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  • 201. Andreou, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Söderman, Erik
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Sedvall, Göran C
    Terenius, Lars
    Agartz, Ingrid
    Jönsson, Erik G
    Polymorphisms in genes implicated in dopamine, serotonin and noradrenalin metabolism suggest association with cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolite concentrations in psychosis2014In: Behavioral and Brain Functions, E-ISSN 1744-9081, Vol. 10, p. 26-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) are the major monoamine metabolites in the central nervous system (CNS). Their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations, reflecting the monoamine turnover rates in CNS, are partially under genetic influence and have been associated with schizophrenia. We have hypothesized that CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations represent intermediate steps between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes implicated in monoaminergic pathways and psychosis.

    METHODS: We have searched for association between 119 SNPs in genes implicated in monoaminergic pathways [tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), TPH2, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), DOPA decarboxylase (DDC), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and MAOB] and monoamine metabolite concentrations in CSF in 74 patients with psychotic disorder.

    RESULTS: There were 42 nominally significant associations between SNPs and CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations, which exceeded the expected number (20) of nominal associations given the total number of tests performed. The strongest association (p = 0.0004) was found between MAOB rs5905512, a SNP previously reported to be associated with schizophrenia in men, and MHPG concentrations in men with psychotic disorder. Further analyses in 111 healthy individuals revealed that 41 of the 42 nominal associations were restricted to patients with psychosis and were absent in healthy controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that altered monoamine turnover rates in CNS reflect intermediate steps in the associations between SNPs and psychosis.

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  • 202.
    Andræ, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Facing death: physicians' difficulties and coping strategies in cancer care1994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if the treatment of cancer has developed over the last decades 50% of the patients still die of their cancer. The doctor's way of dealing with his and his patient's anxiety must surely be of significance for the treatment the patient receives.

    In the first part of the thesis earlier studies of physicians' stress and ways of coping are reported. There is a lack of systematic studies which show how doctors working with cancer patients adjust to this work. The aim of this investigation is to study cancer doctors' difficulties and coping strategies. The theoretical frame of the study embraces parts of psychoanalytical theory and coping models, emphasizing that both unconscious and conscious psychological processes play their part in the coping process.

    The second, empirical part of the study includes 23 physicians strategically selected out of a population of physicians who work with institutional care and who have daily contact with adult cancer patients. The main method of data collection has been a series of recorded interviews. The focus of the interview was the physician's perception of how he reacts, thinks, talks and acts in different phases of the cancer disease. To illustrate the defence strategies of the interviewers, the projective percept-genetic test, the "Defence Mechanism Test" (DMT) is used. The "Structural Analysis of Social Behaviour" (SASB) has been used to study the doctors' self image.

    The results indicate that the stated difficulties deeply affect the doctor as a human being. The statements reflect conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to authority, conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to frightening and injuring, conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to intimacy/distance. Thirty themes of coping strategies frequently recur and they have been grouped into seven categories. Most of the doctors "seek knowledge" and support from scientific literature. The majority of them state that attempting to "solve a problem" is their main strategy. Most of the doctors "seek support " as a part of their coping strategy. An interesting observation is that the doctors to a higher extent "seek a relation" to their patients rather than to their colleagues. Almost one third use "denial of the severity of a situation" as their main strategy. All the doctors consciously or unconsciously use "diverting strategies", i.e. undertake tasks which are devoid of contact with patients, such as research and administration or other activities which allow them to avoid the patient. One third use "projective manoeuvres" but this is never a main strategy.

    In the third part of the study the credibility of the results and their pedagogical and practical implications are discussed.

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    Facing death
  • 203.
    André, Frida
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Einarsson, Isak
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Trebbin Harvard, Sunna
    Civic Centre Children and Youth, The Social Services Administration, Copenhagen (DNK).
    Franzén, Leonard
    Social Services, Malmö (SWE).
    Möttus, Annika
    Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Håkansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, (SWE); Region Skåne, Malmö Addiction Centre, Gambling Disorder Unit, Malmö (SWE).
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Relapse prevention therapy for internet gaming disorder in Swedish child and adolescent psychiatric clinics: a randomized controlled trial2023In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of relapse prevention (RP) as a treatment for internet gaming disorder (IGD).

    Design: Randomized controlled trial.

    Setting: Three child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) units in Region Skåne, Sweden.

    Participants: Children aged 13-18 years, coming for their first visit to CAP during 2022, were screened for gaming behavior. Those who met the proposed DSM-5 criteria for IGD were offered participation in the trial, if they had the capacity to provide written informed consent and if they spoke Swedish. A total of 111 CAP patients agreed to participate. Out of those, 11 patients were excluded due to incorrect inclusion such as young age (n = 1), or due to the absence of responses to follow-up measures (n = 9). After exclusion, 102 participants remained (intervention = 47, control = 55).

    Interventions: The intervention, RP, is based on cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) and was provided individually, comprising of five to seven 45-min sessions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks versus treatment as usual.

    Outcome measures: Participants were assessed with Game Addiction Scale for Adolescents pre-treatment (GASA) (baseline), post-treatment (treatment group only), and 3 months after baseline (follow-up).

    Results: The repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant interaction effect between treatment and time. Both the control group and treatment group lowered their mean GASA score from baseline to follow-up significantly, but the improvement was greater in the treatment group (mean difference in control group -5.1, p < 0.001, 95% CI = - 3.390 to -6.755, mean difference in treatment group -9.9, p < 0.001, 95% CI = -11.746 to -8.105).

    Conclusion: RP was found to be superior to treatment as usual in terms of reduction of IGD symptoms. Future research should address which aspects within a given treatment are effective, who benefits from treatment, in what aspects, and why.

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  • 204.
    Andrén, Daniela
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Prioritizing Suicide Prevention through the Lens of the Individual's Well-Being2023In: Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, ISSN 1091-4358, E-ISSN 1099-176X, Vol. 26, no Suppl. 1, p. S4-S4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The need for priority setting in healthcare became evident during the Covid-19 pandemic, when planned care was postponed facilitating emergency treatment of Covid-19 patients, raisinquestions about the population’s preferences.

    Aim: To estimate the population values interventions reducing the number of suicides in comparison to treatments reducing the number of deaths due to other causes in a country where healthcare system has a pronounced public character and a declared emphasis on equity and solidarity during a time when the limited healthcare resources were predominantly allocated for the treatment of Covid patients.

    Data and Methods: The data was collected via a web survey sent to members of the web panel Userneeds during a tree-week period starting with the last week of December 2021, when media was informing the population about global experts and politicians’ huge concern about the extremely high infection risk of the Omicron. The survey was designed to identify the populations’ preferences for the allocation of the limited health care resources to save lives. An online discrete choice experiment was conducted among a sample of 1000 respondents to elicit the relative importance placed on reducing the number of deaths due to suicide in comparison to deaths due to pancreatic cancer, breast cancer and acute heart attack. The sample is representative with respect age, gender, and geographical region for the adult population of Sweden.

    Results: Respondents with high value of life satisfaction and no experience of any of the four health conditions chose to allocate a given limited healthcare budget for relatively young people but not to suicide. When not controlling for the individual’s life satisfaction, the respondents seem to prioritize the interventions that reduce the risk of young people to die due to suicide and breast cancer.

    Discussion: Even though the derived value of suicide prevention is near the average willingness to pay for suicide prevention, in general, a value derived using Wellbeing Valuation should not be seen as the actual amount that people would be willing to pay.

  • 205.
    Andrén, Daniela
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Valuing Mental Illness by Using the Well-Being Valuation Method2022In: Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, ISSN 1091-4358, E-ISSN 1099-176X, Vol. 25, no Suppl. 1, p. S2-S2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Each year, near one million individuals worldwide commit suicide, and several more make suicide attempts. Both suicide and suicide attempts are a source of tremendous grief among friends and relatives of the victim, which generate large costs for society. This has prompted calls for more research on interventions that prevent suicide and self-harm behaviors, their costs and the society willingness to pay (WTP) for such interventions. Suicide screening followed by an intervention may identify suicidal individuals and prevent recurring self-harm, but few cost-effectiveness studies have been conducted.

    Aims of the Study: We aim to derive the value of suicide prevention by using the wellbeing valuation method.

    Methods: We use data collected from a representative sample of 1038 Swedish residents aged 18-80, who were randomly selected from a web-panel. They answered questions about the importance of interventions aimed prevent suicide and their WTP for these interventions. They also reported their life-satisfaction, their direct and indirect experience with mental disorders, including knowing someone who committed suicide or suicide attempt, variable needed to apply the well-being approach. In a first step, we estimate life satisfaction equations, controlling additionally to the well-known determinants such as satisfaction with health, income, and martial satisfaction, for variables related to suicide (e.g., the individual’s awareness about suicide because a close friend or relative committed suicide or had a suicide attempt and the individual’s s willingness to pay for suicide prevention). In the second step, we derive the value of suicide prevention by using the estimates of awareness about suicide and income from the life satisfaction equations.

    Results: Our preliminary estimates show that knowing someone who committed suicide or suicide attempt has positive significant effect on the individual’s life satisfaction, and the preliminary derived value of suicide prevention is near the average willingness to pay for suicide prevention.

    Discussion: Even though the derived value of suicide prevention is near the average willingness to pay for suicide prevention, in general, a value derived using Wellbeing Valuation should not be seen as the actual amount that people would be willing to pay.

  • 206.
    Andrén, Martin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Gustafsson, Daniel
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    "Folk kommer att dö": Framtida krigsveteraner och hur samhället ska kunna möta deras behov2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of our study is to research what the future help-needs and expectations on the civilian society are among Swedish soldiers before they are sent on their first deployment abroad, especially to Afghanistan. The fact that Sweden sends soldiers to a warzone is something that is new nd research according the help-needs from the returning soldiers are missing.

    This study is based on a qualitative method where the data consists of four focus group interviews with at least two participants in each focus group from three different military bases in Sweden. The results indicate that the soldiers´expectations on the civilian society are low but that they would like to have more support from the civilian society. An important notice during the study, we encountered the fact that the participants in some way feel stigmatized. The results also show that they want the Swedish armed forces to be in charge and provide the care for the soldiers where health professionals involved have som military background. In the results found we also see that they are in different extent thinking and aware of the risks with deployment in Afghanistan and that they are thinking more on the physical risks rather than the psychological.

    One of the final conclusions is that if they really are stigmatized this might be a new group of people for the Swedish social services to work with.

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    Folk kommer att dö
  • 207.
    Andrén, Per
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holmsved, Moa
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ringberg, Helene
    Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wachtmeister, Vera
    Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Isomura, Kayoko
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Aspvall, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lenhard, Fabian
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hall, Charlotte L.
    Univ Nottingham, Queens Med Ctr, Sch Med, Mental Hlth & Clin Neurosci, Nottingham, England.;Univ Nottingham, Sch Med, Natl Inst Hlth & Care Res MindTech MedTech Cooper, Inst Mental Hlth,Div Psychiat & Appl Psychol, Innovat Pk,Triumph Rd, Nottingham, England.;Univ Nottingham, Natl Inst Hlth & Care Res Nottingham Biomed Res C, Inst Mental Hlth Mental Hlth & Clin Neurosci, Innovat Pk, Nottingham, England..
    Davies, E. Bethan
    Univ Nottingham, Queens Med Ctr, Sch Med, Mental Hlth & Clin Neurosci, Nottingham, England.;Univ Nottingham, Sch Med, Natl Inst Hlth & Care Res MindTech MedTech Cooper, Inst Mental Hlth,Div Psychiat & Appl Psychol, Innovat Pk,Triumph Rd, Nottingham, England..
    Murphy, Tara
    UCL, Great Ormond St Inst Child Hlth, London, England.;Great Ormond St Hosp Children Natl Hlth Serv Fdn, Psychol & Mental Hlth Serv, Great Ormond St, London, England..
    Hollis, Chris
    Univ Nottingham, Queens Med Ctr, Sch Med, Mental Hlth & Clin Neurosci, Nottingham, England.;Univ Nottingham, Sch Med, Natl Inst Hlth & Care Res MindTech MedTech Cooper, Inst Mental Hlth,Div Psychiat & Appl Psychol, Innovat Pk,Triumph Rd, Nottingham, England.;Univ Nottingham, Natl Inst Hlth & Care Res Nottingham Biomed Res C, Inst Mental Hlth Mental Hlth & Clin Neurosci, Innovat Pk, Nottingham, England..
    Sampaio, Filipa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Bottai, Matteo
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Serlachius, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Med Fac, Dept Clin Sci, Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Lund, Sweden..
    Andersson, Erik
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    de la Cruz, Lorena Fernandez
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mataix-Cols, David
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Reg Stockholm, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Therapist-Supported Internet-Delivered Exposure and Response Prevention for Children and Adolescents With Tourette Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial2022In: JAMA Network Open, E-ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 5, no 8, article id e2225614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: The availability of behavior therapy for individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS) and chronic tic disorder (CTD) is limited.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of internet-delivered exposure and response prevention (ERP) for children and adolescents with TS or CTD.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This single-masked, parallel group, superiority randomized clinical trial with nationwide recruitment was conducted at a research clinic in Stockholm, Sweden. Out of 615 individuals assessed for eligibility, 221 participants meeting diagnostic criteria for TS or CTD and aged 9 to 17 years were included in the study. Enrollment began in April 2019 and ended in April 2021. Data were analyzed between October 2021 and March 2022.

    INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomized to 10 weeks of therapist-supported internet-delivered ERP for tics (111 participants) or to therapist-supported internet-delivered education for tics (comparator group, 110 participants).

    MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was change in tic severity from baseline to the 3-month follow-up as measured by the Total Tic Severity Score of the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS-TTSS). YGTSS-TTSS assessors were masked to treatment allocation. Treatment response was operationalized as a score of 1 ("Very much improved") or 2 ("Much improved") on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale.

    RESULTS: Data loss was minimal, with 216 of 221 participants (97.7%) providing primary outcome data. Among randomized participants (152 [68.8%] boys; mean [SD] age, 12.1 [2.3] years), tic severity improved significantly, with a mean reduction of 6.08 points on the YGTSS-TTSS in the ERP group (mean [SD] at baseline, 22.25 [5.60]; at 3-month follow-up, 16.17 [6.82]) and 5.29 in the comparator (mean [SD] at baseline, 23.01 [5.92]; at 3-month follow-up, 17.72 [7.11]). Intention-to-treat analyses showed that the 2 groups improved similarly over time (interaction effect, -0.53; 95% CI, -1.28 to 0.22; P = .17). Significantly more participants were classified as treatment responders in the ERP group (51 of 108 [47.2%]) than in the comparator group (31 of 108 [28.7%]) at the 3-month follow-up (odds ratio, 2.22; 95% CI. 1.27 to 3.90). ERP resulted in more treatment responders at little additional cost compared with structured education. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained was below the Swedish willingness-to-pay threshold, at which ERP had a 66% to 76% probability of being cost-effective.

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Both interventions were associated with clinically meaningful improvements in tic severity, but ERP led to higher response rates at little additional cost.

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  • 208.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their child is ill and needs medical care, irrespective of the child’s age, diagnosis or the severity of the illness. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, to care for their ill child, and to cope with the challenges they face.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate sleep, mood, cortisol response, and sense of coherence (SOC) in parents caring for children in need of medical care, and to identify factors that may influence parents’ sleep.

    This thesis includes four original studies; two of these are quantitative, prospective, descriptive and comparative studies including parents (n=82) accommodated in six pediatric wards with their ill child, using questionnaires and sleep logs to measure sleep, mood and SOC, and saliva cortisol to measure cortisol response. A follow-up was performed four weeks later at home, after hospital discharge. The other two studies are qualitative, inductive and explorative interview studies, including parents (n=12) staying overnight with their preterm and/or ill infant in three neonatal intensive care units, and parents (n=15) with a child receiving hospital-based home care in two pediatric outpatient clinics. The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenographic method.

    Being together with one’s family seems beneficial for sleep and may decrease stress. The ability to stay with the child, in the hospital or at home, was highly appreciated by the parents. When caring for a child with illness, parents’ sleep quality was sufficient in the hospital; however, sleep quality improved further (p<0.05) at home after discharge. The parents reported frequent nocturnal awakenings in the hospital caused by the child, medical treatment and hospital staff. Concern and anxiety about the child’s health, and uncertainty about the future were stressors affecting the parents’ sleep and mood negatively. The parents had lower (p=0.01) morning awakening cortisol levels in the pediatric ward compared to at home, and parents accommodated for more than one night had lower (p<0.05) post-awakening cortisol levels compared to parents staying their first night.

    The findings of this thesis conclude that being together as a family is important for the parents’ sleep. The ability to be accommodated in the hospital and gather the family around the child may have given the parents time for relaxation and recovery, that in turn may lead to a less stressful hospital stay. When it is beneficial for the child, the whole family should be included in the pediatric care. Moreover, pediatric nurses must acknowledge parents’ sleep, in hospital and at home. Medical treatment and care at night should be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents in order to maintain health and well-being in the family.

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    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care
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  • 209.
    Anghammar, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Psykologiska bedömningar inför arbete med föräldrar inom BUP2010Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Psykologiska bedömningar av föräldrar beskrivs sällan som en mer uttalad och tydlig del av arbetet inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatri, utan det är i hög grad ett underförstått arbetsområde. Syftet med den här undersökningen var att beskriva hur arbetet med psykologiska bedömningar av föräldrar konceptualiseras och praktiseras under det inledande skedet av behandlingskontakter inom BUP. Nio psykologer vid sju öppenvårdsmottagningar intervjuades och intervjuerna analyserades tematiskt. En viktig aspekt som framkommer i resultatet är hur det gemensamma arbetet mellan psykolog och förälder för att etablera en arbetsallians erbjuder goda möjligheter till psykologiska bedömningar av föräldern. Under arbetet med alliansen, och med alliansen som bas, kan olika former av systematik och modeller för psykologiska bedömningar tillämpas. Resultatet indikerar också att arbetsalliansens centrala betydelse för bedömningsarbetet är tydligt relaterad till organisationens påverkan på det arbetet, liksom till betydelsen av psykologisk kompetens vid arbete med psykologiska bedömningar av föräldrar.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 210. Angst, Jules
    et al.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Benazzi, Franco
    Gamma, Alex
    Hantouche, Elie
    Meyer, Thomas D
    Skeppar, Peter
    Vieta, Eduard
    Scott, Jan
    The HCL-32: towards a self-assessment tool for hypomanic symptoms in outpatients2005In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 217-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bipolar disorders (BP) are frequently diagnosed and treated as pure depression initially; accurate diagnosis often being delayed by 8 to 10 years. In prospective studies, the presence of hypomanic symptoms in adolescence is strongly predictive of later bipolar disorders. As such, an instrument for self-assessment of hypomanic symptoms might increase the detection of suspected and of manifest, but under-treated, cases of bipolar disorders.

    Methods: The multi-lingual hypomania checklist (HCL-32) has been developed and is being tested internationally. This preliminary paper reports the performance of the scale in distinguishing individuals with BP (N=266) from those with major depressive disorder (MDD; N= 160). The samples were adult psychiatry patients recruited in Italy (N= 186) and Sweden (N=240).

    Results: The samples reported similar clinical profiles and the structure for the HCL-32 demonstrated two main factors identified as "active/elated" hypomania and "risk-taking/irritable" hypomania. The HCL-32 distinguished between BP and MDD with a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 51%.

    Limitations: Although the HCL-32 is a sensitive instrument for hypomanic symptoms, it does not distinguish between BP-1 and BP-11 disorders.

    Conclusions: Future studies should test if different combinations of items. possibly recording the consequences of hypomania, can distinguish between these BP subtypes.

  • 211. Angst, Jules
    et al.
    Meyer, Thomas D.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Skeppar, Peter
    Carta, Mauro
    Benazzi, Franco
    Lu, Ru-Band
    Wu, Yi-Hsuan
    Yang, Hai-Chen
    Yuan, Cheng-Mei
    Morselli, Paolo
    Brieger, Peter
    Katzmann, Judith
    Teixeira Leão, Ines Alice
    Del Porto, José Alberto
    Hupfeld Moreno, Doris
    Moreno, Ricardo A.
    Soares, Odeilton T.
    Vieta, Eduard
    Gamma, Alex
    Hypomania: a transcultural perspective2010In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the transcultural robustness of a screening instrument for hypomania, the Hypomania Checklist-32, first revised version (HCL-32 R1). It was carried out in 2606 patients from twelve countries in five geographic regions (Northern, Southern and Eastern Europe, South America and East Asia). In addition, GAMIAN Europe contributed data from its members. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to examine the transregional stability of the measurement properties of the HCL-32 R1, including the influence of sex and age as covariates. Across cultures, a two-factor structure was confirmed: the first factor (F1) reflected the more positive aspects of hypomania (being more active, elated, self-confident, and cogni-tively enhanced); the second factor (F2) reflected the more negative aspects (being irritable, impulsive, careless, more substance use). The measurement properties of the HCL-32 R1 were largely invariant across cultures. Only few items showed transcultural differences in their relation to hypomania as measured by the test. F2 was higher among men and in more severe manic syndromes; F1 was highest in North and East Europe and lowest in South America. The scores decreased slightly with age. The frequency of the 32 items showed remarkable similarities across geographic areas, with two excep-tions: South Europeans had lower symptom frequencies in general and East Europeans higher rates of substance use. These findings support the interna-tional applicability of the HCL-32 R1 as a screening instrument for hypomania.

  • 212.
    Annell, Anna-Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine.
    Manic-depressive illness in children and effect of treatment with lithium carbonate1969In: Acta pædopsychiatrica, ISSN 0001-6586, Vol. 36, no 8-10, p. 292-301Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Barnafrid, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Child physical abuse: factors influencing the associations between self-reported exposure and self-reported health problems2018In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 12, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Child physical abuse (CPA) is an extensive public health problem because of its associations with poor health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine which of the background factors of CPA committed by a parent or other caregiver relates to self-reported poor health among girls and boys (13; 15 and 17 years old): perpetrator, last year exposure; severity and frequency; socioeconomic load and foreign background.

    Methods: In a cross-sectional study in a Swedish county (n = 8024) a path analysis was performed to evaluate a model where all background variables were put as predictors of three health-status variables: mental; physical and general health problems. In a second step a log linear analysis was performed to examine how the distribution over the health-status categories was different for different combinations of background factors.

    Results: Children exposed to CPA reported poor health to a much higher extent than those who were not exposed. In the path analysis it was found that frequency and severity of abuse (boys only) and having experienced CPA during the last year, was significantly associated with poor health as well as socioeconomic load in the families. Foreign background was significantly negatively associated with all three health indicators especially for girls. Neither mother nor father as perpetrator remained significant in the path analysis, while the results from the log linear analyses showed that mother-abuse did in fact relate to poor general health and mental as well as physical health problems among boys and girls. Father-abuse was associated with poor mental health if severe abuse was reported. Poor mental health was also associated with mild father-abuse if exposure during the last year was reported.

    Conclusion: Despite the limitations that cross-sectional studies imply, this study provides new knowledge about factors associated with poor health among physically abused children. It describes details of CPA that have significant associations to different aspects of poor health and thus what needs to be addressed by professionals within mental health providers and social services. Understanding how different factors may contribute to different health outcomes for exposed children is important in future research and needs further studies.

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  • 214.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research in Sörmland, Sörmland County Council, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Child physical abuse: factors influencing the associations between self-reported exposure and self-reported health problems: a cross-sectional study2018In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 12, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Child physical abuse (CPA) is an extensive public health problem because of its associations with poor health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine which of the background factors of CPA committed by a parent or other caregiver relates to self-reported poor health among girls and boys (13; 15 and 17 years old): perpetrator, last year exposure; severity and frequency; socioeconomic load and foreign background.

    Methods

    In a cross-sectional study in a Swedish county (n = 8024) a path analysis was performed to evaluate a model where all background variables were put as predictors of three health-status variables: mental; physical and general health problems. In a second step a log linear analysis was performed to examine how the distribution over the health-status categories was different for different combinations of background factors.

    Results

    Children exposed to CPA reported poor health to a much higher extent than those who were not exposed. In the path analysis it was found that frequency and severity of abuse (boys only) and having experienced CPA during the last year, was significantly associated with poor health as well as socioeconomic load in the families. Foreign background was significantly negatively associated with all three health indicators especially for girls. Neither mother nor father as perpetrator remained significant in the path analysis, while the results from the log linear analyses showed that mother-abuse did in fact relate to poor general health and mental as well as physical health problems among boys and girls. Father-abuse was associated with poor mental health if severe abuse was reported. Poor mental health was also associated with mild father-abuse if exposure during the last year was reported.

    Conclusion

    Despite the limitations that cross-sectional studies imply, this study provides new knowledge about factors associated with poor health among physically abused children. It describes details of CPA that have significant associations to different aspects of poor health and thus what needs to be addressed by professionals within mental health providers and social services. Understanding how different factors may contribute to different health outcomes for exposed children is important in future research and needs further studies.

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  • 215.
    Anniko, Malin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tillfors, M
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of Social and Psychological Studies: Psychology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sources of stress and worry in the development of stress-related mental health problems: A longitudinal investigation from early- to mid-adolescence2019In: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, ISSN 1061-5806, E-ISSN 1477-2205, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 155-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Stress and stress-related mental health complaints are common and increasing among adolescents, especially girls. Identifying typical sources of stress as well as central intervention targets is an important effort in the development of effective prevention and treatment protocols. This study investigated worry as potential mediator in the development of mental health problems in response to common stressors in adolescence. We also examined to what sources adolescents ascribe their stress over the years from the 7th through the 9th grade.

    DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.

    METHODS: Self-reported subjective stressor load, worry, anxiety and depressive symptoms were assessed in a sample of Swedish 7th graders (N = 1137; 46% girls, mean age 13.2) with follow-up assessments one and two years later.

    RESULTS: School was the most common source of stress across all time-points, with girls reporting considerable more stress than boys. Worry mediated the relationship between overall stressor load and depressive symptoms and anxiety over time and was not moderated by gender.

    CONCLUSIONS: Worry may be an important target in stress prevention and efforts to prevent stress-related problems would benefit from focusing on early adolescence as especially school stress is already relatively common in grade 7.

  • 216.
    Anniko, Malin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    van Wijk, Nikil Ph. L.
    Aquarius Analyses & Training (AA&T), Curaçao.
    Byrne, Don
    The Medical School, College of Medicine Biology and Environment, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Psychology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Development of a Shortened Version of the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ-S): construct validity and sex invariance in a large sample of Swedish adolescents2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, E-ISSN 2245-8875, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 4-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stressor experience is an important topic of research concerning adolescent health and ill-health. For this, valid and reliable measures of adolescent stress are needed. The Adolescent Stress Questionnaire 2 was developed to tap into stressor domains specific for adolescence. Psychometric evaluations in Australian and European samples have indicated adequate psychometric properties. However, the ASQ-2 is quite extensive, which may render its use in large cohort studies, where several aspects of adolescent health are investigated, inconvenient and problematic.

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of a short version of the ASQ-2 (ASQ-S) in terms of construct validity and factorial invariance across gender.

    Method: The ASQ-2 was translated into Swedish and items were retained from nine of the ten scales based on factor loadings. One scale (stress of emerging adult responsibilities) was removed entirely due to low internal consistency and variance explained. The remaining 27 items were piloted and then included in an ongoing 5-year longitudinal study involving the participation of all students in the 7th and 8th grade in public schools from three Swedish municipalities (N = 2768, 47.5 % girls, mean age 13.64 years). For this study data from the first and second wave was used.

    Results: A nine factor Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) showed a good fit to the data and invariance across sexes was supported. The nine scales correlated positively with depressive symptoms, anxiety and worry and negatively with self-esteem. Girls reported higher stress levels than boys in eight of the nine scales. Stressors related to peer pressure predicted reported levels of anxiety and worry one year later, whereas stressors related to romantic relationships predicted depressive symptoms.

    Conclusions: Overall this study suggests that the ASQ-S could be a valid measure of adolescent stressor experience and psychometrically equivalent to the full ASQ-2.

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    Development of a Shortened Version of the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ-S)
  • 217.
    Anniko, Malin K.
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University.
    van Wijk, Nikil Ph. L.
    Aquarius Analyses & Training, Willemstad, Curacao.
    Byrne, Don
    Australian National University, Australia.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Development of a Shortened Version of the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ-S): Construct validity and sex invariance in a large sample of Swedish adolescents2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, E-ISSN 2245-8875, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 4-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stressor experience is an important topic of research concerning adolescent health and ill-health. For this, valid and reliable measures of adolescent stress are needed. The Adolescent Stress Questionnaire 2 was developed to tap into stressor domains specific for adolescence. Psychometric evaluations in Australian and European samples have indicated adequate psychometric properties. However, the ASQ-2 is quite extensive, which may render its use in large cohort studies, where several aspects of adolescent health are investigated, inconvenient and problematic. Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of a short version of the ASQ-2 (ASQ-S) in terms of construct validity and factorial invariance across gender. Method: The ASQ-2 was translated into Swedish and items were retained from nine of the ten scales based on factor loadings. One scale (stress of emerging adult responsibilities) was removed entirely due to low internal consistency and variance explained. The remaining 27 items were piloted and then included in an ongoing 5-year longitudinal study involving the participation of all students in the 7th and 8th grade in public schools from three Swedish municipalities (N = 2768, 47.5 % girls, mean age 13.64 years). For this study data from the first and second wave was used. Results: A nine factor Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) showed a good fit to the data and invariance across sexes was supported. The nine scales correlated positively with depressive symptoms, anxiety and worry and negatively with self-esteem. Girls reported higher stress levels than boys in eight of the nine scales. Stressors related to peer pressure predicted reported levels of anxiety and worry one year later, whereas stressors related to romantic relationships predicted depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Overall this study suggests that the ASQ-S could be a valid measure of adolescent stressor experience and psychometrically equivalent to the full ASQ-2.

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    Anniko_et_al_2018
  • 218.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Linnman, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fernandez, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Langström, Bengt
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Altered NK1-receptor availability in patients with post traumatic stress disorder2009In: [Biological Psychiatry 2009, 65(8), Suppl. 1, 118S, no. 394], 2009, p. 118S-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after one or more traumatic events causing extreme stress or grave physical harm. The neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor is the primary receptor for substance P (SP); a neuropeptide suggested being involved in anxiety and depression. The present study investigated differences in NK1-receptor availability between PTSD patients and healthy controls, using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Eleven male refugee patients (age: 41±10) with DSM-IV defined PTSD and nine healthy male control subjects (age: 33±10) were investigated using the PET-tracer [11C]GR205171, supplied by Uppsala Imanet. GR205171 is a highly selective NK1-receptor antagonist. Scans were performed during 60 minutes in the resting state. Parametric images were generated using the graphical reference Patlak method assuming irreversible binding of [11C]GR205171 from 20-60 minutes and having cerebellum as reference region. Exploratory whole brain analyses were performed using the statistical parametric mapping (SPM2) software. Results: PTSD patients had lower [11C]GR205171 binding compared to controls, in frontal cortical clusters encompassing bilaterally insula and left Brodmann area 11, reflecting lower NK1-receptor availability. No areas were found in which PTSD patients had higher [11C]GR205171 binding. Conclusions: This is the first study reporting differences in NK1-receptor availability in PTSD patients relative to controls. A tentative conclusion is that PTSD patients have a down regulation of the NK1-receptor system, which could be either a risk factor or due to emotional trauma processing.

  • 219.
    Arango, Celso
    et al.
    Hosp Gen Univ Gregorio Maranon, Spain; Univ Complutense Madrid, Spain; Biomed Res Ctr Mental Hlth CIBERSAM, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Solmi, Marco
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Padua, Italy; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Univ Southampton, England; Univ Nottingham, England; NYU Langone, NY USA.
    Domschke, Katharina
    Univ Freiburg, Germany; Univ Freiburg, Germany; Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Murray, Robin M.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Jones, Peter B.
    Univ Cambridge, England; Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Natl Hlth Serv Fdn, England.
    Uher, Rudolf
    Dalhousie Univ, Canada; Nova Scotia Hlth, Canada; IWK Hlth Ctr, Canada; Dalhousie Univ, Canada.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Deakin Univ, Australia; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Reichenberg, Abraham
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, NY 10029 USA; Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, NY 10029 USA; Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, NY 10029 USA.
    Shin, Jae Ii
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Severance Childrens Hosp, South Korea.
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Correll, Christoph U.
    Northwell Hlth, NY USA; Zucker Sch Med Hofstra Northwell, NY USA; Feinstein Inst Med Res, NY USA; Charite, Germany.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Pavia, Italy.
    Risk and protective factors for mental disorders beyond genetics: an evidence-based atlas2021In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 417-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decades of research have revealed numerous risk factors for mental disorders beyond genetics, but their consistency and magnitude remain uncer-tain. We conducted a "meta-umbrella" systematic synthesis of umbrella reviews, which are systematic reviews of meta-analyses of individual studies, by searching international databases from inception to January 1, 2021. We included umbrella reviews on non-purely genetic risk or protective factors for any ICD/DSM mental disorders, applying an established classification of the credibility of the evidence: class I (convincing), class II (highly suggestive), class III (suggestive), class IV (weak). Sensitivity analyses were conducted on prospective studies to test for temporality (reverse causation), TRANSD criteria were applied to test transdiagnosticity of factors, and A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) was employed to address the quality of meta-analyses. Fourteen eligible umbrella reviews were retrieved, summarizing 390 meta-analyses and 1,180 associations between putative risk or protective factors and mental disorders. We included 176 class I to III evidence associations, relating to 142 risk/protective factors. The most robust risk factors (class I or II, from prospective designs) were 21. For dementia, they included type 2 diabetes mellitus (risk ratio, RR from 1.54 to 2.28), depression (RR from 1.65 to 1.99) and low frequency of social contacts (RR=1.57). For opioid use disorders, the most robust risk factor was tobacco smoking (odds ratio, OR=3.07). For non-organic psychotic disorders, the most robust risk factors were clinical high risk state for psychosis (OR=9.32), cannabis use (OR=3.90), and childhood adversities (OR=2.80). For depressive disorders, they were widowhood (RR=5.59), sexual dysfunction (OR=2.71), three (OR=1.99) or four-five (OR=2.06) metabolic factors, childhood physical (OR=1.98) and sexual (OR=2.42) abuse, job strain (OR=1.77), obesity (OR=1.35), and sleep disturbances (RR=1.92). For autism spectrum disorder, the most robust risk factor was maternal overweight pre/during pregnancy (RR=1.28). For attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), they were maternal pre-pregnancy obesity (OR=1.63), maternal smoking during pregnancy (OR=1.60), and maternal overweight pre/during pregnancy (OR=1.28). Only one robust protective factor was detected: high physical activity (hazard ratio, HR=0.62) for Alzheimers disease. In all, 32.9% of the associations were of high quality, 48.9% of medium quality, and 18.2% of low quality. Transdiagnostic class I-III risk/protective factors were mostly involved in the early neurodevelopmental period. The evidence-based atlas of key risk and protective factors identified in this study represents a benchmark for advancing clinical characterization and research, and for expanding early intervention and preventive strategies for mental disorders.

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  • 220.
    Arat, Arzu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Burström, Bo
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    ADHD medication in offspring of immigrants - does the income level of the country of parental origin matter?2018In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Child psychiatric treatment facilities vary greatly worldwide and are virtually non-existent in many low-income countries. One of the most common psychiatric disorders in childhood is ADHD, with an estimated prevalence of 3-5% in Sweden. Previous studies have shown a similar prevalence of ADHD in minority and majority children in Sweden and the UK. However, clinical studies demonstrated that children from immigrant families living in Sweden received less psychiatric care than those of native-born parents. We tested the hypothesis that the consumption of child psychiatric care in immigrant families would be determined by the availability of such treatment in the parents' country of origin. Patterns of medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were studied as a proxy for child psychiatric care.

    METHODS: This was a register study of dispensed stimulant medication during 2013-2014 in Swedish national birth cohorts from 1995-2009. The study population, consisting of nearly 1.4 million children, was divided by national income of the parental country of origin and whether the parents were native Swedes, European immigrants, non-European immigrants or a mixture. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios of having been dispensed at least one ADHD drug during 2013, with adjustments for gender, family status indicating whether the child is living with both parents, household income and area of residence.

    RESULTS: Having parents born in low-income (OR [95% confidence interval] 0.27 [0.24-0.29]) or middle-income (European: OR 0.23 [0.20-0.26], non-European: OR 0.39 [0.34-0.41]) countries was associated with lower ADHD treatment levels than having parents born in high-income countries (European: OR 0.60 [0.54-0.66], non-European: OR 0.68 [0.59-0.79]), when compared to children of parents born in Sweden. In families with a background in low or middle income countries, there was no significant association between household income and ADHD medication, while in children with Swedish and mixed backgrounds high level of disposable income was associated with lower levels of ADHD medication.

    CONCLUSION: The use of child psychiatric care by immigrant families in Sweden was largely associated with the income level of the country of origin.

  • 221.
    Araya, Mesfin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Chotai, Jayanti
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Komproe, Ivan H
    de Jong, Joop TVM
    Quality of life after postconflict displacement in Ethiopia: comparing placement in a community setting with that in shelters2011In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 585-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The resilience of post-war displaced persons is not only influenced partly by the nature of premigration trauma, but also by postmigration psychosocial circumstances and living conditions. A lengthy civil war leading to Eritrea separating from Ethiopia and becoming an independent state in 1991 resulted in many displaced persons.

    METHOD: A random sample of 749 displaced women living in the shelters in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa was compared with a random sample of 110 displaced women living in the community setting of Debre Zeit, 50 km away from Addis Ababa, regarding their quality of life, mental distress, sociodemographics, living conditions, perceived social support, and coping strategies, 6 years after displacement.

    RESULTS: Subjects from Debre Zeit reported significantly higher quality of life and better living conditions. However, mental distress did not differ significantly between the groups. Also, Debre Zeit subjects contained a higher proportion born in Ethiopia, a higher proportion married, reported higher traumatic life events, employed more task-oriented coping, and perceived higher social support. Factors that accounted for the difference in quality of life between the shelters and Debre Zeit groups in three of the four quality of life domains of WHOQOL-BREF (physical health, psychological, environment), included protection from insects/rodents and other living conditions. However, to account for the difference in the fourth domain (social relationships), psychosocial factors also contributed significantly.

    CONCLUSION: Placement and rehabilitation in a community setting seems better than in the shelters. If this possibility is not available, measures to improve specific living conditions in the shelters are likely to lead to a considerable increase in quality of life.

  • 222.
    Arbjork, Asa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Childhood maltreatment, violence and social cognition in forensic psychiatric patients2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood maltreatment is connected to increased risk of violent offending and psychopathology. Mentalisation and emotion regulation are reduced in individuals who have experienced severe childhood maltreatment, and are involved in violent behaviour and psychotic disorders. The current study investigated if childhood maltreatment is more prevalent and more severe in forensic psychiatric patients than in community controls, if those who have committed violent acts that are more severe report a higher severity of childhood maltreatment, and if mentalisation and emotion regulation are reduced in forensic psychiatric patients. Four types of childhood maltreatment, neglect, psychological, sexual and physical abuse, were investigated separately with the use of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse semi-structured interview. All types of childhood maltreatment were more prevalent and more severe in forensic psychiatric patients as compared to community controls.The results suggest that different types of childhood maltreatment have different effects on mentalisation, emotion regulation and violence. Forensic psychiatric patients had lower mentalisation scores and higher emotion dysregulation. There was no significant relationship between severity of childhood maltreatment and severity of violence. 

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  • 223.
    Arce, Luis
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology.
    Serrano, Irene
    Division of Plant Science, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Acton, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.
    Impact of childhood trauma on the epigenetics of anxiety disorder2023In: Revista de Psiquiatria Clínica, ISSN 0101-6083, E-ISSN 1806-938X, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction of epigenetics, childhood trauma, and anxiety disorders is a fascinating area of scientific study with significant ramifications for clinical practice and mental health. This abstract captures the intricate interplay between these factors, emphasizing how early-life hardships leave persistent biochemical fingerprints on a person's genetic composition, perhaps influencing the emergence of anxiety disorders. Through epigenetic pathways, childhood trauma, which includes events like abuse, neglect, and persistent stress, might influence a person's sensitivity to anxiety. These processes, which control the expression of genes involved in stress response, neurotransmitter signaling, and emotional regulation, include DNA methylation, histone changes, and microRNA regulation. The disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and neuroplasticity provide as more evidence of the effects of trauma-induced epigenetic modifications, which manifest as altered brain circuits and stress response mechanisms. This complex interaction highlights how nature and nurture interact dynamically, enhancing our knowledge of the many-faceted causes of anxiety disorders. A need for focused treatments and therapies that address the molecular causes of anxiety is made as a result of the recognition of the long-lasting impacts of childhood trauma, giving those who are afflicted hope for better mental health outcomes and resilience.

  • 224.
    Archer, Mari
    et al.
    Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, P.O. Box 100, Tampere, 33014, Finland.
    Niemelä, Onni
    Department of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Research Unit, Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Tampere University, Seinäjoki, 60220, Finland.
    Hämäläinen, Mari
    The Immunopharmacology Research Group, Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, 33014, Finland.
    Moilanen, Eeva
    The Immunopharmacology Research Group, Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, 33014, Finland.
    Leinonen, Esa
    Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, P.O. Box 100, 33014 University of Tampere, and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, 33014, Finland.
    Kampman, Olli
    Tampere University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, P.O. Box 100, 33014 University of Tampere and Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Department of Psychiatry, Tampere, 33521, Finland.
    The role of alcohol use and adiposity in serum levels of IL-1RA in depressed patients2022In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The role of Interleukin-1 Receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an innate antagonist to pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1, has attracted increasing attention due to its potential pathogenic and therapeutic implications in depression. However, the role of alcohol and adiposity in modulating IL-1Ra cytokine pathway in depressed patients has remainned unknown. The aim of this study was to follow the changes in IL-1Ra serum levels in depressed patients with or without simultaneous alcohol use disorder (AUD) and different degrees of adiposity during 6 months of follow-up.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 242 patients with depression were followed for 6 months. At baseline 99 patients had simultaneous AUD. Levels of serum IL-1Ra and common mediators of inflammation (IL-6, hs-CRP) were measured. Clinical assessments included Body Mass Index (BMI), Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores.

    RESULTS: Significant reductions in clinical symptoms and IL-1Ra were observed during 6-month follow-up. In hierarchical linear regression analysis, the effect of MADRS score, age, gender, and smoking had a combined effect of 2.4% in the model. The effect of AUDIT score increased the effect to 4.2% of variance (p = 0.08), whereas adding BMI increased the effect to 18.5% (p <  0.001).

    CONCLUSION: Adiposity may influence the IL-1Ra anti-inflammatory response in depressed patients, whereas the effect of alcohol consumption in these patients seems insignificant. These findings should be considered in studies on the role of IL-1Ra in depression.

  • 225. Arentsen, T.
    et al.
    Qian, Y.
    Gkotzis, Spyridon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Femenia, T.
    Wang, T.
    Udekwu, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Forssberg, H.
    Heijtz, R. Diaz
    The bacterial peptidoglycan-sensing molecule Pglyrp2 modulates brain development and behavior2017In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 257-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have revealed that the gut microbiota modulates brain development and behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we show that bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) derived from the commensal gut microbiota can be translocated into the brain and sensed by specific pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) of the innate immune system. Using expression-profiling techniques, we demonstrate that two families of PRRs that specifically detect PGN (that is, PGN-recognition proteins and NOD-like receptors), and the PGN transporter PepT1 are highly expressed in the developing brain during specific windows of postnatal development in both males and females. Moreover, we show that the expression of several PGN-sensing molecules and PepT1 in the developing striatum is sensitive to manipulations of the gut microbiota (that is, germ-free conditions and antibiotic treatment). Finally, we used the PGN-recognition protein 2 (Pglyrp2) knockout mice to examine the potential influence of PGN-sensing molecules on brain development and behavior. We demonstrate that the absence of Pglyrp2 leads to alterations in the expression of the autism risk gene c-Met, and sex-dependent changes in social behavior, similar to mice with manipulated microbiota. These findings suggest that the central activation of PRRs by microbial products could be one of the signaling pathways mediating the communication between the gut microbiota and the developing brain.

  • 226.
    Armelius, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Borderline diagnosis from hospital records:  reliability and validity of Gunderson's diagnostic interview for Borderlines (DIB)1985In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 32-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two trained and experienced clinical psychologists and two nontrained students rated the sections in Gunderson's Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB) on the basis of hospital records for 16 patients (DIB-R). The results showed that both reliability and validity, i.e., correlations with an actual interview, were unexpectedly high, around .80 for the trained judges and around .55 for the nontrained judges. The conclusion is that the DIB may be used for retrospective diagnosis of borderline patients from hospital records.

  • 227.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Long-Term Posttraumatic Stress in Survivors from Disasters and Major Accidents2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Disasters and major accidents are a significant cause of distress worldwide. High levels of posttraumatic stress can become chronic after severe and prolonged psychological trauma, raising concerns about the extent of adverse long-term consequences after single events. The present thesis aimed to describe the course and burden of posttraumatic stress in survivors from a ferry disaster in the Baltic Sea, an airliner crash-landing in Gottröra, Sweden, and a bus accident involving Swedish 6th grade schoolchildren in Måbødalen, Norway.

    The participants were surveyed 1 month to 4 years after the events and again after 14 to 20 years. The follow-up surveys included 33 ferry disaster survivors, 70 airline survivors, and 7 surviving schoolchildren with a comparison group from the same school (n = 33). Short- and long-term changes in posttraumatic stress were estimated separately in generalised regression models refined by linear splines. In-depth interviews were conducted with 22 ferry survivors 15 years after the disaster, including structured clinical interviews and thematic analysis of survivors’ descriptions of consequences of the event and social support.

    Approximately half of all survivors experienced significant posttraumatic stress at the initial assessments. Significant long-term distress was noted in one fourth of the ferry survivors and one sixth of the airline survivors. The bus crash was not associated with significant long-term posttraumatic stress. A poorer long-term outcome was noted in women and in bereaved survivors.

    The thematic analysis revealed that long-term consequences not only included negative aspects but also positive ones, including personal growth and existential awareness. There was ample availability of social support, although the need for support extended over a period of several years. Barriers to support from significant others were described in detail by the survivors.

    The results extend previous research by providing a comprehensive account of long-term consequences of disasters and major accidents in light of early reactions. The interviews provide some new insights into features of social support that warrant further study. Important future challenges include evaluating whether timely attention to survivors at risk for chronic distress and significant others can facilitate recovery.

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  • 228.
    Arnberg, Filip
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Cernvall, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Development and Pilot-testing of the Swedish Version of the PTSD Coach2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, four out of five people have smartphones, indicating the potential to increase the reach of low- intensity support after trauma via smartphone-apps to aid recovery. While there are many apps in the mental health field available to the general public, their effects are rarely evaluated. The PTSD Coach smartphone-app was developed by the VA ́s National Center for PTSD—Dissemination and Training Division. A Swedish version was developed by using existing code while making adjustment to the content for a Swedish context with a view for use by both civilians and veterans. A pilot study is underway and the findings will be used to inform a larger efficacy study. To date, 31 participants have been recruited to the pilot study, in which they use the Swedish version of the PTSD Coach for four weeks. Pre- and post- assessments include a structured clinical interview (MINI), PCL-5, PHQ-9 and the Swedish version of the PTSD Coach Survey. The participants’ experiences with using the app are explored in focus groups. During this presentation, the adaptation for the Swedish PTSD Coach will be outlined and experiences from the development and pilot study of the Swedish version will be described. 

  • 229.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Melin, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Differences in social support between groups of tsunami survivors and the correlation between social support and posttraumatic stress after 14 months2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Prevalence and Duration of PTSD in Survivors Six Years After a Natural Disaster2013In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 347-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to examine the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in survivors with low levels of risk factors for PTSD. The sample included 142 adults (58% women, 54% university education, 93% employed/students/retired) on vacation in Southeast Asia during the 2004 Indian Ocean disaster. Semi-structured clinical interviews (SCID-I) were performed after 6 years including PTSD, depression, specific phobia, and alcohol abuse. The 6-year prevalence of PTSD was 11.3% and the current prevalence was 4.2%, with onset mainly within 1 month and remission within 3 years post-disaster. Suicidal ideation and comorbidity were common in PTSD cases. Lifetime prevalence of depression was 19%, specific phobia 7%, and alcohol abuse 4%. The findings suggest elevated levels of PTSD but not other disorders as compared with general population samples, but still lower levels than other disaster samples. Despite benign circumstances, however, the course and burden of PTSD were comparable to similar studies.

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  • 231.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Panel discussion: early interventions after traumatic events2015In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8198, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 6, article id 28636Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 232.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Panel discussion: early interventions after traumatic events2015In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8198, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 6, article id 28636Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 233.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Nils-Gustaf
    Mariehamn, Åland, Finland.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    A longitudinal study of posttraumatic stress: from 3 months to 14 years after the m/s Estonia disaster2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Nils-Gustaf
    Mariehamn, Åland, Finland.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Traumatic bereavement, acute dissociation, and posttraumatic stress: 14 years after the MS Estonia disaster2011In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed to examine posttraumatic stress in survivors 14 years after a ferry disaster, and estimate short- and long-term changes in stress associated with traumatic bereavement and acute dissociation. There were 852 people who perished in the disaster, 137 survived. The 51 Swedish survivors were surveyed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) at 3 months, 1, 3, and 14 years (response rates 82%, 65%, 51%, and 69%). Symptoms decreased from 3 months to 1 year; no change was found thereafter. After 14 years, 27% reported significant symptoms. Traumatic bereavement, but not acute dissociation, was associated with long-term symptom elevation. Chronic posttraumatic stress can persist in a minority of survivors, and traumatic bereavement appears to hinder recovery.

  • 235.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fang, Fang
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A
    University of Iceland.
    Can a Natural Disaster Lead to Suicide Attempts and Psychiatric Disorders in Adults? A 5-Year Matched Cohort Study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gudmundsdottír, Ragnhildur
    University of Iceland.
    Valdimarsdottír, Unnur
    University of Iceland; Harvard School of Public Health.
    Can a Natural Disaster Increase the Risks of Suicide Attempts and Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents? A 5-Year Matched Cohort Study2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Gudmundsdóttir, Ragnhildur
    Butwicka, Agnieszka
    Fang, Fang
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Hultman, Christina M
    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A
    Psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts in Swedish survivors of the 2004 southeast Asia tsunami: a 5 year matched cohort study2015In: The Lancet Psychiatry, ISSN 2215-0366, Vol. 2, no 9, p. 817-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Survivors of natural disasters are thought to be at an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, however the extent of this risk, and whether it is linked to pre-existing psychopathology, is not known. We aimed to establish whether Swedish survivors of tsunamis from the 2004 Sumatra–Andaman earthquake had increased risks of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts 5 years after repatriation.

    Methods

    We identified Swedish survivors repatriated from southeast Asia (8762 adults and 3742 children) and 864 088 unexposed adults and 320 828 unexposed children matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. We retrieved psychiatric diagnoses and suicide attempts from the Swedish patient register for the 5 years after the tsunami (from Dec 26, 2004, to Jan 31, 2010) and estimated hazard ratios (HRs), then adjusted for pre-tsunami psychiatric disorders, and, for children, for parental pre-tsunami disorders.

    Findings

    Exposed adults were more likely than unexposed adults to receive any psychiatric diagnosis (547 [6.2%] vs 47 734 [5.5%]; adjusted HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.11–1.32), particularly stress-related disorders (187 [2.1%] vs 8831 [1.0%]; 2.27, 1.96–2.62) and suicide attempts (38 [0.43%] vs 2752 [0.32%]; 1.54, 1.11–2.13), but not mood or anxiety disorders. Risk of psychiatric diagnoses did not differ between exposed and unexposed children and adolescents (248 [6.6] vs 22 081 [6.9%]; 0.98, 0.86–1.11), although exposed children and adolescents had a higher risk for suicide attempts with uncertain intent (1.43; 1.01–2.02) and stress-related disorders (1.79; 1.30–2.46), mainly during the first 3 months after the tsunami.

    Interpretation

    The 2004 tsunami was, independently of previous psychiatric morbidity, associated with an increased risk of severe psychopathology, mainly stress-related disorders and suicide attempts, in children and adults. Survivors of natural disasters should be targeted with early interventions and active long-term follow-up to prevent, detect, and alleviate psychiatric disorders that might follow.

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    Appendix
  • 238.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gudmundsdóttir, Ragnhildur
    Butwicka, Agnieszka
    Fang, Fang
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Hultman, Christina M.
    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A.
    Psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts in Swedish survivors of the 2004 southeast Asia tsunami: a 5 year matched cohort study2015In: Lancet psychiatry, ISSN 2215-0374, E-ISSN 2215-0366, Vol. 2, no 9, p. 817-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Survivors of natural disasters are thought to be at an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, however the extent of this risk, and whether it is linked to pre-existing psychopathology, is not known. We aimed to establish whether Swedish survivors of tsunamis from the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake had increased risks of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts 5 years after repatriation.

    Methods: We identified Swedish survivors repatriated from southeast Asia (8762 adults and 3742 children) and 864 088 unexposed adults and 320 828 unexposed children matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. We retrieved psychiatric diagnoses and suicide attempts from the Swedish patient register for the 5 years after the tsunami (from Dec 26, 2004, to Jan 31, 2010) and estimated hazard ratios (HRs), then adjusted for pre-tsunami psychiatric disorders, and, for children, for parental pre-tsunami disorders.

    Findings: Exposed adults were more likely than unexposed adults to receive any psychiatric diagnosis (547 [6.2%] vs 47 734 [5.5%]; adjusted HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.11-1.32), particularly stress-related disorders (187 [2.1%] vs 8831 [1.0%]; 2.27, 1.96-2.62) and suicide attempts (38 [0.43%] vs 2752 [0.32%]; 1.54, 1.11-2.13), but not mood or anxiety disorders. Risk of psychiatric diagnoses did not differ between exposed and unexposed children and adolescents (248 [6.6] vs 22 081 [6.9%]; 0.98, 0.86-1.11), although exposed children and adolescents had a higher risk for suicide attempts with uncertain intent (1.43; 1.01-2.02) and stress-related disorders (1.79; 1.30-2.46), mainly during the first 3 months after the tsunami.

    Interpretation: The 2004 tsunami was, independently of previous psychiatric morbidity, associated with an increased risk of severe psychopathology, mainly stress-related disorders and suicide attempts, in children and adults. Survivors of natural disasters should be targeted with early interventions and active long-term follow-up to prevent, detect, and alleviate psychiatric disorders that might follow.

    Funding: The Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education, Swedish Society for Medical Research.

  • 239.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska Institutet.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fifteen years after a ferry disaster: Clinical interviews and survivors’ self-assessment of their experience2013In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8198, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 4, p. 20650-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Disasters yield increased rates of psychological disorders decades later. Other consequences, however, have received little attention in the past.

    Objective:

    We aimed to examine diagnostic status and survivors’ views on disaster-related consequences and social support.

    Methods:

    A mixed-methods approach was used with 22 survivors (of 49 eligible) 15 years after a ferry disaster. Data collection included audiotaped interviews with open-ended questions and diagnostic assessment of Axis-I disorders.

    Results:

    The post-disaster incidence was 54% (12/22) for Axis-I disorders, and 45% (10/22) for full or subsyndromal posttraumatic stress disorder. Thematic analysis revealed that survivor perception of the longterm consequences included positive (character change) and negative aspects (being ascribed a survivor identity). Participants’ sought social support for several years, yet many felt hindered by experiential dissimilarity and distress of significant others.

    Conclusions:

    Axis-I disorders were prevalent, but not salient to survivors’ perceptions in the long-term. Postdisaster interventions need to attend to common barriers to support.

  • 240.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Sstressforskningsinstitutet, Stockholms universitet.
    Hultman, Christina M
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A
    Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
    Registration and definitions of mental disorders in Swedish survivors of the 2004 southeast Asia tsunami: – Authors' response2015In: Lancet psychiatry, ISSN 2215-0374, E-ISSN 2215-0366, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 962-963Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Linton, Steven J
    Hultcrantz, Monica
    Heintz, Emelie
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Internet-delivered psychological treatments for mood and anxiety disorders: a systematic review of their efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e98118-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Greater access to evidence-based psychological treatments is needed. This review aimed to evaluate whether internet-delivered psychological treatments for mood and anxiety disorders are efficacious, noninferior to established treatments, safe, and cost-effective for children, adolescents and adults.

    METHODS: We searched the literature for studies published until March 2013. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were considered for the assessment of short-term efficacy and safety and were pooled in meta-analyses. Other designs were also considered for long-term effect and cost-effectiveness. Comparisons against established treatments were evaluated for noninferiority. Two reviewers independently assessed the relevant studies for risk of bias. The quality of the evidence was graded using an international grading system.

    RESULTS: A total of 52 relevant RCTs were identified whereof 12 were excluded due to high risk of bias. Five cost-effectiveness studies were identified and three were excluded due to high risk of bias. The included trials mainly evaluated internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (I-CBT) against a waiting list in adult volunteers and 88% were conducted in Sweden or Australia. One trial involved children. For adults, the quality of evidence was graded as moderate for the short-term efficacy of I-CBT vs. waiting list for mild/moderate depression (d = 0.83; 95% CI 0.59, 1.07) and social phobia (d = 0.85; 95% CI 0.66, 1.05), and moderate for no efficacy of internet-delivered attention bias modification vs. sham treatment for social phobia (d = -0.04; 95% CI -0.24, 0.35). The quality of evidence was graded as low/very low for other disorders, interventions, children/adolescents, noninferiority, adverse events, and cost-effectiveness.

    CONCLUSIONS: I-CBT is a viable treatment option for adults with depression and some anxiety disorders who request this treatment modality. Important questions remain before broad implementation can be supported. Future research would benefit from prioritizing adapting treatments to children/adolescents and using noninferiority designs with established forms of treatment.

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  • 242.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Melin, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Can Demographic and Exposure Characteristics Predict Levels of Social Support in Survivors from a Natural Disaster?2013In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6, p. e65709-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Lack of social support is a strong predictor for poor mental health after disasters. Psychosocial post-disaster interventions may benefit from targeting survivors at risk oflow support, yet it is unknown whether demographic and disaster exposure characteristics are associated with social support. This study assessed if age, gender, educational status, cohabitation, and disaster exposure severity predicted aspects of informal social support in a cohort of Swedish survivors from the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami.

    Methods The participants were 3,536 disaster survivors who responded to a mail survey 14 months after the disaster (49% response rate). Their perceptions of present emotional support, contact with others, tangible support, negative support and overall satisfaction with informal support were assessed with the Crisis Support Scale and analysed in five separate ordinal regressions.

    Results Demographic factors and exposure severity explained variation in social supports although the effect size and predictive efficiency were modest. Cohabitation and female gender were associated with both more positive and more negative support. Single-household men were especially at risk for low emotional support and younger women were more likely to perceive negative support. Higher education was associated with more positive support, whereas no clear pattern was found regarding age as a predictor. Disaster exposure severity was associated with more negative support and less overall support satisfaction.

    Conclusions After a disaster that entailed little disruptions to the community the associations between demographic characteristics and social support concur with findings in the general population. The findings suggest that psychosocial disaster interventions may benefit from targeting specific groups of survivors.

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  • 243.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Properties of Swedish Posttraumatic Stress Measures after a Disaster2014In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 402-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the properties of Swedish versions of self-report measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with emphasis on the Impact of Event Scale–Revised (IES-R). Survey data from adult survivors 1, 3, and 6 years after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami (n = 1506) included the IES-R (from which the IES-6 was derived) and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). The PTSD Checklist (PCL) was included in one survey. A structured clinical interview was performed after 6 years (n = 142). Factor analyses of the IES-R and PCL indicated that a dysphoric-arousal model provided good fit invariant across assessments. Both measures were accurate in excluding PTSD while all measures provided poorer positive predictive values. The IES-R, but not the IES-6 and GHQ-12, evidenced stability across assessments. In conclusion, the Swedish IES-R and PCL are sound measures of chronic PTSD, and the findings illustrate important temporal aspects of PTSD assessment.

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  • 244.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital. Stressforskningsinstitutet, Stockholms universitet.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Posttraumatic stress in survivors 1 month to 19 years after an airliner emergency landing2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e0119732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Posttraumatic stress (PTS) is common in survivors from life-threatening events. Little is known, however, about the course of PTS after life threat in the absence of collateral stressors (e.g., bereavement, social stigma, property loss) and there is a scarcity of studies about PTS in the long term. This study assessed the short- and long-term course of PTS, and the influence of gender, education and age on the level and course of PTS, in survivors from a non-fatal airliner emergency landing caused by engine failure at an altitude of 1 km. There were 129 persons on board. A survey including the Impact of Event Scale was distributed to 106 subjects after 1 month, 4 months, 14 months, and 25 months, and to 95 subjects after 19 years (response rates 64–83%). There were initially high levels of PTS. The majority of changes in PTS occurred from 1 to 4 months after the event. There were small changes from 4 to 25 months but further decrease in PTS thereafter. Female gender was associated with higher levels of PTS whereas gender was unrelated to the slope of the short- and long-term trajectories. Higher education was related to a quicker recovery although not to initial or long-term PTS. Age was not associated with PTS. The present findings suggest that a life-threatening experience without collateral stressors may produce high levels of acute posttraumatic stress, yet with a benign prognosis. The findings further implicate that gender is unrelated to trajectories of recovery in the context of highly similar exposure and few collateral stressors.

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  • 245.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Lundin, Tom
    Posttraumatic stress in survivors 1 month to 19 years after an airliner emergency landing2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e0119732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Posttraumatic stress (PTS) is common in survivors from life-threatening events. Little is known, however, about the course of PTS after life threat in the absence of collateral stressors (e.g., bereavement, social stigma, property loss) and there is a scarcity of studies about PTS in the long term. This study assessed the short- and long-term course of PTS, and the influence of gender, education and age on the level and course of PTS, in survivors from a non-fatal airliner emergency landing caused by engine failure at an altitude of 1 km. There were 129 persons on board. A survey including the Impact of Event Scale was distributed to 106 subjects after 1 month, 4 months, 14 months, and 25 months, and to 95 subjects after 19 years (response rates 64-83%). There were initially high levels of PTS. The majority of changes in PTS occurred from 1 to 4 months after the event. There were small changes from 4 to 25 months but further decrease in PTS thereafter. Female gender was associated with higher levels of PTS whereas gender was unrelated to the slope of the short- and long-term trajectories. Higher education was related to a quicker recovery although not to initial or long-term PTS. Age was not associated with PTS. The present findings suggest that a life-threatening experience without collateral stressors may produce high levels of acute posttraumatic stress, yet with a benign prognosis. The findings further implicate that gender is unrelated to trajectories of recovery in the context of highly similar exposure and few collateral stressors.

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    fulltext
  • 246.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Rydelius, Per-Anders
    Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    A longitudinal follow-up of posttraumatic stress: from 9 months to 20 years after a major road traffic accident2011In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 5, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although road traffic accidents (RTA) are a major cause of injury and a cause of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in the aftermath, little is known about the long-term psychological effects of RTA.

    Methods: This prospective longitudinal study assessed long-term PTS, grief, and general mental health after a bus carrying 23 sixth-grade schoolchildren crashed on a school outing and 12 children died. Directly affected (i.e., children in the crash) and indirectly affected children (i.e., all pupils in the sixth grade who were not in the crash) were surveyed at 9 months (N = 102), 4 years (N = 51), and 20 years (N = 40) after the event. Psychological distresswas assessed by single items, including sadness, avoidance, intrusions, and guilt. After 20 years, PTS was assessed by the Impact of Event Scale–Revised.

    Results: Stress reactions were prevalent 9 months after the event, with sadness (69%) and avoidance (59%) being highly represented in both directly and indirectly affected groups, whereas, nightmares (60%) and feelings of guilt (50%) were only frequent in those directly affected. The frequency of sadness and avoidance decreased after 4 years in the indirectly exposed (ps < .05). After 20 years, the directly affected had a higher prevalence of PTS (p = .003), but not decreased general mental health (p = .14), than those indirectly affected.

    Conclusions: The limitations preclude assertive conclusions. Nonetheless, the findings corroborate previous studies reporting traumatic events are associated with long-term PTS, but not with decreased general mental health.

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  • 247.
    Arnberg, Filip K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Rydelius, Per-Anders
    Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundin, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Twenty years later: a follow-up study after the Måbødalen school-bus accident, August 15th, 19882009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Arndtzen, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    To live with a Schizoaffective disorder2022In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 4-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article tells about how it is to live with severe mental illness, but primarily it is a story about how to recover with the help of mental health professionals, friends and medication. The overarching aim is to convey a message of hope. Even great difficulties may be left behind. As a summary, four key points for staff members to reflect on are mentioned: Nurses should often encourage their patients and acknowledge their progress; Nurses should remember that there is hope, for everybody; Nurses should be encouraged to use their creativity when working with patients; If the alliance between nurse and patient is working well in a bilateral sense, nurses should have the opportunity to keep in touch with the patient as long as the patient needs and benefits from it.

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  • 249.
    Arnell, Erika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Wahman, Linda
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Specialistsjuksköterskors erfarenheter av omvårdnad vid suicidproblematik inom psykiatrisk hälso- och sjukvård2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Specialist nurses in psychiatric health care meet patients with suicide problems on a daily basis. Suicide is seen as a public health problem and is a complex area to work with. Aim: was to describe specialist nurses' experiences of nursing in suicide problems in psychiatric health care. Method: Qualitative design with inductiveapproach. Twelve semistructured interviews were analyzed according to qualitative content analysis. Results: The study revealed three categories "The need for continuous and uniform assessments for patient safety","The importance of collegial collaboration as a basis for participation" and "The importance of competence in creating security". The results described the specialist nurse's experience of sometimes feeling alone in suicide risk assessments and thus emphasized the importance of collegial cooperation. Specialist nurses have an important role in meeting patients with suicide problems and in conveying knowledge to colleagues in other organisations. Conclusion: The time to be there for the patients was highlighted as important and the importance of education and supervision was described as significant efforts in the work with patients with suicide problems. 

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  • 250.
    Arnell, Susann
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center (UFC) Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerlinder, K.
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle , Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. University Health Care Research Center (UFC) Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Participation in physical activities: a multilevel challenge for adolescents with autism spectrum disorders2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical inactivity is one of the biggest current public health problems. Few adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) achieve the recommendation of daily physical activity (PA). The reasons for not being physically active depend on several complex factors, yet not comprehensively described from the adolescents’point of view. The absence of their perspective means that intervention strategies for health enhancing physical activity may not encompass the experiences of the adolescents themselves. Therefore the purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the perceptions, experiences and reflections of adolescents with ASDs’participation in PA.

    Participants and methods: Twenty-four adolescents, diagnosed with ASD without a co-occurring intellectual disability, aged 12-16 years, participated in the study.Data was collected using qualitative interviews and inductively analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Adolescents with ASD were a heterogeneous group in regard to their current PA habits and preferences. Their willingness to participate in PA was conditioned regarding; what, where, when and with whom. They described challenges in the activity and the social context during PA, especially during the mandatory physical education. Perceived demands, freedom of choice, physical ability and sense of control affected their PA participation.

    Conclusion: Findings indicate that the adolescents’willingness to participate was associated with interacting and individual-related conditions, which can be misinterpreted as unwillingness to participate in PA. Thus aspects of autonomy and knowledge about individual conditions and needs have to be recognized when intervention strategies for health enhancing physical activities are planned for this population.

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