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  • 201. Beven, Keith J.
    Uncertainty in Predictions of Floods and Hydraulic Transport2007In: Transport phenomena in hydraulics / [ed] Rowiński, Paweł, Warszawa: Institute of Geophysics , 2007, p. 5-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a review of work within the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) methodology on estimating uncertainties in predicting flood frequency, flood inundation, and hydraulic transport of solutes in rivers and soils. The issue of prediction uncertainty as an input decision making is also discussed. It is concluded that in real applications it is unlikely that a fully objective approach to uncertainty estimation is possible. It is therefore important that the assumptions made are stated explicitly so that they can be agreed or disputed with the users of the resulting predictions. It is also important that the modelling process be considered as a learning process of constraining uncertainty by adding new information.

  • 202.
    Beygi, Heydar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Impact of irrigation development and climate change on the water level of Lake Urmia, Iran2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Lake Urmia, located in the north-west of Iran, is one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world. In recent years, there has been a significant decrease in the lake’s area and volume by 88% and 80% respectively. An integrated water balance model of the Lake Urmia Drainage Basin (LUDB) and Lake Urmia was developed to identify these main drivers of the significant changes, and to investigate the possible future evolution of the lake under effects of projected climate change and land use change. We used an energy balance method to estimate the evaporation from the lake and the Turc-Langbein method to estimate the evapotranspiration from the drainage basin of the lake. Agricultural irrigation water was introduced to the model as an extra precipitation over the irrigated fields, after being subtracted from the surplus runoff (precipitation−evapotranspiration). The agricultural land development was assumed to be linear that changed from 300000 ha at 1979 to 500000 at 2010, which is consistent with the best available data on the actual irrigation development in the basin. We estimated the annual evaporation over the Lake Urmia and the evapotranspiration over its drainage basin as 932 mm and 287 mm respectively. Our results showed that decreased precipitation and increased temperature over the basin since 1995 could explain 68% of the observed lake level decrease. Irrigation developments during the last four decades were found to be responsible for 32% of the observed lake level decrease. Thus the future lake level of the Lake Urmia is very likely to continue to decrease unless the current climate condition will be followed by a period of increased precipitation. If the current climate conditions will prevail also in the future, even a 20% decrease in the irrigated land area, which is actually quite ambitious, will not make the lake recover to its ecological level at the end of 2020.

  • 203.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Ahmed, K.M.
    Hasan, M.A.
    Broms, S.
    Fogelström, J.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Sracek, O.
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Routh, J.
    Mobility of arsenic in groundwater in a part of Brahmanbaria district, NE Bangladesh2006In: Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From soil to human health / [ed] Naidu, R., Smith, E., Owens, G., Bhattacharya, P. Nadebaum. P., Melbourne, Australia: CSIRO Publishing , 2006, p. 95-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 204.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Claesson, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Fagerberg, Jens
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    Storniolo, Angel del R.
    Martin, Raul A.
    Thir, Juan Martin
    Sracek, Ondra
    Natural arsenic in the groundwater of the alluvial aquifers of Santiago del Estero Province, Argentina2005In: Natural Arsenic in Groundwater: Occurrence, Remediation and Management / [ed] Bundschuh, J; Bhattacharya, P; Chandrasekharam, D, London: Balkema, 2005, p. 57-65Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural occurrences of arsenic has been documented in groundwater of the shallow aquifers of the Chaco-Pampean Plain, Argentina. The distribution of arsenic and mechanisms of its mobilization in the shallow alluvial aquifers was investigated around the city of Santiago del Estero in Northwestern Argentina in order to provide an insight into the complex hydrological and geochemical conditions that yields high As concentrations in groundwater. Significant spatial variations of total arsenic (As-tot) concentrations were observed with an average value of 743 mu g/L. Arsenate was a dominant species in most samples. Average concentrations of Al, Mn, and Fe were 360 mu g/L, 574 mu g/L, and 459 mu g/L, respectively. The 7M HNO3 extraction of sediments and volcanic ash-layer indicated AS(N03) concentrations ranging between 2.5-7.1 mg/kg. AS(N03) indicated a significant positive correlation with Mn-N03, Al-N03, and Fe-N03. Oxalate extractions revealed significant fractions of As (Aso(ox)) in the sediments (0.4-1.4mg/kg) and a dominance of oxalate extractable Al- and Mn. Speciation calculations indicate that Al oxide and hydroxides have the potential to precipitate in the groundwater, suggesting that As adsorption processes may be to some extent controlled by Al oxides and hydroxides. Mobility of As at local scale seems to depend on high pH values, related to the dissolution of carbonates driven by cation exchange, and dissolution of silicates. There is a clear relationship of As with F, V, B and Si, suggesting their common origin in volcanic ash layer. Preliminary conceptual model of arsenic input includes release of As and Al from dissolution of volcanic ash layer, precipitation of Al oxides and hydroxides followed by adsorption of As on Al and Fe phases in sediments, and release of As under high pH conditions.

  • 205.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Mukherjee, A.
    Mukherjee, A. B.
    Groundwater Arsenic in India: Source, Distribution, Effects and Alternate Safe Drinking Water Sources2013In: Reference Module in Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences, Elsevier, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Elevated natural groundwater arsenic, a carcinogen, has created a severe environmental health crisis in several parts of India. Since the discovery of groundwater arsenic and arsenicosis in West Bengal, in 1984, a huge wealth of information has been generated by groundwater arsenic research during the last three decades. The principal mechanism of arsenic mobilization in groundwater is believed to be reductive dissolution of Fe-oxyhydroxides in aquifer sediments. Arsenic enriched groundwater used for irrigation also leads to long-term risks for arsenic enrichment in the soils and bioaccumulation in crops. Various studies are ongoing to develop a holistic approach for arsenic mitigation.

  • 206.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    von Brömssen, M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Hasan, M.A.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Ahmed, K.M.
    Sracek, O.
    Jakariya, M.
    Huq, S.M.I.
    Naidu, R.
    Smith, E.
    Owens, G.
    Arsenic mobilisation in the Holocene flood plains in South-central Bangladesh: Evidences from the hydrogeochemical trends and modeling results2008In: Groundwater for Sustainable Development: Problems, Perspectives and Challenges / [ed] Bhattacharya, P., Ramanathan, AL., Mukherjee A.B., Bundschuh, J., Chandrasekharam, D. Keshari, A.K., The Netherlands: Taylor and Francis/A.A. Balkema , 2008, p. 283-299Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 207.
    Bidleman, Terry
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kucklick, John
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Letcher, Robert
    Environment and Climate Change, Canada.
    Jantunen, Liisa
    Environment and Climate Change, Canada.
    Wong, Fiona
    Environment and Climate Change, Canada.
    Halogenated Natural Products2017In: AMAP Assessment 2016: Chemicals of Emerging Arctic Concern, Oslo, Norway: AMAP , 2017, p. 243-267Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 208.
    Bidleman, Terry
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Sweden.
    Kucklick, John
    National Institute of Standards and Technology, South Carolina, USA.
    Letcher, Robert
    National Wildlife Research Centre, Canada.
    Jantunen, Liisa
    Environment and Climate Change, Canada.
    Wong, Fiona
    Environment and Climate Change, Canada.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    CONTAMINANTS OF EMERGING CONCERN IN THE ARCTIC: AN ASSESSMENT OF HALOGENATED NATURAL PRODUCTS2016In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 78, p. 193-196, article id 8.4010Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 209.
    Bidleman, Terry
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kurt-Karakus, Perihan
    Bahcesehir University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Armitage, James
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Brown, Tanya
    University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
    Danon Schaffer, Monica
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Helm, Paul
    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto, Canada.
    Hung, Haley
    Meteorological Services Canada .
    Jantunen, Liisa
    Environment Canada.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Li, Yi-Fan
    Environment, Canada.
    Loock, Daniela
    Royal Military College of Canada.
    Luttmer, Carol
    Royal Military College of Canada.
    Ma, Jianmin
    Lanzhou University, Peoples Republic of China.
    Macdonald, Robie
    Fisheries and Oceans, Canada.
    Mackay, Don
    Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.
    Reid, Liisa
    Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.
    Reimer, Ken
    Royal Military College of Canada.
    Chapter 2: Properties, sources, global fate and transport2013In: Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report III 2013: Persistent Organic Pollutants in Canada’ s North / [ed] Derek Muir, Perihan Kurt-Karakus and Peter Stow, Ottawa: Northern Contaminants Program, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada , 2013, p. 19-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Part II of the second Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report (CACAR-II) began with a section on “Physicochemical Properties of Persistent Organic Pollutants”, which identified key physicochemical (pchem) properties, provided the rationale for their measurement or prediction and tabulated literature citations for chemicals that are of concern to the NCP (Bidleman et al. 2003). The section also discussed temperature dependence of pchem properties and their applications to describing partitioning in the physical environment.

    There is, and will continue to be, emphasis on predictive approaches to screening chemicals for persistence, bioaccumulation and toxic (PB&T)properties, as well as long-range atmospheric transport (LRAT) potential (Brown and Wania 2008, Czub et al. 2008, Fenner et al. 2005, Gouin andWania 2007, Howard and Muir 2010, Klasmeier et al. 2006, Matthies et al. 2009, Muir and Howard 2006). This has created the need for determining pchem properties of new and emerging chemicals of concern.

    Predicting gas exchange cycles of legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and new and emerging chemicals of concern places a high demand on the accuracy of pchem properties, particularly the air/water partition coefficient, KAW. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in Arctic Ocean surface waters are close to air-water equilibrium, with excursions toward net volatilization or deposition that vary with location and season (Hargrave et al. 1993, Jantunen et al. 2008a, Lohmann et al. 2009, Su et al. 2006, Wong et al. 2011) while hexachlorobenzene (HCB) (Lohmann et al. 2009, Su et al. 2006, Wong et al. 2011) and some current use pesticides (CUPs) (Wong et al. 2011) are undergoing net deposition. The predicted Arctic Contamination Potential (ACP) for persistent organic chemicals is strongly influenced by ice cover due to its effect on air-water gas exchange (Meyer and Wania 2007).

    Many advances have taken place and numerous papers have been published since CACAR-II, which present new measurements and predictions of pchem properties. This section does not attempt to provide a comprehensive review of the field, or to compile pchem properties from the many studies. The approach taken is to highlight the reports which are most relevant to polar science, particularly in areas of improving reliability of pchem properties for POPs, improving experimental techniques and comparing predictive methods. The section ends with a discussion of polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs), which goes beyond partitioning descriptions based on single pchem properties by taking into account specific chemical interactions that can take place in airsurface and water-surface exchange processes. A detailed list of chemical names and nomenclature are provided in the Glossary.

  • 210.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    9. Contaminants and Health of Aquatic Wildlife2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 73-85Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 211. Bijmans, Martijn FM
    et al.
    van Helvoort, Pieter-Jan
    Dar, Shabir A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Dopson, Mark
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Lens, Piet NL
    Buisman, Cees JN
    Selective recovery of nickel over iron from a nickel-iron solution using microbial sulfate reduction in a gas-lift bioreactor2009In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 853-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process streams with high concentrations of metals and sulfate are characteristic for the mining and metallurgical industries. This study aims to selectively recover nickel from a nickel-iron-containing solution at pH 5.0 using a single stage bioreactor that simultaneously combines low pH sulfate reduction and metal-sulfide formation. The results show that nickel was selectively precipitated in the bioreactor at pH 5.0 and the precipitates consisted of >= 83% of the nickel content. The nickel-iron precipitates were partly crystalline and had a metal/sulfur ratio of 1, suggesting these precipitates were NiS and FeS. Experiments focusing on nickel recovery at pH 5.0 and 5.5 reached a recovery of >99.9%, resulting in a nickel effluent concentration <0.05 mu M. The mixed microbial population included known sulfate reducers and acetogens. This study shows that selective metal precipitation in a single stage sulfate reducing bioreactor operated at low pH has the potential to produce metal-sulfides that can be used by the metallurgical industry as a resource for metal production.

  • 212.
    Bindler, Richard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Klaminder, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Beyond the peat: synthesizing peat, lake sediments and soils in studies of the Swedish environment2006In: Peatlands: basin evolution and depository of records on global environmental and climatic changes / [ed] I.P. Martini, A. Martínez Cortizas and W. Chesworth, Elsevier, 2006, p. 431-448Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter illustrates on comparing peat and lake sediment records and linking the quantitative record of metals in peat to contemporary environmental problems. Quantifying metal records in peat has been an important step, but new research needs to move beyond this and consider how to apply these data. Lead analyses, including stable isotopes, are now fairly routine and based on these analyses the historical trends of lead deposition are now well established in peat, lake sediments and even glacial ice. The biogeochemical cycling of lead has also been well researched, which allows making this link between the historical lead record and soil biogeochemistry. Because peat and lake sediments seem to record the same changes in mercury deposition, there is similar promise in linking the long-term peat record of mercury and other metals with biogeochemical cycling of mercury and other important metals in forests and soils.

  • 213.
    Bishop, Adrian N.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Fidan, Baris
    Anderson, Brian D. O.
    Dogancay, Kutluyil
    Pathirana, Pubudu N.
    Optimal Range-Difference-Based Localization Considering Geometrical Constraints2008In: IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, ISSN 0364-9059, E-ISSN 1558-1691, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 289-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a new type of algorithm aimed at finding the traditional maximum-likelihood (TML) estimate of the position of a target given time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) information, contaminated by noise. The novelty lies in the fact that a performance index, akin to but not identical with that in maximum likelihood (ML), is a minimized subject to a number of constraints, which flow from geometric constraints inherent in the underlying problem. The minimization is in a higher dimensional space than for TML, and has the advantage that the algorithm can be very straightforwardly and systematically initialized. Simulation evidence shows that failure to converge to a solution of the localization problem near the true value is less likely to occur with this new algorithm than with TML. This makes it attractive to use in adverse geometric situations.

  • 214. Bishop, K.
    et al.
    Seibert, J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Nyberg, L.
    Rodhe, A.
    Water storage in a till catchment. II: Implications of transmissivity feedback for flow paths and turnover times2011In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 25, no 25, p. 3950-3959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the flow paths and turnover times within a catchment characterized by the transmissivity feedback mechanism where there is a strong increase in the saturated hydraulic conductivity towards the soil surface and precipitation inputs saturate progressively more superficial layers of the soil profile. The analysis is facilitated by the correlation between catchment water storage and groundwater levels, which made it possible to model the daily spatial distribution of water storage, both vertically in different soil horizons and horizontally across a 6300-m2 till catchment. Soil properties and episodic precipitation input dynamics, combined with the influence of topographic features, concentrate flow in the horizontal, vertical, and temporal dimensions. Within the soil profile, there was a vertical concentration of lateral flow to superficial soil horizons (upper 30?cm of the soil), where much of the annual flow occurred during runoff episodes. Overland flow from a limited portion of the catchment can contribute to peak flows but is not a necessary condition for runoff episodes. The spatial concentration of flow, and the episodic nature of runoff events, resulted in a strong and spatially structured differentiation of local flow velocities within the catchment. There were large differences in the time spent by the laterally flowing water at different depths, with turnover times of lateral flow across a 1-m-wide soil pedon ranging from under 1?h at 10- to 20-cm depth to a month at 70- to 80-cm depth. In many regards, the hydrology of this catchment appears typical of the hydrology in till soils, which are widespread in Fenno-Scandia. Copyright (c) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 215. Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Beven, Keith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Abrahamsson, Katarina
    Andersson, Lotta
    Johnson, K
    Rodhe, Johan
    Hjerdt, Niclas
    Nature as the “Natural” Goal for Water Management: A Conversation2009In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 38, p. 209-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goals for water-quality and ecosystem integrity are often defined relative to “natural” reference conditions in many water-management systems, including the European Union Water Framework Directive. This paper examines the difficulties created for water management by using “natural” as the goal. These difficulties are articulated from different perspectives in an informal (fictional) conversation that takes place after a workshop on reference conditions in water-resources management. The difficulties include defining the natural state and modeling how a system might be progressed toward the natural, as well as the feasibility and desirability of restoring a natural state. The paper also considers the appropriateness for developing countries to adopt the use of natural as the goal for water management. We conclude that failure to critically examine the complexities of having “natural” as the goal will compromise the ability to manage the issues that arise in real basins by not making the ambiguities associated with this “natural” goal explicit. This is unfortunate both for the western world that has embraced this model of “natural as the goal” and for the developing world in so far as they are encouraged to adopt this model.

  • 216. Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Beven, Keith
    Destouni, Georgia
    Abrahamsson, Katarina
    Andersson, Lotta
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Johnson, Richard K.
    Rodhe, Johan
    Hjerdt, Niclas
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Nature as the "Natural" Goal for Water Management: A Conversation2009In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 209-214Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goals for water-quality and ecosystem integrity are often defined relative to "natural" reference conditions in many water-management systems, including the European Union Water Framework Directive. This paper examines the difficulties created for water management by using "natural" as the goal. These difficulties are articulated from different perspectives in an informal (fictional) conversation that takes place after a workshop on reference conditions in water-resources management. The difficulties include defining the natural state and modeling how a system might be progressed toward the natural, as well as the feasibility and desirability of restoring a natural state. The paper also considers the appropriateness for developing countries to adopt the use of natural as the goal for water management. We conclude that failure to critically examine the complexities of having "natural" as the goal will compromise the ability to manage the issues that arise in real basins by not making the ambiguities associated with this "natural" goal explicit. This is unfortunate both for the western world that has embraced this model of "natural as the goal" and for the developing world in so far as they are encouraged to adopt this model.

  • 217.
    Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Swedish University Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Beven, Keith
    Swedish University Agriculture Science.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Swedish University Agriculture Science.
    Abrahamsson, Katarina
    Gothenburg University.
    Andersson, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnson, Richard K
    Swedish University Agriculture Science.
    Rodhe, Johan
    Gothenburg University.
    Hjerdt, Niclas
    Swedish Meteorological & Hydrological Institute.
    Nature as the "Natural" Goal for Water Management: A Conversation2009In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 209-214Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goals for water-quality and ecosystem integrity are often defined relative to "natural" reference conditions in many water-management systems, including the European Union Water Framework Directive. This paper examines the difficulties created for water management by using "natural" as the goal. These difficulties are articulated from different perspectives in an informal (fictional) conversation that takes place after a workshop on reference conditions in water-resources management. The difficulties include defining the natural state and modeling how a system might be progressed toward the natural, as well as the feasibility and desirability of restoring a natural state. The paper also considers the appropriateness for developing countries to adopt the use of natural as the goal for water management. We conclude that failure to critically examine the complexities of having "natural" as the goal will compromise the ability to manage the issues that arise in real basins by not making the ambiguities associated with this "natural" goal explicit. This is unfortunate both for the western world that has embraced this model of "natural as the goal" and for the developing world in so far as they are encouraged to adopt this model.

  • 218.
    Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Gebrehiwot, Solomon
    SLU Aquatic Sciences and Assessment.
    Taye, Ayale
    Awassa University, Ethiopia.
    Forest Cover and Stream Flow in a Headwater of the Blue Nile: Complementing Observational Data Analysis with Community Perception2010In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 284-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the relation of forest cover and stream flow on the 266 km2 Koga watershed in the headwaters of Blue Nile Basin using both observed hydrological data and community perception. The watershed went from 16% forest cover in 1957 to 1% by 1986. The hydrological record did not reveal changes in the flow regime between 1960 and 2002 despite the reduction in forest area. This agrees with the perception of the downstream community living near the gauging station. The upstream community, however, reported both decreases in low flows and increases in high flows shortly after the forest cover was reduced. The upstream deforestation effect appeared to have been buffered by a wetland lower in the watershed. This study concludes that community perception can be a complement to observational data for better understanding how forest cover influences the flow regime.

  • 219.
    Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    SLU-Ultuna.
    Lyon, Steve
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Dahlke, Helen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    The relationship between land use and water2012In: EOS: Transactions, ISSN 0096-3941, E-ISSN 2324-9250, Vol. 93, no 28, p. 259-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water As the Mirror of Landscapes: How Useful a Hypothesis for Resource Management?; Uppsala, Sweden, 28–29 March 2012 The question posed in the title of this workshop formed its focus as an international group of more than 50 researchers and managers gathered to discuss our current level of understanding of land-water interactions and the potential impacts this has for resource management. Special emphasis was placed on the Ethiopian highlands, which deliver more than 85% of the flow in the Nile in Egypt. The 2-day workshop, held at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala, was cosponsored by the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs as part of its special allocation for global food security and by the International Union of Forest Research Organizations' Unit 3.05, Forest Operations Ecology.

  • 220.
    Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Seibert, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    A primer for hydrology: the beguiling simplicity of Water's journey from rain to stream at 30 Preface2015In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 29, no 16, p. 3443-3446Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Water's journey from rain to stream by Harald Grip and Allan Rodhe (1985, in Swedish: Vattnets vag fran regn till back) was one of the first textbooks to present groundwater contributions as a major feature of runoff generation, with implications for water quality and management. Three decades later, we have the privilege of presenting a special issue of Hydrological Processes, Runoff Generation in a Nordic Light: 30Years with Water's Journey from Rain to Stream' that seeks to introduce the book to a larger audience and continue the journey of ideas that the authors set in motion with their book.

  • 221.
    Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Seibert, Jan
    Uppsala University, Switzerland.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Rodhe, Allan
    Uppsala University.
    Water storage in a till catchment: II: Implications of transmissivity feedback for flow paths and turnover times2011In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 25, no 25, p. 3950-3959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the flow paths and turnover times within a catchment characterized by the transmissivity feedback mechanism where there is a strong increase in the saturated hydraulic conductivity towards the soil surface and precipitation inputs saturate progressively more superficial layers of the soil profile. The analysis is facilitated by the correlation between catchment water storage and groundwater levels, which made it possible to model the daily spatial distribution of water storage, both vertically in different soil horizons and horizontally across a 6300-m2 till catchment. Soil properties and episodic precipitation input dynamics, combined with the influence of topographic features, concentrate flow in the horizontal, vertical, and temporal dimensions. Within the soil profile, there was a vertical concentration of lateral flow to superficial soil horizons (upper 30 cm of the soil), where much of the annual flow occurred during runoff episodes. Overland flow from a limited portion of the catchment can contribute to peak flows but is not a necessary condition for runoff episodes. The spatial concentration of flow, and the episodic nature of runoff events, resulted in a strong and spatially structured differentiation of local flow velocities within the catchment. There were large differences in the time spent by the laterally flowing water at different depths, with turnover times of lateral flow across a 1-m-wide soil pedon ranging from under 1 h at 10- to 20-cm depth to a month at 70- to 80-cm depth. In many regards, the hydrology of this catchment appears typical of the hydrology in till soils, which are widespread in Fenno-Scandia.

  • 222. Bjork, Goran
    et al.
    Nordberg, Kjell
    Arneborg, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Bornmalm, Lennart
    Harland, Rex
    Robijn, Ardo
    Odalen, Malin
    Seasonal oxygen depletion in a shallow sill fjord on the Swedish west coast2017In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 175, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 223. Bjork, Goran
    et al.
    Stranne, Christian
    Borenäs, Karin
    SMHI, Core Services.
    The Sensitivity of the Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Thickness and Its Dependence on the Surface Albedo Parameterization2013In: Journal of Climate, ISSN 0894-8755, E-ISSN 1520-0442, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 1355-1370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the response of sea ice thickness to changes in the external forcing is investigated and particularly how this response depends on the surface albedo formulation by means of a one-dimensional coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere model. The main focus is on the thickness response to the atmospheric heat advection F-wall, solar radiation F-SW, and amount of snow precipitation S-prec. Different albedo parameterization schemes [ECHAM5, CSIRO, and Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3)] representing albedos commonly used in global climate models are compared together with more simplified schemes. Using different albedo schemes with the same external forcing produces large differences in ice thickness. The ice thickness response is similar for all realistic albedo schemes with a nearly linear decrease with increasing F-wall in the perennial ice regime and with a steplike transition into seasonal ice when F-wall exceeds a certain threshold. This transition occurs at an annual-mean ice thickness of 1.7-2.0 m. Latitudinal differences in solar insolation generally leads to increasing ice thickness toward the North Pole. The snow response varies significantly depending on which albedo scheme is used. The ECHAM5 scheme yields thinner ice with S-prec, the CSIRO scheme gives ice thickness nearly independent of S-prec, and with the CCSM3 scheme the ice thickness decreases with S-prec. A general result is that the modeled ice cover is rather sensitive to positive perturbations of the external heat supply when it is close to the transition such that just a small increase of, for example, F-wall can force the ice cover into the seasonal regime.

  • 224. Björk, G
    et al.
    Nohr, C
    Gustafsson, BG
    Lindberg, Amund E. B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ice dynamics in the Bothnian Bay inferred from ADCP measurements2008In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 178-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A bottom mounted ADCP has monitored the ice motion and thickness in Bothnian Bay, Baltic Sea during the entire winter season 2004. The ADCP was deployed at 20 m depth at Falkensgrund well outside the land fast ice zone. The data shows that the ice motion is primarily driven by the wind but with a clear influence of internal ice stresses. The ice stresses become more dominant as the ice grow thicker with increasing number of observations with nearly stationary ice for relatively high wind speeds. A clear dependence of the ice/wind speed ratio to wind shifts is detected with higher ratio in the new wind direction. The effect of strain hardening is also seen in several events as decreasing ice speed, sometimes to zero, in spite of constant wind speed and wind direction. A rough force balance computation gives a compressive ice strength of about  9 × 104 N m−2 , which is much larger than normally used in numerical ice models. The ice thickness data show numerous ice ridges with ice draft well above 1 m passing the instrument. The ridges make up a large portion, 30–50%, of the total ice volume showing that dynamical processes are important for the total ice production in the Bothnian Bay.

  • 225. Blauw, A. N.
    et al.
    Anderson, P.
    SMHI.
    Estrada, M.
    Johansen, M.
    Laanemets, J.
    Peperzak, L.
    Purdie, D.
    Raine, R.
    Vahtera, E.
    The use of fuzzy logic for data analysis and modelling of European harmful algal blooms: results of the HABES project2006In: African Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1814-232X, E-ISSN 1814-2338, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 365-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fuzzy logic was applied to model blooms of Nodularia spumigena, Dinophysis spp., Alexandrium minutum, Karenia mikimotoi and Phaeocystis globosa at various European sites as part of the Harmful Algal Blooms Expert System (HABES) project. This modelling approach was useful in performing integrated analyses of interacting physical and biological factors involved in HABs. A basic knowledge of HAB formation and sufficient data are a prerequisite for successful bloom prediction.

  • 226. Bloeschl, Guenter
    et al.
    Hall, Julia
    Parajka, Juraj
    Perdigao, Rui A. P.
    Merz, Bruno
    Arheimer, Berit
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Aronica, Giuseppe T.
    Bilibashi, Ardian
    Bonacci, Ognjen
    Borga, Marco
    Canjevac, Ivan
    Castellarin, Attilio
    Chirico, Giovanni B.
    Claps, Pierluigi
    Fiala, Kayroly
    Frolova, Natalia
    Gorbachova, Liudmyla
    Gul, Ali
    Hannaford, Jamie
    Harrigan, Shaun
    Kireeva, Maria
    Kiss, Andrea
    Kjeldsen, Thomas R.
    Kohnova, Silvia
    Koskela, Jarkko J.
    Ledvinka, Ondrej
    Macdonald, Neil
    Mavrova-Guirguinova, Maria
    Mediero, Luis
    Merz, Ralf
    Molnar, Peter
    Montanari, Alberto
    Murphy, Conor
    Osuch, Marzena
    Ovcharuk, Valeryia
    Radevski, Ivan
    Rogger, Magdalena
    Salinas, Jose L.
    Sauquet, Eric
    Sraj, Mojca
    Szolgay, Jan
    Viglione, Alberto
    Volpi, Elena
    Wilson, Donna
    Zaimi, Klodian
    Zivkovic, Nenad
    Changing climate shifts timing of European floods2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 357, no 6351, p. 588-590Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Blomberg, Freddy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Inläckage i dagbrott: En jämförelse mellan beräknade och uppmätta värden i dagbrott i norra Sverige2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Before the construction of an open pit mine is initialized it is common practice to perform hydrogeological surveys, in order to quantify the inflow of groundwater from surrounding soil and bedrock layers. As expansion of the pits progress, continuous pumping will need to be done, as groundwater will otherwise fill the pits, preventing further mining. Several quantification methods are available for these analyses, which can be either analytical or numerical in their structure. In this study, a review of established methods is performed. Then the inflow to five active mines in northern Sweden are estimated, using four analytical methods. The results from using these methods are then compared to the measured pumping rates in the mines, to evaluate the methods efficiency in estimating the correct withdrawal. One of the mines is also evaluated using a numerical model. All methods approximate the inflow rates to the same order of magnitude as the measured values. However, the same method can in some mines overestimate the inflow while in other mines make an underestimation of it. As they in most cases make an adequate approximation of the inflow, further use of the methods are recommended. Smaller adjustments might be needed based on local knowledge of the modeled area. The sensitivity analysis that was performed show a significant predisposition toward changes in hydraulic conductivity, emphasizing the importance of thorough surveys before parameterization of the models.

  • 228.
    Blomgren, Axel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Stockholms grundvattenkvalitet: Bidrag till övergödningen av ytvattendrag och sjöar i Stockholmsområdet2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Eutrophication is one of Sweden’s most severe environmental issues. Due to emissions through anthropogenic activity nutrients are added to aquatic systems. The latest analysis of the Stockholm municipality groundwater has examined the levels of nitrogen and phosphorus. Due to the fact that the groundwater is part of the hydrological cycle and will eventually reach the surface water, the condition of the groundwater will affect the recipient and correlating ecosystem. This report aims to analyze the levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in the groundwater of Stockholm based on current national quality standards, and to identify whether the groundwater is contributing to the eutrophication of the surface water bodies in the municipality of Stockholm. This is of significance regarding the water management in Stockholm municipality, based on the EU water framework directive, and the target of achieving good status for all water bodies. It is also of great importance regarding the Swedish environmental quality objectives.

    The groundwater quality analysis indicates high levels of phosphorus and ammonium. The nitrate and nitrite levels are only excessive in certain cases. Primarily, the levels of phosphorus and ammonium may, according to national quality standards, have eutrophic effect on surface water bodies. A cursory examination based on the flow directions of the groundwater, indicates that the municipality’s surface waters are supplied with water from the municipality’s groundwater. This correlation is represented in the analysis of groundwater quality and it is therefore concluded that the groundwater has a negative impact on the surface water bodies within the municipality. 

  • 229.
    Blomqvist (Jonsson), Anna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Food and Fashion: Water Management and Collective Action among Irrigation Farmers and Textile Industrialists in South India1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, much ofthe political debate in the West, East aud South has focused on the decentralization of responsibilities from the state to private enterprises and NGOs. But what potential is there for local communities to create their own govenlance structures able to deal with issues up till recently seen as the responsibility of the state? In this thesis, answer to this question is sought by analyzing two case studies from the semi-arid Coimbatore-region in South India from an institutionai perspective. One case concerns the efforts to involve farmers in irrigation water management in the Lower Bhavani Project, while the other focuses on the pressure on textile industrialists in Tirupur city to collectively treat their polluted effluent water.

    In both cases, the new distribution ofresponsibilities required that groups ofwater users would succeed in establishing new entities for collective action among themselves strong enough to prevent free-riding on a massive scale. Overcoming three main obstacles proved crucial in this process; meeting coordination costs, re-defining the notion of free-riding among resource users, and meeting motivation costs. Factors both within and outsicte the loeal community affected the degree ofsuccess.

    The distribution and lise of economic, moral and physical power between various actors and the interconnectedness between local and external institutions proved crucial for the establishrnent oflocal govemance stmctures. Moreover, the historical relation between the respective user group and the state has to a large extent affected the goals and strategies oflocal entities of eolleetive action.

    Clearly, resource management problems at localleve1 can not be solved by simply decentralizing responsibilities from the state to groups ofresource users. Rather, the state could playan important role by initiating, supporting and directing slich local entities of collective action.

  • 230.
    Blumenthal, Barbara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    När Vänern svämmade över: Händelseutveckling och konsekvenser av översvämningen 2000/20012010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mellan november 2000 och juni 2001 låg Vänerns vattennivå över sjöns dämningsgräns i nästan 6 månader. Situationen orsakades av en utdragen period med ovanligt stora nederbördsmängder över Vänerns tillrinningsområde mellan oktober och mitten av december 2000. Sjöns nivå ökade under denna period i genomsnitt med 2 cm per dygn. Översvämningsproblemen började uppstå längs den ca 2000 km långa kusten (utan öar) från mitten av november. När sjöns nivå kulminerade den 11 januari 2001 hade olika aktörer lyckats vidta omfattande åtgärder i de översvämningshotade områdena som skyddade samhällsviktiga funktioner såsom VA, transporter och elförsörjning, men även bostäder och industrianläggningar.

    I en genomgång av skador och konsekvenser i samband med översvämningen visade det sig inte oväntat att det främst är tangibla1 direkta och indirekta skador som är beskrivna i olika dokument och sammanställningar som har tagits fram inom olika sektorer. Uppföljningar av långsiktiga konsekvenser av översvämningen och beskrivningar av hur interaktionen mellan olika sektorer påverkades av Vänerns höga nivåer saknas däremot med några få undantag. Rapporten kan inte ge någon heltäckande bild av de ekonomiska konsekvenser som Väneröversvämningen 2000/2001 har lett till. För en del sektorer som lantbruk, yrkesfisket och de kommunala verksamheterna i de drabbade Vänerkommunerna kunde ekonomiska värderingar hittas medan de saknas för skogsbruket, delar av transportsektorn och industrierna. I rapporten görs en uppskattning av hushållens skador i Värmland med hjälp skadebeloppen som utbetalades av Länsförsäkringar Värmland i samband med Väneröversvämningen.

    Kommunerna utmed Vänerkusten fick omfattande skador på avlopps- och dagvattennäten och reningsverken. Kommunala, strandnära fritidsområden såsom fritidshamnar, campingplatser, badplatser och sjönära gång- och cykelvägar skadades i nästan alla berörda kommuner. Efter översvämningen gav regeringen kommunerna möjlighet att ansöka om bidrag för direkta fysiska skador och kostnader för förebyggande åtgärder, t ex temporära invallningar. 

    Studien genomfördes med syfte att kunna bevara, återföra och nyttja erfarenheter från översvämningen 2000-2001 inför och under kommande översvämningssituationer med likartade eller högre nivåer. Studien är en del i Centrum för klimat och säkerhets deltagande inom EU–projektet SAWA (Strategic Alliance for integrated Water management Actions) vars målsättning bl a är att utveckla planer för hantering av översvämningsrisker. Studien är det första steget av en sårbarhetsstudie i Vänern som kommer att utföras vid Centrum för klimat och säkerhet under åren 2010/2011.

  • 231.
    Bockgård, N.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. LUVA.
    Niemi, A.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. LUVA.
    Role of soil-rock interaction on recharge into fractured rock2003In: Proceedings of TOUGH Symposium 2003 , May 12–14, 2003, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 232.
    Bockgård, N., Rodhe, A.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. AIR AND WATER SCIENCE.
    An experimental study of groundwater recharge to fractured bedrock2003In: Proceedings of the IAH International Conference on GROUNDWATER IN FRACTURED ROCKS, Prague 15-19 September 2003,J. Krasny, Z. Hrkal, J. Bruthans (Eds.), Prague: International Association of Hydrogeologists , 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 233.
    Bockgård, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. HYDROLOGY.
    Environmental tracer methods for dating of young groundwaters2000In: XXI Nordic Hydrological Conference; T. Nilsson Ed., Uppsala: Swedish Hydrological Council , 2000, Vol. 2, p. 503-509Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Bockgård, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Groundwater Recharge in Crystalline Bedrock: Processes, Estimation, and Modelling2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about the groundwater recharge is essential for the prediction of impacts of groundwater withdrawal and underground construction. Recharge in the bedrock is, however, difficult to estimate. The objectives of this thesis were to increase the understanding of groundwater recharge in crystalline bedrock, to investigate how the recharge could be estimated, and to develop new models to describe the recharge. The study was based on three approaches: groundwater dating using chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), geohydraulic field measurements, and mathematical modelling.

    Low concentrations of CFC-11 and CFC-113 were found in the bedrock groundwater, which in combination with low dissolved-oxygen levels indicated anaerobe degradation. The CFC-12 and tritium concentrations agreed fairly well, which means that apparent ages could be true ages. The results suggest that CFC dating may not be reliable at forested, humid sites covered by fine-grained soil.

    A quick response in hydraulic head to precipitation was observed in the studied bedrock, despite the 10-m thick till cover. A substantial portion of observed head variations was found to be loading effects, involving no storage changes or water flow. The loading efficiency of the bedrock was estimated, from the air-pressure response, to be 0.95. The surface loading was calculated from measurements of air pressure, water in the soil, and snow. About 20% of the seasonal variation of the hydraulic head was estimated to be related to loading changes only. A simple conceptual model could be used to simulate the observed hydraulic heads. The loading effect had to be included to properly describe individual recharge events.

    Numerical experiments were performed with a soil–bedrock profile. When the rock was modelled as a heterogeneous continuum, unsaturated zones developed at high hydraulic gradients. The phenomenon appeared in areas where low-conductive zones were located upstream of high-conductive zones, decreasing the effective hydraulic conductivity of the material.

  • 235.
    Bockgård, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. HYDROLOGY.
    Recharge of groundwater in crystalline rock: a review2000Report (Other scientific)
  • 236.
    Bockgård, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. LUVA.
    Niemi, Auli
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. LUVA.
    Role of rock heterogeneity on lateral diversion of water flow at the soil-rock interface2004In: Vadose Zone Journal, ISSN 1539-1663, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 786-795Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Bockgård, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. Air and Water Science.
    Rodhe, Allan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. Air and Water Science.
    Experiences of CFC dating of groundwater in central Sweden2004Report (Other scientific)
  • 238.
    Bockgård, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. Air and Water Science.
    Rodhe, Allan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. Air and Water Science.
    Olsson, K Anders
    Accuracy of CFC groundwater dating in a crystalline bedrock aquifer: Data from a site in southern Sweden2004In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 171-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) and tritium were determined in groundwater in fractured crystalline bedrock at Finnsjon, Sweden. The specific goal was to investigate the accuracy of CFC dating in such an environment, taking potential degradation and mixing of water into consideration. The water was sampled to a depth of 42 m in three boreholes along an 800-m transect, from a recharge area to a local discharge area. The CFC-113 concentration was at the detection limit in most samples. The apparent recharge date obtained from CFC-11 was earlier than from CFC-12 for all samples, with a difference of over 20 years for some samples. The difference was probably caused by degradation of CFC-11. The CFC-12 dating of the samples ranged from before 1945 to 1975, with the exception of a sample from the water table, which had a present-day concentration. Conclusions about flow paths or groundwater velocity could not be drawn from the CFCs. The comparison between CFC-12 and tritium concentrations showed that most samples could be unmixed or mixtures of waters with different ages, and the binary mixtures that matched the measured concentrations were determined. The mixing model approach can be extended with additional tracers.

  • 239.
    Bonaglia, Stefano
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Hylén, Astrid
    Rattray, Jayne E.
    Kononets, Mikhail Y.
    Ekeroth, Nils
    Roos, Per
    Thamdrup, Bo
    Brüchert, Volker
    Hall, Per O. J.
    The fate of fixed nitrogen in marine sediments with low organic loading: an in situ study2017In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 285-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decades, the impact of human activities on the global nitrogen (N) cycle has drastically increased. Consequently, benthic N cycling has mainly been studied in anthropogenically impacted estuaries and coasts, while in oligotrophic systems its understanding is still scarce. Here we report on benthic solute fluxes and on rates of denitrification, anammox, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) studied by in situ incubations with benthic chamber landers during two cruises to the Gulf of Bothnia (GOB), a cold, oligotrophic basin located in the northern part of the Baltic Sea. Rates of N burial were also inferred to investigate the fate of fixed N in these sediments. Most of the total dissolved fixed nitrogen (TDN) diffusing to the water column was composed of organic N. Average rates of dinitrogen (N-2) production by denitrification and anammox (range: 53-360 mu mol Nm(-2) day(-1)) were comparable to those from Arctic and subarctic sediments worldwide (range: 34-344 mu mol Nm(-2) day(-1)). Anammox accounted for 18-26% of the total N2 production. Absence of free hydrogen sulfide and low concentrations of dissolved iron in sediment pore water suggested that denitrification and DNRA were driven by organic matter oxidation rather than chemolithotrophy. DNRA was as important as denitrification at a shallow, coastal station situated in the northern Bothnian Bay. At this pristine and fully oxygenated site, ammonium regeneration through DNRA contributed more than one-third to the TDN efflux and accounted, on average, for 45% of total nitrate reduction. At the offshore stations, the proportion of DNRA in relation to denitrification was lower (0-16% of total nitrate reduction). Median value and range of benthic DNRA rates from the GOB were comparable to those from the southern and central eutrophic Baltic Sea and other temperate estuaries and coasts in Europe. Therefore, our results contrast with the view that DNRA is negligible in cold and well-oxygenated sediments with low organic carbon loading. However, the mechanisms behind the variability in DNRA rates between our sites were not resolved. The GOB sediments were a major source (237 kt yr(-1), which corresponds to 184% of the external N load) of fixed N to the water column through recycling mechanisms. To our knowledge, our study is the first to document the simultaneous contribution of denitrification, DNRA, anammox, and TDN recycling combined with in situ measurements.

  • 240. Bonk, Alicja
    et al.
    Kinder, Małgorzata
    Enters, Dirk
    Grosjean, Martin
    Meyer-Jacob, Carsten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Tylmann, Wojciech
    Sedimentological and geochemical responses of Lake Żabińskie (north-eastern Poland) to erosion changes during the last millennium2016In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 56, no 2-3, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased erosion triggered by land-use changes is a major process that influences lake sedimentation. We explored the record of erosion intensity in annually laminated sediments of Lake Żabińskie, northeast Poland. A 1000-year-long, annually resolved suite of sedimentological (varve thickness, sediment accumulation rate) and geochemical data (scanning XRF, loss on ignition, biogenic silica) was analyzed with multivariate statistics. PCA indicated erosion was a major process responsible for changes in the chemical composition of the sediments. Analysis of sedimentary facies enabled identification of major phases of erosion that influenced lake sedimentation. These phases are consistent with the history of land use, inferred from pollen analysis. From AD 1000 to 1610, conditions around and in Lake Żabińskie were relatively stable, with low erosion intensity in the catchment and a dominance of carbonate sedimentation. Between AD 1610 and 1740, higher lake productivity and increased delivery of minerogenic material were caused by development of settlements in the region and widespread deforestation. The most prominent changes were observed between AD 1740 and 1880, when further land clearance and increased agricultural activity caused intensified soil erosion and higher lake productivity. Landscape clearance also created better conditions for water column mixing, which led to changes in redox conditions in the hypolimnion. The most recent period (AD 1880–2010) was characterized by partial reforestation and a gradual decrease in the intensity of erosional processes.

  • 241.
    Borenäs, Karin
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Hietala, R.
    Laanearu, J.
    Lundberg, P.
    Some estimates of the Baltic deep-water transport through the Stolpe trench2007In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 238-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subsurface flow of high-saline water masses from the Bornholm Basin through the Stolpe Channel plays an important role for the renewal of the Baltic Central Basin deep waters. In order to determine whether rotating 11/2-layer hydraulic theory is an appropriate tool for describing this process, maximal-transport estimates based on climatological data from the Bornholm and Gdansk Basins have been established. These were found to deviate considerably from observational realities, and hence similar hydraulic considerations were also applied to more-or-less synoptic field data from a Finnish field campaign carried through in the mid-1980s. Also in this case significant differences were found between calculated transport capacity and observations. Since it furthermore was demonstrated that the characteristics of the observed cross-channel hydrographic structure could be explained using a frictional-balance model of the deep-water flow, it has been concluded that a hydraulic framework, although providing an upper bound of the transport, is of limited use when dealing with the Stolpe-Channel overflow. Although it cannot be excluded that the inflow is inviscid, but submaximal, it is more likely that the transport is governed by the combined effects of friction and wind forcing.

  • 242.
    Borenäs, Karin
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Lake, Irene
    Lundberg, P A
    On the intermediate water masses of the Faroe-Bank Channel overflow2001In: Journal of Physical Oceanography, ISSN 0022-3670, E-ISSN 1520-0485, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 1904-1914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A review of available hydrographic data from the Faroe-Bank Channel indicates that North Icelandic/Arctic Intermediate water masses are present in the passage to a larger extent than was previously believed. The presently compiled statistics, including results on the seasonality, are discussed in relation to previous investigations. Finally, a high quality subset of the hydrographic data is used for an analysis of the alongchannel mixing of the intermediate water masses.

  • 243.
    Borenäs, Karin
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Lundberg, P
    The Faroe-Bank channel deep-water overflow2004In: Deep-sea research. Part II, Topical studies in oceanography, ISSN 0967-0645, E-ISSN 1879-0100, Vol. 51, no 4-5, p. 335-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 1950s it was recognised that a considerable transport of water from the deeper reaches of the Norwegian Sea into the Atlantic takes place through the Faroe-Bank Channel, which thereby serves as an important source for the renewal of the North Atlantic Deep Water. Consequently, substantial efforts have, over the past decades, been dedicated towards quantifying the overflow as well as clarifying the underlying dynamics. In the present review, an attempt is made to summarise the main body of the observational results as well as some theoretical considerations regarding the dynamical mechanisms. The most prominent characteristic of the Faroe-Bank Channel overflow is that it is a persistent phenomenon with a yearly average deep-water (viz. T<5degreesC) transport of around 2 Sv. Using inviscid rotating hydraulics, the flow through the controlling section at the sill, furthermore, can be reasonably well predicted on the basis of upstream conditions in the Norwegian Sea. After passing the threshold the descending overflow plume is subject to intense mixing, a process very much in the focus of ongoing research. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 244.
    Bosshard, Thomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Carambia, M.
    Goergen, K.
    Kotlarski, S.
    Krahe, P.
    Zappa, M.
    Schaer, C.
    Quantifying uncertainty sources in an ensemble of hydrological climate-impact projections2013In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 1523-1536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quantification of uncertainties in projections of climate impacts on river streamflow is highly important for climate adaptation purposes. In this study, we present a methodology to separate uncertainties arising from the climate model (CM), the statistical postprocessing (PP) scheme, and the hydrological model (HM). We analyzed ensemble projections of hydrological changes in the Alpine Rhine (Eastern Switzerland) for the near-term and far-term scenario periods 2024-2050 and 2073-2099 with respect to 1964-1990. For the latter scenario period, the model ensemble projects a decrease of daily mean runoff in summer (-32.2%, range [-45.5% to -8.1%]) and an increase in winter (+41.8%, range [+4.8% to +81.7%]). We applied an analysis of variance model combined with a subsampling procedure to assess the importance of different uncertainty sources. The CMs generally are the dominant source in summer and autumn, whereas, in winter and spring, the uncertainties due to the HMs and the statistical PP gain importance and even partly dominate. In addition, results show that the individual uncertainties from the three components are not additive. Rather, the associated interactions among the CM, the statistical PP scheme, and the HM account for about 5%-40% of the total ensemble uncertainty. The results indicate, in distinction to some previous studies, that none of the investigated uncertainty sources are negligible, and some of the uncertainty is not attributable to individual modeling chain components but rather depends upon interactions. Citation: Bosshard, T., M. Carambia, K. Goergen, S. Kotlarski, P. Krahe, M. Zappa, and C. Schar (2013), Quantifying uncertainty sources in an ensemble of hydrological climate-impact projections, Water Resour. Res., 49, 1523-1536, doi: 10.1029/2011WR011533.

  • 245.
    Bosshard, Thomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Kotlarski, Sven
    Zappa, Massimiliano
    Schaer, Christoph
    Hydrological Climate-Impact Projections for the Rhine River: GCM-RCM Uncertainty and Separate Temperature and Precipitation Effects2014In: Journal of Hydrometeorology, ISSN 1525-755X, E-ISSN 1525-7541, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 697-713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is expected to affect the hydrological cycle, with considerable impacts on water resources. Climate-induced changes in the hydrology of the Rhine River (Europe) are of major importance for the riparian countries, as the Rhine River is the most important European waterway, serves as a freshwater supply source, and is prone to floods and droughts. Here regional climate model data from the Ensemble-Based Predictions of Climate Changes and their Impacts (ENSEMBLES) project is used to drive the hydrological model Precipitation-Runoff-Evapotranspiration-Hydrotope (PREVAH) and to assess the impact of climate change on the hydrology in the Rhine basin. Results suggest increases in monthly mean runoff during winter and decreases in summer. At the gauge Cologne and for the period 2070-99 under the A1B scenario of the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, projected decreases in summer vary between -9% and -40% depending on the climate model used, while increases in winter are in the range of +4% to +51%. These projected changes in mean runoff are generally consistent with earlier studies, but the derived spread in the runoff projections appears to be larger. It is demonstrated that temperature effects (e.g., through altered snow processes) dominate in the Alpine tributaries, while precipitation effects dominate in the lower portion of the Rhine basin. Analyses are also presented for selected extreme runoff indices.

  • 246. Bots, Pieter
    et al.
    Gooch, Geoffrey
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Understanding the role of perception and valuation in the development and use of models for water management2010In: Integrated Assessment for Water Framework Directive Implementation: data, economic and Human Dimension / [ed] Vanrolleghem, P., London: IWA , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrated Assessment for Water Framework Directive Implementation: Data, Economic and Human Dimension - Volume 2 is a concrete outcome from the Harmoni-CA concerted action as part of a 4-volume series of Guidance Reports that guide water professionals through the implementation process of the Water Framework Directive, with a focus on the use of ICT-tools (and in particular modelling). They are complementary to the Guidance Documents produced by the EU Directorate General for Environment.  Water resources planning and management and the development of appropriate policies require methodologies and tools that are able to support systematic, integrative and multidisciplinary assessments at various scales. It also requires the quantification of various uncertainties in both data and models, and the incorporation of stakeholders participation and institutional mechanisms into the various tools and risk assessment methodologies, to help decision makers understand and evaluate alternative measures and decisions.

  • 247.
    Bottacin-Busolin, Andrea
    et al.
    Executive, Länsstyrelser, Länsstyrelsen Gävleborg. KTH.
    Wörman, Anders
    Executive, Länsstyrelser, Länsstyrelsen Gävleborg. KTH.
    Reducing  the risk of floods in lower Dalälven by optimal reseroir operation2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Reducing  the risk of floods in lower Dalälven by optimal reseroir operation

  • 248.
    Bouwman, Henk
    et al.
    Northwest University, South Africa.
    Choong Kwe Yive, Nee Sun
    University of MAuritius.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Polder, Anushka
    Veterinary Institute, Norway.
    Organic pollutants in term eggs from Rodrigues Island – Indian Ocean.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Bouwman, Henk
    et al.
    Nort-West University, South Africa.
    Krátká, M
    Masaryk University, Czech Republic.
    Choong Kwet Yive, Nee Sun
    University of Mauritius, Mauritius.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Klanova, Jana
    Masaryk University, Czech Republic.
    Do POPs Transfer from Plastic Marine Debris to Coral on Tropical Islands?2014In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 76, p. 1352-1355Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Bouwman, Hindrik
    et al.
    North-West Uniersity, South AFrica.
    Evans, Steven
    University of Venda, South Africa.
    Cole, Nik
    Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, Channel Isles, UK.
    Choong Kwer Yive, Nee Sun
    University of Mauritius, Mauritius.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The flip-or-flop boutique: Marine debris on the shores of St Brandon’s Rock, an isolated tropical atoll in the Indian Ocean2016In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 114, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isolated coral atolls are not immune from marine debris accumulation. We identified Southeast Asia, the Indian sub-continent, and the countries on the Arabian Sea as most probable source areas of 50 000 items on the shores of St. Brandon’s Rock (SBR), Indian Ocean. 79% of the debris was plastics. Flip-flops, energy drink bottles, and compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) were notable item types. The density of debris (0.74 m-1 shore length) is comparable to similar islands but less than mainland sites. Intact CFLs suggests product-facilitated long-range transport of mercury. We suspect that aggregated marine debris, scavenged by the islands from currents and gyres, could re-concentrate pollutants. SBR islets accumulated debris types in different proportions suggesting that many factors act variably on different debris types. Regular cleaning of selected islets will take care of most of the accumulated debris and may improve the ecology and tourism potential. However, arrangements and logistics require more study.

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