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  • 201.
    Lindqvist, Malin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Strandberg, Linda
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Behandlingspersonalens perspektiv på bemötande: "Tron på individen"2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The treatment of clients within abuse and addiction care is extremely important for clients to want to receive support from those who perform care, and the meeting between councellor/therapist and client can be a first step in the right direction for the client. The purpose of this study was to examine how the staff treats adult clients with substance abuse or addiction. To answer the study's purpose and issues conducted the study with a qualitative approach. Materials Collection has been done through seven semi-structured interviews, and then analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Theoretical study of interpretation based on Goffman´s dramaturgical perspective.

    The results of the study show that the hospitality of substance abuse and addiction services should be characterized by knowledge-based and respectful attitude and signal the human warmth, and it should be based on an individualized treatment with the belief in the individual's own abilities. The result also showed the aggravating factors in the plea, namely the client's illness, denial, resistance, and the asymmetrical power relationship.

  • 202.
    Lindqvist, Malin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Strandberg, Linda
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Behandlingspersonalens perspektiv på bemötande: "Tron på individen"2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The treatment of clients within abuse and addiction care is extremely important for clients to want to receive support from those who perform care, and the meeting between councellor/therapist and client can be a first step in the right direction for the client. The purpose of this study was to examine how the staff treats adult clients with substance abuse or addiction. To answer the study's purpose and issues conducted the study with a qualitative approach. Materials Collection has been done through seven semi-structured interviews, and then analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Theoretical study of interpretation based on Goffman´s dramaturgical perspective.

    The results of the study show that the hospitality of substance abuse and addiction services should be characterized by knowledge-based and respectful attitude and signal the human warmth, and it should be based on an individualized treatment with the belief in the individual's own abilities. The result also showed the aggravating factors in the plea, namely the client's illness, denial, resistance, and the asymmetrical power relationship.

  • 203.
    Loman, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Tidén, Carolinne
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Maskrosbarn: En litteraturstudie om barn i riskzon2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of how society better can support and protect children who grow up under challenging and unfavorable circumstances. This study is based on six autobiographies which have been selected based on certain criteria. These autobiographies have been compiled based on a qualitative content analysis and a number of topics have been identified. Based on the purpose of the study and its framing of questions theories of risk and protective factors, Sense Of Coherense, shame, resilience and attachment theory has been chosen. Existing research indicates that children at risk and social child care are a somewhat neglected research area. The result of this study highlights a number of deficiencies both within the social welfare system and the society as a whole. There is a large need for continuous appreciation and clarification of the support that these children can expect.

  • 204.
    Lundblad, Cassandra
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Gustafsson, Malin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Anhörigperspektivet på äldre med beteendemässiga och psykiska symtom vid demens: En kvalitativ intervjustudie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and analyse relative’s involvement and experience of the care in a nursing home for a next of kin who was an older person with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, and how the role as a relative changed after the elderly’s move from their own home to a nursing home. We conducted five qualitative interviews with relatives related to elderly residing at a nursing home. The results showed that the role as a relative changed after their related elderly’s move to nursing home. The majority of the respondents had previously acted as a caretaker in the home and after their related elderly’s move to nursing home they described mixed feelings of relief and loneliness. The results showed that the respondents had a positive experience of the care and felt involved in the care of their related elderly residing in the nursing home.

  • 205.
    Lundell, Jonna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Är samverkan a och o?: En kvalitativ studie om samverkans betydelse i det förebyggande sociala arbetet med att öka ungdomars närvaro i skolan.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to increase the knowledge of the preventive social work with adolescents and examine if cooperation in the preventive work contributes to increase attendance at school among adolescents. A qualitative approach has been used, where interviews with six representatives from school and social services has been done.

    The result shows that a preventive social work by increase attendance at school among adolescents is performed. Though it appears that lack of time and personal resources contributes to the preventive social work is not made in the extent as the representatives would wish. They agree that preventive work is important in the work with increase attendance at school among adolescents. The result also shows that cooperation is of great importance on the preventive social work as it benefits the adolescents if different social authorities cooperative. Cooperation contribute to achieved a comprehensive view of the adolescent and that the adolescents who risk to develop absenteeism can be intercepted in time.

  • 206.
    Löfgren Lyttbacka, Ann-Catrine
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kvinnors våld mot barn: - utifrån professionellas erfarenheter2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports a qualitative study in which semi-structured interviews have been performed with professionals who are working close to mothers with violent behavior and their children. The purpose of the present study was to examine social workers’ perceptions regarding mothers´ violence toward children and what they experience as underlying causes to mothers violence. Three main categories have been identified;

    the extent and constitution of the violence, its underlying causes and the professional´s approach concerning mother´s violence. The results mainly indicate the importance for professionals to address and ask about violence when meeting clients, also when meeting mothers. Findings also indicate that there are several underlying factors to why a mother abuse her children.

  • 207.
    Löfvenmark, Jennifer
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Öberg, Catrin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    ”Det behöver bli bättre för att vi ska hålla i längden…”: En kvalitativ intervjustudie om socialsekreterares psykosociala arbetsmiljö2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To work as a social worker within investigations at social services specialized in children and

    young adults is assumed to be stressful with a high workload. Consequently, their working

    environment is often discussed. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to investigate what

    factors social workers, working under these circumstances, perceive as affecting their

    psychosocial working environment. This study was based on qualitative interviews and the

    result is analyzed with help of the demand- control- and support model.

    The result indicates that social support is an important component to consider in order for

    social workers to be healthy in their roles. The circumstances need to improve to prevent

    social workers from being exposed to stress and unhealthiness, and thereby improving their

    psychosocial working environment. Our conclusion from this study is that there is an

    imbalance between the requirements asked from social workers and the resources available.

  • 208.
    Lövgren, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Udo, Camilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Family talk intervention in paediatric oncology: a pilot study protocol2019In: BMJ Paediatrics Open, ISSN 2399-9772, Vol. 3, no 1, article id e000417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is evidence that families with a child diagnosed with cancer need psychosocial support throughout the illness trajectory. Unfortunately, there is little research into psychosocial interventions for such families, especially interventions where the entire family is involved. The aim of this pilot study is therefore to evaluate a psychosocial intervention, the family talk intervention(FTI), in paediatric oncology in terms of study feasibility and potential effects.

    Methods and analysis: This pretest/post-test intervention pilot study is based on families with a child diagnosed with cancer. All families that include at least one child aged 6–19 years (ill child and/or sibling) at one of the six paediatric oncology centres in Sweden between September 2018 and September 2019 will be asked about participation. The intervention consists of six meetings with the family (part of the family or the entire family), led by two interventionists. The core elements in the interventionare to support the families in talking about the illness and related subjects, support the parents in understandingthe needs of their children and how to support them and support the families in identifying their strengths and howto use them best. Mixed methods are used to evaluatethe intervention (web-based questionnaires, interviews, field notes and observations). Self-reported data from all family members are collected at baseline, directly after the intervention and 6 months later. Study outcomes are family communication, knowledge about the illness, resilience, quality of life and grief.

    Ethics and dissemination: The study has been approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Stockholm (Dnr 2018/250-31/2 and 2018/1852–32). Data are processed in coded form, accessible only to the research team and stored at Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College in a secure server.

    Trial registration: ClinicalTrials. gov IdentifierNCT03650530, registered in August 2018.

  • 209.
    Lövgren, Malin
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Högskola.
    Udo, Camilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Högskola; Ctr Clin Res Dalarna.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Telling the truth to dying children — end-of-life communication with families2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communicating a terminal prognosis is challenging for patients, families and healthcare professionals. However, positive effects have been reported when children are told about their diagnosis and prognosis, including fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression and enhanced adherence to treatment (1). When research about prognostic communication was first published in the 1950s and 1960s, it recommended protecting children from bad news. By the late 1960s, a more open approach was recommended and by the late 1980s the advice was to always tell children. There has been a growing awareness of the complexity of prognostic disclosure and the need to balance often competing factors, such as hope and patient and family considerations, on a case-to-case basis (2).

  • 210. Lüdecke, Daniel
    et al.
    Bien, Barbara
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Mestheneos, Elizabeth
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    von dem Knesebeck, Olaf
    Kofahl, Christopher
    For better or worse: Factors predicting outcomes of family care of older people over a one-year period. A six-country European study2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Demographic change has led to an increase of older people in need of long-term care in nearly all European countries. Informal carers primarily provide the care and support needed by dependent people. The supply and willingness of individuals to act as carers are critical to sustain informal care resources as part of the home health care provision. This paper describes a longitudinal study of informal care in six European countries and reports analyses that determine those factors predicting the outcomes of family care over a one-year period.

    METHODS: Analyses are based on data from the EUROFAMCARE project, a longitudinal survey study of family carers of older people with baseline data collection in 2004 and follow-up data collection a year later in six European countries (Germany, Greece, Italy, Poland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom), N = 3,348. Descriptive statistics of the sample characteristics are reported. Binary logistic random-intercept regressions were computed, predicting the outcome of change of the care dyad's status at follow-up.

    RESULTS: Where care is provided by a more distant family member or by a friend or neighbour, the care-recipient is significantly more likely to be cared for by someone else (OR 1.62) or to be in residential care (OR 3.37) after one year. The same holds true if the care-recipient has memory problems with a dementia diagnosis (OR 1.79/OR 1.84). Higher dependency (OR 1.22) and behavioural problems (OR 1.76) in the care-recipient also lead to a change of care dyad status. Country of residence explained a relatively small amount of variance (8%) in whether a care-recipient was cared for by someone else after one year, but explained a substantial amount of variance (52%) in whether a care-recipient was in residential care. Particularly in Sweden, care-recipients are much more likely to be cared for by another family or professional carer or to be in residential care, whereas in Greece the status of the care dyad is much less likely to change.

    DISCUSSION: The majority of family carers continued to provide care to their respective older relatives over a one-year period, despite often high levels of functional, cognitive and behavioural problems in the care-recipient. Those family carers could benefit most from appropriate support. The carer/care-recipient relationship plays an important role in whether or not a family care dyad remains intact over a one-year period. The support of health and social care services should be particularly targeted toward those care dyads where there is no partner or spouse acting as carer, or no extended family network that might absorb the caring role when required. Distant relatives, friends or acquaintances who are acting as carers might need substantial intervention if their caregiving role is to be maintained.

  • 211.
    Mahmutovic, Dzana
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Petersson, Amanda
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Vi ser samma tjejer gå på gatan nu som för fyra år sedan: En kvalitativ studie av aktörers arbete med sexuellt människohandlade kvinnor2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore how the social services, the police and voluntary organizations in the municipality of Gothenburg work with sexually trafficked women. The method that has been used is qualitative in form of semi-structured interviews. The theoretical starting point was empowerment. For the study, this meant that we had a basis in the limited opportunities of sexual trafficked women to exercise power over their lives, as their life is controlled by, for example, pimps and traffickers. The results of the study has shown that respondents work with both short- and long-term measures but that the work is characterized by restrictions and counterclaims. The results also showed the respondents feel that cooperation and the work of the police is crucial for success in the work with sexual trafficked women.

  • 212.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Williams, C
    Meranius, Summer
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Extended support to increase quality of life in spouse caregivers of older persons with dementia. A pilot study2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 213. Matlabi, H
    et al.
    Parker, S
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Tha contribution of home-based technology to older people's quality of life in extra care housing2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, article id 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: British government policy for older people focuses on a vision of active ageing and independent living. In the face of diminishing personal capacities, the use of appropriate home-based technology (HBT) devices could potentially meet a wide range of needs and consequently improve many aspects of older people's quality of life such as physical health, psychosocial well-being, social relationships, and their physical or living environment. This study aimed to examine the use of HBT devices and the correlation between use of such devices and quality of life among older people living in extra-care housing (ECH). 

    Methods: A structured questionnaire was administered for this study. Using purposive sampling 160 older people living in extra-care housing schemes were selected from 23 schemes in England. A face-to-face interview was conducted in each participant's living unit. In order to measure quality of life, the SEIQoL-Adapted and CASP-19 were used. 

    Results: Although most basic appliances and emergency call systems were used in the living units, communally provided facilities such as personal computers, washing machines, and assisted bathing equipment in the schemes were not well utilised. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for confounders including age, sex, marital status, living arrangement and mobility use indicated a coefficient of 1.17 with 95% CI (0.05, 2.29) and p = 0.04 [SEIQoL-Adapted] and 2.83 with 95% CI (1.17, 4.50) and p = 0.001 [CASP-19]. 

    Conclusions: The findings of the present study will be value to those who are developing new form of specialised housing for older people with functional limitations and, in particular, guiding investments in technological aids. The results of the present study also indicate that the home is an essential site for developing residential technologies.

  • 214. Matlabi, H.
    et al.
    Parker, S.G.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Experiences of extra care housing residents aged fifty-five an over with home-based technology2012In: Social behavior and personality, ISSN 0301-2212, E-ISSN 1179-6391, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological interventions could help older people live independently. In this study with 160 people aged 55 and over who were living in extra care housing in England we aimed to explore awareness of, access to, attitudes towards availability, and use of home-based technological (HBT) devices, and factors that influence the use of devices. A quantitatively designed and structured questionnaire was developed for this study. The majority of new HBT devices were not available in living units or schemes. Moreover, most basic appliances and emergency call systems were used in the living units. We found that in order to increase the use of technological devices among the elderly, their perceptions, capabilities, attitudes, and needs should be assessed in the designing, planning, and supplying process.

  • 215.
    Mattsson, Linnea
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Stenquist, Cecilia
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Skolans arbete med barn som far illa: En kvalitativ undersökning av skolpersonals förhållningssätt till barn som misstänks fara illa2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In their daily contact with children, teachers have a unique role in detecting child-maltreatment, as mandated reporters they are subject to a statutory personal and unconditional notification. Nevertheless, reporting abilities are generally low, and it is assumed that there are a large number of children who are maltreated.

    The purpose of our study was to investigate school staff’s knowledge and attitudes to act in an appropriate and constructive way if suspicion arises that a child is maltreated. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews were conducted. The empirical data, evaluated through a thematic analysis and linked to previous research and theoretical perspectives and concepts within symbolic interactionism.

    Our conclusion is that there is a gap between how teachers act regarding maltreated children and how they are supposed to act according to skolverket.

    We have identified a lack of ability to identify maltreated children and a hierarchy where teachers can be prevented from completing their mandatory reporting.

  • 216. McCaig, Colin
    et al.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dissemination2010In: Practical Research and Evaluation: A Start-to-Finish Guide for Practitioners / [ed] Dahlberg, Lena; McCaig, Colin, London: SAGE , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 217. McCaig, Colin
    et al.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Writing a research proposal or brief2010In: Practical Research and Evaluation : A Start-to-Finish Guide for Practitioners / [ed] Dahlberg, Lena; McCaig, Colin, London: SAGE , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 218.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Factors associated with the willingness to care of informal carers of older people2011In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 23, no Suppl.1, p. 70-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 219.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Frailty falls and the Body Drop2011In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 23, no Suppl. 1, p. 80-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 220.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    FUTURAGE: A road map for European ageing research2011Report (Other academic)
  • 221.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Austin, C
    Causal attributions following a fall and health outcomes at 6 months post-fall2009In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 24, no Suppl.1, p. 268-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Falls in older people decrease quality of life and increase mortality. There is littleresearch on perceptions of the cause of a fall and their influence on health outcomes. Method.A survey (N¼196) of older people hospitalised after a fall recorded attributions for the causeof the fall. A follow-up survey at 6 months measured functional limitation, anxiety anddepression. Findings. of the participants, 44.3% saw their fall as due to their character, 15.6%due to their behaviour, and 40.1% due to external factors. A hopelessness explanatory stylewas found in 21.1% of participants. Perceiving age as the cause of the fall predicted (p5.06)higher levels of depression at 6 months, while having hopelessness explanatory stylesignificantly predicted higher functional limitation (p¼.001). Discussion. Causal attributionsof fall events impact on physical and mental health outcomes, offering a route forpsychological intervention to reframe the meaning attached to a fall.

  • 222.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Bien, B
    Wojszel, B
    Kofahl, C
    Krevers, B
    Melchiorre, M G
    Mnich, E
    Prouskas, C
    The willingness of informal carers of older people to continue caring: results of the EUROFAMCARE study2010In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 25, no Suppl. 1, p. 59-59Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The willingness to continue in the caregiving role has been shown to be one of the most significant factors in the breakdown of family care of an older person. Willingness to care was considered in the EUROFAMCARE study, which examined the characteristics of caregiving in six European countries. Methods: Nearly 6000 informal carers of older people (n = 1000 in Germany, Italy, Sweden, Greece, Poland and the UK) were recruited using a shared sampling protocol and interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Logistic regression procedures determined the best model of willingness to care in each country. Results: Between 29% and 14% of the variance in willingness to care was explained by the models. No single variable was significant in the models across all countries, but the negative impact of care was associated with low willingness in five countries, while being a son/daughter carer was associated with high willingness in four. The category of variables that explained the most variance in willingness to care was ‘caregiving circumstances and relationships’. Conclusions: If a carer's motivation for caregiving is to be maintained, support for carers must adequately address any negative impact of their role, and use a relationship-centred approach.

  • 223.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Psychological, health and social predictors of emotional and social loneliness in older people2012In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 27, no s1, p. 89-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 224.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Social exclusion and well-being in older adults in rural and urban communities.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 225.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    The association between receipt of informal care and health in older people2011In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 26, no Suppl. 2, p. 173-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Older people as care-receivers are under-researched. We examined the health and well-being of older people with differing levels of care need and receipt. Methods: Community resident older people (N = 1250) from a single UK metropolitan area were randomly recruited, and completed a questionnaire on social exclusion via interview. Participants were categorised into one of the four groups: receiving informal care; receiving informal support; no receipt of informal care/support despite need and no receipt of informal care/support, no need. Findings: Associations (p < 0.001) between group membership and health status (F = 75.7), functional status (F = 159.1), well-being (F = 29.5) and loneliness (F = 28.9) indicated the ‘receiving care’ and ‘no receipt of care/support despite need’ groups had the poorest health profiles. Logistic regression determined primary predictors of group membership. Discussion: A significant group of older people receives no informal care/support despite frailty. Research is needed to determine why some older people do not receive informal care appropriate to their needs.

  • 226.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    The association between social exclusion and well-being in older adults from rural and urban areas2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 227.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kostela, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Stockholm University; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Five years from now: Correlates of older people’s expectation of future quality of life2014In: Age Well - Challenges for Individuals and Society: Program 22nd Nordic Congress of Gerontology Gothenburg 25-28 May, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have explored older people’s expected future quality of life (QoL), despite evidence that perceptions of one’s future influence healthy ageing. Research on this topic should embrace a range of potential influences, including perceptions of one’s neighbourhood and region. This study examined expected QoL in a random sample of the population of Dalarna, a Swedish region. A self-completion questionnaire assessed demographic characteristics, current neighbourhood and regional evaluations, self-evaluations, expectations for the future, and current and expected QoL.  In total, 786 people aged ≥ 65 years participated. Current QoL was favourably evaluated, and while expected QoL also received a positive assessment, the mean value for expected QoL was notably lower than that for current QoL (t(755)=24.06, p<.05). Indeed, only 3.6% (n=27) of participants rated their expected QoL higher than their current QoL. A sequential multiple regression model explained 44% of the variance in older people’s expected QoL. Nine IVs were significant (p<.05) in the final model of expected QoL: current QoL (1% unique variance explained), age (1%), education level (1%), Regional Development Beliefs (1%), Perceived Regional Status (2%), self-reported health (3%), social influence (1%), Expected Regional Opportunity (3%) and expected change in housing need (1%). Our findings establish the significance of an older person’s perception of their locality for their expected future QoL. Policies that focus only on individual and relational factors for the promotion of healthy ageing are overlooking the potential contribution of an older person’s connection to their neighbourhood and region.

  • 228.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kostela, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University.
    Five years from now: Correlates of older people’s expectation of future quality of life2015In: Research on Aging, ISSN 0164-0275, E-ISSN 1552-7573, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 18-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have explored older people’s expected future quality of life (QoL), despite evidence that perceptions of one’s future influence healthy ageing. Research on this topic should embrace a range of potential influences, including perceptions of one’s neighbourhood and region. This study examined expected QoL in a random sample of the population of Dalarna, a Swedish region. A self-completion questionnaire assessed demographic characteristics, current neighbourhood and regional evaluations, self-evaluations, expectations for the future, and current and expected QoL. In total, 786 people aged ≥ 65 years participated. A sequential multiple regression model explained 44% of the variance in older people’s expected QoL, with self-reported health (sr2=.03), Expected Regional Opportunity (sr2=.03), and Perceived Regional Status (sr2=.02) having the strongest associations with expected QoL. Research on the importance of one’s neighbourhood to QoL in older people should encompass people’s perceptions of their region, to better inform social policy for healthy ageing.

  • 229.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Nordin, Susanna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Developmentand initial validation of the Staff Perception Of Residential care Environments(SPORE) instrument2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staff perceptions of the health care environment influence the delivery of person-centred care.  Little research has examined staff perceptions of health care environments, in part because of a lack of validated instruments.  This study reports the development and initial validation of the Staff Perception Of Residential care Environments (SPORE) instrument for use in residential care facilities for older people (RCFs).

    Items developed in a British project on the design of care environments were translated and adapted for the Swedish care context as SPORE (24 items, 5 sub-scales).  In a study of the physical environment and quality of care, 200 staff recruited from 20 RCFs sampled from across Sweden completed a questionnaire containing SPORE, the Person-centred Care Assessment Tool (PCAT), the Person-centred Climate Questionnaire – staff version (PCQ-S), and the Sheffield Care Environment Assessment Matrix –Sweden (SCEAM-S).

    All SPORE sub-scales were normally distributed with good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach αs=.85-.88). Correlations between SPORE and PCAT sub-scales ranged from .301-.503, and between SPORE and PCQ-S sub-scales from .353-.557.  RCF-level analyses (N=20) indicated that scores on SCEAM overall environment quality correlated significantly with all SPORE sub-scales (range=.496-.700).  The SCEAM Comfort sub-scale was correlated with all SPORE sub-scales (range=.509-.721), while the SCEAM Privacy sub-scale was correlated (r=.428) with the SPORE Staff Facilities sub-scale.  The SPORE Working and Caring for Residents sub-scale was correlated with SCEAM cognitive support (r=.502) and physical support (r=.566) sub-scales.

    The SPORE instrument demonstrated good psychometric properties and its sub-scales an excellent range of associations with staff perceptions of person-centred care and with objective assessments of the physical environment.  Further validation is required, but the SPORE instrument has potential for understanding how staff perceptions of the RCF environment relate to the delivery of person-centred care.

  • 230.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Schüz, Benjamin
    University of Tasmania.
    Psychosocial factors in healthy ageing2015In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 607-626Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 231.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Spazzafumo, L
    Nolan, MR
    Wojszel, ZB
    Lamura, G
    Bien, B
    Components of the difficulties, satisfactions and management strategies of carers of older people: A principle component analysis of CADI-CASI-CAMI.2009In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 255-264Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Lagerin, Annika
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Lind, Susanne
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Lövgren, Malin
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Udo, Camilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    End-of-life communication from a life cycle perspective: a register study2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 233. Mocumbi, Sibone
    et al.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Munguambe, Khátia
    Chiau, Rogério
    Högberg, Ulf
    Hanson, Claudia
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet; Göteborgs universitet.
    Sevene, Esperança
    Bergström, Anna
    Ready to deliver maternal and newborn care? Health providers' perceptions of their work context in rural Mozambique2018In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1532631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Deficiencies in the provision of evidence-based obstetric care are common in low-income countries, including Mozambique. Constraints relate to lack of human and financial resources and weak health systems, however limited resources alone do not explain the variance. Understanding the healthcare context ahead of implementing new interventions can inform the choice of strategies to achieve a successful implementation. The Context Assessment for Community Health (COACH) tool was developed to assess modifiable aspects of the healthcare context that theoretically influence the implementation of evidence.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the comprehensibility and the internal reliability of COACH and its use to describe the healthcare context as perceived by health providers involved in maternal care in Mozambique.

    METHODS: A response process evaluation was completed with six purposively selected health providers to uncover difficulties in understanding the tool. Internal reliability was tested using Cronbach's α. Subsequently, a cross-sectional survey using COACH, which contains 49 items assessing eight dimensions, was administered to 175 health providers in 38 health facilities within six districts in Mozambique.

    RESULTS: The content of COACH was clear and most items were understood. All dimensions were near to or exceeded the commonly accepted standard for satisfactory internal reliability (0.70). Analysis of the survey data indicated that items on all dimensions were rated highly, revealing positive perception of context. Significant differences between districts were found for the Work culture, Leadership, and Informal payment dimensions. Responses to many items had low variance and were left-skewed.

    CONCLUSIONS: COACH was comprehensible and demonstrated good reliability, although biases may have influenced participants' responses. The study suggests that COACH has the potential to evaluate the healthcare context to identify shortcomings and enable the tailoring of strategies ahead of implementation. Supplementing the tool with qualitative approaches will provide an in-depth understanding of the healthcare context.

  • 234.
    Modig, Charlotta
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    ”De vill ha LARO”: Missbrukshandläggares upplevelser av att arbeta medopiatberoende klienter2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Opiate addiction is a serious and difficult condition and drug mortality in Sweden is very

    high. The purpose of this study is to acquire knowledge and illustrate how staff working with

    drug addiction in social services in Dalarna look at their work with people with opiate

    addiction in relation to the fact that MAT lies with another operator. A qualitative study has

    been carried out where social workers who works with drug addiction from five different

    municipalities in Dalarna have been interviewed. The empirical data were analyzed in relation

    to previous research on the area and the theories of domains and professions. The conclusion

    of the study shows that the social workers in Dalarna experiencing some obstacles in their

    work with clients with opioid dependence since it is two operators involved. For example, the

    long queues to MAT and difficulties to get through forced addiction care were issues that may

    be a risk for clients lives.

  • 235.
    Naseer, Mahwish
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm Universit.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Health related quality of life and emergency department visits in adults of age ≥ 66 years: a prospective cohort study.2018In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Age increases the risk of emergency department [ED] visits. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) is often estimated as an outcome of ED visits, but it can be a risk factor of ED visits. This study aims to assess the association of HRQoL with time to first ED visit and/or frequent ED use in older adults during four-year period and if this association differs in 66-80 and 80+ age groups.

    METHODS: Data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Blekinge of wave 2007-2009 was used in combination with electronic health records on ED visits. The analytical sample included 673 participants of age 66 years and older with information on HRQoL. Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess the association between HRQoL and time to first ED visit. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the association of HRQoL with frequent ED use.

    RESULTS: During the study period, 55.3% of older adults visited the ED and 28.8% had a frequent ED use. Poor physical HRQoL was independently associated with first ED visit both in total sample (p < 0.001) and in 66-80 (p < 0.001) and 80+ (p = 0.038) age groups. Poor mental HRQoL had no significant association with first ED visit and frequent ED use.

    CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that poor physical HRQoL is associated with time to first ED visit in older adults. Therefore, physical HRQoL should be considered while planning interventions on the reduction of ED utilisation in older adults. Explanatory factors of frequent ED use may differ in age groups. Further studies are needed to identify associated factors of frequent ED visits in 80+ group.

  • 236.
    Naseer, Mahwish
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Poor health related quality of life: A risk factor of emergency visits among older adults2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Naéem, Sara
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Hedman, Jimmy
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    ‘’Hon blir ju en till i vår familj’’: Flyktingguiders upplevelser av projektet Flyktingguide2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this qualitative study, six refugee guides are interviewed as participants of the Refugee Guide project in the municipality of Falun. The study aims at seeing the importance of the project for the refugee guides and, from their perspective, suggesting ways to improve the project for increased integration. The results found in this study show that the refugee guides feel a sense of satisfaction, that they find that the Refugee Guide project contributes to long-term integration and that the project has development potential. Through the interviews, there was a picture of many successful meetings across the cultural borders where respondents expressed everything from gaining new social networks in the form of friends as well as the feeling of getting a whole new family member.

  • 238. Nehlin, Christina
    et al.
    Arinell, Hans
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Jess, Kari
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Alcohol habits and health care use in patients with psychiatric disorders2017In: Journal of dual diagnosis, ISSN 1530-3209, E-ISSN 1550-4271, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 247-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: It is more common for persons with psychiatric disorders to also have alcohol problems. Studies in the general population as well as in clinical samples have found hazardous or harmful alcohol habits to be particularly prevalent in the presence of psychiatric disorders. This study sought to explore the relationships between drinking habits and health care utilization (psychiatric as well as general medical) in persons seeking psychiatric treatment and to investigate the associations between age, sex and type or number of diagnoses and health care use and costs. For the planning of targeted interventions, we also sought to identify subgroups with high prevalence of hazardous drinking habits.

    METHODS: From a psychiatric clinic for affective disorders at a university hospital in Sweden patients who had been screened for hazardous drinking (N = 609) were selected. Patients with primary psychosis or substance use disorder are treated at other clinics and did not participate. Medical records data were grouped and compared. The ICD-10 was used for diagnoses and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for screening. Patients were grouped by drinking habits, sex-, age- and diagnosis group and their psychiatric as well as general medical health care use was compared.

    RESULTS: Abstainers used psychiatric care more than all other drinking groups (p < 0.001). Psychiatric health care costs were higher in abstainers and low-risk drinkers (1.64 to 1). No differences in general medical care could be identified between drinking groups. Specific subgroups with higher rates of hazardous drinking could not be identified (44% of all males and 34% of all females reported such habits). Inconclusive results from previous research are most likely due to different methods used to classify drinking problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: Abstainers and low-risk drinkers used psychiatric health care to a higher cost than the other drinking groups. Possible explanations are discussed from a clinical and scientific perspective. This study clarifies the need for uniform measures when classifying alcohol use in studies of relationships between alcohol use and health care use. There is also a need to separate former drinkers from abstainers in future studies.

  • 239. Nehlin, Christina
    et al.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Jess, Kari
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Brief intervention within primary care for at-risk gambling: a pilot study2016In: Journal of Gambling Studies, ISSN 1050-5350, E-ISSN 1573-3602, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1327-1335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on interventions for at-risk gambling are scarce. This pilot study is the first step in a larger project aimed to develop methods to prevent more serious gambling problems. Drawing on experiences from the alcohol field, the brief intervention (BI) model was tested in a primary care setting. Primary care personnel was trained for 2 days. Patients were screened, and those with signs of problematic gambling were offered a return visit to discuss their gambling habits. Of the 537 screened, 34 (6.3 %) screened positive for problem gambling. Of those, 24 were at-risk gamblers whereof 19 agreed to participate. Six of those 19 took part in a 1-month follow-up. Important information for the planning of upcoming studies was collected from the pilot work. Given that the rate of at-risk gamblers was elevated in this setting we consider primary care a suitable arena for intervention. Staff training and support appeared essential, and questionnaires should be selected that are clear and well-presented so staff feel secure and comfortable with them. The BI model was found to be most suitable for patients already known to the caregiver. The number of participants who were willing to take part in the follow-up was low. To ensure power in future studies, a much larger number of screened patients is evidently necessary.

  • 240.
    Nilsen, Louise
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Sandström, Linnéa
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    "Lite får man räkna med": Socialsekreterares upplevelser av hot och trakasserier inom socialtjänsten med särskilt fokus på betydelsen av sociala medier.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate social workers experiences of threats and harassment in social services, focusing on the eventual importance of social media, as well as examine how threats and harassment are handled in the workplace. Six qualitative interviews were conducted with social workers in children- and family services. The empirical material, based on the social workers experiences, was evaluated through a thematic analysis and linked to previous research as well as chosen theoretical perspectives. Our conclusion is that threats and harassment occurs relatively often at the workplace, although the degree of severity in the threats varies. We found that social media has an impact but that it did not have a decisive role. The result also showed that most workplaces have written policys but that it varied in knowledge about these routines for staff and that routines are not always followed in practice.

  • 241.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Are empathy and compassion bad for the professional social worker?2014In: Advances in Social Work, ISSN 1527-8565, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 294-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have shown that social workers and other professional helpers who work with traumatized individuals run a risk of developing compassion fatigue or secondary traumatic stress. Some researchers have hypothesized that helpers do this as a result of feeling too much empathy or too much compassion for their clients, thereby implying that empathy and compassion may be bad for the professional social worker. This paper investigates these hypotheses. Based on a review of current research about empathy and compassion it is argued that these states are not the causes of compassion fatigue. Hence, it is argued that empathy and compassion are not bad for the professional social worker in the sense that too much of one or the other will lead to compassion fatigue.

  • 242.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Butler's stone and ultimate psychological hedonism2013In: Philosophia (Ramat Gan), ISSN 0048-3893, E-ISSN 1574-9274, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 545-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses psychological hedonism with special reference to the writings of Bishop Butler, and Elliott Sober and David Sloan Wilson. Contrary to philosophical orthodoxy, Sober and Wilson have argued that Butler failed to refute psychological hedonism. In this paper it is argued: (1) that there is a difference between reductive and ultimate psychological hedonism; (2) that Butler failed to refute ultimate psychological hedonism, but that he succeeded in refuting reductive psychological hedonism; and, finally and more importantly, (3) that Butler's criticism of reductive hedonism can be used as a stepping-stone in another argument showing the implausibility of ultimate psychological hedonism as well.

  • 243.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Compassion - a resource or threat for the professional social worker?2011In: The 2011 Joint Nordic Conference on Welfare and professionalism in Turbulent Times, Reykjavik, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the proper place of compassion within social work? Should social workers feel compassion for their clients, or is this something that should be avoided? Opinions differ. While some have claimed that compassion should be avoided in favor of a more detached and professional approach, others argue that compassion is an important, and unavoidable part, of a proper working-alliance. While some claim that compassion can be beneficial for the client, recent studies have suggested that too much compassion can lead to so-called compassion fatigue and be detrimental for the professional. If we want to assess these claims, we must first consider what compassion is. That is the purpose of this study. The aim is to gain a better understanding of what compassion is, with a special eye to the question as to whether compassion is a resource or threat within professional social work. Methods include conceptual analysis and phenomenological descriptions of compassion and related phenomena. The results can be summarized in two main claims. The first is that compassion is a particular kind of suffering directed towards the suffering of someone. What is special about compassion is that it is a suffering for another person’s sake: When you feel compassion (and only compassion) for another person, then you suffer over her suffering for her sake and not your own sake. The second claim is that compassion in and of itself is not harmful to the person feeling it. Although compassion consists in suffering, since it is a suffering for another person’s sake, a person feeling compassion is not, and does not take herself to be, the victim of something bad. It is an essential feature of compassion that if you feel compassion (and only compassion) for another person, then you take this person to be the victim of a harm but you do not take yourself to be so. In conclusion it is argued that these results point towards a more positive view of compassion and its place within social work.

  • 244.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Empati, sympati, medlidande2013In: Empati: Teoretiska och praktiska perspektiv / [ed] Henrik Bohlin och Jakob Eklund Håkansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, p. 51-67Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    On the suffering of compassion2011In: Philosophia (Ramat Gan), ISSN 0048-3893, E-ISSN 1574-9274, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 125-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compassion is often described in terms of suffering. This paper investigates the nature of this suffering. It is argued that compassion involves suffering of a particular kind. To begin with a case is made for the negative claim that compassion does not involve an ordinary, or afflictive, suffering over something. Secondly, it is argued that the suffering of compassion is a suffering for someone else’s sake: If you feel compassion for another person, P, then you suffer over P:s suffering for P:s sake, and if that is all you do, then you are not affected with an afflictive suffering over something. The final section identifies and addresses a problem concerning self-pity, and a suggestion is made on how to specify the proposed account so as to cover both self-directed and other-directed compassion.

  • 246.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Pain, pity, and motivation: Spinoza, Hume, and Schopenhauer2014In: Schopenhauer-Jahrbuch, ISSN 0080-6935, Vol. 95, p. 29-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares the views on compassion in Spinoza, Hume and Schopenhauer. It is shown that even though all three approach compassion with the same aim and from very similar starting-points, all give significantly different accounts of compassion. The differences among the accounts are compared and explained, and it is shown how progress is made in that later accounts avoid certain problems faced by the earlier ones.

  • 247.
    Nordin, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Technology to support decision-making for older people with dementia2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Nordin, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle.
    Wijk, Helle
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet .
    Validating a tool for evaluating nursing home environments: Integrating research and expert evidence2012In: IFA 11TH GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON AGEING, 28 May – 1 June 2012 Prague, Czech Republic, Book of Abstracts, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 249.
    Nordin, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Wijk, Helle
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    A person-centered design can support accessibility and equality in residential care facilities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that the world foresees an ageing population for whom the physical environment plays a central role in everyday life and wellbeing. Creating a health care environment that ensures accessibility and equality, shows respect and dignity will therefore be a great challenge. With increasing levels of frailty many older persons will be more or less depending on the care environment. A modern person-centered building design considers both individual and specific needs related to old age, in order to support quality of life and care. However, many of the existing buildings do not meet modern standards and there is a need for methods to evaluate the quality of the building design. According to a recently performed review there are few validated tools measuring the physical environment, especially in terms of a person-centered approach. This study presents a translated and validated tool for evaluating design quality in nursing home facilities. The tool is based on the idea that there is a relationship between high quality caring environments and quality of life of older persons. It makes a person-centered evaluation of the building, covering aspects such as privacy, personalization, safety, choice and control. These are essential factors to assure older persons a dignified ageing as equal members of the society.

  • 250.
    Nordin, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Wijk, Helle
    Assessing the physical environment of older people’s residential care facilities: development of the Swedish version of the Sheffield Care Environment Assessment Matrix (S-SCEAM)2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is emerging evidence that the physical environment is important for health, quality of life and care, but there is a lack of valid instruments to assess health care environments. The Sheffield Care Environment Assessment Matrix (SCEAM), developed in the United Kingdom, provides a comprehensive assessment of the physical environment of residential care facilities for older people. This paper reports on the translation and adaptation of SCEAM for use in Swedish residential care facilities for older people, including information on its validity and reliability.

    Methods

    SCEAM was translated into Swedish and back-translated into English, and assessed for its relevance by experts using content validity index (CVI) together with qualitative data. After modification, the validity assessments were repeated and followed by test-retest and inter-rater reliability tests in six units within a Swedish residential care facility that varied in terms of their environmental characteristics.

    Results

    Translation and back translation identified linguistic and semantic related issues. The results of the first content validity analysis showed that more than one third of the items had item-CVI (I-CVI) values less than the critical value of 0.78.  After modifying the instrument, the second content validation analysis resulted in I-CVI scores above 0.78, the suggested criteria for excellent content validity. Test-retest reliability showed high stability (96% and 95% for two independent raters respectively), and inter-rater reliability demonstrated high levels of agreement (95% and 94% on two separate rating occasions). Kappa values were very good for test-retest (κ= 0.903 and 0.869) and inter-rater reliability (κ= 0.851 and 0.832).

    Conclusions

    Adapting an instrument to a domestic context is a complex and time-consuming process, requiring an understanding of the culture where the instrument was developed and where it is to be used. A team, including the instrument’s developers, translators, and researchers is necessary to ensure a valid translation and adaption. This study showed preliminary validity and reliability evidence for the Swedish version (S-SCEAM) when used in a Swedish context. Further, we believe that the S-SCEAM has improved compared to the original instrument and suggest that it can be used as a foundation for future developments of the SCEAM model.

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