Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 3658
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Billermark, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical trial of a digital hearing aid1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 51-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A clinical trial of Oticon DigiFocus hearing aid was performed. The test aid was evaluated on 33 subjects with several years' experience as users of modern analog hearing aids. These aids were used as reference for the 1-month-long trial. The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) showed a mean difference in benefit with superior ratings for the test aid concerning ease of communication, speech in reverberation and speech in background noise. The subjects' own aids were rated somewhat better concerning aversiveness of sounds, but this difference was not statistically significant. The Gothenburg Profile showed a statistically significant difference between the test aid and the reference aids in favour of the test aid. The difference was not most evident with regard to speech communication and the effects of hearing loss on social interactions. Sound quality ratings concerning clearness were significantly higher for the test aid. Speech recognition thresholds in noise were on average 0.7 dB better for the test aids when tested at speech levels 60 and 75 dB. The difference was statistically significant only at 75 dB. There was significant interaction between general preference and hearing aid type, indicating that overall sound quality was an important factor affecting the general preference for either the test aid or the reference aid. Twenty-three subjects generally preferred the test aid, six preferred their own aid and four stated no difference.

  • 202.
    Arnlund, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Utveckling av sensor för mätning av hjärtaktivitet2014Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Motion analysis is a necessary tool when it comes to evaluation, monitoring and diagnosis of all the diseases that affect the human musculoskeletal system. There are only a few clinical walking laboratories in Sweden, where the patients can receive a more detailed and objective evaluation of their walking patterns. The problem with these laboratories is that they are relatively expensive and resource-demanding.

    The department of research and development at NUS has initiated a research project where AnyMo, a mobile system for measuring of moving patterns, was produced. The aim of this thesis was to further develop the existing system to simultaneously measure the electrical activity of the heart (ECG).

    The parts that were constructed during this project was an ECG sensor and a Master Unit, coupled to an existing motion sensor (part of the AnyMo system). The information that was collected from these sensors was stored locally in a memory on the system’s Master Unit.

    The finished product was tested and evaluated on a stationary bike at different pace and heart rate.

  • 203.
    Arousell, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Engdahl, Ylva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Can Surface Scanning Improve the Workflow of Elekta Linac Treatments?2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the project was to compare the workflow for an Elekta Linac with and without the surfacescanning system Catalyst and describe pros and cons with both workflows. The findings in the reportcan be used as decision support in development of Elekta products and workflow improvements.

    The method for the project was to do interviews, observations and time measurements at Södersjukhuset(not using Catalyst) and Sundsvalls sjukhus (using Catalyst). The workflows were graded in an as-sessment protocol covering time efficiency, comfort, noise, resources, reliability, cost, dosage and sideeffects. Different workflow scenarios were simulated in AnyLogic.

    The result of the project was that, according to our protocol, the workflow with Catalyst was ratedhigher than without it. The simulations in Anylogic showed that minimizing gaps in the treatment sched-ule generated the same number of patients treated per day, if the positioning could not be done faster.The simulations also showed that removing position verification with cone beam computer tomography(CBCT), an imaging system which is used in addition to the Catalyst system, would increase the numberof treated patients with approximately 33%.

    The conclusion was that there were no great differences in time efficiency between the workflows. How-ever, considering the higher reliability and comfort for the patient, optical surface scanning can improvethe positioning for Elekta Linac and is therefore worth implementing. Minimizing treatment gaps wouldnot improve the workflow. Removing the use of CBCT would increase the number of treated patientsper day.

  • 204.
    Arroyo Porras, Igor Alfredo
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Developing an sleep scorer by using Biosignals in Matlab.: Evaluation for sleep apnea patients.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, sleep disorders e.g. sleep apnea —the cessation of airflow at the nose and mouth lasting at least 10 second— are a broadly problem around the world. Direct and indirect costs associated to sleep problems are outsize and the quality of patient life is deteriorated because of it. In addition, Sleep is a fundamental part of everyday life, the lack of it or the poor quality of sleep may lead into the development of important diseases. Sleep studies are usually carried out by specialists by means of polysomnography. Polysomnography is a type of sleep study which is consisting of EEG, EOG, EMG, ECG, respiratory signals and/or many other biosignals which together can be used to determine the state of patient’s sleep and any other issue. Nowadays, visual inspection of these signals forms the “gold standard” in sleep clinics. The cost of monitoring a person overnight, the scarcity of beds available and the uncertainty of whether the results are representative of a normal nights’ sleep means that a move to home diagnostics is likely to be advantageous. Therefore, a necessity for home recorders systems capable of perform this kind of analysis has come out. A state machine based automatic scorer is developed and evaluated in Matlab by using 12 recordings of apnoeic patients from sleep heart health study (SHHS) database. By the analysis of EEG, EOG, EMG, Oxygen saturation (Sao2) and respiratory movements signals, the implemented algorithm is trained and evaluated to detect the five stages of subject’s sleep (Wake, N1, N2, N3, or REM) as well as apnoeic episodes according to guidelines from American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). In the final evaluation of algorithms, the automatic scorer achieved 74±5.27% accuracy for all five stages and Cohen’s kappa of 0.5 for the overall set of 12 patients, being the accuracy better for healthier subjects and reaching in this case 78±4.05%. The analysis of the sleep apnea concluded with a sensitivity of 47.08%, a specificity of 83.38%, and an accuracy of 78.1%. Differences in the performance among patients according to their apnea/hypopnea index were significant.

     

    Key Words: Polysomnography, AASM, Sleep apnea/hypopnea.

  • 205.
    Arumuganainar, Ganesh Prasanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Simulation of Lower Limb Muscle Activity During Inclined Slope Walking2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic exoskeletons are designed to assist patients with motor dysfunctions. Recent researches focus on extending the robotic assistance to patient activities other than ground level walking. This study aims to analyse the lower limb muscle activity during inclined slope walking contrasting with that of ground level walking. Two different angles of inclination were chosen: 9 degrees and 18 degrees. 9 degrees inclined slope is the universal ramp size for wheelchairs. The hypothesis is that muscle activation, and ultimately metabolic cost, in inclined slope walking is different from that of ground level walking. Collected motion data and simulation in OpenSim prove that the difference in metabolic cost is because of increased activity of ankle dorsiflexors and hip extensors and reduced activity of knee extensors. Finally, muscle activities along with other criteria such as kinematic alignment and joint range of motion are summed up as biomechanical considerations for robotic exoskeleton design.

  • 206. Arvidsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sarve, Hamid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Johansson, Carina B.
    Comparing and visualizing titanium implant integration in rat bone using 2D and 3D techniques2015In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare the osseointegration of grit-blasted implants with and without a hydrogen fluoride treatment in rat tibia and femur, and to visualize bone formation using state-of-the-art 3D visualization techniques. Grit-blasted implants were inserted in femur and tibia of 10 Sprague-Dawley rats (4 implants/rat). Four weeks after insertion, bone implant samples were retrieved. Selected samples were imaged in 3D using Synchrotron Radiation-based CT (SRCT). The 3D data was quantified and visualized using two novel visualization techniques, thread fly-through and 2D unfolding. All samples were processed to cut and ground sections and 2D histomorphometrical comparisons of bone implant contact (BIC), bone area (BA), and mirror image area (MI) were performed. BA values were statistically significantly higher for test implants than controls (p<0.05), but BIC and MI data did not differ significantly. Thus, the results partly indicate improved bone formation at blasted and hydrogen fluoride treated implants, compared to blasted implants. The 3D analysis was a valuable complement to 2D analysis, facilitating improved visualization. However, further studies are required to evaluate aspects of 3D quantitative techniques, with relation to light microscopy that traditionally is used for osseointegration studies. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 103B: 12-20, 2015.

  • 207.
    Arvidsson, Daniel
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Fridolfsson, Jonatan
    University of Gothenburg.
    Börjesson, Mats
    University of Gothenburg.
    Andersen, Lars Bo
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Sogndal, Norway..
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Dencker, Magnus
    Lund University.
    Brønd, Jan Christian
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Re-examination of accelerometer data processing and calibration for the assessment of physical activity intensity.2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1442-1452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review reexamines use of accelerometer and oxygen uptake data for assessment of activity intensity. Accelerometers capture mechanical work, while oxygen uptake captures the energy cost of this work. Frequency filtering needs to be considered when processing acceleration data. A too restrictive filter attenuates the acceleration signal for walking and, to a higher degree, for running. This measurement error affects shorter (children) more than taller (adults) individuals due to their higher movement frequency. Less restrictive filtering includes more movement related signals and provide measures that better capture mechanical work, but may include more noise. An optimal filter cut-point is determined where most relevant acceleration signals are included. Further, accelerometer placement affects what part of mechanical work being captured. While the waist placement captures total mechanical work and therefore contributes to measures of activity intensity equivalent by age and stature, the thigh and wrist placements capture more internal work and do not provide equivalent measures. Value calibration of accelerometer measures is usually performed using measured oxygen uptake with the metabolic equivalent of task (MET) as reference measure of activity intensity. However, the use of MET is not stringent and is not a measure of activity intensity equivalent by age and stature. A candidate measure is the mass-specific net oxygen uptake, VO2 net (VO2 tot - VO2 stand). To improve measurement of physical activity intensity using accelerometers, research developments are suggested concerning processing of accelerometer data, use of energy expenditure as reference for activity intensity, and calibration procedure with absolute versus relative intensity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 208.
    Asan, Noor Badariah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics. Univ Tekn Malaysia Melaka, Fac Elect & Comp Engn, Durian Tunggal 76100, Malaysia.
    Hassan, Emadeldeen
    Umea Univ, Dept Comp Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden;Menoufia Univ, Dept Elect & Elect Commun, Menoufia 32952, Egypt.
    Perez, Mauricio David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Shah, Syaiful Redzwan Mohd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Velander, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Blokhuis, Taco J.
    Maastricht Univ, Dept Surg, Med Ctr, NL-6229 HX Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Systems. ¨.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Assessment of Blood Vessel Effect on Fat-Intrabody Communication Using Numerical and Ex-Vivo Models at 2.45 GHZ2019In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 7, p. 89886-89900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential offered by the intra-body communication (IBC) over the past few years has resulted in a spike of interest for the topic, specifically for medical applications. Fat-IBC is subsequently a novel alternative technique that utilizes fat tissue as a communication channel. This work aimed to identify such transmission medium and its performance in varying blood-vessel systems at 2.45 GHz, particularly in the context of the IBC and medical applications. It incorporated three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic simulations and laboratory investigations that implemented models of blood vessels of varying orientations, sizes, and positions. Such investigations were undertaken by using ex-vivo porcine tissues and three blood-vessel system configurations. These configurations represent extreme cases of real-life scenarios that sufficiently elucidated their principal influence on the transmission. The blood-vessel models consisted of ex-vivo muscle tissues and copper rods. The results showed that the blood vessels crossing the channel vertically contributed to 5.1 dB and 17.1 dB signal losses for muscle and copper rods, respectively, which is the worst-case scenario in the context of fat-channel with perturbance. In contrast, blood vessels aligned-longitudinally in the channel have less effect and yielded 4.5 dB and 4.2 dB signal losses for muscle and copper rods, respectively. Meanwhile, the blood vessels crossing the channel horizontally displayed 3.4 dB and 1.9 dB signal losses for muscle and copper rods, respectively, which were the smallest losses among the configurations. The laboratory investigations were in agreement with the simulations. Thus, this work substantiated the fat-IBC signal transmission variability in the context of varying blood vessel configurations.

  • 209.
    Asan, Noor Badariah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Noreland, Daniel
    Department of Computing Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Hassan, Emadeldeen
    Department of Computing Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden; Department of Electronics and Electrical Communications, Menoufia University, 32952 Menouf, Egypt.
    Redzwan, Syaiful
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Rydberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Blokhuis, Taco J.
    Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center+, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Architecture and Computer Communication.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Intra-body microwave communication through adipose tissue2017In: Healthcare Technology Letters, E-ISSN 2053-3713, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 210. Asan, Noor Badariah
    et al.
    Noreland, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Hassan, Emadeldeen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Department of Electronics and Electrical Communications, Menoufia University, Menouf, Egypt.
    Shah, Syaiful Redzwan Mohd
    Rydberg, Anders
    Blokhuis, Taco J.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Augustine, Robin
    Intra-body microwave communication through adipose tissue2017In: Healthcare technology letters, E-ISSN 2053-3713, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human body can act as a medium for the transmission of electromagnetic waves in the wireless body sensor networks context. However, there are transmission losses in biological tissues due to the presence of water and salts. This Letter focuses on lateral intra-body microwave communication through different biological tissue layers and demonstrates the effect of the tissue thicknesses by comparing signal coupling in the channel. For this work, the authors utilise the R-band frequencies since it overlaps the industrial, scientific and medical radio (ISM) band. The channel model in human tissues is proposed based on electromagnetic simulations, validated using equivalent phantom and ex-vivo measurements. The phantom and ex-vivo measurements are compared with simulation modelling. The results show that electromagnetic communication is feasible in the adipose tissue layer with a low attenuation of approximate to 2 dB per 20 mm for phantom measurements and 4 dB per 20 mm for ex-vivo measurements at 2 GHz. Since the dielectric losses of human adipose tissues are almost half of ex-vivo tissue, an attenuation of around 3 dB per 20 mm is expected. The results show that human adipose tissue can be used as an intra-body communication channel.

  • 211.
    Asan, Noor Badariah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Redzwan, Syaiful
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Rydberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Noreland, Daniel
    Hassan, Emadeldeen
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Architecture and Computer Communication.
    Human fat tissue: A microwave communication channel2017In: Proc. 1st MTT-S International Microwave Bio Conference, IEEE, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an approach for communication through human body tissue in the R-band frequency range. This study examines the ranges of microwave frequencies suitable for intra-body communication. The human body tissues are characterized with respect to their transmission properties using simulation modeling and phantom measurements. The variations in signal coupling with respect to different tissue thicknesses are studied. The simulation and phantom measurement results show that electromagnetic communication in the fat layer is viable with attenuation of approximately 2 dB per 20 mm. 

  • 212. Asan, Noor Badariah
    et al.
    Redzwan, Syaiful
    Rydberg, Anders
    Augustine, Robin
    Noreland, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Hassan, Emadeldeen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Department of Electronics and Electrical Communications, Menoufia University, Menouf, Egypt.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Human Fat Tissue: A Microwave Communication Channel2017In: 2017 First IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Bio Conference (IMBIOC), IEEE, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an approach for communication through human body tissue in the R-band frequency range. This study examines the ranges of microwave frequencies suitable for intra-body communication. The human body tissues are characterized with respect to their transmission properties using simulation modeling and phantom measurements. The variations in signal coupling with respect to different tissue thicknesses are studied. The simulation and phantom measurement results show that electromagnetic communication in the fat layer is viable with attenuation of approximately 2 dB per 20 mm.

  • 213.
    Asan, Noor Badariah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Velander, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Redzwan, Syaiful
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Hassan, Emadeldeen
    Department of Computing Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Noreland, Daniel
    Department of Computing Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Architecture and Computer Communication.
    Blokhuis, Taco J.
    Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherland.
    Reliability of the fat tissue channel for intra-body microwave communication2017In: 2017 IEEE Conference on Antenna Measurements & Applications (CAMA), IEEE, 2017, p. 310-313Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, the human fat tissue has been proposed as a microwave channel for intra-body sensor applications. In this work, we assess how disturbances can prevent reliable microwave propagation through the fat channel. Perturbants of different sizes are considered. The simulation and experimental results show that efficient communication through the fat channel is possible even in the presence of perturbants such as embedded muscle layers and blood vessels. We show that the communication channel is not affected by perturbants that are smaller than 15 mm cube.

  • 214.
    Ashfaq, Awais
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Segmentation of Cone Beam CT in Stereotactic Radiosurgery2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    C-arm Cone Beam CT (CBCT) systems – due to compact size, flexible geometry and low radiation exposure – inaugurated the era of on-board 3D image guidance in therapeutic and surgical procedures. Leksell Gamma Knife Icon by Elekta introduced an integrated CBCT system to determine patient position prior to surgical session, thus advancing to a paradigm shift in facilitating frameless stereotactic radiosurgeries. While CBCT offers a quick imaging facility with high spatial accuracy, the quantitative values tend to be distorted due to various physics based artifacts such as scatter, beam hardening and cone beam effect. Several 3D reconstruction algorithms targeting these artifacts involve an accurate and fast segmentation of craniofacial CBCT images into air, tissue and bone.

    The objective of the thesis is to investigate the performance of deep learning based convolutional neural networks (CNN) in relation to conventional image processing and machine learning algorithms in segmenting CBCT images. CBCT data for training and testing procedures was provided by Elekta. A framework of segmentation algorithms including multilevel automatic thresholding, fuzzy clustering, multilayer perceptron and CNN is developed and tested against pre-defined evaluation metrics carrying pixel-wise prediction accuracy, statistical tests and execution times among others. CNN has proven its ability to outperform other segmentation algorithms throughout the evaluation metrics except for execution times. Mean segmentation error for CNN is found to be 0.4% with a standard deviation of 0.07%, followed by fuzzy clustering with mean segmentation error of 0.8% and a standard deviation of 0.12%. CNN based segmentation takes 500s compared to multilevel thresholding which requires ~1s on similar sized CBCT image.

    The present work demonstrates the ability of CNN in handling artifacts and noise in CBCT images and maintaining a high semantic segmentation performance. However, further efforts targeting CNN execution speed are required to utilize the segmentation framework within real-time 3D reconstruction algorithms.

  • 215.
    Ashfaq, Awais
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adler, Jonas
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden & Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A modified fuzzy C means algorithm for shading correction in craniofacial CBCT images2017In: CMBEBIH 2017: Proceedings of the International Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering 2017 / [ed] Almir Badnjevic, Singapore: Springer, 2017, Vol. 62, p. 531-538Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CBCT images suffer from acute shading artifacts primarily due to scatter. Numerous image-domain correction algorithms have been proposed in the literature that use patient-specific planning CT images to estimate shading contributions in CBCT images. However, in the context of radiosurgery applications such as gamma knife, planning images are often acquired through MRI which impedes the use of polynomial fitting approaches for shading correction. We present a new shading correction approach that is independent of planning CT images. Our algorithm is based on the assumption that true CBCT images follow a uniform volumetric intensity distribution per material, and scatter perturbs this uniform texture by contributing cupping and shading artifacts in the image domain. The framework is a combination of fuzzy C-means coupled with a neighborhood regularization term and Otsu’s method. Experimental results on artificially simulated craniofacial CBCT images are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm. Spatial non-uniformity is reduced from 16% to 7% in soft tissue and from 44% to 8% in bone regions. With shading-correction, thresholding based segmentation accuracy for bone pixels is improved from 85% to 91% when compared to thresholding without shading-correction. The proposed algorithm is thus practical and qualifies as a plug and play extension into any CBCT reconstruction software for shading correction. © Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017.

  • 216.
    Ashfaq, Awais
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research. Halland Hospital, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Machine learning in healthcare - a system’s perspective2019In: Proceedings of the ACM SIGKDD Workshop on Epidemiology meets Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery (epiDAMIK) / [ed] B. Aditya Prakash, Anil Vullikanti, Shweta Bansal, Adam Sadelik, Arlington, 2019, p. 14-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A consequence of the fragmented and siloed healthcare landscape is that patient care (and data) is split along multitude of different facilities and computer systems and enabling interoperability between these systems is hard. The lack interoperability not only hinders continuity of care and burdens providers, but also hinders effective application of Machine Learning (ML) algorithms. Thus, most current ML algorithms, designed to understand patient care and facilitate clinical decision-support, are trained on limited datasets. This approach is analogous to the Newtonian paradigm of Reductionism in which a system is broken down into elementary components and a description of the whole is formed by understanding those components individually. A key limitation of the reductionist approach is that it ignores the component-component interactions and dynamics within the system which are often of prime significance in understanding the overall behaviour of complex adaptive systems (CAS). Healthcare is a CAS.

    Though the application of ML on health data have shown incremental improvements for clinical decision support, ML has a much a broader potential to restructure care delivery as a whole and maximize care value. However, this ML potential remains largely untapped: primarily due to functional limitations of Electronic Health Records (EHR) and the inability to see the healthcare system as a whole. This viewpoint (i) articulates the healthcare as a complex system which has a biological and an organizational perspective, (ii) motivates with examples, the need of a system's approach when addressing healthcare challenges via ML and, (iii) emphasizes to unleash EHR functionality - while duly respecting all ethical and legal concerns - to reap full benefits of ML.

  • 217.
    Ask, P.
    et al.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ekstrand, K.
    ?.
    Hult, P.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lindén, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Pettersson, N. -E
    Örebro County Council, Sweden.
    NovaMedTech - A regional program for supporting new medical technologies in personalized health care2012In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 2012, p. 71-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NovaMedTech is an initiative funded from EU structural funds for supporting new medical technologies for personalized health care. It aims at bringing these technologies into clinical use and to the health care market. The program has participants from health care, industry and academia in East middle Sweden. The first three year period of the program was successful in terms of product concepts tried clinically, and number of products brought to a commercialization phase. Further, the program has led to a large number of scientific publications. Among projects supported, we can mention: Intelligent sensor networks; A digital pen to collect medical information about health status from patients; A web-based intelligent stethoscope; Methodologies to measure local blood flow and nutrition using optical techniques; Blood flow assessment from ankle pressure measurements; Technologies for pressure ulcer prevention; An IR thermometer for improved accuracy; A technique that identifies individuals prone to commit suicide among depressed patients; Detection of infectious disease using an electronic nose; Identification of the lactate threshold from breath; Obesity measurements using special software and MR camera; and An optical probe guided tumor resection. During the present three years period emphasis will be on entrepreneurial activities supporting the commercialization and bringing products to the market.

  • 218.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low-compliance perfusion pump for oesophageal manometry.1978In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 732-738Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 219.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Measurement techniques for urodynamic investigations.1989In: Critical reviews in biomedical engineering, ISSN 0278-940X, E-ISSN 1943-619X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 413-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Important measurement techniques for investigating lower urinary tract function are flow and pressure measurements. The demands on urinary flowmeters and the measurement principles of balance type, rotating disc, dipstick, and air-displacement type are described. Urological pressure measurements are performed in the bladder, in the urethra, and in the abdominal cavity. Various fluid-filled and microtransducer systems are reviewed and demands for performance given. Differences in measuring a mechanical pressure, like in the urethra, and a fluid pressure in the bladder are discussed. Electromyography (EMG) technique is used to investigate various neurological disturbances in the lower urinary tract. The electrode technique is also described. Furthermore, techniques for incontinence detection are reviewed.

  • 220.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Edwall, G
    Johansson, K E
    Tibbling, Lita
    On the use of monocrystalline antimony pH electrodes in gastro-oesophageal functional disorders.1982In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 383-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monocrystalline antimony electrodes have been shown to be suitable for thein vivo determination of pH in blood, tissue and in the upper gastro-intestinal canal. Thanks to their small dimensions it has been possible to mount them into conventional manometry catheters for oesophageal investigation. The monocrystalline antimony pH electrode has several advantages over the conventional pH glass electrode; better accuracy, shorter rise time, smaller dimensions. The monocrystalline antimony electrode has been used for long-term registration of gastro-oesophageal reflux, for the oesophageal acid clearing test and for identification of the pH gradient zone between the gastric and oesophageal mucosa. Its use in combination with pressure sensors has added a new dimension to the diagnosis of functional disorders in the gastro-oesophageal region.

  • 221.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hägglund, Sture
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pettersson, Nils-Erik
    Sjöqvist, Bengt-Arne
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    36-nätet och "pensionärsdatorer" kan bidra till att lösa sjukvårdens problem2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 100, no 14, p. 1257-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Regurgitant flow through heart valves: a hydraulic model applicable to ultrasound Doppler measurements.1986In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 643-646Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skogh, Marcus
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Undersökning av EKG-elektroners elektriska och mekaniska långtidsegenskaper1974Report (Other academic)
  • 224.
    Askfors, Ylva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics.
    Samverkan för innovation: En fallstudie av mötet mellan akademi, industri och sjukvård2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Samverkan kan leda till innovation, konkurrenskraftiga företag, förstklassig forskning samt välfungerande myndigheter och institutioner. I den politiska debatten idag finns en förväntan att Sverige ska upprätthålla sin konkurrenskraft och bemöta samhällets utmaningar genom innovation och att vägen till innovation går via samverkan. Avhandlingen bygger på en studie av ett samverkansprojekt vars syfte var att skapa innovation för att minska antalet vårdrelaterade infektioner i Sverige. Projektet som studerats ses som en transdisciplinär ansats med aktörer som representerade akademi, industri samt hälso- och sjukvård.

    Syftet med avhandlingen är att vidareutveckla kunskapen om interorganisatorisk samverkan för innovation. Detta görs genom ett tredelat bidrag, till teoribildningen kring samverkan för innovation som börjat växa fram, till den samverkande praktiken inom både privat och offentlig sektor samt till politiker och beslutsfattare som styr fördelning av statliga anslag till forskning och innovation.

    Fallstudien som ligger till grund för avhandlingen är baserad på en etnografiskt inspirerad studie. Empiriskt material samlades in och skapades tillsammans med aktörerna i projektet under drygt två års tid genom intervjuer och deltagande observation.

    Studien visar att interorganisatorisk samverkan består av flera dimensioner och kan förstås på flera nivåer. Interorganisatorisk samverkan innebär inte bara att det är olika organisationer som ska göra en gemensam ansträngning. Organisationerna består av olika människor med olika discipliner och professioner vilka bygger på olika utgångspunkter och sätt att se på världen. Samverkan kan ses som ett sätt att fylla mellanrummen mellan organisationer istället för att bygga broar över gränser. I de organisatoriska mellanrummen kan aktörer från olika organisationer, med olika discipliner och professioner mötas utan institutionaliserade roller, i en receptiv kontext där innovation kan skapas.

  • 225.
    Asklöf, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Bioelectrical impedance analysis; a new method to evaluate lymphoedema, fluid status, and tissue damage after gynaecological surgery - A systematic review2018In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 228, p. 111-119Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this descriptive review is to summarise the current knowledge of non-invasive bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) used with gynaecological surgical patients in regard to postoperative development of lymphoedema and determination of perioperative fluid balance, and as a prognostic factor in cancer mortality and a predictor of postoperative complications. The databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and reference lists of selected articles were searched for relevant articles published during the period January 2008-April 2018. Only papers published in English were retrieved. Thirty-seven articles were evaluated. Where gynaecological studies were lacking, studies with a study population from neighbouring clinical fields were used instead. Studies on the clinical use of BIA with gynaecological surgical patients were divided into three categories: the postoperative development of lower limb lymphoedema (n = 7), perioperative hydration measuring (n = 3), and the BIA parameter phase angle as a prognostic factor in cancer survival and as predictive for postoperative complications (n = 6). Of these 16 studies only three used a pure gynaecological study population. Three different methods of BIA were used in these articles: single frequency-BIA, multifrequency-BIA and bioimpedance spectroscopy. BIA was found to detect lymphoedema with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 84%. Studies indicated that BIA was able to detect lower limb lymphoedema at an early stage even before it became clinically detectable. During postoperative hydration measurements, an increase in extracellular fluid volume and extracellular fluid volume in relation to total body fluid volume, as well as a decrease in phase angle, were associated with higher frequencies of postoperative complications. Moreover, low values for the phase angle have been associated with increased mortality in cancer patients. However, the number of studies in this field was limited. From our review, BIA seems to be a useful tool for use in the clinical setting of the gynaecological surgical patient. The theoretical approach of using bioelectrical impedance values to measure the fluid distribution in the body compartments offers wide opportunities in the clinical setting. However, so far, all studies have set up cut-off limits within the study population, and reference values for a general population need to be defined. There are also rather few studies on a gynaecological study population. Hence, there is a need for further studies within gynaecological surgery focusing on early detection of lower limb lymphoedema, perioperative fluid balance, and postoperative complications in order to establish the value of BIA in clinical praxis. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 226. Aslund, M.
    et al.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Telman, M.
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Detectors for the future of X-ray imaging2010In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 139, no 1-3, p. 327-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, developments in detectors for X-ray imaging have improved dose efficiency. This has been accomplished with for example, structured scintillators such as columnar CsI, or with direct detectors where the X rays are converted to electric charge carriers in a semiconductor. Scattered radiation remains a major noise source, and fairly inefficient anti-scatter grids are still a gold standard. Hence, any future development should include improved scatter rejection. In recent years, photon-counting detectors have generated significant interest by several companies as well as academic research groups. This method eliminates electronic noise, which is an advantage in low-dose applications. Moreover, energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors allow for further improvements by optimising the signal-to-quantum-noise ratio, anatomical background subtraction or quantitative analysis of object constituents. This paper reviews state-of-the-art photon-counting detectors, scatter control and their application in diagnostic X-ray medical imaging. In particular, spectral imaging with photon-counting detectors, pitfalls such as charge sharing and high rates and various proposals for mitigation are discussed.

  • 227.
    Asplund, Maria
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Conjugated Polymers for Neural Interfaces: Prospects, possibilities and future challenges2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of neuroprosthetics the possibility to use implanted electrodes for communication with the nervous system is explored. Much effort is put into the material aspects of the electrode implant to increase charge injection capacity, suppress foreign body response and build micro sized electrode arrays allowing close contact with neurons. Conducting polymers, in particular poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT), have been suggested as materials highly interesting for such neural communication electrodes. The possibility to tailor the material both mechanically and biochemically to suit specific applications, is a substantial benefit with polymers when compared to metals. PEDOT also have hybrid charge transfer properties, including both electronic and ionic conduction, which allow for highly efficient charge injection.

     

    Part of this thesis describes a method of tailoring PEDOT through exchanging the counter ion used in electropolymerisation process. Commonly used surfactants can thereby be excluded and instead, different biomolecules can be incorporated into the polymer. The electrochemical characteristics of the polymer film depend on the ion. PEDOT electropolymerised with heparin was here determined to have the most advantageous properties. In vitro methods were applied to confirm non-cytotoxicity of the formed PEDOT:biomolecular composites. In addition, biocompatibility was affirmed for PEDOT:heparin by evaluation of inflammatory response and neuron density when implanted in rodent cortex.

     

    One advantage with PEDOT often stated, is its high stability compared to other conducting polymers. A battery of tests simulating the biological environment was therefore applied to investigate this stability, and especially the influence of the incorporated heparin. These tests showed that there was a decline in the electroactivity of PEDOT over time. This also applied in phosphate buffered saline at body temperature and in the absence of other stressors. The time course of degradation also differed depending on whether the counter ion was the surfactant polystyrene sulphonate or heparin, with a slightly better stability for the former.

     

    One possibility with PEDOT, often overlooked for biological applications, is the use of its semi conducting properties in order to include logic functions in the implant. This thesis presents the concept of using PEDOT electrochemical transistors to construct textile electrode arrays with in-built multiplexing. Using the electrolyte mediated interaction between adjacent PEDOT coated fibres to switch the polymer coat between conducting and non conducting states, then transistor function can be included in the conducting textile. Analogue circuit simulations based on experimentally found transistor characteristics proved the feasibility of these textile arrays. Developments of better polymer coatings, electrolytes and encapsulation techniques for this technology, were also identified to be essential steps in order to make these devices truly useful.

     

    In summary, this work shows the potential of PEDOT to improve neural interfaces in several ways. Some weaknesses of the polymer and the polymer electronics are presented and this, together with the epidemiological data, should point in the direction for future studies within this field.

  • 228.
    Asplund, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    Inganäs, Olle
    Forchheimer, Robert
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Neural microcontacts with wire electrodes and woven logic2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Asplund, Raquel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Evaluation of a cloud-based image analysis and image display system for medical images2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 230.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Electrical Bioimpedance Cerebral Monitoring: From Hyopthesis and Simulation to First Experimental Evidence in Stroke Patients2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stroke is amongthe leading causes of death worldwide and requires immediate care to prevent death or permanent disability. Unfortunately, the current stateof stroke diagnosis is limited to fixed neuroimaging facilities that do not allow rapid stroke diagnosis. Hence, a portable stroke-diagnosis device could assist in the pre-hospital triage of patients. Moreover, such a portable device could also be useful for bedside stroke monitoring of patients in the Neuro Intensive Care Unit (Neuro-ICU) to avoid unnecessary neuroimaging. Recent animal studies and numerical simulations have supported the idea of implementing Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in a portable device, allowing non-invasive assessment as a useful tool for the pre-hospital triage of stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients. Unfortunately, these studies have not reported any results from human subjects in the acute phase of the stroke. The numerical simulations are also based on simple models that sometimes lack necessary details.

    Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations on a realistic numerical head model as well as experimental Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (BIS) measurements from human subjectsin the acute, subacute and chronic phasesof stroke were used to answer the following research questions: (i) Does stroke modify the electrical properties of brain tissue in a way that is detectable via EBI? (ii) Would it be possible to detect stroke via EBI as early as in the acute and sub-acute phase?(iii) Is EBI sensitive enough to monitor changes caused by stroke pathogenesis?

    Using FEM to simulate electrical current injection on the head and study the resulting distribution of electrical potential on the scalp, it was shown that Intra-Cranial Hemorrhage (ICH) affects the quasi-symmetric scalp potential distribution,creating larger left-right potential asymmetry when compared to the healthy head model. Proof-of-concept FEM simulations were also tested in a small cohort of 6ICH patients and 10 healthy controls, showing that the left-right potential difference in the patients is significantly (p<0.05) larger than in the controls. Using bioimpedance measurements in the acute,  subacute and chronic phasesof stroke and examining simple features, it was also shown that the head EBI measurements of patients suffering stroke are different from controls, enabling the discrimination of healthy controls and stroke patients at any stage of the stroke. The absolute change in test-retest resistance measurements of the control group (~5.33%) was also found to be significantly (p<0.05) smaller than the EBI measurements of patients obtained 24 hours and 72 hours after stroke onset (20.44%). These results suggested that scalp EBI is sensitive to stroke pathogenesis changesand thususeful for bedside monitoring in the Neuro-ICU. These results suggested that EBI is a potentially useful tool for stroke diagnosis and monitoring.

    Finally, the initial observations based on a small number of patients, addressing the proposed future work of this thesis, suggested that the average head resistance amplitude of hemorrhagic stroke patients is smaller than in healthy controls, while ischemic stroke patients show a larger resistance amplitude than the controls. Scalp potential asymmetry analysis of healthy, hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke subjects also suggests that these three groups can be separated. However, these results are based on a small number of patients and need to be validated using a larger cohort. Initial observations also showed that the resistance of the EBI measurements of controls is robust between test and retest measurements, showing no significant difference (less than 2% and p>0.05). Subject position during EBI recording (supine or sitting) did not seem to affect the resistance of the EBI measurements (p>0.05). However, age, sex and head size showed significant effects on the resistance measurements. These initial observations are encouraging for further research on EBI for cerebral monitoring and stroke diagnosis. However, at this stage, considering the uncertainties in stroke type differentiation, EBI cannot replace CT but has the potential to be used as a consultation tool.

  • 231.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Electrical Bioimpedance Cerebral Monitoring: From Hypothesis and Simulation to First Experimental Evidence in Stroke Patients2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stroke is amongthe leading causes of death worldwide and requires immediate care to prevent death or permanent disability. Unfortunately, the current stateof stroke diagnosis is limited to fixed neuroimaging facilities that do not allow rapid stroke diagnosis. Hence, a portable stroke-diagnosis device could assist in the pre-hospital triage of patients. Moreover, such a portable device could also be useful for bedside stroke monitoring of patients in the Neuro Intensive Care Unit (Neuro-ICU) to avoid unnecessary neuroimaging. Recent animal studies and numerical simulations have supported the idea of implementing Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in a portable device, allowing non-invasive assessment as a useful tool for the pre-hospital triage of stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients. Unfortunately, these studies have not reported any results from human subjects in the acute phase of the stroke. The numerical simulations are also based on simple models that sometimes lack necessary details.

    Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations on a realistic numerical head model as well as experimental Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (BIS) measurements from human subjectsin the acute, subacute and chronic phasesof stroke were used to answer the following research questions: (i) Does stroke modify the electrical properties of brain tissue in a way that is detectable via EBI? (ii) Would it be possible to detect stroke via EBI as early as in the acute and sub-acute phase?(iii) Is EBI sensitive enough to monitor changes caused by stroke pathogenesis?

    Using FEM to simulate electrical current injection on the head and study the resulting distribution of electrical potential on the scalp, it was shown that Intra-Cranial Hemorrhage (ICH) affects the quasi-symmetric scalp potential distribution,creating larger left-right potential asymmetry when compared to the healthy head model. Proof-of-concept FEM simulations were also tested in a small cohort of 6ICH patients and 10 healthy controls, showing that the left-right potential difference in the patients is significantly (p<0.05) larger than in the controls. Using bioimpedance measurements in the acute,  subacute and chronic phasesof stroke and examining simple features, it was also shown that the head EBI measurements of patients suffering stroke are different from controls, enabling the discrimination of healthy controls and stroke patients at any stage of the stroke. The absolute change in test-retest resistance measurements of the control group (~5.33%) was also found to be significantly (p<0.05) smaller than the EBI measurements of patients obtained 24 hours and 72 hours after stroke onset (20.44%). These results suggested that scalp EBI is sensitive to stroke pathogenesis changesand thususeful for bedside monitoring in the Neuro-ICU. These results suggested that EBI is a potentially useful tool for stroke diagnosis and monitoring.

    Finally, the initial observations based on a small number of patients, addressing the proposed future work of this thesis, suggested that the average head resistance amplitude of hemorrhagic stroke patients is smaller than in healthy controls, while ischemic stroke patients show a larger resistance amplitude than the controls. Scalp potential asymmetry analysis of healthy, hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke subjects also suggests that these three groups can be separated. However, these results are based on a small number of patients and need to be validated using a larger cohort. Initial observations also showed that the resistance of the EBI measurements of controls is robust between test and retest measurements, showing no significant difference (less than 2% and p>0.05). Subject position during EBI recording (supine or sitting) did not seem to affect the resistance of the EBI measurements (p>0.05). However, age, sex and head size showed significant effects on the resistance measurements. These initial observations are encouraging for further research on EBI for cerebral monitoring and stroke diagnosis. However, at this stage, considering the uncertainties in stroke type differentiation, EBI cannot replace CT but has the potential to be used as a consultation tool.

  • 232.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Buendia, Ruben
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Cole Function and Conductance-Based Parasitic Capacitance Compensation for Cerebral Electrical Bioimpedance Measurements2012In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE, San Diego: IEEE press , 2012, p. 3368-3371Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most common measurement artifacts present in Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy measurements (EBIS) comes from the capacitive leakage effect resulting from parasitic stray capacitances. This artifact produces a deviation in the measured impedance spectrum that is most noticeable at higher frequencies. The artifact taints the spectroscopy measurement increasing the difficulty of producing reliable EBIS measurements at high frequencies. In this work, an approach for removing such capacitive influence from the spectral measurement is presented making use of a novel method to estimate the value of the parasitic capacitance equivalent that causes the measurement artifact. The proposed method has been tested and validated theoretically and experimentally and it gives a more accurate estimation of the value of the parasitic capacitance than the previous methods. Once a reliable value of parasitic capacitance has been estimated the capacitive influence can be easily compensated in the EBIS measured data. Thus enabling analysis of EBIS data at higher frequencies, i.e. in the range of 300-500 kHz like measurements intended for cerebral monitoring, where the characteristic frequency is remarkably higher than EBIS measurements i.e. within the range 30 to 50 kHz, intended for body composition assessment.

  • 233.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Kamalian, Shervin
    Rosenthal, Eric
    Lev, Michael
    Bonmassar, Giorgio
    Intracranial haemorrhage alters scalp potential distributions in bioimpedance cerebral monitoring applications: preliminary results from FEM simulation on a realistic head model and human subjects2016In: Medical Physics, ISSN 2473-4209, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 675-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Current diagnostic neuroimaging for detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is limited to fixed scanners requiring patient transport and extensive infrastructure support. ICH diagnosis would therefore benefit from a portable diagnostic technology, such as electrical bioimpedance (EBI). Through simulations and patient observation, the authors assessed the influence of unilateral ICH hematomas on quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions in order to establish the feasibility of EBI technology as a potential tool for early diagnosis. Methods: Finite element method (FEM) simulations and experimental leftright hemispheric scalp potential differences of healthy and damaged brains were compared with respect to the asymmetry caused by ICH lesions on quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions. In numerical simulations, this asymmetry was measured at 25 kHz and visualized on the scalp as the normalized potential difference between the healthy and ICH damaged models. Proof-of-concept simulations were extended in a pilot study of experimental scalp potential measurements recorded between 0 and 50 kHz with the authors custom-made bioimpedance spectrometer. Mean leftright scalp potential differences recorded from the frontal, central, and parietal brain regions of ten healthy control and six patients suffering from acute/subacute ICH were compared. The observed differences were measured at the 5% level of significance using the two-sample Welch ttest. Results: The 3D-anatomically accurate FEM simulations showed that the normalized scalp potential difference between the damaged and healthy brain models is zero everywhere on the head surface, except in the vicinity of the lesion, where it can vary up to 5%. The authors preliminary experimental results also confirmed that the leftright scalp potential difference in patients with ICH (e.g., 64 mV) is significantly larger than in healthy subjects (e.g., 20.8 mV; P < 0.05). Conclusions: Realistic, proof-of-concept simulations confirmed that ICH affects quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions. Pilot clinical observations with the authors custom-made bioimpedance spectrometer also showed higher leftright potential differences in the presence of ICH, similar to those of their simulations, that may help to distinguish healthy subjects from ICH patients. Although these pilot clinical observations are in agreement with the computer simulations, the small sample size of this study lacks statistical power to exclude the influence of other possible confounders such as age, ex, and electrode positioning. The agreement with previously published simulation-based and clinical results, however, suggests that EBI technology may be potentially useful for ICH detection. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  • 234.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    Harvard Univsersity.
    Seoane, Fernando
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Kamalian, Shervin
    Rosenthal, Eric
    Lev, Michael
    Massachussets University Hospital.
    Bonmassar, Giorgio
    Harvard University.
    Intracranial haemorrhage alters scalp potential distributions in bioimpedance cerebral monitoring applications: preliminary results from FEM simulation on a realistic head model and human subjects2016In: Medical Physics, ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 675-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    Current diagnostic neuroimaging for detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is limited to fixed scanners requiring patient transport and extensive infrastructure support. ICH diagnosis would therefore benefit from a portable diagnostic technology, such as electrical bioimpedance (EBI). Through simulations and patient observation, the authors assessed the influence of unilateral ICH hematomas on quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions in order to establish the feasibility of EBI technology as a potential tool for early diagnosis.

    Methods:

    Finite element method(FEM) simulations and experimental left–right hemispheric scalp potential differences of healthy and damaged brains were compared with respect to the asymmetry caused by ICH lesions on quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions. In numerical simulations, this asymmetry was measured at 25 kHz and visualized on the scalp as the normalized potential difference between the healthy and ICH damaged models. Proof-of-concept simulations were extended in a pilot study of experimental scalp potential measurements recorded between 0 and 50 kHz with the authors’ custom-made bioimpedance spectrometer. Mean left–right scalp potential differences recorded from the frontal, central, and parietal brain regions of ten healthy control and six patients suffering from acute/subacute ICH were compared. The observed differences were measured at the 5% level of significance using the two-sample Welch t-test.

    Results:

    The 3D-anatomically accurate FEM simulations showed that the normalized scalp potential difference between the damaged and healthy brainmodels is zero everywhere on the head surface, except in the vicinity of the lesion, where it can vary up to 5%. The authors’ preliminary experimental results also confirmed that the left–right scalp potential difference in patients with ICH (e.g., 64 mV) is significantly larger than in healthy subjects (e.g., 20.8 mV; P < 0.05).

    Conclusions:

    Realistic, proof-of-concept simulations confirmed that ICH affects quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions. Pilot clinical observations with the authors’ custom-made bioimpedance spectrometer also showed higher left–right potential differences in the presence of ICH, similar to those of their simulations, that may help to distinguish healthy subjects from ICH patients. Although these pilot clinical observations are in agreement with the computer simulations, the small sample size of this study lacks statistical power to exclude the influence of other possible confounders such as age, sex, and electrode positioning. The agreement with previously published simulation-based and clinical results, however, suggests that EBI technology may be potentially useful for ICH detection.

  • 235.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Electrical Bioimpedance cerebral monitoring. Preliminary results from measurements on stroke patients2012In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE , 2012, p. 126-129Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) is currently used in different tissue characterization applications. In this work we aim to use EBIS to study changes in electrical properties of the cerebral tissues after an incident of hemorrhage/ischemic stroke. To do so a case-control study was conducted using six controls and three stroke cases. The preliminary results of this study show that by using Cole-based analysis on EBIS measurements and analyzing the Cole parameters R0 and R∞, it is possible to detect changes on electrical properties of cerebral tissue after stroke. 

  • 236.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Study of the dynamics of transcephalic cerebral impedance data during cardio-vascular surgery2013In: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), Institute of Physics (IOP), 2013, Vol. 434, no 1, p. 012045-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postoperative neurological deficits are one of the risks associated with cardio vascular surgery, necessitating development of new techniques for cerebral monitoring. In this study an experimental observation regarding the dynamics of transcephalic Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was conducted to investigate the potential use of electrical Bioimpedance for cerebral monitoring in cardio vascular surgery. Tetrapolar transcephalic EBI measurements at single frequency of 50 kHz were recorded prior to and during cardio vascular surgery. The obtained results show that the transcephalic impedance decreases in both groups of patients as operation starts, however slight differences in these two groups were also observed with the cerebral impedance reduction in patients having no ECC being less common and not as pronounced as in the ECC group. Changes in the cerebral impedance were in agreement with changes of haematocrit and temperature. The origin of EBI changes is still unexplained however these results encourage us to continue investigating the application of electrical bioimpedance cerebral monitoring clinically.

  • 237.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Thorlin, Thorleif
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Stroke Damage Detection Using Classification Trees on Electrical Bioimpedance Cerebral Spectroscopy Measurements2013In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 10074-10086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After cancer and cardio-vascular disease, stroke is the third greatest cause of death worldwide. Given the limitations of the current imaging technologies used for stroke diagnosis, the need for portable non-invasive and less expensive diagnostic tools is crucial. Previous studies have suggested that electrical bioimpedance (EBI) measurements from the head might contain useful clinical information related to changes produced in the cerebral tissue after the onset of stroke. In this study, we recorded 720 EBI Spectroscopy (EBIS) measurements from two different head regions of 18 hemispheres of nine subjects. Three of these subjects had suffered a unilateral haemorrhagic stroke. A number of features based on structural and intrinsic frequency-dependent properties of the cerebral tissue were extracted. These features were then fed into a classification tree. The results show that a full classification of damaged and undamaged cerebral tissue was achieved after three hierarchical classification steps. Lastly, the performance of the classification tree was assessed using Leave-One-Out Cross Validation (LOO-CV). Despite the fact that the results of this study are limited to a small database, and the observations obtained must be verified further with a larger cohort of patients, these findings confirm that EBI measurements contain useful information for assessing on the health of brain tissue after stroke and supports the hypothesis that classification features based on Cole parameters, spectral information and the geometry of EBIS measurements are useful to differentiate between healthy and stroke damaged brain tissue.

  • 238.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    Harvard University.
    Seoane, Fernando
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Thorlin, Thorleif
    salhgrenska Hospital.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Stroke Damage Detection Using Classification Trees on Electrical Bioimpedance Cerebral Spectroscopy Measurements2013In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 10074-10086Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 239.
    Athanasiou, Vasileios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Estimation and modelling of fMRI BOLD response2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the current topics of research in neuroimaging techniques is related to explaining and modelling the Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) responses. BOLD responses are estimated by processing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data. BOLD responses are caused by hemodynamic responses to neural activity which alter the levels of blood oxygenation at local brain regions. The main aims of the current thesis were to i) develop and examine methods regarding BOLD response estimation from the visual cortex and the frontal cortex of human brain and to ii) develop a model in order to explain the physiological mechanisms which cause the estimated BOLD responses.

    In order to satisfy the main aims, fMRI data were provided by the Center of Medical Imaging and Visualization (CMIV). The provided fMRI data consist of fMRI brain measurements of twelve healthy human subjects who were subjected to visual stimulation. By processing the fMRI data, Regions Of Interest (ROIs) were extracted at the anatomical sites of the visual cortex and the frontal cortex. Afterwards, the fMRI data were manipulated in order to extract BOLD responses from the visual cortex and the frontal cortex. Various methods were developed and compared in terms of which technique provided well representative BOLD responses.       

    Subsequently, a model was developed by using software Wolfram Mathematica 9 in order to explain the physiological mechanisms of the estimated BOLD responses at the visual and the frontal cortex. The model aimed to solve for oxygen concentration in blood plasma as blood flows from the arterial part to the venous part of the blood circulation system through a capillary. Oxygen outward diffusion through the capillary wall and oxygen concentration at the extravascular environment were modelled as well. Blood plasma oxygen concentration was turned into hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Sa ) through hemoglobin oxygen dissociation curve and Henry’s law for gases. As a result, the Sa  was estimated through modelling for oxygen concentration in blood plasma. Finally, the developed model ended to a system with input the fractional change of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) velocity and Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen (CMR ) and as output a proportional signal to the BOLD response. By simulating for different scenarios of fractional changes of CBF velocity and CMR  and by comparing the resulted BOLD responses to the estimated ones, it was attempted to explain for the physiological mechanisms which caused the BOLD responses at the anatomical sites of the visual and frontal cortex.

  • 240.
    Atif, Abdul Raouf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Pujari-Palmer, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Tenje, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Mestres, Gemma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Evaluation of Ionic Interactions of Bone Cement-on-Chip2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Biomaterials are synthetic materials that can be incorporated into the body to replace an impaired physiological function. Apatite calcium phosphate cements (CPCs), used for bone regeneration, give calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) as an end-product after a dissolution-precipitation reaction during fabrication. CDHA has a tendency to uptake calcium and release phosphate into cell culture medium. Potentially, this leads to depletion of calcium ions in solution, which can be detrimental to cell survival. The aim of this work is to embed CDHA in a microfluidic system and evaluate ion exchange at different flow rates.

    METHODS: CPC paste was cast into a 0.8mm pocket within a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, cured at 60°C for 2h) mould. CPCs were set in 0.9% w/v NaCl at 37°C for 10 days resulting in CDHA. The PDMS containing the CDHA was then bonded to glass, leaving a 0.5mm channel gap. Minimum Essential Media (MEM, 1ml) was pumped through the channel at low (2µl/min), medium (8µl/min) and high (14µl/min) flow rates. A CDHA disc (ø=15mm, h=2mm) was immersed in MEM (1ml) at static conditions (0µl/min) for 24h. Stock Media was taken as control. Calcium and phosphorus concentrations were analysed using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy.

    RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: CDHA was successfully embedded in a microfluidic chip (Fig. 1A). Observed [Ca] and [P] levels were closer to levels in stock MEM at higher flow rates (Fig. 1B). We anticipate that osteoblast viability will improve when grown under flow, as opposed to static conditions, due to continuous replenishment of cell medium.

  • 241.
    Auer, Martin
    et al.
    Develoment, Vascops GmbH, Graz, Austria.
    Gasser, Thomas Christian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Biomechanics.
    Portugaller, R.
    Automatic Displacement and Strain measuring in the Aorta from dynamic electrocardiographically-gated Computed Tomographic Angiography2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Image modalities like Duplex Ultrasound, Transesophageal Echocardiography, Intravascular Ultrasound, Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance provide vascular interventionists and surgeons with useful diagnostic information for treatment planning. Recent developments in cross-sectional imaging, including multi-modality image fusion and new contrast agents have resulted in improved spatial resolution. Specifically, dynamic Electrocardiographically-Gated Computed Tomographic Angiography (ECG-gated CTA) provides valuable information regarding motion and deformation of the normal and diseased aorta during the cardiac cycle. Extracting and presenting (visualization) of accurate quantitative information from the recorded image data, however remains a challenging task of image post processing.

    Method

    The algorithm proposed within this paper processes ECG-gated CTA data (here goes the scanner model and manufacturer) in DICOM (digital imaging and communication in medicine) format, within which the user manually defines an Eulerian Region of Interest (ROI). 2D deformable (active) contour models are used to pre-segment the luminal surfaces of the selected vessels at an arbitrary time point during the cardiac cycle. A tessellation algorithm is used to define the initial configuration of a 3D deformable (active) contour model, which in turn is used for the final segmentation of the luminal surfaces continuously during the cardiac cycle. Specifically, Finite Element (FE) formulations [1] for frames and shells, as known from structural mechanics, are used to define the deformable contour modes. This allows a direct mechanical interpretation of the applied set of reconstruction parameters and leads to an efficient FE implementation of the models [2]; parallel processor architecture is used to solve the global set of non-linear FE equations. Finally displacement and strain measures are derived from the dynamic segmentations and color coded plots are used to visualize them.

    Results and Conclusions

    The clinical relevance of dynamic imaging has not been fully exploited and accurate and fast image processing tools are critical to extract valuable information from ECG-gated CTA data. Such information is not only of direct clinical relevance but also critical to process our current understanding regarding normal and pathological aortic motions and deformations. The image processing concept proposed in this paper leads to efficient and clinically applicable software that facilitates an analysis of the entire aorta on a standard Personal Computer within a few minutes. Deformable (active) contour models are known to be more accurate compared to threshold based segmentation concepts [3] and the accuracy of the present approach is in the range of the in-plane image resolution. Apart from direct diagnostic information the extracted geometrical data could also be used (once enriched by accurate pressure measurements) for none invasive (minimal invasive) estimation of biomechanical aortic tissue properties.

    References

    [1] O. C. Zienkiewicz and R. L. Taylor, vol.1,2, 5th ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann, 2000.

    [2] M. Auer and T. C. Gasser,

    IEEE T. Med. Imaging, 2010 (in press).

    [3] M. Sonka and J. M. Fitzpatrick, editors.,

    Bellingham: Spie press, 2000

  • 242.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University.
    A Non-invasive Skin Burn Degree Analysis Using Microwaves2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University.
    A Preliminary Study on Skin Burn Degree Analysis Based on Coupling Effect between Burn Area and Micro Strip Ring Resonator2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 244.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University.
    Application of UWB Radar Techniques for Imaging cranial vaults2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 245. Augustine, Robin
    Arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea) is an edible starch, commercially available as powder, prepared from the roots of the plant family Marantaceae. Arrowroot is well known for its medicinal effects and use as chief ingredient in infant cookies. Arrowroot in film form is prepared and its microwave absorption characteristics, permittivity, loss factor, conductivity, skin depth, and heating coefficient are analyzed. The results are quite promising and can be concluded that arrowroot in film form is a potential candidate for several applications in medical field, when compared with well studied chitosan film2009In: Microwave and Optical Technology Letters, Vol. 51, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea) is an edible starch, commercially available as powder, prepared from the roots of the plant family Marantaceae. Arrowroot is well known for its medicinal effects and use as chief ingredient in infant cookies. Arrowroot in film form is prepared and its microwave absorption characteristics, permittivity, loss factor, conductivity, skin depth, and heating coefficient are analyzed. The results are quite promising and can be concluded that arrowroot in film form is a potential candidate for several applications in medical field, when compared with well studied chitosan film

  • 246. Augustine, Robin
    Biocompatibility study of beta tricalcium phosphate bioceramics and chitosan biopolymer and their use as phantoms for medical imaging applications2009In: Microwave and Optical Technology Letters, Vol. 51, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beta tricalcium phosphate (b-TCP) bioceramics and chitosan biopolymers are used as biomedical implants because of their better biocompatibility and good bioresorption characteristics. As they are biomaterials, they have good interactions with microwave frequencies. b-TCP and chitosan powder, films, pellets, and gel are prepared and studied at the S-band microwave frequencies. Dielectric parameters such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss, conductivity, and S-parameters are evaluated. Dielectric parameters of different forms of b-TCP and chitosan show resemblance with that of human tissues. Hence, these materials can also be considered as potential phantoms for specific absorption rate measurements as well as in microwave imaging applications. V

  • 247. Augustine, Robin
    Biocompatibility study of hydroxyapatite-chitosan composite for medical applications at microwave frequencies2008In: Microwave and optical technology letters (Print), ISSN 0895-2477, E-ISSN 1098-2760, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 2931-2934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) bioceramic and chitosan (poly [(β-1-4) d-glucosamine]) biopolymer show good biocompatibility in vivo. They have biological origin and show excellent interactions with microwave. Microwave study of HAp made using different drying techniques and their composites with chitosan in the ISM band is presented. Pastes are made using HAp and chitosan with different ratios of mixing. The dielectric properties of this composites match with that of human fat, collagen tissues. Some of the compositions exhibit dielectric property close to that of natural bone. This makes them more biocompatible and better substitutes for natural bone. Thus composite bioceramics can be considered as phantom model constituents for imaging purposes.

  • 248. Augustine, Robin
    Chitosan Biopolymer for Microwave Tomography Applications2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 249. Augustine, Robin
    Complex dielectric permittivity measurements of human skin and biological solution in2-67GHz range2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University.
    COmplex Fracture Orthopedic RehabiliTation – COMFORT2016Conference paper (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 3658
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf