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  • 201.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognition and hearing aids.2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 395-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The perceptual information transmitted from a damaged cochlea to the brain is more poorly specified than information from an intact cochlea and requires more processing in working memory before language content can be decoded. In addition to making sounds audible, current hearing aids include several technologies that are intended to facilitate language understanding for persons with hearing impairment in challenging listening situations. These include directional microphones, noise reduction, and fast-acting amplitude compression systems. However, the processed signal itself may challenge listening to the extent that with specific types of technology, and in certain listening situations, individual differences in cognitive processing resources may determine listening success. Here, current and developing digital hearing aid signal processing schemes are reviewed in the light of individual working memory (WM) differences. It is argued that signal processing designed to improve speech understanding may have both positive and negative consequences, and that these may depend on individual WM capacity.

  • 202.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén,, E.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Exceeding individual working memory capacity restrains aided speech recognition performance - effects in complex listening situations and effects of acclimatization2008In: Auditory Signal Processing in Hearing Impaired Listeners. International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, 2008, p. 551-558Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 203. Luxon, Linda
    et al.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advances in pediatric audiological and vestibular disorders2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 533-534Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 204.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borg, Erik
    Örebro University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Speech understanding in noise: Effects of cognitive skill and hearing loss2004In: International Journal of Psychology (publ abstract), vol 39, issue 5-6, 2004: Special Issue: Abstracts of the XXVIII INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Results from a series of studies where the purpose was examine the relationship between cognitive skills, hearing loss and auditory and audio-visual speech understanding in noise will be reviewed and discussed. The general trend in the results demonstrate a significant relationship between cognitive skill and type of noise and type of listening situation such that cognitive skills is related to level of speech understanding in listening situations that requires an active listening (i.e., answering of questions) and that background noise constituted by human voices proved to be more tied to cognitive skills than other types of background noises (e.g., white noise).

  • 205.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Lunds universitet.
    Cognitive development in children with cochlear implants:: Relations to reading and communication2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl. 2, p. S47-S52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present article is to present an overview of a set of studies conducted in our own laboratory on cognitive and communicative development in children with cochlear implants (CI). The results demonstrate that children with CIs perform at significantly lower levels on the majority of the cognitive tasks. The exceptions to this trend are tasks with relatively lower demands on phonological processing. A fairly high proportion of the children can reach a level of reading comprehension that matches hearing children, despite the fact that they have relatively poor phonological skills.General working memory capacity is further correlated with the type of questions asked in a referential communication task. The results are discussed with respect to issues related to education and rehabilitation.

  • 206.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of phonological skills and working memory capacity in children with cochlear implants: Speed of performance and level of accuracy as indicators of development2007In: From Signal to Dialogue, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive and language development in deaf children with CI2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive and phonological skills in deaf children with CI2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of cognitive composite skills in deaf children with CI2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive development, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implants.2009In: Scandinavian journal of psychology, ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report summarizes some of the results of studies in our laboratory exploring the development of cognitive, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implantation (CI). The children with CI performed at significantly lower levels than the hearing comparison group on the majority of cognitive tests, despite showing levels of nonverbal ability. The differences between children with CI and hearing children were most pronounced on tasks with relatively high phonological processing demands, but they were not limited to phonological processing. Impairment of receptive and productive prosody was also evident in children with CI. Despite these difficulties, 75% of the children with CI reached a level of reading skill comparable to that of hearing children. The results are discussed with respect to compensation strategies in reading.

  • 211.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    CLINTEC, Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

  • 212.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus Centre; Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

  • 213.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Development of cognitive and reading skills in deaf children with CIs2011In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 12, no Suppl 1, p. 98-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 214.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive spare capacity test: Some preliminary findings2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sick and tired of listening.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Speech understanding and cognitive spare capacity2009In: Binaural Processing and Spatial Hearing, ISBN 87-990013-2-2 / [ed] Buchholz, J.M., Dau T., Dalsgaard, J.C., Poulsen, T., Ballerup: The Danavox Jubilee Foundation , 2009, p. 305-313Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 217.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internet-based hearing screening using speech-in-noise: validation and comparisons of self-reported hearing problems, quality of life and phonological representation2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 3223-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives For the last decade a host of different projects have been launched to allow persons who are concerned about their hearing status to quickly and at a low cost test their hearing ability. Most often, this is carried out without collecting complementary information that could be correlated with hearing impairment. In this two-part study we first, present the development and validation of a novel Internet-based hearing test, and second, report on the associations between this test and phonological representation, quality of life and self-reported hearing difficulties.

    Design Cross-sectional study.

    Setting An opportunity sample of participants was recruited at the Stockholm central station for the first study. All parts of the second study were conducted via the Internet, with testing and self-report forms adapted for online use.

    Participants The first part of the study was carried out in direct contact with the participants, and participants from the second study were recruited by means of advertisements in newspapers and on webpages. The only exclusion criterion was that participants had to be over 18 years old. Most participants were between 60 and 69 years old. There were almost an equal number of men and women (total n=316).

    Outcome measures 48 participants failed the Internet-based hearing screening test. The group failing the test reported more problems on the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Disability. In addition, they were found to have diminished phonological representational skills. However, no difference in quality of life was found.

    Conclusions Almost one in five participants was in need of contacting their local hearing clinic. This group had more complaints regarding tinnitus and hyperacusis, rated their own hearing as worse than those who passed, and had a poorer capability of generating accurate phonological representations. This study suggests that it is feasible to screen for hearing status online, and obtain valid data.

  • 218.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bergman, P
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Improved speech recognition and good self-reported benefit from cochlear implantation in adults2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Departmet of Otolaryngology, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bergström, Pia
    Department of Otolaryngology, Ryhov Hospital Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Outcome of cochlear implants in elderly adults2011In: First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2011, p. 89-89Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The proportion of elderly population increases and an increasing number of old adults have severe to profound hearing impairment, thus being possible cochlear implant (CI) candidates. The aim of the project was to assess the outcome of CI in terms of speech audiometric results and self-reported benefit in adults with a special emphasis on elderly adults.Subjects and methods: All 124 adult patients (≥ 18 years at implantation) who have been implanted in the Linköping CI program in 1992-2009 were eligible for the study. In addition to audiological tests, the pre-operative assessment of adult patients includes tests of working memory capacity, phonological and lexical processing skills. Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), a self-assessment instrument covering general health, degree of social support and physical state, was mailed to the CI recipients.Results: Response rate was high (90%) and 43 of the participants were ≥ 65 years. The mean time the participants had used their CI was 5.1 years (SD 4, range 1.2-16.9). All patients, with one exception, reached some degree of open set speech recognition. GBI results were comparable to earlier reports in CI populations. Analyses of the cognitive test results and more detailed analyses of speech reception and GBI among the oldest olds (≥75 years) will be reported.Discussion: According to our preliminary results, CI gives good benefit in the whole group. Provided that a careful assessment of cognitive abilities has been made and general health is reasonably good, a good outcome can be expected also in the oldest part of the population.

  • 220.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Förväntningar och nytta av CI hos vuxna2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Expectations and benefit of cochlear implants in elderly adults2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and other Implantable Auditory Technologies, 2010, p. 111-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Möller, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University.
    Bergholtz, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Otoneurologiska fynd hos styren-exponerade arbetare1990In: Sv Otolaryngol förening Vårmöte 1990, 1990Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 223.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Exploring narrative effects in hearing aid fitting2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring narrative effects

    The clinical meeting is a narrative (‘story’) in itself. To be able to study narrative effects in isolation, the narrative must be separated from the outcome of the hearing-aid fitting. In this study the test persons were given two hearing aids. These were accompanied by different narratives, but had identical amplification/acoustic signal processing.

     

     

    Testing narrative effects

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the power of the narrative in affecting the client’s perception of the dispensing process. The experimental approach was to implement alternative dispensing processes with divergent narratives but identical acoustical results. Then, in a balanced crossover design, to carry out fittings with these processes on a group of hearing-aid clients. The two carefully rehearsed dispensing processes were: a ‘Diagnostic’ process and an ‘Interactive’ process.

     

     

     

     

     

     Narrative 1: ‘Diagnostic’ process. The client is inactive and the dispenser makes a number of adjustments based on hearing assessments, during which the client is passive. Fitting is based on hearing thresholds only.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Narrative 2: ‘Interactive’ process. The client is led to believe that they have adjusted the HA settings to their own preferences. Fitting is based on hearing thresholds only (hearing-aid settings identical for Narratives 1 and 2.)

     

     

     

     

     Results

    20 of the 24 subjects had a clear fitting preference. This is surprising, since the two fittings were acoustically identical. We must suppose that it is the subjects’ perception of the fitting process which determined their preferences. However, all subjects except one gave exclusively sound-related reasons for their preferences (“Sounds more clear” etc.). Thus it seems that clinicians may not always hear the ‘true’ reasons for preferences from their clients.

  • 224.
    Neely, Stephen
    et al.
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska, USA.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schairer, Kim
    Quillen Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Mountain Home, Tennessee, USA.
    Alternative ear-canal measures related to absorbance2013In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 34, no Supplement 1, p. 72s-77sArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several alternative ear-canal measures are similar to absorbance in their requirement for prior determination of a Thévenin-equivalent sound source. Examples are (1) sound intensity level, (2) forward pressure level, (3) time-domain ear-canal reflectance, and (4) cochlear reflectance. These four related measures are similar to absorbance in their utilization of wideband stimuli and their focus on recording ear-canal sound pressure. The related measures differ from absorbance in how the ear-canal pressure is analyzed and in the type of information that is extracted from the recorded response. Sound intensity level and forward pressure level have both been shown to be better as measures of sound level in the ear canal compared with sound pressure level because they reduced calibration errors due to standing waves in studies of behavioral thresholds and otoacoustic emissions. Time-domain ear-canal reflectance may be used to estimate ear-canal geometry and may have the potential to assess middle ear pathology. Cochlear reflectance reveals information about the inner ear that is similar to what is provided by other types of otoacoustic emissions, and may have theoretical advantages that strengthen its interpretation.

  • 225.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid fitting strategy on cognitive outcome measurements.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Ng, Hoi-Ning (Elaine)
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of hearing aid fitting strategy on cognitive outcome measurements2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Niklas, Rönnberg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Testing effort for speech comprehension using the individuals’ cognitive spare capacity – the Auditory Inference Span Test2010In: Adult Hearing Screening 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Niklasson, Magnus
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    The effects of toluene, trichloroethylene, trichlorethane and styrene on the vestibulo- and opto-ocular motor system in rats1992In: 17th Bárány Society Meeting, 1992Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Niklasson, Magnus
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Vestibulär forskning: Råttan som försöksmodell1990In: Sv Otolaryngol förening Vårmöte 1990, 1990Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Nosrati-Zarenoe, Ramesh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: results drawn from the Swedish national database2007In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 127, no 11, p. 1168-1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A national database was developed in Linköping by the authors to gather data from patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSNHL). A form was used for data collection covering background, current disease, examinations and treatment. Audiograms at the onset of SSNHL and after three months are analyzed. The aim of the study was to investigate the treatment policy of SSNHL in Sweden, the effect of treatments on outcome, and which variables are of value in predicting the outcome.

    Out of the first 300 patients reported to the database 208 patients were considered to have idiopathic SSNHL. 50% were treated with corticosteroids, 44% did not receive any treatment. The treated patients had the same outcome as the non-treated patients. The time interval from onset of SSNHL to start of treatment was of importance for the outcome irrespective of type of audiogram or results from laboratory tests. Higher age and heredity for hearing loss gave significant lower chance for improvement.

    The first results from 300 patients in the national database demonstrate that corticosteroids or “no treatment at all” are the treatment options in use today. No significant difference in outcome was seen between treated and non-treated patients. Since spontaneous recovery might be the cause, a placebo-controlled randomized study is required before a positive effect of corticosteroids can be asserted.

  • 231.
    Nylén, Per
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Hagman, Maud
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Höglund, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Auditory and vestibular function in rats after simultaneous exposure to toluene and ethanol1992In: Aktuell arbetsmiljöforskning 1992(1):44, 1992, p. 44-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Nylén, Per
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Birgitta
    Linköping University.
    Hagman, Maud
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Höglund, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tham, Richard
    Linköping University.
    Auditory and vestibular function in rats after simultaneous exposure to toluene and ethanol1991In: Third Meeting of the International neurotoxicology association, 1991, p. 65-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Parazzi, Todi
    et al.
    Cyprus Audiology Center.
    Kramer, Sophia
    VU University Amsterdam.
    Davis, Adrian
    Manchester University.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janssen, Tomas
    Technische Univärsität Munchen.
    Adult Hearing Screening: The Cyprus pilot Program2010In: Adult Hearing Screening 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Prieve, Beth
    et al.
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, USA.
    Feeney, Patrick
    Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Shahnaz, Navid
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Prediction of conductive hearing loss using wideband acoustic immittance2013In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 34, no Supplement 1, p. 54s-59sArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article was to review the effectiveness of wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) and tympanometry in detecting conductive hearing loss (CHL). Eight studies were included that measured CHL through air-and bone-conducted thresholds in at least a portion of their participants. One study included infants, three studies included children, one study included older children and adults, and three studies included adults. WAI identified CHL well in all populations. In infants and children, WAI in several single-frequency bands identified CHL with equal accuracy to measures of middle ear admittance using clinical tympanometry with a single probe tone (1000 Hz for infants; 226 Hz for children and adults). When WAI was combined across frequency bands, it identified CHL superior to traditional, single-frequency tympanometry. Only two studies used WAI tympanometry, which assesses the outer/middle ear across both frequency and introduced air pressure, and differing results were reported as to whether introducing pressure into the ear canal provides better identification of CHL. In general, WAI appears to be a promising clinical tool, and further investigation is warranted.

  • 235.
    Priwin, C
    et al.
    Göteborg University.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Granström, G
    Göteborg University.
    Tjellström, A
    Göteborg University.
    Håkansson, B
    Chalmers.
    Bilateral bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs): An audiometric evaluation2004In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Since the technique to implant bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) with the use of osseointegrated implants was developed in 1977, more than 15,000 patients have been fitted with BAHAs worldwide. Although the majority have bilateral hearing loss, they are primarily fitted unilaterally. The main objective of this study was to reveal benefits and drawbacks of bilateral fitting of BAHAs in patients with symmetric or slight asymmetric bone-conduction thresholds. The possible effects were divided into three categories: hearing thresholds, directional hearing, and binaural hearing. Study Design: Prospective study of 12 patients with bilateral BAHAs. Methods: Baseline audiometry, directional hearing, speech reception thresholds in quiet and in noise, and binaural masking level difference were tested when BAHAs were fitted unilaterally and bilaterally. Results: Eleven of the 12 patients used bilateral BAHAs on a daily basis. Tests performed in the study show a significant improvement in sound localization with bilateral BAHAs; the results with unilateral fitting were close to the chance level. Furthermore, with bilateral application, the improvement of the speech reception threshold in quiet was 5.4 dB. An improvement with bilateral fitting was also found for speech reception in noise. Conclusions: Overall, the results with bilateral fitted BAHAs were better than with unilaterally fitted BA-HA; the benefit is not only caused simply by bilateral stimulation but also, to some extent, by binaural hearing. Bilateral BAHAs should be considered for patients with bilateral hearing loss otherwise suitable for BAHAs.

  • 236.
    Priwin, Claudia
    et al.
    Göteborg Universitet.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edensvärd, Ann
    Göteborg Universitet.
    Granström, Gösta
    Göteborg Universitet.
    Tjellström, Anders
    Göteborg Universitet.
    Håkansson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Unilateral versus bilateral bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs)2005In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1556-9152, Vol. 6, no S1, p. 79-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Ostli, Per
    Chalmers.
    Hakansson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing ones own voice during phoneme vocalization-Transmission by air and bone conduction2010In: JOURNAL OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 128, no 2, p. 751-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between the bone conduction (BC) part and the air conduction (AC) part of ones own voice has previously not been well determined. This relation is important for hearing impaired subjects as a hearing aid affects these two parts differently and thereby changes the perception of ones own voice. A large ear-muff that minimized the occlusion effect while still attenuating AC sound was designed. During vocalization and wearing the ear muff the ear-canal sound pressure could be related to the BC component of a persons own voice while the AC component was derived from the sound pressure at the entrance of an open ear-canal. The BC relative to AC sensitivity of ones own voice was defined as the ratio between these two components related to the ear-canal sound pressure at hearing thresholds for BC and AC stimulation. The results of ten phonemes showed that the BC part of ones own voice dominated at frequencies between 1 and 2 kHz for most of the phonemes. The different phonemes gave slightly different results caused by differences during vocalization. However, similarities were seen for phonemes with comparable vocalization.

  • 238.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Good, Tobias
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Håkansson, Bo
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Examination of bone-conducted transmission from sound field excitation measured by thresholds, ear-canal sound pressure, and skull vibrations2007In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 1576-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone conduction (BC) relative to air conduction (AC) sound field sensitivity is here defined as the perceived difference between a sound field transmitted to the ear by BC and by AC. Previous investigations of BC-AC sound field sensitivity have used different estimation methods and report estimates that vary by up to 20 dB at some frequencies. In this study, the BC-AC sound field sensitivity was investigated by hearing threshold shifts, ear canal sound pressure measurements, and skull bone vibrations measured with an accelerometer. The vibration measurement produced valid estimates at 400 Hz and below, the threshold shifts produced valid estimates at 500 Hz and above, while the ear canal sound pressure measurements were found erroneous for estimating the BC-AC sound field sensitivity. The BC-AC sound field sensitivity is proposed, by combining the present result with others, as frequency independent at 50 to 60 dB at frequencies up to 900 Hz. At higher frequencies, it is frequency dependent with minima of 40 to 50 dB at 2 and 8 kHz, and a maximum of 50 to 60 dB at 4 kHz. The BC-AC sound field sensitivity is the theoretical limit of maximum attenuation achievable with ordinary hearing protection devices. © 2007 Acoustical Society of America.

  • 239.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Goode, Tobias
    Chalmers.
    Håkansson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Bone conduction sensitivity to sound field stimulation: Measurements of REAT, MIRE, and vibrations of the skull bone2006In: 31st Annual Hearing Conservation Conference, Tampa, Florida, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 240.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkannson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Transcranial attenuation of bone conducted sound, acoustically and psycho acoustically measured2006In: 4th International Symposium on Middle Ear Mechanics in Research and Otology, Zurich, Switzerland, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkannson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Transcranial transmission of bone conducted sound measured acoustically and psychoacoustically2007In: Middle Ear Mechanics in Research and Otology: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium / [ed] Alexander Huber and Albrecht Eiber, Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co. , 2007, p. 276-281Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book includes representative, peer-reviewed articles of the lectures and papers presented during the symposium, and thereby gives an overview of the ongoing research and current knowledge in the function and mechanics of the normal, diseased and reconstructed middle ear. It covers basic research, engineering and clinical aspects of evaluation, diagnosis and surgery of the middle ear as well as implantable hearing devices in a very broad and interdisciplinary way. Following the tradition of the organizers of the previous conferences to collect the contributions of the symposium, this volume further initialized and promotes many fruitful discussions on middle ear mechanics with different points of view.

  • 242.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkannson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Transmission of bone conducted sound measured acoustically and psycho-acoustically2007In: 4th joint meeting of the Acoustical Societies of America and Japan, Honolulu, Hawaii, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 243.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, Bo
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Estimation of bone conduction skull transmission by hearing thresholds and ear-canal sound pressure2013In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 299, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone conduction sound transmission in the human skull and the occlusion effect were estimated from hearing thresholds and ear-canal sound pressure (ECSP) measured by a probe tube microphone when stimulation was at three positions on the skull (ipsilateral mastoid, contralateral mastoid, and forehead). The measurements were done with the ear-canal open as well as occluded by an ear-plug. Depending on the estimation method, transcranial transmission at frequencies below 1 kHz was between −8 and 5 dB, around 0 dB at 1 kHz that decreased with frequency to between −17 and −7 dB at 8 kHz. The forehead transmission was, except at frequencies between 1 and 2 kHz, similar to that proposed in the standard ISO:389-3 (1994) when the threshold measurements were conducted with open ear-canals. Compared with the same measurements using hearing thresholds, the ECSP gave similar transmission results at most frequencies, but differed at 0.5, 0.75, 2 and 3 kHz. One probable reason for the differences between thresholds and ECSP might be a significant perception improvement (lower thresholds) when the stimulation was at the ipsilateral mastoid that was not found at the other positions. This improvement, which also was present in the occlusion effect data, was hypothesized to originate in greater sensitivity of the cochlea for vibration in line with the ipsilateral stimulation direction than from other directions.

  • 244.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Transkranial dämpning av benledningsljud mätt akustiskt och psykoakustiskt2006In: TeMA Hörsel 2006, Göteborg, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 245.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Östli, Per
    Chalmers.
    Håkansson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Taghavi, Hamidreza
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing one’s own voice2011In: 3rd International Symposium on Bone Conduction Hearing – Craniofacial Osseointegration, Sarasota, Florida, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Östli, Per
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Differences in bone and air conduction transmission of one’s own voice during phoneme vocalization2009In: 2nd Int Symposium on Bone Conduction Hearing – Craniofacial Osseointegration, Göteborg, Sweden, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Rosowski, John
    et al.
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lilly, David
    Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA.
    An overview of wideband immittance measurements techniques and terminology: you say absorbance, I say reflectance2013In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 34, no Supplement 1, p. 9s-16sArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reviews the relationships among different acoustic measurements of the mobility of the tympanic membrane, including impedance, admittance, reflectance, and absorbance, which the authors group under the rubric of immittance measures. Each of these quantities is defined and related to the others. The relationship is most easily grasped in terms of a straight rigid ear canal of uniform area terminated by a uniform middle ear immittance placed perpendicular to the long axis of the ear canal. Complications due to variations from this geometry are discussed. Different methods for measuring these quantities are described, and the assumptions inherent within each method are made explicit. The benefits of wideband measurements of these quantities are described, as are the benefits and limitations of different components of immittance and reflectance/absorbance. While power reflectance (the square of the magnitude of pressure reflectance) is relatively invariant along the length of the ear canal, it has the disadvantage that it ignores phase information that may be useful in assessing the presence of acoustic leaks in ear-canal measurements and identifying other potential error sources. A combination of reflectance and impedance magnitude and angle give a more complete description of the middle ear from measurements in the ear canal.

  • 248.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Foo, Catharina
    Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp CDD Linköpings universitet.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Aided speech recognition in noise, perceived effort and explicit cognitive capacity2008In: International Hearing Aid Research Conference IHCON 2008, Lake Tahoe, California, 13-17 August 2008.,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Speech recognition in noise is an effortful process requiring explicit cognitive processing. It may be influenced by level and type of noise and by the signal processing algorithms employed when hearing is aided. These complex relationships may be understood in terms of the working memory model for Ease of language Understanding (ELU, Rönnberg et al., in press). This model predicts that under challenging listening conditions, explicit cognitive processing demands will be high and that persons with good explicit cognitive capacity will be better listeners. Previous work has suggested that they may also find listening less effortful (Behrens et al., 2004; Larsby et al., 2005; in press). We studied this issue by including subjective effort ratings in a larger study designed to investigate aided speech recognition in noise and cognition. 32 experienced hearing aid users participated. Effort was rated using a visual analogue scale and the speech material was the Hagerman sentences presented in three fixed speech to noise ratios of +10 dB, +4 dB and -2dB. Effort was rated in modulated and unmodulated noise with fast and slow compression release settings, after each of two nine week training sessions with the same settings. Speech recognition performance was tested objectively under the same conditions using an adaptive procedure. Order of testing was balanced. Explicit cognitive capacity was measured using the reading span test. ANOVAs and correlations were computed. Preliminary results showed that decreasing SNR led to greater perceived effort and that the difference in perceived effort between the highest and the lowest SNR was greater in unmodulated noise than in modulated noise. Speech recognition performance in unmodulated noise generally correlated with effort ratings under similar conditions but in modulated noise generally it did not. Effort ratings correlated with reading span performance at the lowest SNR (-2dB) but only in unmodulated noise after the first training session. These preliminary findings show that subjective ratings of the effort involved in aided speech recognition covary with noise level and performance but that these effects are reduced by noise modulation. Further, the perceived effort of aided speech recognition at low SNR may be related to explicit cognitive capacity as measured by the reading span test. However, we only find evidence of this in unmodulated noise after the first training session. These findings extend previous work on perceived effort and cognitive capacity and provide further evidence that type of noise is an important factor in this relationship.

  • 249.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognition and aided speech recognition in noise: specific role for cognitive factors following nine-week experience with adjusted compression settings in hearing aids.2009In: Scandinavian journal of psychology, ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 405-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The working memory model for Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) proposes that language understanding under taxing conditions is related to explicit cognitive capacity. We refer to this as the mismatch hypothesis, since phonological representations based on the processing of speech under established conditions may not be accessed so readily when input conditions change and a match becomes problematic. Then, cognitive capacity requirements may differ from those used for processing speech hitherto. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis by investigating the relationship between aided speech recognition in noise and cognitive capacity in experienced hearing aid users when there was either a match or mismatch between processed speech input and established phonological representations. The settings in the existing digital hearing aids of the participants were adjusted to one of two different compression settings which processed the speech signal in qualitatively different ways ("fast" or "slow"). Testing took place after a 9-week period of experience with the new setting. Speech recognition was tested under different noise conditions and with match or mismatch (i.e. alternative compression setting) manipulations of the input signal. Individual cognitive capacity was measured using a reading span test and a letter monitoring test. Reading span, a reliable measure of explicit cognitive capacity, predicted speech recognition performance under mismatch conditions when processed input was incongruent with recently established phonological representations, due to the specific hearing aid setting. Cognitive measures were not main predictors of performance under match conditions. These findings are in line with the ELU model.

  • 250.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sundewall-Thoren, Elisabet
    Oticon A/S, Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Phonological mismatch and explicit cognitive processing in a sample of 102 hearing-aid users2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 2, p. S91-S98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rudner et al (2008) showed that when compression release settings are manipulated in the hearing instruments of Swedish habitual users, the resulting mismatch between the phonological form of the input speech signal and representations stored in long-term memory leads to greater engagement of explicit cognitive processing under taxing listening conditions. The mismatch effect is manifest in significant correlations between performance on cognitive tests and aided-speech-recognition performance in modulated noise and/or with fast compression release settings. This effect is predicted by the ELU model (Ronnberg et al, 2008). In order to test whether the mismatch effect can be generalized across languages, we examined two sets of aided speech recognition data collected from a Danish population where two cognitive tests, reading span and letter monitoring, had been administered. A reanalysis of all three datasets, including 102 participants, demonstrated the mismatch effect. These findings suggest that the effect of phonological mismatch, as predicted by the ELU model (Ronnberg et al, this issue) and tapped by the reading span test, is a stable phenomenon across these two Scandinavian languages.

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