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  • 201.
    Cielemecka, Olga
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences..
    Toxic Embodiment and Feminist Environmental Humanities: Toxic Embodiment and Feminist Environmental Humanities2019In: Environmental humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, E-ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With toxic pollutants as a rising threat, important questions about environmental justice, gender, and the sexual politics of environmental movements issue an urgent challenge to intersectional gender and science studies; to anticolonial, queer, and trans theory; as well as to environmental and human-animal studies at large. Taking up this challenge, this piece aims at attending to the ways toxic embodiment disturbs or aligns with multiple boundaries of sexes, generations, races, geographies, nation-states, and species and how toxicity has re-dynamized corporeality and the biochemical materiality of bodies.

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    Åsberg Cielemecka
  • 202. Crona, Beatrice
    et al.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Prell, Christina
    Reed, Mark
    Hubacek, Klaus
    Combining social network approaches with social theories to improve understanding of natural resource governance2011In: Social Networks and Natural Resource Management: Uncovering the Social Fabric in Environmental Governance / [ed] Bodin, Örjan; Prell, Christina, Cambridge University Press , 2011, p. 44-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 203. Cumming, Graeme S.
    et al.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Network analysis in conservation biogeography: Challenges and opportunities2010In: Diversity & distributions: A journal of biological invasions and biodiversity, ISSN 1366-9516, E-ISSN 1472-4642, ISSN 1366-9516, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 414-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACTAims To highlight the potential value of network analysis for conservation biogeography and to focus attention on some of the challenges that lie ahead in applying it to conservation problems.Location Global.Methods We briefly review existing literature and then focus on five important challenges for the further development of network-based approaches in the field.Results Our five challenges include (i) understanding cross-scale and cross-level linkages in ecological systems (top–down and bottom–up effects, such as trophic cascades, have been demonstrated in food webs but are poorly understood in nested hierarchies such as reserve networks and stream catchments), (ii) capturing dynamic aspects of ecological systems and networks (with a few exceptions we have little grasp of how important whole-network attributes change as the composition of nodes and links changes), (iii) integrating ecological aspects of network theory with metacommunity frameworks and multiple node functions and roles (can we link the spatial patterns of habitat patches in fragmented landscapes, the parallel networks of interacting species using those patches and community-level interactions as defined by metacommunity theory in a single framework?), (iv) integrating the analysis of social and ecological networks (particularly, can they be analysed as a single interacting system?) and (v) laying an empirical foundation for network analysis in conservation biogeography (this will require a larger data bank of well-studied networks from diverse habitats and systems).Main conclusions Recent research has identified a variety of approaches that we expect to contribute to progress in each of our five challenge areas. We anticipate that some of the most exciting outcomes of attempts to meet these challenges will be frameworks that unite areas of research, such as food web analysis and metacommunity theory, that have developed independently.

  • 204.
    Dahl, Justiina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Arktisen yhteistyön takana on muutakin kuin huoli ympäristöstä2017In: Suomen Kuvalehti, no 19, p. 67-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [fi]

    Kahdeksan arktisen valtion (Suomi, Ruotsi, Islanti, Venäjä, Yhdysvallat, Tanska, Kanada ja Norja) välisen yhteistyöelimen, Arktisen neuvoston, käytännön työn kivijalka on Arktinen ympäristösuojelustrategia. Toisin kuin sen menestystä juhlistavat puheet antavat ymmärtää, Suomea ei 1980-luvun lopussa ajanut arktiseen yhteistyöhön pääasiallisesti huoli haavoittuvan arktisen ympäristön tilaa kohtaan.

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  • 205.
    Dahl, Justiina
    et al.
    Swedish Polar Research Secretariat.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    van der Watt, Lize-Marié
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Is there anything natural about the polar?2019In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 206.
    D'Alisa, Giacomo
    et al.
    Autonomous University in Barcelona, Spain.
    Armiero, Marco
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    What happened to the trash: Political miracles and real statistics in an emergency regime2013In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 29-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on waste struggles in Campania, Italy, showing how the state of emergency has been used for years to silence alternative solutions to the waste crisis and favor private economic interests. In Italy, when an event severely jeopardizes human security, the prime minister declares a 'state of emergency' and appoints a commissioner with the power to coordinate actions regarding the catastrophe and rescue of the population. This procedure concentrates all the powers in one agency for coping more efficiently and timely with situations of extreme danger, which, due to their intensity and extent, need extraordinary means and power to guarantee an effective coordination and avoid institutional overlaps. In recent decades, the history of the Italian republic attests to an increasing use of the state of emergency to govern the most ordinary issues of contemporary society. Indeed, even if the first commissioners were appointed in the 1970s, Italians have experienced several extraordinary commissioners also for traffic and mobility control, or to manage 'grand' events including G8 summits, international sports meetings, and global religious conventions.

  • 207. D'Alisa, Giacomo
    et al.
    Armiero, Marco
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De Rosa, Salvatore Paolo
    Rethink Campania's toxic-waste scandal2014In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 509, no 7501, p. 427-427Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 208. Danielsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Forsberg, Maria
    Friberg, Maria
    Gustafsson, Bengt
    Liljenström, Hans
    Michanek, Gabriel
    Rydén, Lars
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Zetterberg, Charlotta
    Starkare miljölagstiftning krävs för en hållbar framtid2018In: Dagens Nyheter, no 2018-07-13, article id DN debattArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 209. Dewulf, Art
    et al.
    Karpouzoglou, Timos
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Warner, Jeroen
    Wesselink, Anna
    Mao, Feng
    Vos, Jeroen
    Tamas, Peter
    Groot, Annemarie E.
    Heijmans, Annelies
    Ahmed, Farhana
    Hoang, Long
    Vij, Sumit
    Buytaert, Wouter
    The power to define resilience in social–hydrological systems: Toward a power-sensitive resilience framework2019In: WIREs Water, ISSN 0935-879X, E-ISSN 2049-1948, article id e1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Since the early work on defining and analyzing resilience in domains such as engineering, ecology and psychology, the concept has gained significant traction in many fields of research and practice. It has also become a very powerful justification for various policy goals in the water sector, evident in terms like flood resilience, river resilience, and water resilience. At the same time, a substantial body of literature has developed that questions the resilience concept's systems ontology, natural science roots and alleged conservatism, and criticizes resilience thinking for not addressing power issues. In this study, we review these critiques with the aim to develop a framework for power-sensitive resilience analysis. We build on the three faces of power to conceptualize the power to define resilience. We structure our discussion of the relevant literature into five questions that need to be reflected upon when applying the resilience concept to social?hydrological systems. These questions address: (a) resilience of what, (b) resilience at what scale, (c) resilience to what, (d) resilience for what purpose, and (e) resilience for whom; and the implications of the political choices involved in defining these parameters for resilience building or analysis. Explicitly considering these questions enables making political choices explicit in order to support negotiation or contestation on how resilience is defined and used. This article is categorized under: Human Water > Water Governance. Engineering Water > Planning Water.

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  • 210.
    Diani, Mario
    et al.
    University of Trento.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lorien, Jasny
    University of Essex.
    ‘‘Right to the City’’ and the Structure of Civic Organizational Fields: Evidence from Cape Town2018In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This article proposes a network analytic approach to the role of frames in shaping the structure of civic organizational fields. Adopting a perspective from the global South, it looks at the impact of the expression ‘‘Right to the city’’ (RTC) over alliance building among civil society actors, exploring patterns of collaborative ties among 129 civil society organizations active in Cape Town from 2012 to 2014. The article addresses two broad ques- tions: What is the relation between RTC and other frames that are also frequently invoked to describe urban struggles and issues? Does the RTC frame affect the structure of urban civic organizational fields in significant ways? Data suggest that while RTC plays a significant role in local civil society, it is neither the only interpretative frame that Capetonian civic organizations draw upon to characterize their activity, nor the more salient. ‘‘Urban conservation,’’ especially tied to nature conservation and environmental issues, actually shapes the structure of local organizational fields in a sharper manner. This is, however, a potentially more divisive frame, rooted as it is in the apartheid legacy that still shapes urban dynamics in the city.

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    Diani Ernstson Jasny 2018 Right to the city & SNA in Cape Town
  • 211. Dodds, Klaus
    et al.
    Hemmings, Alan D.Roberts, PederPhilosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Handbook on the Politics of Antarctica2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 212. Doel, Ronald E.
    et al.
    Friedman, Robert Marc
    Lajus, Julia
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wrakberg, Urban
    Strategic Arctic science: national interests in building natural knowledge - interwar era through the Cold War2014In: Journal of Historical Geography, ISSN 0305-7488, E-ISSN 1095-8614, Vol. 44, p. 60-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the 1930s through the 1950s-the decades bracketing the second and third international polar years research in the physical and biological environmental sciences of the Arctic increased dramatically. The heroic, expedition-based style of Arctic science, dominant in the first decades of the twentieth century, gave way to a systematic, long-term, strategic and largely statefunded model of research which increased both Arctic presence and the volume of research output. Factors that made this change possible were distinct for each of the five circumpolar nation-states considered here. For Soviet leaders, the Arctic was an untamed land containing vast economic resources, all within reach if its long-sought Northern Sea Route became reality; Soviet officials sought environmental knowledge of this region with a range of motivations from economic and strategic concerns to enhancing the prestige of socialism. In contrast, United States officials largely ignored the Arctic until the outbreak of World War II, when military commanders quickly grasped the strategic importance of this region. Anxious that the Arctic might become a literal battleground between East and West by 1947, as the Cold War began, Pentagon leaders funded vast northern research programs, including in strategically located Greenland. Canadian leaders while appreciating the national security concerns of its powerful southern neighbor were even more concerned with maintaining sovereignty over its northern territories and gaining knowledge to assist its northern economic ambitions. Norway and Sweden, as smaller states, faced distinct challenges. With strong claims to Arctic heritage but limited resources, leaders of these states sought to create independent research strategies while, especially in the case of Norway, protecting their geopolitical interests in relation to the Soviet Union and the U.S. This article provides the first internationally comparative study of the multiple economic, military, political, and strategic factors that motivated scientific activities and programs in the far north, from the interwar period through World War II and the Cold War, when carefully coordinated, station-based research programs were introduced. The production of knowledge about Arctic's physical environment including its changing climate had little resemblance either to ideas of science-based 'progress,' or responses to perceived environmental concerns. Instead, it demonstrates that strategic military, economic, geopolitical, and national security concerns influenced and shaped most science undertakings, including those of the International Polar Year of 1932-1933 and the following polar year, the International Geophysical Year of 1957-1958.

  • 213.
    Drakenberg, Olof
    et al.
    Göteborgs Miljövetenskapliga Centrum.
    Nilsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Droits de l’Homme à l’Eau et à l’Assainissement au Burkina Faso: Evaluation des droits humains et utilisation d’approches basées sur les droits humains dans la théorie et la pratique2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    D’énormes progrès ont été constatés au Burkina Faso depuis les années 1990 en termes d’accès à l’eau potable. Quelques progrès- mais moindres- peuvent être également observés dans l’accès à un assainissement adéquat. Lorsque l’on utilise les définitions du PCS de l’OMS/UNICEF en matière de couverture d’un meilleur approvisionnement en eau, alors le Burkina Faso atteint déjà les objectifs des OMD en matière d’eau. L’accès à l’assainissement est encore très faible ; entre 11% et 20% selon que l’on utilise les définitions nationales ou celles du PCS. Il y a donc, une réalisation progressive des droits à l’eau et à l’assainissement, bien que les progrès en matière d’assainissement soient non satisfaisants.Les engagements de l’Etat en matière d’eau et d’assainissement sont clairement indiqués au Burkina Faso par le biais des conventions internationales et des législations nationales. Les quatre principes de redevabilité, de transparence, de participation et de non- discrimination des droits humains sont à des degrés divers intégrés dans les institutions formelles, l’organisation et les opérations du secteur. Toutefois, subsistent d’énormes lacunes quant à la manière dont ils sont mis en pratique. La redevabilité est un problème majeur, particulièrement aux niveaux régional et national. Les mécanismes de participation existent au niveau local, mais la participation des femmes et des autres groupes marginalisés demeure faible en bien des endroits et des décisions clés sont prises à d’autres niveaux, mettant en péril la signification de la participation aux endroits où elle se passe. Bien que la plupart des informations soit ouvertes au public, cela ne signifie pas qu’elles soient facilement accessibles. Les mécanismes de non-discrimination, par exemple dans la budgétisation, peuvent être renforcés en utilisant les données déjà existantes en matière d’inégalité.Le Burkina Faso a, dans plusieurs aspects, respecté et dépassé les critères normatifs internationaux (normes minimales) des droits humains aux services d’eau et d’assainissement. Alors que des critères normatifs plus ambitieux sont louables à long terme, ils sont également plus coûteux et par conséquent, le taux de réalisation sera plus lent. Une norme inférieure et plus flexible pourrait accélérer la réalisation des droits particulièrement liés à l’assainissement.Dans l’ensemble, d’importantes opportunités existent pour la réalisation du droit à l’eau et à l’assainissement et pour l’utilisation d’approches basées sur les droits humains dans le secteur de l’eau et de l’assainissement au Burkina Faso.

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  • 214.
    Drakenberg, Olof
    et al.
    Göteborgs Miljövetenskapliga Centrum.
    Nilsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Human Rights to Water and Sanitation in Burkina Faso: Assessing human rights and use of human rights based approaches in theory and practice2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Great progress has been noted in Burkina Faso since the 1990s in terms of access to safe drinking water. Some – but much smaller – progress can also be seen in access to adequate sanitation. When using the WHO/UNICEF JMP definitions of coverage of improved water supply, then Burkina Faso has already met the MDG targets on water. The access to sanitation is still very low; between 11% and 20% depending on whether one uses the national definitions or the JMP definitions. There is thus progressive realisation of the rights to water and sanitation although progress on sanitation is non-satisfactory.

    The obligations of the State for water and sanitation are clearly stated in Burkina Faso through international conventions and national legislation. The four human rights principles of accountability, transparency, participation and non-discrimination are to a varying extent integrated in the formal institutions, organisation and operations of the sector. However, there are serious weaknesses in how they are practically implemented. Accountability is a key problem, especially at regional and national level. Participatory mechanisms exist at local level but participation of women and other marginalised groups remain weak in many places and key decisions are made at other levels, jeopardizing the meaningfulness of participation where it occurs. While most information is open to the public it does not mean it is easily accessible. Mechanisms for non-discrimination e.g. in budgeting can be strengthened using already existing data on inequity.

    Burkina Faso has in several aspects met and overshot international normative criteria (minimum standards) of human rights to WSS. While more ambitious normative criteria are commendable in the long run, it is also more costly and thus the rate of realisation will be slower. A lower and more flexible norm could speed up the realisation of rights especially related to sanitation. On the whole, significant opportunities exist for realising the right to water and sanitation and the use of human rights based approaches in the water and sanitation sector in Burkina Faso. 

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  • 215. Dussauge, I.
    et al.
    Gribbe, Johan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kaijser, Arne
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lundin, Per
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Peralta, Julia
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sjöblom, G.
    Thodenius, B.
    Precursors of the IT Nation: Computer use and control in swedish society, 1955–19852011In: 3rd IFIP WG 9.7 Conference on History of Nordic Computing, HiNC 2010, Springer-Verlag New York, 2011, p. 425-432Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a presentation of a research project that aims at writing the history of computing in Sweden in the mainframe age from a user perspective. Rather than beginning with the history of hardware, this project takes as its point of departure the way in which actors in different sectors of society used computer technology in order to achieve a higher degree of control over crucial processes, whether through electronic data processing systems, process control or technical/scientific computation.

  • 216.
    Eklund, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    van der Watt, Lize-Marié
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Refracting (geo)political choices in the Arctic2017In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geopolitics as a field was originally intended as a theoretical modelling of the relationship between fixed geographical circumstances and political choice. Now, the field is largely dominated by critical studies. It is almost considered axiomatic to include geopolitics as a theme in descriptive and analytical studies of the Arctic in global, regional, national and local contexts. This essay aims to review the core tenets of geopolitical thought and trace the categories and distinctions between the classical and critical approaches as applied in Arctic scholarship. It draws on highlights from the Arctic policy texts of three states demonstrating how assumptions and political options in terms of Arctic geographies can be expressed in different geopolitical frameworks. It is argued that revisiting and reviewing the core categories of geopolitics and their application in Arctic affairs can contribute to a better-informed understanding of how developments in the Arctic may unfold, as well as provide insights into the different functionalities of geopolitics.

  • 217. Ekström, Anders
    et al.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Integrativa kunskapsmiljöer: Rapport från två seminarier våren 2016.2016Report (Other academic)
  • 218. Elmqvist, Thomas
    et al.
    Colding, Johan
    Barthel, Stephan
    Borgström, Sara
    Duit, Andreas
    Lundberg, Jakob
    Andersson, Erik
    Ahrné, Karin
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Folke, Carl
    Bengtsson, Janne
    The Dynamics of Social-Ecological Systems in Urban Landscapes2004In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1023, p. 308-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses social-ecological dynamics in the greater metropolitan area of Stockholm County, Sweden, with special focus on the National Urban Park (NUP). It is part of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) and has the following specific objectives: (1) to provide scientific information on biodiversity patterns, ecosystem dynamics, and ecosystem services generated; (2) to map interplay between actors and institutions involved in management of ecosystem services; and (3) to identify strategies for strengthening social-ecological resilience. The green areas in Stockholm County deliver numerous ecosystem services, for example, air filtration, regulation of microclimate, noise reduction, surface water drainage, recreational and cultural values, nutrient retention, and pollination and seed dispersal. Recreation is among the most important services and NUP, for example, has more than 15 million visitors per year. More than 65 organizations representing 175,000 members are involved in management of ecosystem services. However, because of population increase and urban growth during the last three decades, the region displays a quite dramatic loss of green areas and biodiversity. An important future focus is how management may reduce increasing isolation of urban green areas and enhance connectivity. Comanagement should be considered where locally managed green space may function as buffer zones and for management of weak links that connect larger green areas; for example, there are three such areas around NUP identified. Preliminary results indicate that areas of informal management represent centers on which to base adaptive comanagement, with the potential to strengthen biodiversity management and resilience in the landscape.

  • 219.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Conny Kullman: An interview with Martin Emanuel 15 November 2017 and 25 January 20182018Data set
    Abstract [en]

    The interview treats Conny Kullman’s experiences from space-related work, first at Saab Space in Gothenburg and later from his career within Intelsat. Kullman describes the Gothenburg department of Saab Space—where he worked as a system design engineer, designing and testing on board computer models for the Ariane launcher and a number of European satellites—as relatively independent from the Linköping main office. Coming to Intelsat as a systems engineer in 1986, during the 1990s Kullman advanced within the organization and held management positions with responsibility for Systems Operation, Systems Planning, as Chief Information Officer, and as Vice President for all operation as well as Engineering. In 1998 he became CEO of Intelsat and embarked on a three-tiered program: to privatize Intelsat, to make an IPO, and to have Intelsat develop a ground infrastructure for satellite communication. In the interview, Kullman elaborates on the organizational structure of Intelsat, an “intergovernmental cooperative” as he calls it, and how this structure, having been a strength in the early days, in his view became a major weakness. As fibre optics began to provide a cheap alternative to satellite telecommunication, and with the development of competing satellite communication systems, the treaty-based regulations as well as the interests of the largest Signatories (owners) of Intelsat, not least American Comsat and British Telecom, impeded sound operation from a business point of view. The interview treats in detail Kullman’s role in and insights from the privatization process, the transition in ownership in 2005, when Intelsat was bought by private equity firms, as well as Intelsat’s acquisition of Loral (2003) and PanAmSat (2006).

  • 220.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lennart Lübeck: En intervju av Lennart Björn 10 december 2013 och 7 januari 20142018Data set
    Abstract [en]

    The interview treats Lennart Lübeck’s experiences from space-related work within multiple organizations, most notably during the early Swedish sounding rockets experiment in Nausta and Kronogård; within the so-called Space Technology Group (Rymdtekniska gruppen) of the Swedish Research Councils 1963–69 and as CEO (1986–98) and chairman (1998–2006) of the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC, Rymdbolaget). Even as he held positions within the Ministry of Industry (1969–78), as state secretary in the Ministry of Transport and Communications (1978–79), and as CEO for the Swedish Industrial Development Fund (1979–86), Lübeck continuously had contact with and took an interest in space-related issues—during his time in the latter position he was also board member of SSC. From the viewpoint of this unique carrier, Lübeck depicts key events and projects as well as the inner workings of parts of the state administration, in the event touching upon a great cast of characters involved in or influencing Swedish space-related policy and activities over the years, ranging from scientist to top-rank politicians and bureaucrats. The interview focuses on two issues in particular. Firstly, the character of SSC, and the tactics and strategies of the corporation vis-à-vis other actors in the Swedish space landscape. Lübeck describes SSC as a successful innovation hub but with a culture more resembling a public authority, which meant that they lacked—with some notable exceptions—the capacity to really commercialize and reach volume production. Without a viable domestic market for satellites, in 2011, the satellite-building section of SSC was sold to the German company OHB. Secondly, Lübeck traces how Swedish state policy with respect to space has changed over time. While there has hardly ever been any inherent interest in space or space-related research among policy makers, Lübeck asserts, space-related policy has rather been about achieving other political goals: industrial policy, regional policy, and European policy. In a situation of declining policy interest in Swedish space activities, the latter—that is, to show presence and solidarity in the European arena—has been the most prolific part of the three-tiered policy.

  • 221.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lennart Nordh: En intervju av Martin Emanuel 22 oktober 20172017Data set
    Abstract [en]

    The interview treats Lennart Nordh’s experiences as an astronomer at Stockholm University and the Stockholm Observatory in Saltsjöbaden, and as secretary of the Swedish National Space Board’s (SNSB) scientific committee, responsible for the distribution of funds for Swedish space-related research and development. As part of his role at SNSB, Nordh was also the Swedish delegate in ESA:s scientific committee, which he chaired for three years towards the end of his career. The interview treats, among other things, the entry, development, and special requirements of astronomy as a space-borne scientific field in a landscape that was initially dominated by space physics and aeronomy. Given Nordh’s involvement in infrared (IR) astronomy in particular, focus is on IR-related projects, from balloon and sounding rocket-based projects via the Swedish national satellite project Odin to grand international missions such as ISO, Herschel and James Webb Space Telescope, although he also discusses other Swedish astronomy groups’ particularities and access to experimental know-how and technical facilities. Finally, based on his experiences within the Swedish and European scientific committees, Nordh elaborates on the inner workings and considerations regarding funding of space research, including national strategies and the juste retour-principle that guides ESA-funding.

  • 222.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Per Nobinder: En intervju av Martin Emanuel 12 april 20172017Data set
    Abstract [en]

    The interview treats Per Nobinder’s experiences as industry policy officer at Rymdtekniska gruppen, Rymdbolaget, and later Rymdstyrelsen, which altogether lend him a key role in the distribution of Swedish funds – via European space organizations or not – to space technology projects. The interview elucidates the structure and practice of Sweden’s policy making related to European space activities within ESRO and later ESA. Not least it discusses the trade-offs between technical, political and economic considerations in the distribution of European funds, stressing the Juste Retour as the ultimate principal for the outcome. Among Swedish industry actors competing for Swedish and European funds, Saab was the largest, Ericsson substantially smaller, while Volvo had unique technical competence in a European perspective – in a way that Saab did not. Partly as a result of this, Nobinder describes the cooperation with Volvo as smoother than that with Saab. Attempts to press the Swedish industry actors to co-fund Swedish state funds for space technology projects were, however, ultimately unsuccessful. The interview also highlights the relationships, power struggles and tensions between the private industry actors and state-owned Rymdbolaget, on the one hand, and between Rymdbolaget and the authority Rymdstyrelsen on the other. Not least through its dynamic director, Rymdbolaget tried to, and often succeeded, to shape Swedish policies related to space activities.

  • 223.
    Emanuel, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gärdebo, Johan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Saabs omborddatorer och TT&C för rymdverksamhet: Transkript av ett vittnesseminarium vid RUAG Space i Göteborg den 2 maj 20172018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The witness seminar “Saabs omborddatorer och TT&C för rymdverksamhet” (Saab’s on board computers and TT&C for space activities) was held at RUAG Space in Gothenburg on May 2, 2017, and was led by Lennart Lübeck, assisted by Mar-tin Emanuel. The seminar focused on how Saab’s (or, more correctly, until 1983, Saab-Scania’s, and from then on Saab Space’s) Gothenburg office embarked on European space-related projects, in particular relating to communication sys-tems, Telemetry, Tracking and Command (TT&C), as well as onboard computers (OBC) for spacecraft. After having failed to win bids on ESRO satellites in the 1960s, Saab joined the MESH consortium in 1967. In the seminar, MESH’s success-ful bid for OTS (Orbital Test Satellite) stands out as an im-portant turning point for the company’s future contracts with ESRO and later ESA. With respect to Saab’s development of onboard computers, it initially relied substantially on collabo-ration with the American company TRW. Building on the learning process from the ESRO-funded development pro-gram for an Engineering Model, Saab, and later RUAG Space, would deliver onboard computers for several genera-tions of the Ariane launching rockets, SPOT-satellites, and many more. Beginning with the Hipparcos satellite, TT&C and the onboard computer were merged into a data handling system. In the process, what had previously been two sepa-rate groups of the company merged into one. With respect to Saab’s motives to engage in space technology in the first place, the main motive appears to have been to maintain and promote the company’s technical expertise, more so than any hopes to be able to set up large-scale manufacturing. The seminar also treated the relationship between Saab’s two branches engaged in space-related activities. Although their organizational belonging shifted over the years, Linköping remained the location of management and formal interna-tional contacts—and also nationally-oriented projects—while the Gothenburg office was home to the projects for the in-ternational market. The OBC group in Gothenburg tried to maintain as much independence as possible vis-à-vis Linkö-ping, although it relied on upper management for negotiating and winning international contracts. Also important to secure European contracts for Saab was the support, at critical mo-ments, of the Swedish delegation to ESRO and ESA, as well as excellent Swedish contacts with CNES.

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  • 224.
    Emanuel, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gärdebo, Johan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wormbs, Nina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Politiken kring svensk rymdverksamhet: Transkript av ett vittnesseminarium på Tekniska museet i Stockholm den 17 januari 20182018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The  witness  seminar  “Politiken  kring  svensk  rymdverksam-het” (Politics relating to Swedish space activities) was held at Tekniska museet on January 17, 2018, and was led by Lennart Nordh,  assisted  by  Johan  Gärdebo.  The  seminar  focused  on  the relationship between Swedish space activities and various forms of politics, from the 1960s until the 2000s. The discus-sants  presented  various  definitions  of  politics,  recurrently  re-turning  to  the  question  whether  or  not  Sweden  ever  had  a  comprehensive space policy or not. According to the partici-pants,  Swedish  space  activities  have  been  linked  to  their  real  or  perceived  contributions  to  other  policy  areas—research, technology,  foreign  policy,  regional  policy,  and  European  in-tegration—but without a clear overriding political vision per-taining  to  space  specifically.  Initiatives  were  characterized  as  “management  by  opportunities,”  which  implies  making  full  use of opportunities arising in- or outside of the space activi-ties.  In  addition  to  this,  policy-makers,  whether  within  the  Swedish  National  Space  Board,  the  Swedish  Space  Corpora-tion, or the Swedish space industry, have called upon allies in other European governments, organizations and industries, as well  as  individuals  within  the  Swedish  establishment  to  exert  pressure  on  the  Swedish  Government  at  critical  moments.  On other occasions foreign pressure was exerted without any proposals  from  Swedish  actors.  It  was  noted  that  regional  support  for  Kiruna  has  been  important  since  Swedish  space  activities began in the 1960s, and the Esrange space range was established.  The  seminar  identified  several  examples  of  how  policy-makers  within  the  Swedish  space  sector  negotiated  with  governmental  officials  to  gain  support  for projects  and  to expand the scope of space activities into other policy areas. Telecommunication,  remote  sensing  and  meteorology  were  discussed as the main areas in which space technology found operational use—although research and geographic surveying was  also  mentioned.  Since  the  1990s,  the  main  changes  have  been  driven  by  the  Swedish  integration  into  the  European  Union,  the  reduced  Swedish  ownership  in  major  industrial companies, and the increased commercialization of space ac-tivities.  The  previously  dominant  state  funding  was  comple-mented by increasing private financing, and new start-ups be-gan   to   compete   with   previously   established   companies.   Meanwhile, the ability of Swedish state actors to influence the future of Swedish space enterprises has diminished.

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  • 225.
    Erixon Aalto, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Of Plants, High Lines and Horses: Civics and Designers in the Relational Articulation of Values of Urban Natures2017In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 157, p. 309-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses three interventions into urban green spaces—a wetland in Cape Town, a post- industrial site in New York, and a park outside London. Through their different contexts, they help to grasp a wider phenomenon: the protection of urban nature through the development of protective narratives. We analyze these interventions as examples of “value articulation”, which we view as a relational and sociomaterial practice that requires the enrolment of people, plants, and things that together perform, spread, and deploy stories about why given places need protection. For each case study, we also highlight the moments when narrative practices move beyond mere protection and start to change the very context in which they were developed. We refer to these as projective narratives, emphasizing how novel values and uses are projected onto these spaces, opening them up for reworking. Our analyses of these successful attempts to protect land demonstrate how values emerge as part of inclusive, yet specific, narratives that mobilize and broaden support and constituencies. By constructing spatial linkages, such narratives embed places in wider geographical ‘wholes’ and we observe how the physical landscape itself becomes an active narrative element. In contrast to rationalist and external frameworks for analyzing values in relation to urban natures (e.g., ecosystem services), our ‘bottom-up’ mode situates urban nature in specific contexts, helping us to profoundly rethink planning and practice in order to (i) challenge expert categories and city/nature dichotomies; (ii) provide vernacular ways of knowing/understanding; and (iii) rethink the role of urban designers.

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  • 226.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Book Review. Greening Berlin: The Co-Production of Science, Politics, and Urban Nature2014In: Science & Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2243-4690, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 113-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Re-translating nature in post-apartheid Cape Town: The material semiotics of people and plants at Bottom Road2013In: Actor-Network Theory for Development: Working Paper Series / [ed] Richard Heeks, 2013, no June, p. 1-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses actor-network theory (ANT) to study a grassroots’ ecological rehabilitation project in a marginalized area of Cape Town. By tracing the stabilization of relations between residents, authorities, plants and green areas, the paper demonstrates how ANT can be enfolded into the study of African cities as an attentive way to rethink agency, empowerment and collective action. It also shows how ANT allows for the study of epistemological and ontological politics inherent to all collective action—here demonstrating how plants participated in giving voice to memories of oppression while undermining expert-based practices that separate Nature and Culture.

  • 228.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Social Network Analysis (SNA)2012In: The Encyclopedia of Sustainability: Vol. 6. Measurements, Indicators, and Research Methods for Sustainability / [ed] Fogel, D.; Fredericks, S.; Harrington, L.; Spellerberg, I., Berkshire Publishing , 2012, Vol. 6, p. 322-325Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    The political nature of urban wetlands: Speaking from Princess Vlei Wetland, Cape Town2014In: Urban wetlands: South Asia, no 2, p. 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 230.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Transformative collective action: A network approach to transformative change in ecosystem-based management2011In: Social Networks and Natural Resource Management: Uncovering the Social Fabric in Environmental Governance / [ed] Bodin, Örjan; Prell, Christina, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011, p. 255-287Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [From Introduction] This chapter will strive to add to contributions made by other authors in describing and explaining transformative change. Special attention will be paid to elucidate the collective nature of these transformations, hence the title of transformative collective action. The analysis will show that in order to bring about radical institutional change of natural resource management, a whole network of individuals and organizations are needed that through time can sustain pressure for change. These actors furthermore need to relate to each other through information exchange and repeated collaborations in order to coordinate their collective action, to learn as they go along of what works and what does not work, and to negotiate their vision of change to reach some common ground that can unite their collective effort. This type of sustained collective action furthermore needs to operate through, and challenge, already established institutions, modes of thought and ways of doing things. As such we can talk about collective action as a ‘collective actor’ – the network of actors – that over time builds enough agency to generate institutional change.

  • 231.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Lawhon, Mary
    Duminy, James
    Conceptual Vectors of African Urbanism: 'Engaged Theory-Making' and 'Platforms of Engagement'2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1563-1577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban political ecology (UPE) has provided critical insights into the sociomaterial construction of urban environments, their unequal distribution of resources, and contestation over power and resources. Most of this work is rooted in Marxist urban geographical theory, which provides a useful but limited analysis. Such works typically begin with a historical-materialist theory of power, then examine particular artifacts and infrastructure to provide a critique of society.We argue that there aremultipleways of expanding this framing, including through political ecology or wider currents of Marxism. Here, we demonstrate one possibility: starting from theory and empirics in the South, specifically, African urbanism. We show how African urbanism can inform UPE and the associated research methods, theory and practice to create a more situated UPE. We begin suggesting what a situated UPE might entail: starting with everyday practices, examining diffuse forms of power, and opening the scope for radical incrementalism.

  • 232.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Nilsson, David
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Histories of Heterogenous Infrastructures: Negotiating Colonial, Postcolonial and Oral Archives in Kampala, Uganda2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical infrastructure studies are growing in importance to understand how sociocultural, ecological, and ecological relations are inscribed, negotiated, and contested in urban spaces. A major effort has been to ground such work in experiences of the global South, moving beyond the “modern infrastructure ideal” a fully networked city, towards conceptualizations of incremental, peopled, and heterogenous infrastructure. However, there are still few historical studies that depart from these new conceptualizations. In this paper we draw upon our empirical work in Kampala, Uganda, in an attempt to historicize “heterogenous infrastructure configurations” (Lawhon et al. 2017) through combining (and constructing) three distinct historical archives: (i) the colonial archives (based on traditional archival work in Kew National Archives in London); (ii) the official postcolonial archives (which meant to crisscross through Kampala to assemble documents, reports, photos and legal notes); and (iii) oral histories (where we interviewed elderly women and men with a long family history in the city). This work has led to several pertinent questions about “what to make of the colonial archives when they systematically exclude or distort the wider heterogenous infrastructure reality that surely existed in parallel to the ‘European’ city?” “why are postcolonial archives so difficult to find and assemble?” and “how to draw upon the richness and texture of oral histories from particular places, families and persons.” This paper then, reflects on how we have grappled with working across these archives with the aim to contribute more general ideas of how to situate and historicize the study of contemporary infrastructures in a postcolonial world (in communication with postcolonial historians as in Mamdani, Chakrabarty, Lalu, and Benson). By pushing different narratives to confront and clash, and by critically looking at our own practice, new histories arise. But also new questions; some which should have been asked long ago. We argue here for an approach of heterodoxa; one that opens for different meanings, archives and locations from where to construct histories and futures about infrastructure and urban spaces.

  • 233.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Swyngedouw, Erik
    The University of Manchester.
    Bringing Back the Political: Egalitarian Acting, Performative Theory2019In: Urban Political Ecology in the Anthropo-obscene: Interruptions and Possibilities / [ed] Henrik Ernstson, Erik Swyngedouw, Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2019, p. 255-267Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The political is categorically and fundamentally performative. Those that gain a voice as equals do not do so by demanding a right to speak within an already policed order, they stage equality and produce new spaces from where equality and freedom can be thought and acted out. This notion of the political, we argue, has to (again) become central in radical and critical theory, urban political ecology (UPE) and associated fields in the coming decade. This concluding essay draws on the chapters of the book to discuss what “politically performative theory” could mean and what challenges and possibilities it brings to a reconfigured UPE and in politicizing the environment.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-11 12:39
  • 234.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Swyngedouw, Erik
    The University of Manchester.
    O Tempora! O Mores! Interrupting the Anthropo-obScene2019In: Urban Political Ecology in the Anthropo-obscene: Interruptions and Possibilities / [ed] Henrik Ernstson, Erik Swyngedouw, Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2019, p. 25-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We develop the term “the Anthropo-obScene” to show how various discourses on “the Anthropocene” have created a set of stages that disavow certain voices and render some forms of acting (human, non-human, and more-than-human) off-stage. Examples include consensual narratives of adaptive, resilient, and geo-engineered governance, but also more-than-human ontologies that, in spite their purported radicality, could lead to a problematic strengthening of technomanagerial discourse. With the Anthropo-obScene, we seek to interrupt the deepening of “immunological bio-politics” and a politicization of the socio-ecological conundrum we are in, while fully and radically embracing our interdependence with non-humans.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-11 12:42
  • 235.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Swyngedouw, Erik
    The University of Manchester.
    Politicizing the Environment in the Urban Century2019In: Urban Political Ecology in the Anthropo-obscene: Interruptions and Possibilities / [ed] Ernstson, Henrik; Swyngedouw, Erik, Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2019, p. 3-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on the book’s central theme on how to organize anew the articulation between emancipatory theory and political activism. Framed against the background of five major transformations that deal with planetary urbanisation to de-politicization, we argue that while UPE and associated fields have offered ways to analyse the politics of nature, they have less to offer in terms of what to do, in terms of thinking with radical political activists about new imaginaries and practices of emancipatory socio-ecological change. In light of this, we present the chapters as enriching the approaches to re-centre the political in thought and action in environmental and urban studies.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-11 13:25
  • 236.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Ecosystem services as technology of globalization: On articulating values in urban nature2013In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 86, p. 274-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper demonstrates how ecosystem services can be viewed and studied as a social practice of value articulation. With this follows that when ecosystem services appear as objects of calculated value in decision-making they are already tainted by the social and cannot be viewed as merely reflecting an objective biophysical reality. Using urban case studies of place-based struggles in Stockholm and Cape Town, we demonstrate how values are relationally constructed through social practice. The same analysis is applied on ecosystem services. Of special interest is the TEEB Manual that uses a consultancy report on the economic evaluation of Cape Town's 'natural assets' to describe a step-by-step method to catalog, quantify and price certain aspects of urban nature. The Manual strives to turn the ecosystem services approach into a transportable method, capable of objectively measuring the values of urban nature everywhere, in all cities in the world. With its gesture of being universal and objective, the article suggests that the ecosystem services approach is a technology of globalization that de-historicizes and de-ecologizes debates on urbanized ecologies, effectively silencing other and often marginalized ways of knowing and valuing. The paper inscribes ecosystem services as social practice, as part of historical process, and as inherently political. A call is made for critical ethnographies of how ecosystem services and urban sustainability indicators are put into use to change local decision-making while manufacturing global expertise.

  • 237.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grounding and Worlding Urban Natures: Configuring an Urban Ecology Knowledge Project2019In: Grounding Urban Natures: Histories and Futures of Urban Ecologies / [ed] Henrik Ernstson & Sverker Sörlin, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2019, p. 363-390Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 238.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, SverkerPhilosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grounding Urban Natures: Histories and Futures of Urban Ecologies2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 239.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Preface -- A Diverse Urban World2019In: Grounding Urban Natures: Histories and Futures of Urban Ecologies / [ed] Henrik Ernstson & Sverker Sörlin, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press , 2019, p. vii-xiiiChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Toward Comparative Urban Environmentalism: Situating Urban Natures in an Emerging ‘World of Cities’2019In: Grounding Urban Natures: Histories and Futures of Urban Ecologies / [ed] Henrik Ernstson & Sverker Sörlin, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press , 2019, p. 1-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Social Movements and Ecosystem Services-the Role of Social Network Structure in Protecting and Managing Urban Green Areas in Stockholm2008In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploitation and degradation of urban green areas reduce their capacity to sustain ecosystem services. In protecting and managing these areas, research has increasingly focused on actors in civil society. Here, we analyzed an urban movement of 62 civil-society organizations-from user groups, such as boating clubs and allotment gardens, to culture and nature conservation groups-that have protected the Stockholm National Urban Park. We particularly focused on the social network structure of the movement, i.e., the patterns of interaction between movement organizations. The results reveal a core-periphery structure where core and semi-core organizations have deliberately built political connections to authorities, whereas the periphery gathers all user groups involved in day-to-day activities in the park. We show how the core-periphery structure has facilitated collective action to protect the park, but we also suggest that the same social network structure might simultaneously have constrained collaborative ecosystem management. In particular, user groups with valuable local ecological knowledge have not been included in collaborative arenas. Our case points out the inherent double-nature of all social networks as they facilitate some collective actions, yet constrain others. The paper argues for incorporating social network structure in theories and applications of adaptive governance and co-management.

  • 242.
    Evens, Siegfried
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De brand in de Innovation: De ramp die België veranderde2017 (ed. 2000)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [nl]

    Een ramp zonder voorgaande was het, de brand in de Brusselse Innovation op 22 mei 1967. Er vielen 323 doden en zeker meer dan 150 gewonden. Toen het shoppingcenter in de Brusselse Nieuwstraat uitbrandde, waren er naar schatting zo'n 800 mensen aanwezig in het gebouw. Op basis van onderzoek in de archieven en gesprekken met ooggetuigen van toen reconstrueert historicus Siegfried Evens deze grote ramp. Vijftig jaar na de feiten is het bijvoorbeeld nog steeds niet duidelijk hoeveel slachtoffers er precies zijn gevallen. Ook de vraag wat de brand heeft betekend op politiek en maatschappelijk vlak komt aan bod. De vele foto's maken van het boek een schitterend tijdsdocument.

  • 243.
    Evens, Siegfried
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De impact van de brand in de Innovation: Rampen en risicopreventie in politiek-historisch perspectief2019In: Tijdschrift voor geschiedenis, ISSN 0040-7518, E-ISSN 2352-1163, Vol. 132, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how the Innovation department store fire in Brussels (1967) influenced thepolitics of risk management in Belgium. To do this, I rely on the combination of disaster and riskstudies frameworks and a historical focus on temporality and actors. On the one hand, it is revealedthat the Innovation fire was a decisive part of a longer political and societal process within theBelgian risk society. After the disaster, political changes occurred in the domains of fire preventionregulation, coordination of first aid organisations, and local traffic regulation. In addition, thecatastrophe was an opportunity for Brussels’ city planners. The perception of the fire as a nationaldisaster, abundant media coverage, and a public debate on the risks of long-term modernisationrendered the catastrophe an opportunity for change. However, many regulatory changes had alreadybeen instigated earlier, making the disaster an accelerator rather than a catalyst of change. On theother hand, four actors who set the agenda and implemented the new legislation, are identified:politicians, journalists, experts and insurance companies. In sum, it is argued that the Innovationdisaster is a model case study for both disaster research and political history.

  • 244.
    Evens, Siegfried
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De mijnramp van Marcinelle: Terugblik op een bijzondere herdenking2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    Abstract
  • 245.
    Evens, Siegfried
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Klüppelberg, Achim (Contributor)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De serie "Chernobyl" toont grenzen van experten in coronatijden aan2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246.
    Evens, Siegfried
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    En de woontorens in België?2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 247.
    Evens, Siegfried
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The impact of the fire in the A l'Innovation department store. Disasters and risk prevention in political-historical perspective: [De impact van de brand in grootwarenhuis A l'Innovation: Rampen en risicopreventie in politiek-historisch perspectief]2019In: Tijdschrift voor geschiedenis, ISSN 0040-7518, E-ISSN 2352-1163, Vol. 132, no 1, p. 49-71, article id 10.5117/TVGESCH2019.1.004.EVENSArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how the fire in the Innovation department store in Brussels(1967) influenced the politics of risk management in Belgium. I rely on theframeworks of disaster and risk studies and a historical focus on temporality andactors. The Innovation fire was a decisive part of a longer political and societalprocess within Belgium’s risk community. After the disaster political changesoccurred in the domains of fire prevention regulation, coordination of first aidorganisations, and local traffic regulation. In addition the catastrophe providedan opportunity for Brussels’ city planners. The perception of the fire as a nationaldisaster, abundant media coverage, and a public debate on the risks of long-termmodernisation made the catastrophe an opportunity for change. However, manyregulatory changes had already been instigated, making the disaster an acceleratorrather than a cause of change. Four actors who set the agenda and implementedthe new legislation are identified: politicians, journalists, experts, and insurancecompanies. In sum, it is argued that the Innovation disaster is a model case studyfor both disaster research and political history.

  • 248.
    Evens, Siegfried
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    'Tijd kopen door kerncentrales langer open te houden, is tijd verliezen'2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 249.
    Evens, Siegfried
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Klüppelberg, Achim
    Gärdebo, Johan
    De serie "Chernobyl" toont grenzen van experten in coronatijden aan2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 250. Exner-Pirot, Heather
    et al.
    Ackrén, Maria
    Loukacheva, Natalia
    Nicol, Heather
    Nilsson, Annika E
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Spence, Jennifer
    Form and Function: The Future of the Arctic Council2019Other (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 1052
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