Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 453
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Poropat, Stephen F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Australian Age Dinosaurs Nat Hist Museum, Winton, Qld 4735, Australia..
    Bazzi, Mohamad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Late Triassic capitosaurian remains from Svalbard and the palaeobiogeographical context of Scandinavian Arctic temnospondyls2016In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, p. 113-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Norwegian Arctic Svalbard archipelago is famous for its prolific record of Early-Middle Triassic vertebrate fossils. These represent mainly marine amniotes, together with sharks, bony fishes and temnospondyl amphibians, the latter providing an important faunal correlate with coeval assemblages from the Danish autonomous region of Greenland. However, substantial biostratigraphical gaps exist in the Upper Triassic strata of Svalbard, which are marked by pronounced facies shifts from marine to deltaic systems and intermittent depositional hiatuses. These are accompanied by a dearth of documented vertebrate remains, a notable exception being the partial skull of the capitosaurian Capitosaurus polaris and a few isolated stereospondylian intercentra probably from the middle-late Carnian De Geerdalen Formation of Spitsbergen. Reassessment of this material, which incorporates the only undisputed capitosaurian fossil from Svalbard, indicates affinity with Cyclotosaurus, known elsewhere from the late Norian-early Rhaetian Fleming Fjord Formation of Greenland. The Scandinavian Arctic temnospondyls constituted components of sympatric assemblages that inhabited the Boreal margin of Pangaea throughout the Triassic.

  • 202.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Streng, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carl Wiman's legacy: 100 years of Swedish palaeontology2013In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Kistenich, Sonja
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, POB 1172 Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway.
    Timdal, Einar
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, POB 1172 Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway.
    Bendiksby, Mika
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, POB 1172 Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU Univ Museum, Elvegata 17, N-7012 Trondheim, Norway.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Molecular systematics and character evolution in the lichen family Ramalinaceae (Ascomycota: Lecanorales)2018In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 871-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ramalinaceae is the fourth-largest family of lichenized ascomycetes with 42 genera and 913 species exhibiting considerable morphological variation. Historically, generic boundaries in the Ramalinaceae were primarily based on morphological characters. However, molecular systematic investigations of subgroups revealed that current taxonomy is at odds with evolutionary relationships. Tropical members of the family remain particularly understudied, including the large genus Phyllopsora. We have generated and collected multilocus sequence data (mtSSU, nrITS, nrLSU, RPB1, RPB2) for 149 species associated with the Ramalinaceae and present the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the family. We used ancestral state reconstructions on our molecular family phylogeny to trace the evolution of character states. Our results indicate that the Ramalinaceae have arisen from an ancestor with long, multiseptate ascospores living in humid temperate forests, and that the phyllopsoroid growth form has evolved multiple times within the family. Based on our results using integrative taxonomy, we discuss sister-relations and taxon-delimitation within five well-supported clades: The Bacidia, Biatora- ,Ramalina-, Rolfidium-, and Toninia-groups. We reduce six genera into synonymy and make 49 new nomenclatural combinations. The genera Bacidia, Phyllopsora, Physcidia and Toninia are polyphyletic and herein split into segregates. We describe the two genera Bellicidia and Parallopsora and resurrect the genera Bibbya, Kiliasia, Sporacestra, and Thalloidima. According to our new circumscription, which also includes some additional changes, the family Ramalinaceae now comprises 39 genera.

  • 204.
    Kjellman, Johan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    A quarter millenium of morphological Crystal Models - the makers, the materials, the collections - a current project on retrieving their history2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A quarter millenium of morphological Crystal Models – the makers, the materials, the collections – a current project on retrieving their history.

    Crystal models (CM) and crystal model collections (CMC) made of paper, wood, clay, metal, glass, etc. have been manufactured, developed, and used as an aid in the fields of mineralogy and crystallography from the 1760’s to 1920’s (Figure 1). CM have for example been used to display ideal morphology of different mineral species or relationship between crystal forms; visualize different crystallographic and physical concepts, e. g. symmetry, crystallographic and optical axes, twinning, etc. Earlier geometrical models, such as platonic and archimedian bodies, known since Antiquity and perhaps originally inspired by natural crystals, were often present in the art and the curiosity cabinets of the Rennaisance era. In the early 20th c. the progress in crystal structure determination shifted the focus in crystallography and crystal modelling from outer morphology and symmetry to inner structural relations. Still, morphological CM were produced ​​and used throughout the century.

    Apart from a few attempts to describe special CMC, drawing on the collections in the BMNH in London and Teylers Museum in Haarlem, very little has been written about CMC (Tandy 1998; Touret 2004).

    CMC could and should be complimentary research objects of early crystallography. In their time some CMC conveyed new concepts, many times under direct supervision of the inventor, and by studying them new aspects, blind alleys or pitfalls in the history of crystallography may come to light. The locations of CMC from different schools, may reflect scientific connections and influences, etc. But without any precise knowledge about the different sets and makers no such research can be made, they will remain just CM. The two main institutional uses of CMC – exhibit and education – can also pose potential threats to them, those of being worn in crystallography class or being dispersed both in education and exhibits. Banalized descriptions, e.g. “antique models” or “Krantz models”, is typical if such CM are marketed, ultimately then often losing their institutional provenance.  

    The aim of this study is to provide the mineralogical community with a deeper knowledge of the old CMC: their makers and scientists, when, where, and what of the sets were made, and how many models they contained. And not the least, where we can see typical sets of the different CMC.

    How can this work be done? By a synergetic approach from three directions: (i) by studying literature, both primary books and catalogs listing/treating CMC, and different kinds of secondary literature, (ii) by Internet searches, especially utilizing the facility of searching words in OCR scanned texts, e.g. Google Books, Gallica, an effective tool for finding information which else would be almost impossible to retrieve; (iii) by surveying important collections and their archives, some of which are digitized.

    In this presentation I will give a few examples of what I have accomplished so far by this method.

    Tandy, P. 1998. Crystallography and the geometric modelling of minerals: a reflection on the models in the Natural History Museum, London. The Geological Curator 6(9): 333  – 338.

    Touret, L. 2004. Crystal models: milestone in the birth of crystallography and mineralogy as sciences. pp. 43 – 58 in Dutch Pioneers of the Earth Sciences. Ed. by R.W. Visser and J. Touret, Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, Amsterdam.

  • 205.
    Kjellman, Johan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    ABC2O8: a new look on the crystal chemistry and classification of samarskite group minerals2017In: PEG2017 8th International Symposium on Granitic Pegmatites: NGF Abstracts and Proceedings of the Geological Society of Norway Number 2, 2017 / [ed] Axel Müller, Nanna Rosing-Schow, 2017, Vol. 2, p. 64-67Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to present, based on the collective database of Electron MicroProbe Analyses (EMPA) of Samarskite Group Minerals (SGM), crystal chemical evidence for an ordered formula – ABC2O8 – and the need for a redefinition of the mineral group.

  • 206.
    Kjellman, Johan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Gold: Voitsky Mine, Olonets, South Karelia, Russia2014In: Mineralogical Almanac, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 72-73Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 207.
    Kjellman, Johan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Platonska kroppar och kvasikristaller: nedslag i kristallografins historia2013In: Platonska kroppar och kvasikristaller: nedslag i kristallografins historia, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2013, , p. 7-27p. 7-27Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 208. Knudsen, Kerry
    et al.
    Kocourkova, Jana
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Conspicuous similarity hides diversity in the Acarospora badiofusca group (Acarosporaceae)2014In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 319-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acarospora badiofusca has an irregularly areolate thallus with an uninterrupted algal layer; it is a montane species and occurs in Asia, North America and Europe. Acarospora boulderensis differs from A. badiofusca in having a squamulose thallus, an interrupted algal layer and a higher hymenium. Acarospora boulderensis was considered a synonym of A. badiofusca by North American taxonomists, but is here recognized as a distinct species occurring in North America. Acarospora asperata H. Magn. is revised as a synonym of A. boulderensis. Acarospora irregularis from central Europe (Czech Republic, Hungary and Slovakia), as well as Greece and Italy (Sardinia), was considered a synonym of either A. badiofusca by Weber or of A. nitrophila by Clauzade and Roux. It differs, like A. boulderensis, from A. badiofusca in having a squamulose thallus, an interrupted algal layer and usually a higher hymenium. However, A. irregularis differs from A. boulderensis in having wider hyphal bundles interrupting the algal layer and distinct algal palisades. Acarospora badiofusca var. lepidioides is synonymized with A. irregularis.

  • 209.
    Knudsen, Kerry
    et al.
    Czech Univ Life Sci, Fac Environm Sci, Dept Ecol, Kamycka 129, Prague 16521 6, Suchdol, Czech Republic..
    Kocourkova, Jana
    Czech Univ Life Sci, Fac Environm Sci, Dept Ecol, Kamycka 129, Prague 16521 6, Suchdol, Czech Republic..
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Sipman, Harrie J. M.
    Free Univ Berlin, Bot Garten & Bot Museum Berlin Dahlem, D-14195 Berlin, Germany..
    Acarospora cinerascens (Acarosporaceae), a poorly known species from the southern Central Alps (Italy and Switzerland)2015In: Herzogia, ISSN 0018-0971, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 690-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acarospora cinerascens is accepted as distinct from A. versicolor based on larger spores and areoles as well as apothecia with a higher hymenium. Acarospora cinerascens is lectotypified. Acarospora alboatra is a synonym of A. cinerascens.

  • 210. Kondorosy, Elod
    et al.
    Redei, David
    Mejlon, Hans
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Taxonomic corrections to species of Rhyparochromidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) described by Carl Peter Thunberg2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3838, no 5, p. 567-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Types of Rhyparochromidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Lygaeoidea) species described by Carl Peter Thunberg, deposited in the Museum of Evolution (formerly Zoologiska Institut), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, were reexamined and the taxonomic and nomenclatural problems that existed among those species discussed and resolved as required. Lecto-types are designated for Cimex caffer Thunberg, 1784, Lygaeus ater Thunberg, 1822, Lygaeus biguttatus Thunberg, 1822, and Pendulinus guttatus Thunberg, 1825. The lectotype of Pendulinus (now Metochus) guttatus is designated as neotype of Pendulinus (now Metochus) uniguttatus Thunberg, 1822; as a result the former name becomes junior objective synonym of the latter. The following taxonomic changes are proposed: Lethaeus ater (Thunberg, 1822), new combination (from Lygaeus); Migdilybs biguttatus (Thunberg, 1822), new combination (from Lygaeus) = Migdilybs furcifer Hesse, 1925, new subjective synonym; Metochus uniguttatus (Thunberg, 1822) = Metochus bengalensis (Dallas, 1852), confirmed subjective synonym = Metochus yeh (Dohrn, 1860), confirmed subjective synonym; Raglius alboacuminatus (Goeze, 1778) = Cimex caffer Thunberg, 1874, confirmed subjective synonym. Lethaeus barberi Slater, 1964 does not belong to Lethaeus Dallas, 1852 but currently it cannot be placed with confidence in any existing genus.

  • 211.
    Košuthová, Alica
    et al.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bot, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Otálora, Mónica A.G.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Inst Integrat Biol, Plant Ecol Genet, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bot, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rostania revised: testing generic delimitations in Collemataceae (Peltigerales, Lecanoromycetes )2019In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, no 47, p. 17-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we test the current generic delimitation of Rostania (Collemataceae, Peltigerales, Ascomycota) utilizing molecular phylogeny and morphological investigations. Using DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial SSU rDNA and two nuclear protein-coding genes (MCM7 and β-tubulin) and utilizing parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic methods, Rostania is shown to be non-monophyletic in the current sense. A new generic delimitation of Rostania is thus proposed, in which the genus is monophyletic, and three species (Rostania coccophylla, R. paramensis, R. quadrifida) are excluded and transferred to other genera. Rostania occultata is further non-monophyletic, and a more detailed investigation of species delimitations in Rostania s. str. is needed. The new combinations Leptogium paramense and Scytinium quadrifidum are proposed.

  • 212. Kristinsson, Hördur
    et al.
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lempholemma intricatum found in Iceland and Sweden.2012In: Graphis Scripta, ISSN 0901-7593, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 53-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Kroger, Bjorn
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Finnish Museum Nat Hist, POB 44, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Lithosphere Dynam, Schlossgarten 5, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany..
    Accretionary Mechanisms And Temporal Sequence Of Formation Of The Boda Limestone Mud-Mounds (Upper Ordovician), Siljan District, Sweden2016In: Journal of Sedimentary Research, ISSN 1527-1404, E-ISSN 1938-3681, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 363-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Late Ordovician mud-mounds in the Boda Limestone, Siljan area, central Sweden, consist mainly of massive spiculitic stromatactis limestone similar to other well-known Paleozoic mud-mounds. The mound cores are predominantly formed by spiculite and ostracod-rich mudstone and/or wackestone, and networks of spar-filled syndepositional cavities. The mounds of the Boda Limestone are specific in two ways: (1) large parts of the lower mound cores are formed by a Palaeoporella framestone and/or bafflestone with signs of early recrystallization and cementation; and (2) the stromatactis facies is accompanied by masses of limestone with non-stromatactis cryptocrystalline patches. Cryptocrystalline patches are filled with massive, fibrous low-Mg calcite, have cloudy, transitional margins, contain randomly spaced skeletal grains and dolomitic micro-inclusions, and are interpreted as recrystallized patches of the original host lime mud. Models of formation of Paleozoic mud-mounds generally hypothesize accretionary processes that are based on sponge biomass degradation and associated diagenetic processes. In the Boda Limestone Palaeoporella skeleton disintegration, early recrystallization, and additionally, cementation were essential for the mound formation. The Boda mounds exemplify that formation of Paleozoic mud-mounds reflects a spectrum of different essentially diagenetic accretionary mechanisms. This diversity should be taken into account in future discussions about Paleozoic mud-mound formation. The new name Osmundsberget Formation is given for a Hirnantian succession of brachiopod-rich limestone above the Boda Limestone. The Osmundsberget Formation occurs only in direct geographical vicinity to the mud-mounds.

  • 214. Kroger, Bjorn
    et al.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    Ullmann, Clemens V.
    Korte, Christoph
    Frei, Robert
    Rasmussen, Christian M. O.
    Subaerial speleothems and deep karst in central Sweden linked to Hirnantian glaciations2015In: Journal of the Geological Society, ISSN 0016-7649, E-ISSN 2041-479X, Vol. 172, no 3, p. 349-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The limestones of the upper Katian Boda mud mounds (Ordovician) of the Siljan district in central Sweden are deeply fractured. The fissures were partly synsedimentary and are often lined with stromatolite-like crusts. These crusts thus far are the only known subaerial Ordovician speleothems. They reach depths of up to 30 m below the former mound top. Macroscopically the crusts form decimetre-sized, cone-shaped domal aggregates, stalactites and stalagmites. Microfabric and morphology identify them as microbially mediated speleothems in a dark environment. Combined Sr and C isotope values indicate a formation of the speleothems from meteoric waters without influence of a significant soil horizon. For the first time the age of the speleothems can be precisely constrained by delta C-13 whole-rock and brachiopod shell isotope data to the mid-Hirnantian. Repeated and/or prolonged subaerial exposure of the Boda mud mounds during the Hirnantian is evident from karst surfaces and early cements in the mound capping carbonates. The speleothems and the karst surfaces record an estimated sea-level fall in the range of 80-130 m within the time window of the Hirnantian Isotopic Carbon Excursion. This massive regression coincides with maximum ice sheet extent inferred from sections in West Gondwana.

  • 215.
    Kröger, Björn
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Cambrian-Ordovician cephalopod palaeogeography and diversity2013In: Early Palaeozoic Biogeography and Palaeogeography / [ed] Harper, DAT; Servais, T, 2013, no 38, p. 429-448Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cephalopods have their earliest occurrence in Late Cambrian shallow-water carbonates on the North China Platform and rapidly dispersed across the globe within the latest Cambrian. Latest Cambrian and initial Ordovician cephalopod occurrences are restricted to the palaeotropical realm. The Ordovician records a unique morphological diversification and expansion of cephalopod habits and habitats which is expressed in a massive morphological diversification and unique palaeogeographical patterns of dispersal. The Ordovician cephalopod diversification was a complex process of appearance and disappearance of higher groups with a specific palaeogeographical signature and a clear selective component. A general Ordovician trend showed decreasing evolutionary turnover rates, increasing number of widespread genera, decreasing proportion of endemic genera, and decreasing beta-diversity. This is interpreted as a result of an increasing ecosystem stability during this time interval.

  • 216.
    Kröger, Björn
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Museum für Naturkunde, D–10115 Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 43, Germany..
    The cephalopods of the Boda Limestone, Late Ordovician, of Dalarna, Sweden2013In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF TAXONOMY, ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 41, p. 1-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The late Katian, Late Ordovician Boda Limestone of Dalarna, Sweden contains a rich cephalopod assemblage. The assemblage consists of 61 species, in 31 genera, comprising almost all major Ordovician cephalopod orders. Most common and diverse are the Orthocerida. The Ascocerida are also remarkably common and diverse. The new ascocerid species, Redpathoceras bullatum sp. nov., R. depressum sp. nov., R. magnum sp. nov., and Probillingsites scandinavicum sp. nov., give reason to revise current hypotheses on the origin and evolution of this group. An ascocerid origin from barrandeoceratids or aspidoceratids is hypothesised. The absence of actinocerids in the Boda Limestone is notable, and is interpreted as an indication of relatively cool and/or deep depositional environments. The dominance of orthocerids is provisionally interpreted as evidence for nutrient-rich waters during the time of the deposition of the Boda Limestone. Additionally, the assemblage contains the new barrandeocerids Schuchertoceras fryi sp. nov., Siljanoceras varians gen. et sp. nov., Warburgoceras gen. nov. (for Cyrtoceras longitudinale Angelin in Angelin & Lindstrom, 1880), the new endocerid Cameroceras turrisoides sp. nov., the new oncocerid Cyrtorizoceras thorslundi sp. nov., and the new orthocerids Dawsonoceras stumburi sp. nov., Isorthoceras angelini sp. nov., I. curvilineatum sp. nov., Nathorstoceras adnatum gen. et sp. nov., N. kallholnense gen. et sp. nov., Palaeodawsonocerina? nicolletoides sp. nov., Pleurorthoceras osmundsbergense sp. nov., and Striatocycloceras isbergi sp. nov.

  • 217.
    Kröger, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Palaeoecology and palaeogeography of Late Ordovician (Katian–Hirnantian) cephalopods of the Boda Limestone, Siljan district, Sweden2014In: Lethaia: an international journal of palaeontology and stratigraphy, ISSN 0024-1164, E-ISSN 1502-3931, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The carbonates associated with the Late Ordovician (Katian–Hirnantian) Boda mounds of the Siljan district, Sweden, contain a rich cephalopod fauna. Cephalopodsare rare in the micritic stromatactis facies of the Katian Boda Core Member, but are concentrated together with other molluscs and trilobites in synsedimentary fillings of caves and crevices of the lithified mound limestone. More than 60 cephalopod species are known from these fillings. The assemblage is dominated in richness and abundance by small orthoconic proteoceratids of the genus Isorthoceras and by curved barrandeocerids, and is considerably less endemic than the benthic fauna of the Boda mounds. Similarities are remarkable at the species level with assemblages from elsewhere in Baltica, with Avalonia and south-western Kazakhstan. A genus-level comparison reveals affinities with Laurentia. However, the genus-level similarities are interpreted as reflecting mainly similarities of the depositional environment and of physicochemical conditions. The presence of calcareous algae in the Boda Limestone and maximum hydrostatic septal strength of cephalopods indicate a depositional depth of <100 m, well within the euphotic zone. The dominance and diversity of cephalopods with vertical migrant lifestyle and the absence of actinocerids indicate a cool, nutrient-rich deeper neritic environment. The post-Katian sediments contain a drastically reduced diversity, dominated by orthocerids. The maximum hydrostatic septal strength of the Hirnantian cephalopods and sedimentological features indicate a shallowing during the Hirnantian, but a continuation of high food availability for cephalopods in the water column.

  • 218. Kröger, Björn
    et al.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Annette E. S.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Mass concentration of Hirnantian cephalopods from the Siljan District, Sweden; taxonomy, palaeoecology and palaeobiogeographic relationships2011In: Fossil Record, ISSN 1435-1943, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hirnantian Glisstjarn Formation (Normalograptus persculptus graptolite Biozone) is a succession of limestones and shales onlapping the Katian Boda Limestone in the Siljan District, Sweden. It contains a conspicuous, up to several decimeter thick bed densely packed with bipolarly oriented, orthoconic cephalopod conchs that can reach lengths of more than 120 cm. Conch fragmentation, bioereosion and the generally poor preservation of the conchs indicate time averaging and the conchs are tentatively interpreted as beached, and a result of winnowing. Ten nautiloid species were collected from the Glisstjarn Formation of which five are new: Dawsonoceras gregarium n. sp., Discoceras siljanense n. sp., Isorthoceras dalecarlense n. sp., Retizitteloceras rarum gen. et sp. n., and Transorthoceras osmundsbergense gen. et sp. n. The non-endemic taxa in most cases are known from elsewhere in Baltoscandia, except one species which is known from Siberia, and North America respectively. Proteocerid orthoceridans dominate the association, of which T. osmundsbergense is the predominant species. Oncocerids are diverse but together with tarphycerids very rare. Notable is the lack of many higher taxa, that are typical for other Late Ordovician shallow water depositional settings. Based on the taxonomical composition of the cephalopod mass occurrence it is interpreted as an indicator of eutrophication of the water masses in the area.

  • 219.
    Kröger, Björn
    et al.
    Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 44, FI-00014 Helsinki.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Rasmussen, Christian M.Ø
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, Lund 223 62, Sweden.
    Hirnantian (terminal Ordovician) dripstones and deep palaeo-karst in the Boda Limestone Formation, Dalarna, Sweden2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 220.
    Kröger, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Rasmussen, Jan A.
    Middle Ordovician cephalopod biofacies and palaeoenvironments of Baltoscandia2014In: Lethaia: an international journal of palaeontology and stratigraphy, ISSN 0024-1164, E-ISSN 1502-3931, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 275-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Middle Ordovician cephalopods became an important part of the macrofauna of the Baltoscandian carbonate platform. The earliest cephalopod abundance peak was reached during the early Darriwilian, within the Kunda Stage Yangtzeplacognathus crassus and Lenodus pseudoplanus conodont zones. In sediments of this time interval large orthoconic cephalopods often occur in masses with more than one specimen per square-meter on bedding surfaces. The assemblages are characterized by the strong dominance of often large endocerids. In proximal depositional settings coiled tarphycerids and other cephalopod groups are an important additional component. In the most distal settings orthocerids are the most important secondary component. Correspondence Analysis of assemblages throughout Baltoscandia revealed three distinct biofacies, which here are termed Orthocerid, Proterovaginoceras and Anthoceras Biofacies, respectively. The biofacies reflect differences in depth and proximity to the shoreline and are consistent with the Baltoscandian Confacies Belts. Spatial changes in absolute abundance and taxonomic composition indicate increased original cephalopod population densities and habitat expansion within the Y.crassus and L.pseudoplanus conodont zones. A nearly coeval abundance peak in a similar facies in South China indicates supraregional causes of the mass occurrence, probably reflecting a globally increased nutrient availability in the water column during the Darriwilian.

  • 221. Kumla, Jaturong
    et al.
    Danell, Eric
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Bussaban, Boonsom
    Lumyong, Saisamorn
    Suitable Growth Conditions and Nutrition Factors on In Vitro Culture of Phlebopus portentosus (Boletales)2011In: Chiang Mai Journal of Science, ISSN 0125-2526, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 156-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phlebopus portentosus is one of the most popular wild edible mushrooms in northern Thailand. As this mushroom may not be obligately ectomycorrhizal, we look into the possibilities for its commercial cultivation. In this paper we report the effects of pH, temperature, carbon and nitrogen sources and 15 culture growth media on the growth of P. portentosus. The results indicated that mycelia of P. portentosus grow well at pH 4.0. The fungus was able to grow at temperatures ranging from 20-35 degrees C, with an optimal growth temperature of 30 degrees C. Glucose and ammonium salts produced the largest radial growth. Among 15 culture media tested, modified Murashige & Skoog and fungal-host media were the best for the mycelia growth. Sclerotia-like structures were formed on these media after three weeks of incubation.

  • 222.
    Kundrát, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Liu, Wu
    Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100044, China.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Tong, Hao-Wen
    Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100044, China.
    New Tooth of Peking Man Recognized in Laboratory at Uppsala University2015In: Acta Anthropologica Sinica, ISSN 1000-3193, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 131-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peking Man, originally named Sinanthropus pekinensis and now known as Homoerectus pekinensis, was among the best documented extinct hominids before the catastrophic lossof almost all the material in 1941. The only diagnostic specimens to survive from the originalexcavations are some teeth in the paleontological collections of Uppsala University, Sweden(PMU). Here we report on the discovery of a new tooth in the PMU collection with notes on thehistory of the three previously known teeth. Together they represent the first four specimens ofPeking Man ever collected.

  • 223.
    Kundrát, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Univ Pavol Jozef Safarik, Ctr Interdisciplinary Biosci Technol & Innovat Pk, Kosice, Slovakia.
    Nudds, John
    Univ Manchester, Sch Earth & Environm Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lu, Junchang
    Chinese Acad Geol Sci, Key Lab Stratig & Paleontol, Inst Geol, Minist Land Resources, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    The first specimen of Archaeopteryx from the Upper Jurassic Mornsheim Formation of Germany2019In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 3-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From an initial isolated position as the oldest evolutionary prototype of a bird, Archaeopteryx has, as a result of recent fossil discoveries, become embedded in a rich phylogenetic context of both more and less crownward stem-group birds. This has prompted debate over whether Archaeopteryx is simply a convergently bird-like non-avialan theropod. Here we show, using the first synchrotron microtomographic examination of the genus, that the eighth or Daiting specimen of Archaeopteryx possesses a character suite that robustly constrains it as a basal avialan (primitive bird). The specimen, which comes from the Mornsheim Formation and is thus younger than the other specimens from the underlying Solnhofen Formation, is distinctive enough to merit designation as a new species, Archaeopteryx albersdoerferi sp. nov., but is recovered in close phylogenetic proximity to Archaeopteryx lithographica. Skeletal innovations of the Daiting specimen, such as fusion and pneumatization of the cranial bones, well vascularized pectoral girdle and wing elements, and a reinforced configuration of carpals and metacarpals, suggest that it may have had more characters seen in flying birds than the older Archaeopteryx lithographica. These innovations appear to be convergent on those of more crownward avialans, suggesting that Bavarian archaeopterygids independently acquired increasingly bird-like traits over time. Such mosaic evolution and iterative exploration of adaptive space may be typical for major functional transitions like the origin of flight.

  • 224.
    Lagebro, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology, Palaeontology group. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Stein, Martin
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    A new ?lamellipedian arthropod from the Early Cambrian Sirius Passet Fauna of North Greenland2009In: Journal of Paleontology, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 820-825Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 225. Lane, C.R.
    et al.
    Beales, P.A.
    O'Neill, T.M.
    McPherson, G.M.
    Finlay, A.R.
    David, J.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Henricot, B.
    First report of Impatiens downy mildew (Plasmopara obducens) in the UK2005In: Plant Pathology, Vol. 54, p. 243-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Leavitt, Steven D.
    et al.
    Brigham Young Univ, Dept Biol, Provo, UT 84602 USA.;Brigham Young Univ, Monte L Bean Life Sci Museum, Provo, UT 84602 USA..
    Westberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Nelsen, Matthew P.
    Field Museum, Sci & Educ, Chicago, IL USA..
    Elix, John A.
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Chem, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Timdal, Einar
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Oslo, Norway..
    Sohrabi, Mohammad
    Iranian Res Org Sci & Technol, Dept Biotechnol, Tehran, Iran..
    Clair, Larry L. St.
    Brigham Young Univ, Dept Biol, Provo, UT 84602 USA.;Brigham Young Univ, Monte L Bean Life Sci Museum, Provo, UT 84602 USA..
    Williams, Laura
    Univ Kaiserslautern, Biol Inst, Plant Ecol & Systemat, Kaiserslautern, Germany..
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bot, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lumbsch, H. T.
    Field Museum, Sci & Educ, Chicago, IL USA..
    Multiple, Distinct Intercontinental Lineages but Isolation of Australian Populations in a Cosmopolitan Lichen-Forming Fungal Taxon, Psora decipiens (Psoraceae, Ascomycota)2018In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple drivers shape the spatial distribution of species, including dispersal capacity, niche incumbency, climate variability, orographic barriers, and plate tectonics. However, biogeographic patterns of fungi commonly do not fit conventional expectations based on studies of animals and plants. Fungi, in general, are known to occur across exceedingly broad, intercontinental distributions, including some important components of biological soil crust communities (BSCs). However, molecular data often reveal unexpected biogeographic patterns in lichenized fungal species that are assumed to have cosmopolitan distributions. The lichen-forming fungal species Psora decipiens is found on all continents, except Antarctica and occurs in BSCs across diverse habitats, ranging from hot, arid deserts to alpine habitats. In order to better understand factors that shape population structure in cosmopolitan lichen-forming fungal species, we investigated biogeographic patterns in the cosmopolitan taxon P. decipiens, along with the closely related taxa P. crenata and P. saviczii. We generated a multi-locus sequence dataset based on a worldwide sampling of these taxa in order to reconstruct evolutionary relationships and explore phylogeographic patterns. Both P. crenata and P. decipiens were not recovered as monophyletic; and P. saviczii specimens were recovered as a monophyletic clade closely related to a number of lineages comprised of specimens representing P. decipiens. Striking phylogeographic patterns were observed for P. crenata, with populations from distinct geographic regions belonging to well-separated, monophyletic lineages. South African populations of P. crenata were further divided into well-supported sub-clades. While well-supported phylogenetic substructure was also observed for the nominal taxon P. decipiens, nearly all lineages were comprised of specimens collected from intercontinental populations. However, all Australian specimens representing P. decipiens were recovered within a single well-supported monophyletic clade consisting solely of Australian samples. Our study supports up to 10 candidate species-level lineages in P. decipiens, based on genealogical concordance and coalescent-based species delimitation analyses. Our results support the general pattern of the biogeographic isolation of lichen-forming fungal populations in Australia, even in cases where closely related congeners have documented intercontinental distributions. Our study has important implications for understanding factors influencing diversification and distributions of lichens associated with BSC.

  • 227.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Universität Erlangen, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen, Germany.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Harper, David A.T.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, UK.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen, Germany.
    Palaeokarst formation in the early Palaeozoic of Baltoscandia – evidence for significant sea-level changesin a shallow epicontinental sea2013In: Proceedings of the 3rd IGCP591 Annual MeetingLund, Sweden, 9–19 June 2013 / [ed] Lindskog, A. & Mehlqvist, K, Lund: Lund University , 2013, p. 169-170Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Lower Palaeozoic sedimentary succession of Sweden palaeokarsts have been reportedfrom different stratigraphic levels in the Silurian strata of Gotland by Calner(2008; see references therein). Until last year there were no records of Cambrian karstsand in the Ordovician only the basin-wide Katian palaeokarst horizon in the UpperOrdovician Slandrom Limestone has been described in detail (Calner et al. 2010a). Theunconformities and disconformities on top of the slightly older Kullsberg mounds inquarries located in the Siljan impact structure (Dalarna) presumably represent an earlierregression and karstic development (Calner et al. 2010b). Beside these reports, there isonly the statement by Nielsen (1995) that karst may have formed at the top of theDarriwilian Komstad Limestone. During the last two years, however, several new andsignificant palaeokarst surfaces have been detected in the Cambrian–Ordovician successionsof Sweden (Lehnert et al. 2012).At Kakeled Quarry (Västergötland), a palaeokarst cave with a breccia fill (large, angularOrsten clasts in a dark limestone matrix) is exposed beneath a ‘Middle Cambrian’palaeokarst surface (Jiangshanian Stage) located close to the top of the Kakeled LimestoneBed of the Alum Shale Formation (Lehnert et al., 2012). In the karstic pockets,a mass occurrence of Orusia lenticularis occurs. These shallow-water brachiopods originallysettled on hard substrates after a major regression exposing, regionally, the seafloors of the alum shale basin. Their reworking and concentration in the conglomeraticbed overlying the irregular palaeokarst surface reflects deposition during transgressionin extremely shallow marine environments.A younger karst surface is exposed in Tomten Quarry at Torbjörntorp (Västergötland).In two dimensions in the quarry wall it resembles the “Schrattenkalk”, but rockslabs cut vertically and parallel to bedding planes display a karren system that resembles“Napfkarren” or cockling features. Trilobites of the Furongian Ctenopyge bisulcata andC. linnarssoni zones occur in the 1–2 cm thick, glauconitic packstone bed that overliesthe palaeokarst surface and which represents the upper Tremadocian BjørkåsholmenFormation. The associated stratigraphic gap comprises the six uppermost trilobite zonesof the Furongian plus most of the Tremadocian. Darriwilian conodonts with reworked170older material within a limestone bed slightly above the glauconitic packstone bed indicateyet another substantial gap in the succession.In the new Tingskullen core from northeastern Öland, another palaeokarst surfacewith grikes and evidence of repeated exposure marks the top of the upper TremadocianObolus conglomerate (?) or a lower limestone part of the Djupvik Formation (“CeratopygeShale”). This palaeokarst surface is overlain by glauconitic limestone of the KöpingsklintFormation and inferably reflects the global Ceratopyge Regressive Event(CRE).At the base of the Lanna Limestone in the Siljan area, palaeokarst is associated withthe Dapingian Blommiga Bladet (‘flowery sheet’) hardground complex, which can becorrelated across most of Baltoscandia.The basin-wide palaeokarst in the Katian Slandrom Limestone (Calner et al. 2010a)no longer marks the youngest Ordovician karst record. Recently, Hirnantian karst cavesand solution cavities filled with greenish marls of the Glisstjärn Formation have beenrecognized in sections of the Boda Limestone in the Siljan Ring structure (Dalarna).Solution and karst cave formation reflects an interval of the regression during theHirnantian glaciation and the youngest period of subaerial exposure during the Ordovician.Some earlier sedimentary models suggesting that Baltoscandia was flooded by a deepepicontinental sea are challenged by the discovery of multiple palaeokarst developmenttogether with other shallow-water features. Instead, palaeokarst formation impliessubaerial exposure during a number of major regressions.

  • 228.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Geozentrum Nordbayern, Abteilung Krustendynamik, Universität Erlangen.
    Calner, Mikael
    GeoBiosphere Science Centre, Lund University.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    The Swedish Upper Ordovician – what is the state of the archive and the stratigraphic framework, and how could we use this archive to untangle climate change?2009In: Lundadagarna i Historisk Geologi och paleontology XI, 11-12 March, 2009, Abstracts with programme, 2009, p. 21-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Universität Erlangen, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen, Germany.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen, Germany.
    Arslan, Arzu
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Berner, Ulrich
    Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Early Palaeozoic evolution of the Caledonian foreland basin – new data from the sedimentary record in the Siljan impact structure (Central Sweden)2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Universität Erlangen, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen, Germany.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen, Germany.
    Arslan, Arzu
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Berner, Ulrich
    Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Huff, Warren
    Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, 500 Geology/Physics Building, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013, USA.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    The sediment fill of the ‘Siljan Ring’ - a mirror of the Early Palaeozoic evolution of western Baltoscandia2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Universität Erlangen, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen, Germany.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Arslan, Arzu
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Berner, Ulrich
    Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Huff, Warren
    Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, 500 Geology/Physics Building, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013, USA.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Joachimski, Michael
    GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Lithosphere Dynamics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Schloßgarten 5, D-91054, Erlangen, Germany.
    Juhlin, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Maletz, Jörg
    Freie Universität Berlin, Institut für Geologische Wissenschaften, Berlin, Germany.
    The Siljan impact structure of south-central Sweden: an unique window into the geologic history of western Baltoscandia2013In: IODP/ICDP Kolloquium Freiberg, 25-27.03.2013 (Abstract volume), 2013, p. 120-123Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 232. Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Arslan, Arzu
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Calner, Mikael
    Ordovician stratigraphy of the Stumsnas 1 drill core from the southern part of the Siljan Ring, central Sweden2013In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 2, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Stumsnas 1 core, drilled in 2011 in the southern part of the Siljan Ring, provides new insights into the stratigraphy of the Ordovician succession in central Sweden. The core section shows evidence of the structural complications caused by the late Devonian meteorite impact in the area. In the core, about 90m of Tremadocian to Darriwilian strata are sandwiched between Proterozoic igneous basement rocks. At the lower contact, the sedimentary succession starts with glauconitic, fine-grained siliciclastics and carbonates directly resting on the weathered basement. The basal siliciclastic unit is overlain by a ca. 19-m-thick limestone succession, well-known from this part of the Baltoscandian Basin, includes strata corresponding to the Latorp Limestone through the upper Holen Formation. This succession is covered by a limestone-marl alternating sequence, representing some yet unknown deeper water facies, presumably coeval to the topmost Holen Formation through upper Dalby Limestone. The upper third of the sedimentary succession in the core includes numerous slices of partly overturned strata, including relatively thick successions of the Slandrom Formation, Fjacka Shale and Jonstorp Formation, as well as carbonate and siliciclastic units of yet unknown stratigraphic origin.

  • 233. Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Bergstroem, Stig M.
    Calner, Mikael
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Egenhoff, Sven
    Frisk, Asa M.
    Hannah, Judith L.
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    Huff, Warren D.
    Juhlin, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Maletz, Joerg
    Stein, Holly J.
    Sturkell, Erik
    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.
    New Ordovician-Silurian drill cores from the Siljan impact structure in central Sweden: an integral part of the Swedish Deep Drilling Program2012In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 134, no 2, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New drill cores from the largest known impact structure in Europe, the relict of the Siljan meteorite crater, provide new possibilities to reconstruct Early Palaeozoic marine environments and ecosystems, and to document changes in sedimentary facies, sea level and palaeoclimate in Baltoscandia. The impact crater is an important target of the project "Concentric Impact Structures in the Palaeozoic" within the framework of the "Swedish Deep Drilling Program". Two core sections, Mora 001 and Solberga 1, have been analysed. The sedimentary successions of these core sections include strata of late Tremadocian through late Wenlock ages. Our preliminary studies show not only that several of the classical Palaeozoic units of Sweden are represented in the area, but also that other significantly different facies are preserved in the Siljan district. An erosional unconformity representing a substantial hiatus occurs between Middle Ordovician limestone and a Llandovery-Wenlock (Silurian) shale succession in the western part of the Siljan structure and suggests an extended period of uplift and erosion. This may be related to forebulge migration due to flexural loading by the Caledonian thrust sheet to the west. Thus, this part of Sweden, previously regarded as a stable cratonic area, presumably was affected by the Caledonian collision between Baltica and Laurentia.

  • 234.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen,.
    Bergström, Stig
    The Ohio State University, School of Earth Sciences, Division of Earth History, Columbus, Ohio.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Egenhof, Sven
    Colorado State University, Department of Geosciences, Fort Collins, Colorado.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Universität Zürich, Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Zürich.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Maletz, Jörg
    Freie Universität Berlin, Institut für Geologische Wissenschaften, Berlin, Germany.
    The Siljan Impact Structure – an important integral for reconstructing the early Palaeozoic history of Baltoscandia2012In: Of Land and Sea: Processes and Products / [ed] Betzler, C. & Lindhorst, S., 2012, p. 165-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Universität Erlangen, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen, Germany.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen, Germany.
    Bergström, Stig M.
    The Ohio State University, School of Earth Sciences, Division of Earth History, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Egenhoff, Sven
    Colorado State University, Department of Geosciences, Fort Collins, Colorado.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Universität Zürich, Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Zürich.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Maletz, Jörg
    Freie Universität Berlin, Institut für Geologische Wissenschaften, Berlin, Germany.
    The Siljan Meteorite Crater in central Sweden – an integral of the Swedish Deep Drilling Program (SDDP)2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    New drill cores from the largest known impactstructure in Europe, the Siljan crater, provide superbpossibilities to reconstruct Early Palaeozoic marineenvironments and ecosystems, and to document changes insedimentary facies, sea-level and palaeoclimate. Themeteorite crater is a major target of the project ConcentricImpact Structures in the Palaeozoic (CISP) in theframework of the Swedish Deep Drilling Program.Studies of Ordovician and Silurian strata in the SiljanDistrict have a long tradition and many scientific papersdeal with the geology of the area. The Palaeozoicsuccession starts with the Tremadocian Obolusconglomerate, the youngest pre-Caledonian strata areMiddle Silurian shales of the Nederberga Formation.However, exposures are limited, there are few continoussections, and the Early Palaeozoic sedimentary rocksresting on the Precambrian basement are incompletelyinvestigated.Detailed sedimentological and biostratigraphicalstudies of the cores and the Nittsjö trench together withanalysis of the carbon isotope chemostratigraphy will allowintra- and intercontinental correlations and the dating ofCaledonian movements. Our preliminary studies show thatdifferent and yet undefined facies belts are preserved in theSiljan District. The recent findings of palaeokarst in thearea together with similar new findings in other parts ofBaltoscandia reflect times of subaerial exposure of thebasin regionally and challange the idea that theBaltoscandian basin was a deep and tranquil depositionalenvironment.Our preliminary data provide a first base forreinterpretations of this part of Sweden, previouslyregarded as representing a stable cratonic area unaffectedby the Caledonian collision between Baltica and Laurentia.The erosional unconformity and the substantial hiatusbetween Middle Ordovician limestones and late EarlySilurian shales in the western part of the crater suggests anextended period of uplift and erosion presumably related toflexural forebulge migration toward the east due to tectonicloading by the Caledonian nappes to the west. The Lowerto Middle Ordovician carbonate succession is only about21 m thick, with a sharp flooding surface on top of theMid-Ordovician Holen Formation. The overlyingsiliciclastic succession (Upper Llandovery, based ongraptolite data) comprises a minimum thickness of about224 m. The sudden deepening after the eastward migrationof the forebulge is indicated by rapid deposition of shalesand shale/mudstones displaying unstable conditionsexpressed by megaslumps, debris flows, turbidites andseveral synsedimentary tectonic features. The intercalationof a sandstone unit reflects a strong regression in this shalebasin followed by rapid transgression and deposition ofdark, organic-rich shale and mudstone.In contrast to this development, a classicalOrdovician/Silurian carbonate/shale succession, well103 IODP/ICDP Kolloquium Kiel, 07. – 09.03.2012Figure 6: Bathymetry map of Lake Ohrid. Proposed sites aremarked by the red dots.Figure 5: Multichannel seismic line crossing the DEEP-Site inthe central basin of Lake Ohrid.known from other parts of Sweden, formed in the northern(Skattungbyn-Kallholn), northeastern (Furudal), andsoutheastern part (Boda) of the Siljan District. Detailedsampling of the cores for stable isotopes, thermal maturity,geochemistry, sediment provenance, facies and microfaciesstudies in the autumn of 2011 now helps in solvingregional problems as well as stratigraphical andpalaeogeographical questions.

  • 236.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Universität Erlangen, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen, Germany.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen, Germany.
    Bergström, Stig M.
    The Ohio State University, School of Earth Sciences, Division of Earth History, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Egenhoff, Sven
    Colorado State University, Department of Geosciences, Fort Collins, Colorado.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Universität Zürich, Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Zürich.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Maletz, Jörg
    Freie Universität Berlin, Institut für Geologische Wissenschaften, Berlin, Germany.
    The Siljan Ring in central Sweden - a window into the Palaeozoic history of Baltoscandia2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 237.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Universität Erlangen, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen, Germany.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen, Germany.
    Berner, Ulrich
    Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany.
    Ahmed, M.
    Arslan, Arzu
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Palaeogeographic setting of Upper Ordovician and Silurian source rocks preserved in the Siljan impact structure (central Sweden)2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    et al.
    Universität Erlangen, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Erlangen, Germany.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen, Germany.
    Joachimski, M.M.
    Kröger, Björn
    Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 44, FI-00014 Helsinki.
    Calner, Mikael
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hiatal surfaces in the Late Ordovician of Baltoscandia: Palaeokarst formation during glacially-induced global regressions2014In: In: Röhling, H.-G. & Zulauf, G. (eds.): GeoFrankfurt 2014. Dynamik des Systems Erde / Earth System Dynamics. 21.-24. September 2014, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität Frankfurt a.M., Abstract Volume, 2014, p. 197-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 239. Lindblom, Louise
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    New evidence corroborates population differentiation in Xanthoria parietina2007In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 39, p. 259-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to examine genetic variation and population structure of the widespread lichen-forming ascomycete Xanthoria parietina from similar habitats, but different sites in Scandinavia, we investigated seven populations in Scania, southernmost Sweden, and compared the results with a corresponding study on Storfosna, central Norway. Sequence variations of the nuclear ribosomal DNA were used as molecular markers, for both a part of the IGS region and the complete ITSI-5.8S-ITS2 region. The amount of genetic variability observed was comparable in the two investigations. Divergence between populations in different habitats found in the previous study was also present in this study. Xanthoria parietina is genetically differentiated between habitats with no evidence of restricted gene flow between populations in the same habitat at the present spatial scale, at least at sites along the coast of Scandinavia. Differentiation between habitats is considerable at both study sites, which we attribute to restricted gene flow between habitats, i.e. habitat isolation.

  • 240. Lindblom, Louise
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    RAPDs distinguish the lichens Xanthoria aureola and X. parietina in a mixed seashore rock population2012In: Nova Hedwigia: Zeitschrift für Kryptogamenkunde, ISSN 0029-5035, Vol. 94, no 3-4, p. 279-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morphological characters can vary to an extent that makes it difficult to separate the two morphologically and chemically similar species Xanthoria aureola and X. parietina for an inexperienced field biologist. They occur frequently in mixed stands on seashore rocks on the western coast of Norway. We examined (1) whether a simple method like RAPD-PCR could confirm the distinction between the two species previously reported on the basis of DNA sequences, and (2) whether infraspecific DNA and RAPD data from X. parietina were congruent. We also checked whether the RAPD band scoring procedure could affect the results. Results show that (1) RAPD distance matrices based on band scorings performed independently by the two authors were always congruent and differences never affected conclusions, (2) RAPD clearly distinguishes between X. parietina and X. aureola in a way that is fully congruent with a classification based on DNA sequence data, and (3) there was no significant congruence between infraspecific distances based on DNA sequences and RAPD data in X. parietina. The latter observation may be taken as support for a previously published report of low levels of recombination in X. parietina, which stands in contrast to statements of obligate homothallism in that species.

  • 241.
    Lindgren, Johan
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Moyer, Alison
    N Carolina State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA..
    Schweitzer, Mary H.
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.;N Carolina State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA.;North Carolina Museum Nat Sci, Raleigh, NC 27601 USA..
    Sjovall, Peter
    SP Tech Res Inst Sweden, Chem Mat & Surfaces, S-50115 Boras, Sweden..
    Uvdal, Per
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, MAX Lab 4, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Chem, Chem Phys, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Dan E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Heimdal, Jimmy
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, MAX Lab 4, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Engdahl, Anders
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, MAX Lab 4, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Gren, Johan A.
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Schultz, Bo Pagh
    MUSERUM, Nat Hist Div, DK-7800 Skive, Denmark..
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Interpreting melanin-based coloration through deep time: a critical review2015In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 282, no 1813, article id 20150614Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colour, derived primarily from melanin and/or carotenoid pigments, is integral to many aspects of behaviour in living vertebrates, including social signalling, sexual display and crypsis. Thus, identifying biochromes in extinct animals can shed light on the acquisition and evolution of these biological traits. Both eumelanin and melanin-containing cellular organelles (melanosomes) are preserved in fossils, but recognizing traces of ancient melanin-based coloration is fraught with interpretative ambiguity, especially when observations are based on morphological evidence alone. Assigning microbodies (or, more often reported, their 'mouldic impressions') as melanosome traces without adequately exduding a bacterial origin is also problematic because microbes are pervasive and intimately involved in organismal degradation. Additionally, some forms synthesize melanin. In this review, we survey both vertebrate and microbial melanization, and explore the conflicts influencing assessment of microbodies preserved in assodation with ancient animal soft tissues. We discuss the types of data used to interpret fossil melanosomes and evaluate whether these are sufficient for definitive diagnosis. Finally, we outline an integrated morphological and geochemical approach for detecting endogenous pigment remains and associated microstructures in multimillion-year-old fossils.

  • 242.
    Lindgren, Johan
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Dan-Eric
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjövall, Peter
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Chem & Mat, Boras, Sweden.
    Jarenmark, Martin
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Ito, Shosuke
    Fujita Hlth Univ, Dept Chem, Sch Hlth Sci, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan.
    Wakamatsu, Kazumasa
    Fujita Hlth Univ, Dept Chem, Sch Hlth Sci, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Schultz, Bo Pagh
    Fur Museum, Museum Salling, Fur, Denmark.
    Sylvestersen, Rene Lyng
    Fur Museum, Museum Salling, Fur, Denmark.
    Madsen, Henrik
    Mo Clay Museum, Museum Mors, Nykobing, Denmark.
    LaFountain, James R., Jr.
    SUNY Buffalo, Dept Biol Sci, Buffalo, NY USA.
    Alwmark, Carl
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Hall, Stephen A.
    Lund Univ, Dept Construct Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Paula
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Rodriguez-Meizoso, Irene
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, Ctr Anal & Synth, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Fossil insect eyes shed light on trilobite optics and the arthropod pigment screen2019In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 573, no 7772, p. 122-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fossilized eyes permit inferences of the visual capacity of extinct arthropods(1-3). However, structural and/or chemical modifications as a result of taphonomic and diagenetic processes can alter the original features, thereby necessitating comparisons with modern species. Here we report the detailed molecular composition and microanatomy of the eyes of 54-million-year-old crane-flies, which together provide a proxy for the interpretation of optical systems in some other ancient arthropods. These well-preserved visual organs comprise calcified corneal lenses that are separated by intervening spaces containing eumelanin pigment. We also show that eumelanin is present in the facet walls of living crane-flies, in which it forms the outermost ommatidial pigment shield in compound eyes incorporating a chitinous cornea. To our knowledge, this is the first record of melanic screening pigments in arthropods, and reveals a fossilization mode in insect eyes that involves a decay-resistant biochrome coupled with early diagenetic mineralization of the ommatidial lenses. The demonstrable secondary calcification of lens cuticle that was initially chitinous has implications for the proposed calcitic corneas of trilobites, which we posit are artefacts of preservation rather than a product of in vivo biomineralization(4-7). Although trilobite eyes might have been partly mineralized for mechanical strength, a (more likely) organic composition would have enhanced function via gradient-index optics and increased control of lens shape.

  • 243. Lindgren, Johan
    et al.
    Sjovall, Peter
    Carney, Ryan M.
    Cincotta, Aude
    Uvdal, Per
    Hutcheson, Steven W.
    Gustafsson, Ola
    Lefevre, Ulysse
    Escuillie, Francois
    Heimdal, Jimmy
    Engdahl, Anders
    Gren, Johan A.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Wakamatsu, Kazumasa
    Yans, Johan
    Godefroit, Pascal
    Molecular composition and ultrastructure of Jurassic paravian feathers2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 13520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feathers are amongst the most complex epidermal structures known, and they have a well-documented evolutionary trajectory across non-avian dinosaurs and basal birds. Moreover, melanosome-like microbodies preserved in association with fossil plumage have been used to reconstruct original colour, behaviour and physiology. However, these putative ancient melanosomes might alternatively represent microorganismal residues, a conflicting interpretation compounded by a lack of unambiguous chemical data. We therefore used sensitive molecular imaging, supported by multiple independent analytical tests, to demonstrate that the filamentous epidermal appendages in a new specimen of the Jurassic paravian Anchiornis comprise remnant eumelanosomes and fibril-like microstructures, preserved as endogenous eumelanin and authigenic calcium phosphate. These results provide novel insights into the early evolution of feathers at the sub-cellular level, and unequivocally determine that melanosomes can be preserved in fossil feathers.

  • 244.
    Lindgren, Johan
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjövall, Peter
    RISE Res Inst Sweden Chem & Mat, Boras, Sweden.
    Thiel, Volker
    Univ Gottingen, Geosci Ctr, Geobiol, Gottingen, Germany.
    Zheng, Wenxia
    North Carolina State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA.
    Ito, Shosuke
    Fujita Hlth Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Dept Chem, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan.
    Wakamatsu, Kazumasa
    Fujita Hlth Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Dept Chem, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan.
    Hauff, Rolf
    Urweltmuseum Hauff, Holzmaden, Germany.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Engdahl, Anders
    Lund Univ, MAX Lab 4, Lund, Sweden.
    Alwmark, Carl
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Jarenmark, Martin
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Sachs, Sven
    Nat Kunde Museum Bielefeld, Abt Geowissensch, Bielefeld, Germany.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Marone, Federica
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland.
    Kuriyama, Takeo
    Univ Hyogo, Inst Nat & Environm Sci, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan;Wildlife Management Res Ctr, Tanba, Hyogo, Japan.
    Gustafsson, Ola
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Lund, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Per
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thomen, Aurelien
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Chem & Mol Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rodriguez-Meizoso, Irene
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, Ctr Anal & Synth, Lund, Sweden.
    Uvdal, Per
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, Chem Phys, Lund, Sweden.
    Ojika, Makoto
    Nagoya Univ, Grad Sch Bioagr Sci, Dept Appl Biosci, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
    Schweitzer, Mary H.
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden;North Carolina State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA;North Carolina Museum Nat Sci, Raleigh, NC USA.
    Soft-tissue evidence for homeothermy and crypsis in a Jurassic ichthyosaur2018In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 564, no 7736, p. 359-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ichthyosaurs are extinct marine reptiles that display a notable external similarity to modern toothed whales. Here we show that this resemblance is more than skin deep. We apply a multidisciplinary experimental approach to characterize the cellular and molecular composition of integumental tissues in an exceptionally preserved specimen of the Early Jurassic ichthyosaur Stenopterygius. Our analyses recovered still-flexible remnants of the original scaleless skin, which comprises morphologically distinct epidermal and dermal layers. These are underlain by insulating blubber that would have augmented streamlining, buoyancy and homeothermy. Additionally, we identify endogenous proteinaceous and lipid constituents, together with keratinocytes and branched melanophores that contain eumelanin pigment. Distributional variation of melanophores across the body suggests countershading, possibly enhanced by physiological adjustments of colour to enable photoprotection, concealment and/or thermoregulation. Convergence of ichthyosaurs with extant marine amniotes thus extends to the ultrastructural and molecular levels, reflecting the omnipresent constraints of their shared adaptation to pelagic life.

  • 245.
    Lindström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Predation on bellerophontiform molluscs with special reference to shell morphology1991Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Lindström, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The history and significance of the Chinese Mesozoiccollections hosted at the Swedish Museum of NaturalHistory, Stockholm, and the Museum of Evolution,Uppsala, Sweden2015In: International Geoscience Programme Project 632, Shenyang, 12-13 September, 2015, abstracts. / [ed] Wang Yaqiong, Zhang Yongli, Gong Enpu, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, China, 2015, p. 2-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    NRM hosts a vast collection of over one million fossil specimens, including both fauna and flora.Amongst these, ca. 30,000 specimens are represented by plant fossils brought to Sweden from China.These include both Palaeozoic and Mesozoic specimens from a range of localities. Presently we areaiming at digitalizing the Mesozoic plant collections and we have several questions to be addressedconcerning the context of these fossils, such as collectors and exact locations.The material was mainly collected in the early 1920s on the initiative of Professor Johan GunnarAndersson and Professor Erik Nyström, and later also by Professor T. G. Halle. Andersson wasemployed by the Chinese government in 1914 as an advisor in mining, and Nyström had started ageological institute in Taiyuan. Andersson participated in several field excursions collecting fossils, andhe involved himself in the training of young geologists and assistants, in close collaboration with thedirector of the newly founded Chinese Geological Survey in Beijing, Dr. V. K. Ting.Unfortunately, all the material Halle collected in 1916–17 was lost when the ship sank in the SouthChina Sea on return to Sweden in 1919. Andersson and his assistants worked the following years collecting new material that was successfully shipped to Stockholm, and that is the material we have athand in the museum’s collections today.Besides the palaeobotanical material, a significant collection of fossil Chinese vertebrates was depositedat Uppsala University (today in the Museum of Evolution), and scientifically described by ProfessorCarl Wiman and others, among whom Professor Otto Zdansky should be mentioned. In retrospect, it isclear that the Sino-Swedish collaboration between 1914 and 1927 was a singularly unique historicalevent which allowed mutual exchange of material and scientific knowledge between China and Sweden.

  • 247.
    Lindström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Shell repair and mode of life of Praenatica gregaria (Gastropoda) from the Devonian of Bohemia (Czech Republic)2003In: Palaeontology, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 623-633Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Lindström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Repaired injuries and shell form in some Palaeozoic pleurotomarioid gastropods2005In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 697-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pleurotomarioid gastropods typically develop a spiral band called the selenizone in the outer whorl face of the shell that is formed by the closure of an open slit in the apertural margin. The slit and selenizone may be important in controlling the extent to which fractures induced by predatory attacks propagate across the whorl surface. A prominent selenizone can prevent fractures from traversing the entire whorl. Study of six Palaeozoic pleurotomarioid gastropod species with repaired shell injuries shows that repaired injuries are dependent on both the nature of the selenizone and shell form. The species can be divided into three morphological groups (turbiniform, trochiform and planispiral) and show a variety of selenizones with different degrees of prominence. Turbiniform shells show more repaired injuries than planispiral forms, indicating that species in the former group more often survive predatory attacks. The studied material is too sparse for meaningful statistical analysis, but individual case studies suggest that the combined influence of shell form and the nature of the selenizone can make the interpretation complex.

  • 249. Liu, Alexander G.
    et al.
    Brasier, Martin D.
    Bogolepova, Olga K.
    Cambridge university.
    Raevskaya, Elena G.
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University.
    First report of a newly discovered Ediacaran biota from the Irkineeva Uplift, East Siberia2013In: Newsletters on stratigraphy, ISSN 0078-0421, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 95-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New Ediacara-type macrofossils are described from the Irkineeva Uplift of East Siberia, Russia. Preliminary field studies within the Taseeva Group reveal probable examples of the Ediacaran taxa Arkarua adami and Beltanelliformis minutae; the organo-sedimentary structure 'Arumberia'; and 'elephant skin' microbial mat fabrics. These impressions are consistent with a latest Ediacaran age for the units of the upper Taseeva Group, suggesting that they are tens of millions of years younger than has previously been reported. Large discoidal specimens from the upper part of the Sukhoy Pit Group, likely to be Middle Riphean (Mesoproterozoic) in age, are tentatively assigned to the taxon Nimbia occlusa, and are suggested to be microbial in origin. These discs, and a contemporaneous acritarch assemblage of long-ranging sphaeromorphic taxa, cannot be precisely geochronologically constrained at present, but are highly likely to be pre-Ediacaran in age. The Irkineeva finds supplement a diverse suite of Russian Ediacaran (Vendian) fossil localities, and may be of considerable importance in correlating disparate Meso- and Neoproterozoic stratigraphic units across the Siberian Platform. This report emphasises the largely unexplored potential of the Irkineeva Uplift for palaeontological study, and provides tantalising evidence for the preservation of Late Ediacaran macro-organisms in this region.

  • 250. Llop, Esteve
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Bacidia coprodes – resurrecting a misinterpreted species2007In: Lichenologist, Vol. 39, p. 251-257Article in journal (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 453
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf