for Experimental Medical Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hematopoietic stem cell ageing is uncoupled from p16 INK4A-mediated senescence2009In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 28, no 22, p. 2238-2243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somatic stem cells are ultimately responsible for mediating appropriate organ homeostasis and have therefore been proposed to represent a cellular origin of the ageing process-a state often characterized by inappropriate homeostasis. Specifically, it has been suggested that ageing stem cells might succumb to replicative senescence by a mechanism involving the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4A). Here, we tested multiple functional and molecular parameters indicative of p16(INK4A) activity in primary aged murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We found no evidence that replicative senescence accompanies stem cell ageing in vivo, and in line with p16(INK4A) being a critical determinant of such processes, most aged HSCs (>99%) failed to express p16(INK4A) at the mRNA level. Moreover, whereas loss of epigenetically guided repression of the INK4A/ARF locus accompanied replicative senescent murine embryonic fibroblasts, such repression was maintained in aged stem cells. Taken together, these studies indicate that increased senescence as mediated by the p16(INK4A) tumor suppressor has only a minor function as an intrinsic regulator of steady-state HSC ageing in vivo.

  • 230.
    Augsten, Martin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Olsson, Eleonor
    Lunds universitet.
    Stolz, Claudia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tsagozis, Panagiotis
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Levchenko, Tetyana
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Frederick, Mitchell J
    University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston.
    Borg, Åke
    Lunds universitet.
    Micke, Patrick
    Uppsala universitet.
    Egevad, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Östman, Arne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    CXCL14 is an autocrine growth factor for fibroblasts and acts as a multi-modal stimulator of prostate tumor growth2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 9, p. 3414-3419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the role of secreted fibroblast-derived factors in prostate cancer growth. Analyses of matched normal and tumor tissue revealed up-regulation of CXCL14 in cancer-associated fibroblasts of a majority of prostate cancer. Fibroblasts over-expressing CXCL14 promoted the growth of prostate cancer xenografts, and increased tumor angiogenesis and macrophage infiltration. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that autocrine CXCL14-stimulation of fibroblasts stimulate migration and ERK-dependent proliferation of fibroblasts. CXCL14-stimulation of monocyte migration was also demonstrated. Furthermore, CXCL14-producing fibroblasts, but not recombinant CXCL14, enhanced in vitro proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells and in vivo angiogenesis. These studies thus identify CXCL14 as a novel autocrine stimulator of fibroblast growth and migration, with multi-modal tumor-stimulatory activities. In more general terms, our findings suggest autocrine stimulation of fibroblasts as a previously unrecognized mechanism for chemokine-mediated stimulation of tumor growth, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby cancer-associated fibroblasts achieve their pro-tumorigenic phenotype.

  • 231.
    Augsten, Martin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Karolinska Institute.
    Peña, Cristina
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ostman, Arne
    Karolinska Institute.
    A digest on the role of the tumor microenvironment in gastrointestinal cancers2010In: Cancer microenvironment : official journal of the International Cancer Microenvironment Society, ISSN 1875-2284 (online), 1875-2292 (print), Vol. 3, no 1, p. 167-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental studies and analyses of clinical material have convincingly demonstrated that tumor formation and progression occurs through a concerted action of malignant cells and the surrounding microenvironment of the tumor stroma. The tumor microenvironment is comprised of various cell types like fibroblasts, immune cells, vascular cells and bone-marrow-derived cells embedded in the extracellular matrix. This review, focusing on recent findings in the context of gastrointestinal tumors, introduces the different stromal cell types and delineates their contributions to cancer initiation, growth and metastasis. By selected examples we also present how the tumor microenvironment is emerging as a promising target for therapeutic intervention.

  • 232.
    Aulin, Julia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Hijazi, Ziad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ezekowitz, Michael D.
    Lankenau Inst Med Res, Wynnewood, PA USA.;Ctr Heart, Wynnewood, PA USA..
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Connolly, Stuart J.
    Populat Hlth Res Inst, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Huber, Kurt
    Dept Internal Med Cardiol & Emergency Med 3, Vienna, Austria..
    Reilly, Paul A.
    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceut Inc, Ridgefield, CT 06877 USA..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein and risk for death and cardiovascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation2015In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 170, no 6, p. 1151-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Inflammation has been associated with cardiovascular disease and the burden of atrial fibrillation (AF). In this study we evaluate inflammatory biomarkers and future cardiovascular events in AF patients in the RE-LY study. Methods Interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP) (n = 6,187), and fibrinogen (n = 4,893) were analyzed at randomization; outcomes were evaluated by Cox models and C-statistics. Results Adjusted for clinical risk factors IL-6 was independently associated with stroke or systemic embolism (P =.0041), major bleedings (P =.0001), vascular death (P<.0001), and a composite thromboembolic outcome (ischemic stroke, systemic embolism, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and vascular death) (P<.0001). CRP was independently related to myocardial infarction (P =.0047), vascular death (P =.0004), and the composite thromboembolic outcome (P =.0001). When further adjusted for cardiac (troponin andN-terminal fragment B-type natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP]) and renal (cystatin-C) biomarkers on top of clinical risk factors IL-6 remained significantly related to vascular death (P<.0001), major bleeding (P<.0170) and the composite thromboembolic outcome (P<.0001), and CRP to myocardial infarction (.0104). Fibrinogen was not associated with any outcome. C-index for stroke or systemic embolism increased from 0.615 to 0.642 (P =.0017) when adding IL-6 to the clinically used CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc risk score with net reclassification improvement of 28%. Conclusion In patients with AF, IL-6 is related to higher risk of stroke and major bleeding, and both markers are related to higher risk of vascular death and the composite of thromboembolic events independent of clinical risk factors. Adjustment for cardiovascular biomarkers attenuated the prognostic value, although IL-6 remained related to mortality, the composite of thromboembolic events, and major bleeding, and CRP to myocardial infarction.

  • 233.
    Aus, Gunnar
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Sahlgrens University Hospital, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Robinson, David
    Department of Surgery, Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Department of Urology and Surgery, Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Prognostic Factors and Survival in Node-Positive (N1) Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study Based on Data from a Swedish Population-Based Cohort2003In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 627-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: At presentation of prostate cancer, patients with proven lymph node metastasis (N1) are comparatively rare. It is difficult to give prognostic information based on the present literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of known risk factors in patients with pelvic node involvement and without distant metastasis.

    Methods: From the population-based, prospective prostate cancer tumour registry of the South–East Region in Sweden, we collected data on all 181 patients with N1, M0 prostate cancer diagnosed from January 1987 to October 2000 with a follow-up to December 2001. Mean follow-up was 62 months. Pre-operative risk factors as age, T-category, serum PSA, tumour grade and also primary treatment given was correlated to the outcome.

    Results: Median age at diagnosis was 65 years. Cancer-specific survival was highly variable with 5-year survival of 72%, a median of 8 years and the projected 13-year figure was 31%. T-category, age, PSA or treatment did not affect the outcome while poorly differentiated tumours had a tendency towards lower cancer-specific survival (p=0.0523) when compared to well and moderately differentiated tumours.

    Conclusions: This population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients with pelvic node involvement treated principally with non-curative intent had a median cancer-specific survival of 8 years. Preoperatively known risk factors seem to have but a modest impact on the prognosis for patients in this stage of the disease.

  • 234.
    Aus, Gunnar
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Sahlgrens University Hospital, Go¨ teborg, Sweden.
    Robinson, David
    Section of Urology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Department of Surgery, Akademiska Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Department of Surgery and Urology, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Survival in prostate carcinoma - Outcomes from a prospective, population-based cohort of 8887 men with up to 15 years of follow-up: Results from three counties in the population-based National Prostate Cancer Registry of Sweden2005In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 943- 951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND To decide on screening strategies and curative treatments for prostate carcinoma, it is necessary to determine the incidence and survival in a population that is not screened.

    METHODS The 15-year projected survival data were analyzed from a prospective, complete, population-based registry of 8887 patients with newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma from 1987 to 1999.

    RESULTS The median patient age at diagnosis was 75 years (range, 40-96 years), and 12% of patients were diagnosed before the age 65 years. The median follow-up was 80 months for patients who remained alive. In total, 5873 of 8887 patients (66.1%) had died, and 2595 of those patients (44.2%) died directly due to prostate carcinoma. The overall median age at death was 80 years (range, 41-100 years). The projected 15-year disease-specific survival rate was 44% for the whole population. In total, 18% of patients had metastases at diagnosis (M1), and their median survival was 2.5 years. Patients with nonmetastatic T1-T3 prostate carcinoma (age < 75 years at diagnosis; n = 2098 patients) had a 15-year projected disease-specific survival rate of 66%. Patients who underwent radical prostatectomy had a significantly lower risk of dying from prostate carcinoma (relative risk, 0.40) compared with patients who were treated with noncurative therapies or radiotherapy.

    CONCLUSIONS The disease-specific mortality was comparatively high, but it took 15 years to reach a disease-specific mortality rate of 56%. These data form a truly population-based baseline on how prostate carcinoma will affect a population when screening is not applied and can be used for comparison with other health care strategies. Cancer 2005. © 2005 American Cancer Society.

  • 235. Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Staf, Christian
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Dahm-Kahler, Pernilla
    Falconer, Henrik
    Holmberg, Erik
    Kjolhede, Preben
    Stålberg, Karin Glimskär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Hogberg, Thomas
    A population-based study of pelvic serous carcinoma in Sweden: Primary site, FIGO stage and survival.2015In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 33, no 15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    What is the Place for an Effect of Surgery to Prevent And/or to Treat Cancer Pain2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, p. S45-S45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 237.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Östersund Hospital.
    Stellborn, P
    Palliative Team at Långbro Park, Sweden.
    Ström, G
    Palliative Team at Södertälje, Sweden.
    Analgesic effect of paracetamol on cancer related pain in concurrent strong opioid therapy. A prospective clinical study2008In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 891-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. In palliative cancer care, when approaching death, swallowing difficulties and the burden of tablet intake frequently makes us reconsider each individual drug prescribed. Through the last two decades the routine of always combining a strong opioid with paracetamol has been widely spread in Sweden. Clinical experience has challenged this routine as many patients seem to manage equally well without paracetamol. To find out whether this might be of clinical importance, we wanted to perform a more systematic registration. Material and methods. Thirty-four incurable cancer patients with well controlled pain (NRS 4), treated by specialised palliative home care teams, with ongoing medication with the strong opioid paracetamol combination was recruited to this prospective clinical study. The effect of completely stopping paracetamol medication was evaluated four days later at follow-up. Results. At follow-up nine patients (26%) felt more pain compared to when they entered the study, two patients (6%) felt less pain and 23 (68%) felt no difference. When asked about their preference about future paracetamol treatment 18 patients (53%) wanted to stop taking it, six patients (18%) wanted to continue with regular paracetamol medication as before, and ten patients (29%) wanted to take paracetamol as needed. No clinical predictors of paracetamol response could be identified. Discussion. The results of this study indicate that a critical evaluation, in every patient, of the subjective additive analgesic effect of paracetamol in concurrent strong opioid therapy is advisable and that stopping paracetamol medication not necessarily implies increased pain. Rather in some patients the cessation of paracetamol medication is experienced as a relief as pain control is maintained with a lesser tablet burden.

  • 238.
    Azar , Jonny
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Snickars, Sophie
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Hur ungdomar med cancer hanterar sin sjukdom och vad de har för livskvalitet: en litteraturstudie2009Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this literature study was to investigate how adolescents with cancer cope with there disease and how it effect their quality of life (QoL). This study was a descriptive literature study were the authors searched for scientific articles in the databases Medline, Cinahl, SweMed+ and PsykInfo. The result is based on fifteen articles. The result showed that social support such as parents and a special friend is important for the adolescents' well-being. The adolescents also described that it felt god to have someone to talk to that was in the same situation. A positive attitude and humour helped the adolescents to cope with their disease. One way to escape from the disease was trying to feel normal, a way of doing that was to wear accessories, modern clothes and pushing their limits. The adolescents spent a lot of time in the hospitals thus made them isolated, which resulted in alienation. Changed body image, fear and alienation are all factors that influence on the adolescents QoL. It was showed that adolescents with cancer had lower QoL than healthy adolescents, but as time pass by their QoL increased. In general the girls hade better QoL than the boys.

  • 239.
    Babaei, Masoud
    et al.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Balavarca, Yesilda
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Jansen, Lina
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Lemmens, Valery
    Netherlands Comprehens Canc Org IKNL, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van Erning, Felice N.
    Netherlands Comprehens Canc Org IKNL, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van Eycken, Liesbet
    Belgian Canc Registry, Brussels, Belgium..
    Vaes, Evelien
    Belgian Canc Registry, Brussels, Belgium..
    Sjövall, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ulrich, Cornelia M.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany.;Huntsman Canc Inst, Salt Lake City, UT USA.;Univ Utah, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    Schrotz-King, Petra
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany.;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Administration of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II-III colon cancer patients: An European population-based study2018In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1480-1489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advantage of adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) for treating Stage III colon cancer patients is well established and widely accepted. However, many patients with Stage III colon cancer do not receive ACT. Moreover, there are controversies around the effectiveness of ACT for Stage II patients. We investigated the administration of ACT and its association with overall survival in resected Stage II (overall and stratified by low-/high-risk) and Stage III colon cancer patients in three European countries including The Netherlands (2009-2014), Belgium (2009-2013) and Sweden (2009-2014). Hazard ratios (HR) for death were obtained by Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounders. A total of 60244 resected colon cancer patients with pathological Stages II and III were analyzed. A small proportion (range 9-24%) of Stage II and over half (range 55-68%) of Stage III patients received ACT. Administration of ACT in Stages II and III tumors decreased with higher age of patients. Administration of ACT was significantly associated with higher overall survival in high-risk Stage II patients (in The Netherlands (HR; 95%CI = 0.82 (0.67-0.99), Belgium (0.73; 0.59-0.90) and Sweden (0.58; 0.44-0.75)), and in Stage III patients (in The Netherlands (0.47; 0.43-0.50), Belgium (0.46; 0.41-0.50) and Sweden (0.48; 0.43-0.54)). In Stage III, results were consistent across subgroups including elderly patients. Our results show an association of ACT with higher survival among Stage III and high-risk Stage II colon cancer patients. Further investigations are needed on the selection criteria of Stages II and III colon cancer patients for ACT.

  • 240.
    Babaei, Masoud
    et al.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, INF 581, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Jansen, Lina
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, INF 581, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Balavarca, Yesilda
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Sjovall, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Digest Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bos, Amanda
    Comprehens Canc Org Netherlands, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Univ Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van de Velde, Tony
    Netherlands Canc Inst, Biometr Dept, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Moreau, Michel
    Inst Jules Bordet, Datactr, Brussels, Belgium..
    Liberale, Gabriel
    Inst Jules Bordet, Datactr, Brussels, Belgium..
    Goncalves, Ana Filipa
    Portuguese Oncol Inst Porto, Porto, Portugal..
    Bento, Maria Jose
    Portuguese Oncol Inst Porto, Porto, Portugal..
    Ulrich, Cornelia M.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis, Heidelberg, Germany.;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Schrotz-King, Petra
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Lemmens, Valery
    Comprehens Canc Org Netherlands, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Univ Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, INF 581, Heidelberg, Germany.;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis, Heidelberg, Germany.;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Neoadjuvant Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients With Clinical Stage II to III Across European Countries: Variations and Outcomes2018In: Clinical colorectal cancer, ISSN 1533-0028, Vol. 17, no 1, p. E129-E142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is the largest observational study on neoadjuvant therapy in patients with stage II & III rectal cancer by including high-quality data from large population-based and clinical cancer registries. We observed large variations in administration of neoadjuvant chemo(radio) therapy across European countries. Our results support major survival advantages of patients treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Background: Neoadjuvant therapy improves survival of patients with clinical stage II and III rectal cancer in clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the administration of neoadjuvant radiotherapy (neo-RT) and neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neo-CRT) and its association with survival in resected patients in 2 European countries (The Netherlands and Sweden) and at 3 specialist centers. Materials and Methods: Administration of neoadjuvant treatment (all registries) and overall survival after surgery in The Netherlands and Sweden were assessed. Hazard ratios (HRs) were obtained using Cox regression adjusted for potential confounders. Results: A total of 16,095 rectal cancer patients with clinical stage II and III were eligible for analyses. Large variations in administration of neo-RT and neo-CRT were observed. Elderly patients less often received neo-RT and neo-CRT. Patients with stage III disease received neo-CRT more frequently than neo-RT. Administration of neo-RT versus surgery without neoadjuvant treatment was significantly associated with improved survival in The Netherlands (HR, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53-0.73) as well as in Sweden (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.69-0.90). Administration of neo-CRT was associated with enhanced survival in The Netherlands (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50-0.78) but not in Sweden (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.80-1.18). The mortality of patients treated with neo-CRT compared with neo-RT showed inconsistent results in population-based centers. Conclusions: Our results support an association of neo-RT with enhanced survival among stage II and III rectal cancer patients. Comparing neo-CRT with neo-RT, larger variations and inconsistent results with respect to survival were observed across centers.

  • 241.
    Baban, Bayar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. iRiSC – Inflammatory Response and Infection Susceptibility Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Inflammasome activation, colonic cancer and glucose metabolism2016In: Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, ISSN 2405-4577, Vol. 12, article id e37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study the association between inflammasome activation (a potent initiator of inflammation acting via caspase-1 and maturation of interleukin-1β), colonic cancer and glucose metabolism.

    Methods: Five patients with colon cancer and ten matched controls without cancer were measured for insulin sensitivity using the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. For detection of inflammasome activation the caspase-1 activity, determined by detecting FLICA using flow cytometry, was measured in both monocytes and granulocytes at the start of, and at 120 minutes into the clamp. Descriptive and analytical statistics were performed using nonparametric methods by SPSS.

    Results: There was no difference in levels of insulin sensitivity between the two groups (p=0.09). The cancer patients had significantly lower levels of caspase-1 both in monocytes (p<0.05) and granulocytes (p<0.05) compared with the controls. However both patients and controls had significantly higher levels of both mono- and granulocyte caspase-1 activity at 120 minutes into the clamp as compared to at start (p<0.05). Patients showed an overall higher relative increase in caspase-1 during the clamp, however this finding did not reach statistical significance (monocytes; p=0.27, granulocytes; p=0.22).

  • 242.
    Backman, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Falk Delgado, Alberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Crona, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Cupisti, Kenko
    Marien Hosp, Dept Surg, Euskirchen, Germany..
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Global DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Two Discrete clusters of Pheochromocytoma with Distinct Genomic and Genetic Alterations2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 44943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs) are rare and frequently heritable neural-crest derived tumours arising from the adrenal medulla or extra-adrenal chromaffin cells respectively. The majority of PPGL tumours are benign and do not recur with distant metastases. However, a sizeable fraction of these tumours secrete vasoactive catecholamines into the circulation causing a variety of symptoms including hypertension, palpitations and diaphoresis. The genetic landscape of PPGL has been well characterized and more than a dozen genes have been described as recurrently mutated. Recent studies of DNA-methylation have revealed distinct clusters of PPGL that share DNA methylation patterns and driver mutations, as well as identified potential biomarkers for malignancy. However, these findings have not been adequately validated in independent cohorts. In this study we use an array-based genome-wide approach to study the methylome of 39 PPGL and 4 normal adrenal medullae. We identified two distinct clusters of tumours characterized by different methylation patterns and different driver mutations. Moreover, we identify genes that are differentially methylated between tumour subcategories, and between tumours and normal tissue.

  • 243.
    Backman, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Crona, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Detection of Somatic Mutations in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Using Targeted Deep Sequencing2017In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 705-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations affecting the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) signalling pathway are frequent in human cancer and have been identified in up to 15% of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Grade A evidence supports the efficacy of MTOR inhibition with everolimus in pancreatic NETs. Although a significant proportion of patients experience disease stabilization, only a minority will show objective tumour responses. It has been proposed that genomic mutations resulting in activation of MTOR signalling could be used to predict sensitivity to everolimus.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with NETs that underwent treatment with everolimus at our Institution were identified and those with available tumour tissue were selected for further analysis. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to re-sequence 22 genes that were selected on the basis of documented involvement in the MTOR signalling pathway or in the tumourigenesis of gastroenterpancreatic NETs. Radiological responses were documented using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours.

    RESULTS: Six patients were identified, one had a partial response and four had stable disease. Sequencing of tumour tissue resulted in a median sequence depth of 667.1 (range=404-1301) with 1-fold coverage of 95.9-96.5% and 10-fold coverage of 87.6-92.2%. A total of 494 genetic variants were discovered, four of which were identified as pathogenic. All pathogenic variants were validated using Sanger sequencing and were found exclusively in menin 1 (MEN1) and death domain associated protein (DAXX) genes. No mutations in the MTOR pathway-related genes were observed.

    CONCLUSION: Targeted NGS is a feasible method with high diagnostic yield for genetic characterization of pancreatic NETs. A potential association between mutations in NETs and response to everolimus should be investigated by future studies.

  • 244. Badr, Christian E
    et al.
    Wurdinger, Thomas
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Neuro-oncology Research Group, Department of Neurosurgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Niers, Johanna M
    Whalen, Michael
    Degterev, Alexei
    Tannous, Bakhos A
    Lanatoside C sensitizes glioblastoma cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and induces an alternative cell death pathway.2011In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 1213-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human glioblastoma (GBM) cells are notorious for their resistance to apoptosis-inducing therapeutics. We have identified lanatoside C as a sensitizer of GBM cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell death partly by upregulation of the death receptor 5. We show that lanatoside C sensitizes GBM cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a GBM xenograft model in vivo. Lanatoside C on its own serves as a therapeutic agent against GBM by activating a caspase-independent cell death pathway. Cells treated with lanatoside C showed necrotic cell morphology with absence of caspase activation, low mitochondrial membrane potential, and early intracellular ATP depletion. In conclusion, lanatoside C sensitizes GBM cells to TRAIL-induced cell death and mitigates apoptosis resistance of glioblastoma cells by inducing an alternative cell death pathway. To our knowledge, this is one of the first examples of use of caspase-independent cell death inducers to trigger tumor regression in vivo. Activation of such mechanism may be a useful strategy to counter resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis.

  • 245. Baecklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Foo, Jia-Nee
    Bracci, Paige
    Darabi, Hatef
    Karlsson, Robert
    Hjalgrim, Henrik
    Rosenquist Brandell, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Melbye, Mads
    Conde, Lucia
    Liu, Jianjun
    Humphreys, Keith
    Skibola, Christine F.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    A comprehensive evaluation of the role of genetic variation in follicular lymphoma survival2014In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 15, p. 113-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Survival in follicular lymphoma (FL) is highly variable, even within prognostic groups defined by tumor grade and the Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index. Studies suggest that germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may hold prognostic information but further investigation is needed. Methods: We explored the association between SNPs and FL outcome using two approaches: 1) Two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of similar to 300.000 SNPs followed by a meta-analysis encompassing 586 FL patients diagnosed in Denmark/Sweden 1999-2002 and in the United States 2001-2006; and 2) Investigation of 22 candidate-gene variants previously associated with FL outcome in the Danish/Swedish cohort (N = 373). We estimated time to lymphoma-specific death (approach 1 and 2) and lymphoma progression (approach 2) with hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) in a multivariable Cox regression model. Results: In the GWAS meta-analysis, using a random effects model, no variants were associated with lymphoma-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (p < 5.0x10(-8)). The strongest association was observed for tightly linked SNPs on 17q24 near the ABCA10 and ABCA6 genes (rs10491178 HRrandom = 3.17, 95% CI 2.09-4.79, prandom = 5.24x10(-8)). The ABCA10 and ABCA6 genes belong to a family of genes encoding for ABC transporter proteins, implicated in multidrug resistance. In line with a previous study, rs2466571 in CD46 (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.58-0.91, p = 0.006) showed nominal association with lymphoma progression, as did two highly linked SNPs in IL8 (rs4073 HR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.62-0.97, p = 0.02; rs2227307 HR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.60-0.94, p = 0.01) previously associated with overall survival. Conclusions: The results suggest a possible role for multidrug resistance in FL survival and add to the evidence that genetic variation in CD46 and IL8 may have prognostic implications in FL. Our findings need further confirmation in other independent populations or in a larger multicenter GWAS.

  • 246.
    Bager, Ninna
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat & Adolescent Med, Palle Juul Jensens Blvd 99, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Juul-Dam, Kristian L.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat & Adolescent Med, Palle Juul Jensens Blvd 99, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Sandahl, Julie D.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat & Adolescent Med, Palle Juul Jensens Blvd 99, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Abrahamsson, Jonas
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Paediat, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Beverloo, Berna
    Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Cytogenet, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Paediat, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Ha, Shau-Yin
    Queen Mary Hosp, Hong Kong Paediat Haematol & Oncol Study Grp, Dept Paediat, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Jahnukainen, Kirsi
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jonsson, Olafur G.
    Landspital Inn, Dept Paediat, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Kaspers, Gertjan L.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Paediat Oncol Haematol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Acad Princess Maxima Ctr Paediat Oncol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kovalova, Zhanna
    Childrens Clin Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, Riga, Latvia.
    Lausen, Birgitte
    Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Dept Paediat & Adolescent Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    De Moerloose, Barbara
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, Ghent, Belgium.
    Noren-Nystroem, Ulrika
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Med Biosci, Genet, Umea, Sweden.
    Palle, Josefine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Saks, Kadri
    SA Tallinna Lastehaigla, Dept Paediat, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Zeller, Bernward
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Kjeldsen, Eigil
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Cytogenet, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Hasle, Henrik
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat & Adolescent Med, Palle Juul Jensens Blvd 99, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Complex and monosomal karyotype are distinct cytogenetic entities with an adverse prognostic impact in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia: A NOPHO-DBH-AML study2018In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 183, no 4, p. 618-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data on occurrence, genetic characteristics and prognostic impact of complex and monosomal karyotype (CK/MK) in children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are scarce. We studied CK and MK in a large unselected cohort of childhood AML patients diagnosed and treated according to Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO)-AML protocols 1993-2015. In total, 800 patients with de novo AML were included. CK was found in 122 (15%) and MK in 41 (5%) patients. CK and MK patients were young (median age 2.1 and 3.3 years, respectively) and frequently had FAB M7 morphology (24% and 22%, respectively). Refractory disease was more common in MK patients (15% vs. 4%) and stem cell transplantation in first complete remission was more frequent (32% vs. 19%) compared with non-CK/non-MK patients. CK showed no association with refractory disease but was an independent predictor of an inferior event-free survival (EFS; hazard ratio [HR] 1.43, P = 0.03) and overall survival (OS; HR 1.48, P = 0.01). MK was associated with a poor EFS (HR 1.57, P = 0.03) but did not show an inferior OS compared to non-MK patients (HR 1.14, P = 0.62). In a large paediatric cohort, we characterized AML with non-recurrent abnormal karyotype and unravelled the adverse impact of CK and MK on prognosis.

  • 247.
    Bagge, Ebba
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Beiron, Ulrica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Malander, Susanne
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pattern of endocrine treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer in the Southeast medical region of Sweden: a population-based study2019In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 320-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study: Endocrine treatment (ET) is an alternative as salvage therapy in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) but the usage in routine care is unknown. We evaluated the treatment patterns and outcome of patients receiving ET for EOC in the Southeast medical region in Sweden.Method: Patients were identified through the population-based Southeast Quality Registry for gynaecological cancer. Inclusion criteria were: age 18 years, histologically verified EOC diagnosed 2000-2013, ET for 4 weeks. Coverage compared with the Swedish National Cancer Registry was 100%. Data extracted from medical records was collected by means of a study-specific Case Report Form. Last date of follow-up was February 1st, 2018. All statistics were descriptive.Results: Altogether 248 (18%) of 1414 patients were treated with ET. Most (49%) had received only one, and 34% two previous lines of chemotherapy. Time from last chemotherapy to ET was 4 months, range 0-55months. The reason for initiating ET was tumor progression (66%), chemotherapy related toxicity (29%) and maintenance (4%). Tamoxifen was prescribed in 94% of cases. Best response was partial (amp;lt; 5%) and stable disease (50%). No patient had a complete response. 194 (78%) patients received subsequent chemotherapy, of these 27% had 3-7 lines of chemotherapy. Duration of ET was a median 4 months (range 1-80 months). Median time from ET to subsequent chemotherapy was 5 months (range 0-79). The median overall survival was 45 months (range 9-173).Conclusion: In the Southeast region of Sweden, endocrine treatment for EOC was prescribed inconsistently and in various settings, usually initiated by a rising CA-125 level. Poorer documentation and irregular tumor response assessment were observed for endocrine treatment compared to chemotherapy.

  • 248. Baglietto, Laura
    et al.
    Ponzi, Erica
    Haycock, Philip
    Hodge, Allison
    Bianca Assumma, Manuela
    Jung, Chol-Hee
    Chung, Jessica
    Fasanelli, Francesca
    Guida, Florence
    Campanella, Gianluca
    Chadeau-Hyam, Marc
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Ala, Ugo
    Provero, Paolo
    Wong, Ee Ming
    Joo, Jihoon
    English, Dallas R
    Kazmi, Nabila
    Lund, Eiliv
    Faltus, Christian
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Risch, Angela
    Barrdahl, Myrto
    Sandanger, Torkjel M
    Southey, Melissa C
    Giles, Graham G
    Johansson, Mattias
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Vineis, Paolo
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Relton, Caroline L
    Severi, Gianluca
    DNA methylation changes measured in pre-diagnostic peripheral blood samples are associated with smoking and lung cancer risk2017In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 1, p. 50-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA methylation changes are associated with cigarette smoking. We used the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 array to determine whether methylation in DNA from pre-diagnostic, peripheral blood samples is associated with lung cancer risk. We used a case-control study nested within the EPIC-Italy cohort and a study within the MCCS cohort as discovery sets (a total of 552 case-control pairs). We validated the top signals in 429 case-control pairs from another 3 studies. We identified six CpGs for which hypomethylation was associated with lung cancer risk: cg05575921 in the AHRR gene (p-valuepooled  = 4 × 10(-17) ), cg03636183 in the F2RL3 gene (p-valuepooled  = 2 × 10 (- 13) ), cg21566642 and cg05951221 in 2q37.1 (p-valuepooled  = 7 × 10(-16) and 1 × 10(-11) respectively), cg06126421 in 6p21.33 (p-valuepooled  = 2 × 10(-15) ) and cg23387569 in 12q14.1 (p-valuepooled  = 5 × 10(-7) ). For cg05951221 and cg23387569 the strength of association was virtually identical in never and current smokers. For all these CpGs except for cg23387569, the methylation levels were different across smoking categories in controls (p-valuesheterogeneity  ≤ 1.8 x10 (- 7) ), were lowest for current smokers and increased with time since quitting for former smokers. We observed a gain in discrimination between cases and controls measured by the area under the ROC curve of at least 8% (p-values ≥ 0.003) in former smokers by adding methylation at the 6 CpGs into risk prediction models including smoking status and number of pack-years. Our findings provide convincing evidence that smoking and possibly other factors lead to DNA methylation changes measurable in peripheral blood that may improve prediction of lung cancer risk.

  • 249. Bahmanyar, S.
    et al.
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hillert, J.
    Ekbom, A.
    Olsson, T.
    Cancer risk among patients with multiple sclerosis and their parents2009In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 72, no 13, p. 1170-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We investigated cancer risk among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and whether variation by age at MS diagnosis helps to elucidate mechanisms underlying the previously reported reduced cancer risk. We also studied cancer risk among parents to ascertain if MS susceptibility genes may confer protection against cancer in relatives. METHODS: Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for age, sex, area, and socioeconomic index, estimated cancer risk among 20,276 patients with MS and 203,951 individuals without MS, using Swedish general population register data. Similar analyses were conducted among 11,284 fathers and 12,006 mothers of patients with MS, compared with 123,158 fathers and 129,409 mothers of controls. RESULTS: With an average of 35 years of follow-up, there was a decreased overall cancer risk among patients with MS (hazard ratio = 0.91, 0.87-0.95). Increased risks were observed for brain tumors (1.44, 1.21-1.72) and urinary organ cancer (1.27, 1.05-1.53). Parents of patients with MS did not have a notably increased or decreased overall cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in cancer risk in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may result from behavioral change, treatment, or we speculate that some immunologic characteristics of MS disease activity improve antitumor surveillance. The lack of association among parents indicates that a simple inherited characteristic is unlikely to explain the reduced cancer risk among patients with MS. MS is associated with increased risk for some cancers, such as of urinary organs and brain tumors (although surveillance bias may be responsible).

  • 250. Bainbridge, Matthew N
    et al.
    Armstrong, Georgina N
    Gramatges, M Monica
    Bertuch, Alison A
    Jhangiani, Shalini N
    Doddapaneni, Harsha
    Lewis, Lora
    Tombrello, Joseph
    Tsavachidis, Spyros
    Liu, Yanhong
    Jalali, Ali
    Plon, Sharon E
    Lau, Ching C
    Parsons, Donald W
    Claus, Elizabeth B
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Houlston, Richard S
    Jenkins, Robert B
    Lachance, Daniel
    Olson, Sara H
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Merrell, Ryan T
    Wrensch, Margaret R
    Walsh, Kyle M
    Davis, Faith G
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Aldape, Kenneth
    Amos, Christopher I
    Thompson, Patricia A
    Muzny, Donna M
    Gibbs, Richard A
    Melin, Beatrice S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa L
    Germline mutations in shelterin complex genes are associated with familial glioma2015In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 107, no 1, article id dju384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gliomas are the most common brain tumor, with several histological subtypes of various malignancy grade. The genetic contribution to familial glioma is not well understood. Using whole exome sequencing of 90 individuals from 55 families, we identified two families with mutations in POT1 (p.G95C, p.E450X), a member of the telomere shelterin complex, shared by both affected individuals in each family and predicted to impact DNA binding and TPP1 binding, respectively. Validation in a separate cohort of 264 individuals from 246 families identified an additional mutation in POT1 (p.D617Efs), also predicted to disrupt TPP1 binding. All families with POT1 mutations had affected members with oligodendroglioma, a specific subtype of glioma more sensitive to irradiation. These findings are important for understanding the origin of glioma and could have importance for the future diagnostics and treatment of glioma.

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