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  • 201.
    Brue, Thierry
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Univ, Inst Natl Sante & Rech Med INSERM, U1251, MMG, F-13005 Marseille, France;Hop Conception, AP HM, Ctr Reference Malad Rares Hypophyse HYPO, Dept Endocrinol, F-13005 Marseille, France.
    Lindberg, Anders
    Pfizer Hlth AB, Sollentuna, Sweden.
    van der Lely, Aart Jan
    Erasmus Univ MC, Dept Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Akerblad, Ann Charlotte
    Pfizer Hlth AB, Sollentuna, Sweden.
    Koltowska-Häggström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gomez, Roy
    Pfizer, European Med Affairs, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Droste, Michael
    Hey-Hadavi, Judith
    Pfizer Inc, Endocrine Care, New York, NY USA.
    Strasburger, Christian J.
    Campus Charite Mitte, Dept Med, Div Clin Endocrinol, Berlin, Germany.
    Camacho-Hubner, Cecilia
    Pfizer Inc, Endocrine Care, New York, NY USA.
    Diabetes in patients with acromegaly treated with pegvisomant: observations from acrostudy2019In: Endocrine (Basingstoke), ISSN 1355-008X, E-ISSN 1559-0100, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 563-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeTo explore the effects of pegvisomant (PEGV) on glucose metabolism in patients with acromegaly within ACROSTUDY, an international, observational, prospective safety surveillance study.MethodsPatients were retrospectively divided into two cohorts, with (DM group) or without diabetes mellitus (no-DM). Parameters of glucose metabolism and IGF-I values were analyzed yearly both cross-sectionally for 4 years (yrs) and longitudinally at 1 and 4-5yrs of PEGV treatment.ResultsAmong 1762 patients, 510 (28.9%) had DM before PEGV start. At cross-sectional analyses, in the DM group mean blood glucose was 140.058.7mg/dl at baseline, 116.4 +/- 44.8mg/dl at year 1 and 120.0 +/- 44.3mg/dl at yr 4. Mean HbA1c was 6.6 +/- 1.2 % at yr 1 vs. 7.0 +/- 1.4 % at baseline. HbA1c was above 6.5% in 61.9% at baseline and ranged from 45.4 to 53.8% at subsequent yearly time points. At the 4-yr longitudinal analysis, in the DM group (n=109), mean blood glucose decreased by 20.2mg/dl at yr 4, mean HbA1c was 7.0 +/- 1.5% at baseline vs. 6.8 +/- 1.4%. Patients achieved IGF-I normalization in 52.1% and 57.4% of cases in the DM and no-DM groups, respectively at 1 year. The mean daily PEGV dose (mg/day) was higher in the DM group (18.2 vs. 15.3) while the absolute change of IGF-I values from baseline was similar in both groups. PEGV was well tolerated in both groups without any unexpected AEs.Conclusions p id=Par4 Patients with DM had a moderate decrease in mean fasting glucose values during PEGV treatment.

  • 202. Bruenner, Yvonne F.
    et al.
    Kofoet, Anja
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Freiherr, Jessica
    Central Insulin Administration Improves Odor-Cued Reactivation of Spatial Memory in Young Men2015In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Insulin receptors are ubiquitously found in the human brain, comprising the olfactory bulb, essential for odor processing, and the hippocampus, important for spatial memory processing. Objective: The present study aimed at examining if intranasal insulin, which is known to transiently increase brain insulin levels in humans, would improve odor-cued reactivation of spatial memory in young men. Design: We applied a double-blind, placebo-controlled, counterbalanced within-subject design. Setting: The study was conducted at the research unit of a university hospital. Interventions/Participants/Main Outcome Measures: Following intranasal administration of either insulin (40 I.U.) or placebo, male subjects (n = 18) were exposed to eight odors. During each odor exposure, a green-colored field was presented on a 17-in. computer screen. During immediate recall (comprising 3 runs), the participants were re-exposed to each odor cue, and were asked to select the corresponding field (with visual feedback after each response). The delayed recall was scheduled similar to 10 min later (without feedback). To test if insulin's putative effect on odor-place memory would be domain-specific, participants also performed a separate place and odor recognition task. Results: Intranasal insulin improved the delayed but not immediate odor-cued recall of spatial memory. This effect was independent of odor type and in the absence of systemic side effects (eg, fasting plasma glucose levels remained unaltered). Place and odor recognition were unaffected by the insulin treatment. Conclusions: These findings suggest that acute intranasal insulin improves odor-cued reactivation of spatial memory in young men.

  • 203.
    Brunner, Fabian J.
    et al.
    Univ Heart & Vasc Ctr Hamburg, Dept Cardiol, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Waldeyer, Christoph
    Univ Heart & Vasc Ctr Hamburg, Dept Cardiol, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Ojeda, Francisco
    Univ Heart & Vasc Ctr Hamburg, Dept Cardiol, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kee, Frank
    Queens Univ Belfast, Ctr Publ Hlth, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Sans, Susana
    Catalan Dept Hlth, Barcelona, Spain.
    Thorand, Barbara
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Giampaoli, Simona
    Natl Inst Hlth ISS, Dept Cardiovasc Endocrine Metab Dis & Ageing, Rome, Italy.
    Brambilla, Paolo
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Med & Surg, Milan, Italy.
    Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh
    Univ Dundee, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Unit, Inst Cardiovasc Res, Dundee, Scotland.
    Moitry, Marie
    Univ Hosp Strasbourg, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Strasbourg, France.
    Iacoviello, Licia
    IRCCS Neuromed, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Pozzilli, Italy;Univ Insubria, Dept Med & Surg, Res Ctr Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Varese, Italy.
    Veronesi, Giovanni
    Univ Insubria, Dept Med & Surg, Res Ctr Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Varese, Italy.
    Grassi, Guido
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Med Clin, Dept Med & Surg, Milan, Italy.
    Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.
    Univ Tromso, Univ Tromso Arctic, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway;Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Neurol & Neurophysiol, Tromso, Norway.
    Soderberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Ctr Heart, Umea, Sweden.
    Linneberg, Allan
    Bispebjerg & Frederiksberg Hosp, Ctr Clin Res & Prevent, Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Dept Clin Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Univ Lille, Risk Factors & Mol Determinants Aging Dis, Lille, France;INSERM, Lille, France;CHU Lille, Lille, France;Inst Pasteur, Lille, France.
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Toulouse Univ, Sch Med, Toulouse, France.
    Tamosiunas, Abdonas
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Inst Cardiol, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Nikitin, Yuriy P.
    Russian Acad Sci, Siberian Branch, Inst Cytol & Genet, Res Inst Internal & Prevent Med,Branch Fed Res Ct, Novosibirsk, Russia.
    Drygas, Wojciech
    Natl Inst Cardiol, Dept Epidemiol Cardiovasc Dis Prevent & Hlth Prom, Warsaw, Poland.
    Melander, Olle
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.
    Joeckel, Karl-Heinz
    Univ Hosp Essen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Essen, Germany.
    Leistner, David M.
    Charite Berlin Univ Med, Dept Cardiol, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany;German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Shaw, Jonathan E.
    Baker Heart & Diabet Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.
    Harokopio Univ, Sch Hlth Sci & Educ, Dept Nutr & Dietet, Athens, Greece.
    Simons, Leon A.
    Univ New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia;St Vincents Hosp, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Kavousi, Maryam
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Vasan, Ramachandran S.
    Boston Univ, Framingham, MA USA;NHLBI, Framingham Study, Framingham, MA USA.
    Dullaart, Robin P. F.
    Univ Groningen, Dept Endocrinol, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Wannamethee, S. Goya
    UCL, Dept Primary Care & Populat Hlth, London, England.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Shea, Steven
    Columbia Univ, Dept Med, New York, NY USA;Columbia Univ, Dept Epidemiol, New York, NY USA.
    de Lemos, James A.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, Div Cardiol, Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Omland, Torbjorn
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Div Med, Lorenskog, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Ctr Heart Failure Res, Oslo, Norway.
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland.
    Landmesser, Ulf
    Charite Berlin Univ Med, Dept Cardiol, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany;German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Berlin, Berlin, Germany;Berlin Inst Hlth, Berlin, Germany.
    Blankenberg, Stefan
    Univ Heart & Vasc Ctr Hamburg, Dept Cardiol, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany;German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Hamburg Kiel Lubeck, Hamburg, Germany.
    Zeller, T.
    Lackner, K.
    Wild, P.
    Peters, A.
    Meisinger, C.
    Voelzke, H.
    Doerr, M.
    Nauck, M.
    Schoettker, B.
    Lorenz, T.
    Makarova, N.
    Schmidt, B.
    Klotsche, J.
    Koenig, W.
    Kontto, J.
    Mannisto, S.
    Jaaskelainen, T.
    Niiranen, T.
    Jousilahti, P.
    Metspalu, A.
    Alver, M.
    Donfrancesco, C.
    Signorini, S. G.
    Gianfagna, F.
    Costanzo, S.
    Woodward, M.
    Dobson, A.
    Giles, G.
    Hodge, A.
    Magliano, D. J.
    Wilsgaard, T.
    Lyngbakken, M. N.
    Hveem, K.
    Eliasson, M.
    Engstrom, G.
    Ingelsson, M.
    Jorgensen, T.
    Twerenbold, R.
    Dallongeville, J.
    Malyutina, S.
    Pajak, A.
    Bobak, M.
    Whincup, P.
    Pitsavos, C.
    Benjamin, E. J.
    Bakker, S. J. L.
    Ikram, M. K.
    Application of non-HDL cholesterol for population-based cardiovascular risk stratification: results from the Multinational Cardiovascular Risk Consortium2019In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 394, no 10215, p. 2173-2183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The relevance of blood lipid concentrations to long-term incidence of cardiovascular disease and the relevance of lipid-lowering therapy for cardiovascular disease outcomes is unclear. We investigated the cardiovascular disease risk associated with the full spectrum of bloodstream non-HDL cholesterol concentrations. We also created an easy-to-use tool to estimate the long-term probabilities for a cardiovascular disease event associated with non-HDL cholesterol and modelled its risk reduction by lipid-lowering treatment. Methods In this risk-evaluation and risk-modelling study, we used Multinational Cardiovascular Risk Consortium data from 19 countries across Europe, Australia, and North America. Individuals without prevalent cardiovascular disease at baseline and with robust available data on cardiovascular disease outcomes were included. The primary composite endpoint of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease was defined as the occurrence of the coronary heart disease event or ischaemic stroke. Sex-specific multivariable analyses were computed using non-HDL cholesterol categories according to the European guideline thresholds, adjusted for age, sex, cohort, and classical modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. In a derivation and validation design, we created a tool to estimate the probabilities of a cardiovascular disease event by the age of 75 years, dependent on age, sex, and risk factors, and the associated modelled risk reduction, assuming a 50% reduction of non-HDL cholesterol. Findings Of the 524 444 individuals in the 44 cohorts in the Consortium database, we identified 398 846 individuals belonging to 38 cohorts (184 055 [48.7%] women; median age 51.0 years [IQR 40.7-59.7]). 199 415 individuals were included in the derivation cohort (91 786 [48.4%] women) and 199 431 (92 269 [49.1%] women) in the validation cohort. During a maximum follow-up of 43.6 years (median 13.5 years, IQR 7.0-20.1), 54 542 cardiovascular endpoints occurred. Incidence curve analyses showed progressively higher 30-year cardiovascular disease eventrates for increasing non-HDL cholesterol categories (from 7.7% for non-HDL cholesterol <2.6 mmol/L to 33.7% for >= 5.7 mmol/L in women and from 12.8% to 43.6% in men; p<0.0001). Multivariable adjusted Cox models with non-HDL cholesterol lower than 2.6 mmol/L as reference showed an increase in the association between non-HDL cholesterol concentration and cardiovascular disease for both sexes (from hazard ratio 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.3 for nonHDL cholesterol 2.6 to <3.7 mmol/L to 1.9, 1.6-2.2 for >= 5.7 mmol/L in women and from 1.1, 1.0-1.3 to 2.3, 2.0-2.5 in men). The derived tool allowed the estimation of cardiovascular disease event probabilities specific for non-HDL cholesterol with high comparability between the derivation and validation cohorts as reflected by smooth calibration curves analyses and a root mean square error lower than 1% for the estimated probabilities of cardiovascular disease. A 50% reduction of non-HDL cholesterol concentrations was associated with reduced risk of a cardiovascular disease event by the age of 75 years, and this risk reduction was greater the earlier cholesterol concentrations were reduced. Interpretation Non-HDL cholesterol concentrations in blood are strongly associated with long-term risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We provide a simple tool for individual long-term risk assessment and the potential benefit of early lipid-lowering intervention. These data could be useful for physician-patient communication about primary prevention strategies.

  • 204. Brunner, Fabian J.
    et al.
    Waldeyer, Christoph
    Ojeda, Francisco
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Kee, Frank
    Sans, Susana
    Thorand, Barbara
    Giampaoli, Simona
    Brambilla, Paolo
    Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh
    Moitry, Marie
    Iacoviello, Licia
    Veronesi, Giovanni
    Grassi, Guido
    Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Linneberg, Allan
    Brenner, Hermann
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Tamosiunas, Abdonas
    Nikitin, Yuriy P.
    Drygas, Wojciech
    Melander, Olle
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Leistner, David M.
    Shaw, Jonathan E.
    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.
    Simons, Leon A.
    Kavousi, Maryam
    Vasan, Ramachandran S.
    Dullaart, Robin P. F.
    Wannamethee, S. Goya
    Riserus, Ulf
    Shea, Steven
    de Lemos, James A.
    Omland, Torbjorn
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    Landmesser, Ulf
    Blankenberg, Stefan
    Zeller, T.
    Lackner, K.
    Wild, P.
    Peters, A.
    Meisinger, C.
    Voelzke, H.
    Doerr, M.
    Nauck, M.
    Schoettker, B.
    Lorenz, T.
    Makarova, N.
    Schmidt, B.
    Klotsche, J.
    Koenig, W.
    Kontto, J.
    Mannisto, S.
    Jaaskelainen, T.
    Niiranen, T.
    Jousilahti, P.
    Metspalu, A.
    Alver, M.
    Donfrancesco, C.
    Signorini, S. G.
    Gianfagna, F.
    Costanzo, S.
    Woodward, M.
    Dobson, A.
    Giles, G.
    Hodge, A.
    Magliano, D. J.
    Wilsgaard, T.
    Lyngbakken, M. N.
    Hveem, K.
    Eliasson, M.
    Engstrom, G.
    Ingelsson, M.
    Jorgensen, T.
    Twerenbold, R.
    Dallongeville, J.
    Malyutina, S.
    Pajak, A.
    Bobak, M.
    Whincup, P.
    Pitsavos, C.
    Benjamin, E. J.
    Bakker, S. J. L.
    Ikram, M. K.
    Application of non-HDL cholesterol for population-based cardiovascular risk stratification: results from the Multinational Cardiovascular Risk Consortium2019In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 394, no 10215, p. 2173-2183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The relevance of blood lipid concentrations to long-term incidence of cardiovascular disease and the relevance of lipid-lowering therapy for cardiovascular disease outcomes is unclear. We investigated the cardiovascular disease risk associated with the full spectrum of bloodstream non-HDL cholesterol concentrations. We also created an easy-to-use tool to estimate the long-term probabilities for a cardiovascular disease event associated with non-HDL cholesterol and modelled its risk reduction by lipid-lowering treatment.

    Methods: In this risk-evaluation and risk-modelling study, we used Multinational Cardiovascular Risk Consortium data from 19 countries across Europe, Australia, and North America. Individuals without prevalent cardiovascular disease at baseline and with robust available data on cardiovascular disease outcomes were included. The primary composite endpoint of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease was defined as the occurrence of the coronary heart disease event or ischaemic stroke. Sex-specific multivariable analyses were computed using non-HDL cholesterol categories according to the European guideline thresholds, adjusted for age, sex, cohort, and classical modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. In a derivation and validation design, we created a tool to estimate the probabilities of a cardiovascular disease event by the age of 75 years, dependent on age, sex, and risk factors, and the associated modelled risk reduction, assuming a 50% reduction of non-HDL cholesterol.

    Findings: Of the 524 444 individuals in the 44 cohorts in the Consortium database, we identified 398 846 individuals belonging to 38 cohorts (184 055 [48·7%] women; median age 51·0 years [IQR 40·7–59·7]). 199 415 individuals were included in the derivation cohort (91 786 [48·4%] women) and 199 431 (92 269 [49·1%] women) in the validation cohort. During a maximum follow-up of 43·6 years (median 13·5 years, IQR 7·0–20·1), 54 542 cardiovascular endpoints occurred. Incidence curve analyses showed progressively higher 30-year cardiovascular disease event-rates for increasing non-HDL cholesterol categories (from 7·7% for non-HDL cholesterol <2·6 mmol/L to 33·7% for ≥5·7 mmol/L in women and from 12·8% to 43·6% in men; p<0·0001). Multivariable adjusted Cox models with non-HDL cholesterol lower than 2·6 mmol/L as reference showed an increase in the association between non-HDL cholesterol concentration and cardiovascular disease for both sexes (from hazard ratio 1·1, 95% CI 1·0–1·3 for non-HDL cholesterol 2·6 to <3·7 mmol/L to 1·9, 1·6–2·2 for ≥5·7 mmol/L in women and from 1·1, 1·0–1·3 to 2·3, 2·0–2·5 in men). The derived tool allowed the estimation of cardiovascular disease event probabilities specific for non-HDL cholesterol with high comparability between the derivation and validation cohorts as reflected by smooth calibration curves analyses and a root mean square error lower than 1% for the estimated probabilities of cardiovascular disease. A 50% reduction of non-HDL cholesterol concentrations was associated with reduced risk of a cardiovascular disease event by the age of 75 years, and this risk reduction was greater the earlier cholesterol concentrations were reduced.

    Interpretation: Non-HDL cholesterol concentrations in blood are strongly associated with long-term risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We provide a simple tool for individual long-term risk assessment and the potential benefit of early lipid-lowering intervention. These data could be useful for physician–patient communication about primary prevention strategies.

  • 205.
    Brunner, G. A.
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karl-Franzens University, Graz, Austria.
    Balent, B.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karl-Franzens University, Graz, Austria.
    Ellmerer, M.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karl-Franzens University, Graz, Austria.
    Schaupp, L.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karl-Franzens University, Graz, Austria.
    Siebenhofer, A.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karl-Franzens University, Graz, Austria.
    Jendle, Johan
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Okikawa, J.
    Aradigm Corp., Hayward, California, USA.
    Pieber, T. R.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karl-Franzens University, Graz, Austria.
    Dose-response relation of liquid aerosol inhaled insulin in type I diabetic patients.2001In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 305-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The AERx insulin Diabetes Management system (AERx iDMS) is a liquid aerosol device that enables insulin to be administered to the peripheral parts of the lung. This study aimed to compare the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of insulin which is inhaled using AERx iDMS with insulin which is subcutaneously administered.

    METHODS: In total, 18 C-peptide negative patients with Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus participated in this randomised, open-label, 5-period crossover trial. Human regular insulin was administered subcutaneously (0.12 U/kg body weight) or inhaled by means of the AERx iDMS (dosages 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 U/kg body weight). Thereafter plasma glucose was kept constant at 7.2 mmol/l for a 10-h period (glucose clamp technique).

    RESULTS: Inhaled insulin provided a dose-response relation that was close to linear for both pharmacokinetic (AUC-Ins(0-10 h); Cmax-Ins) and pharmacodynamic (AUC-GIR(0-10 h); GIRmax) parameters. Time to maximum insulin concentration (Tmax-Ins) and time to maximum glucose infusion rate (TGIRmax) were shorter with inhaled insulin than with subcutaneous administration. The pharmacodynamic system efficiency of inhaled insulin (AUC-GIR(0-6 h) was 12.7% (95% C.I.: 10.2-15.6).

    CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION: The inhalation of soluble human insulin using the AERx iDMS is feasible and provides a clear dose response. Further long-term studies are required to investigate safety aspects, HbA1c values, incidence of hypoglycaemic events and the quality of life.

  • 206.
    Brunström, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Cardiovascular outcomes in the Da Qing Diabetes Prevention Study2014In: The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, ISSN 2213-8587, Vol. 2, no 7, p. 539-540Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 207.
    Brunström, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Blood pressure treatment levels and choice of antihypertensive agent in people with diabetes mellitus: an overview of systematic reviews2017In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 35, p. 435-462Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Multiple systematic reviews address the effect of antihypertensive treatment in people with diabetes. Here, we summarize current systematic reviews concerning antihypertensive treatment effect at different blood pressure (BP) levels, and relative treatment effect of different antihypertensive agents.

    METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, BIOSIS, DARE and CDSR during years 2005-2016. Eligibility criteria, number of trials and participants, outcomes analysed, statistical methods used for data synthesis, and principal results were extracted for each review. Review quality was assessed using the assessment of multiple systematic reviews tool.

    RESULTS: We found four reviews concerning BP treatment level. These consistently showed that the effect of antihypertensive treatment on mortality, cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease was attenuated at lower BP levels. If SBP was more than 140 mmHg, treatment reduced all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease, stroke, myocardial infarction and heart failure. If SBP was less than 140 mmHg, treatment increased the risk of cardiovascular death. We found eight reviews concerning choice of agent. We found no difference between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and diuretics in preventing all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, combined cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease and end-stage renal disease. Minor differences exist for stroke and heart failure. Data were limited on people with type 1 diabetes and very elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. None of the reviews concerning choice of agent included all relevant trials.

    CONCLUSION: The available evidence supports treatment in people with type 2 diabetes and SBP more than 140 mmHg, using any of the major antihypertensive drug classes.

  • 208.
    Bruserud, Oyvind
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway..
    Oftedal, Bergithe E.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway..
    Landegren, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Erichsen, Martina M.
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Med, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    Bratland, Eirik
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway..
    Lima, Kari
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept Med, N-1747 Nordbyhagen, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, N-0372 Oslo, Norway..
    Jorgensen, Anders P.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, N-0372 Oslo, Norway..
    Myhre, Anne G.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, N-0424 Oslo, Norway..
    Svartberg, Johan
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Div Internal Med, N-9019 Tromso, Norway.;Artic Univ Norway, Univ Tromso, Inst Clin Med, N-9019 Tromso, Norway..
    Fougner, Kristian J.
    St Olavs Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, N-7006 Trondheim, Norway..
    Bakke, Asne
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Dept Med, N-4011 Stavanger, Norway..
    Nedrebo, Bjorn G.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway.;Haugesund Hosp, Dept Med, N-5504 Haugesund, Norway..
    Mella, Bjarne
    Ostfold Hosp, Dept Med, N-1603 Fredrikstad, Norway..
    Breivik, Lars
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway..
    Viken, Marte K.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Immunol, N-0372 Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, N-0372 Oslo, Norway..
    Knappskog, Per M.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    Marthinussen, Mihaela C.
    Univ Bergen, Fac Med & Dent, Dept Clin Dent, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.;Oral Hlth Ctr Expertise Western Norway, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    Lovas, Kristian
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Med, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    Kampe, Olle
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wolff, Anette B.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway..
    Husebye, Eystein S.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5012 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Med, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    A Longitudinal Follow-up of Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 12016In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, no 8, p. 2975-2983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a childhood-onset monogenic disease defined by the presence of two of the three major components: hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical insufficiency, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Information on longitudinal follow-up of APS1 is sparse. Objective: To describe the phenotypes of APS1 and correlate the clinical features with autoantibody profiles and autoimmune regulator (AIRE) mutations during extended follow-up (1996-2016). Patients: All known Norwegian patients with APS1. Results: Fifty-two patients from 34 families were identified. The majority presented with one of the major disease components during childhood. Enamel hypoplasia, hypoparathyroidism, and CMC were the most frequent components. With age, most patients presented three to five disease manifestations, although some had milder phenotypes diagnosed in adulthood. Fifteen of the patients died during follow-up (median age at death, 34 years) or were deceasedsiblingswithahighprobability of undisclosed APS1. All except three had interferon-omega) autoantibodies, and allhadorgan-specific autoantibodies. The most common AIRE mutation was c.967_979del13, found in homozygosity in 15 patients. A mild phenotype was associated with the splice mutation c.879+1G>A. Primary adrenocortical insufficiency and type 1 diabetes were associated with protective human leucocyte antigen genotypes. Conclusions: Multiple presumable autoimmune manifestations, in particular hypoparathyroidism, CMC, and enamel hypoplasia, should prompt further diagnostic workup using autoantibody analyses (eg, interferon-omega) and AIRE sequencing to reveal APS1, even in adults. Treatment is complicated, and mortality is high. Structured follow-up should be performed in a specialized center.

  • 209.
    Bucci, M.
    et al.
    Turku Univ, Turku Pet Ctr, Turku, Finland..
    Huovinen, V.
    Turku Univ, Turku Pet Ctr, Turku, Finland.;Turku Univ, Dept Radiol Med Imaging Ctr Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland. Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland..
    Guzzardi, M. A.
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, PET Ctr, Pisa, Italy..
    Koskinen, S.
    Turku Univ, Turku Pet Ctr, Turku, Finland..
    Raiko, J.
    Turku Univ, Turku Pet Ctr, Turku, Finland..
    Lipponen, H.
    Turku Univ, Turku Pet Ctr, Turku, Finland..
    Badeau, R. M.
    Turku Univ, Turku Pet Ctr, Turku, Finland..
    Sarja, N.
    Turku Univ, Turku Pet Ctr, Turku, Finland..
    Salonen, M.
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland..
    Andersson, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sandboge, S.
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland..
    Iozzo, P.
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, PET Ctr, Pisa, Italy..
    Eriksson, J. G.
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Nuutila, P.
    Turku Univ, Turku Pet Ctr, Turku, Finland.;Univ Turku, Dept Med, SF-20500 Turku, Finland.;Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland..
    Maternal obesity and telomere length associate with skeletal muscle insulin resistance which is reversed by exercise training in elderly womenM2015In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 58, no Suppl. 1, p. S16-S17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 210. Bucci, Marco
    et al.
    Huovinen, Ville
    Guzzardi, Maria Angela
    Koskinen, Suvi
    Raiko, Juho R
    Lipponen, Heta
    Ahsan, Shaila
    Badeau, Robert M
    Honka, Miikka-Juhani
    Koffert, Jukka
    Savisto, Nina
    Salonen, Minna K
    Andersson, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sandboge, Samuel
    Iozzo, Patricia
    Eriksson, Johan G
    Nuutila, Pirjo
    Resistance training improves skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in elderly offspring of overweight and obese mothers.2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Maternal obesity predisposes offspring to adulthood morbidities, including type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance have been associated with shortened telomere length. First, we aimed to investigate whether or not maternal obesity influences insulin sensitivity and its relationship with leucocyte telomere length (LTL) in elderly women. Second, we tested whether or not resistance exercise training improves insulin sensitivity in elderly frail women.

    METHODS: Forty-six elderly women, of whom 20 were frail offspring of lean/normal weight mothers (OLM, BMI ≤26.3 kg/m(2)) and 17 were frail offspring of overweight/obese mothers (OOM, BMI ≥28.1 kg/m(2)), were studied before and after a 4 month resistance training (RT) intervention. Muscle insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake was measured using (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography with computed tomography during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Muscle mass and lipid content were measured using magnetic resonance and LTL was measured using real-time PCR.

    RESULTS: The OOM group had lower thigh muscle insulin sensitivity compared with the OLM group (p = 0.048) but similar whole body insulin sensitivity. RT improved whole body and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in the OOM group only (p = 0.004 and p = 0.013, respectively), and increased muscle mass in both groups (p < 0.01). In addition, in the OOM group, LTL correlated with different thigh muscle groups insulin sensitivity (ρ ≥ 0.53; p ≤ 0.05). Individuals with shorter LTL showed a higher increase in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity after training (ρ ≥ -0.61; p ≤ 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Maternal obesity and having telomere shortening were associated with insulin resistance in adult offspring. A resistance exercise training programme may reverse this disadvantage among offspring of obese mothers.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01931540.

  • 211. Buijsse, B.
    et al.
    Boeing, H.
    Drogan, D.
    Schulze, M. B.
    Feskens, E. J.
    Amiano, P.
    Barricarte, A.
    Clavel-Chapelon, F.
    de Lauzon-Guillain, B.
    Fagherazzi, G.
    Fonseca-Nunes, A.
    Franks, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Huerta, J. M.
    Jakobsen, M. U.
    Kaaks, R.
    Key, T. J.
    Khaw, K. T.
    Masala, G.
    Moskal, A.
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Overvad, K.
    Pala, V.
    Panico, S.
    Redondo, M. L.
    Ricceri, F.
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Sanchez, M-J
    Sluijs, I.
    Spijkerman, A. M.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Tumino, R.
    van der A, D. L.
    van der Schouw, Y. T.
    Langenberg, C.
    Sharp, S. J.
    Forouhi, N. G.
    Riboli, E.
    Wareham, N. J.
    Consumption of fatty foods and incident type 2 diabetes in populations from eight European countries2015In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 455-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

    Diets high in saturated and trans fat and low in unsaturated fat may increase type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk, but studies on foods high in fat per unit weight are sparse. We assessed whether the intake of vegetable oil, butter, margarine, nuts and seeds and cakes and cookies is related to incident T2D.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS:

    A case-cohort study was conducted, nested within eight countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC), with 12 403 incident T2D cases and a subcohort of 16 835 people, identified from a cohort of 340 234 people. Diet was assessed at baseline (1991-1999) by country-specific questionnaires. Country-specific hazard ratios (HRs) across four categories of fatty foods (nonconsumers and tertiles among consumers) were combined with random-effects meta-analysis.

    RESULTS:

    After adjustment not including body mass index (BMI), nonconsumers of butter, nuts and seeds and cakes and cookies were at higher T2D risk compared with the middle tertile of consumption. Among consumers, cakes and cookies were inversely related to T2D (HRs across increasing tertiles 1.14, 1.00 and 0.92, respectively; P-trend <0.0001). All these associations attenuated upon adjustment for BMI, except the higher risk of nonconsumers of cakes and cookies (HR 1.57). Higher consumption of margarine became positively associated after BMI adjustment (HRs across increasing consumption tertiles: 0.93, 1.00 and 1.12; P-trend 0.03). Within consumers, vegetable oil, butter and nuts and seeds were unrelated to T2D.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Fatty foods were generally not associated with T2D, apart from weak positive association for margarine. The higher risk among nonconsumers of cakes and cookies needs further explanation.

  • 212.
    Bullock, Martyn
    et al.
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Lim, Grace
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Zhu, Ying
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Åberg, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Kurdyukov, Sergey
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Clifton-Bligh, Roderick
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia.
    ETS Factor ETV5 Activates the Mutant Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Promoter in Thyroid Cancer2019In: Thyroid, ISSN 1050-7256, E-ISSN 1557-9077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Co-occurrence of TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) promoter (TERTp) mutations with BRAF/RAS mutations is associated with significantly more aggressive thyroid cancer. TERTp mutations are hypothesized to generate de novo binding sites for ETS transcription factors, which are themselves activated by BRAF/RAS-stimulated MEK-ERK activity. To date, a detailed study of this mechanism has been limited to only a few cancer types, and we hypothesized that ETS factors involved in TERTp activation could vary between different cancers. Methodology: Here we sought to identify ETS factor(s) required for TERTp activation in thyroid cancer, using a combination of in silico analyses of TCGA data, and experimentation using in vitro thyroid cell models analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, immunoprecipitation (IP), chromatin IP, and gene reporter assays. Results: We found that ETV5 was abundantly expressed in papillary thyroid cancers from the TCGA data set, and in thyroid cancer cell line models. Furthermore, ETV5 was found to preferentially bind to the -124 bp(T) TERTp allele and stimulate TERT transcription in thyroid cancer cells devoid of GA binding protein transcription factor (GABP) activity. We also found that ETV5 functionally cooperates with the transcription factor FOXE1 to further enhance TERTp activity, a mechanism that may at least partially explain why FOXE1 represents a significant genetic determinant of thyroid cancer risk. Conclusions: ETS factors that activate mutant TERTp vary between cancer types, and here we show for the first time that ETV5 demonstrates mutant allele-specific affinity for TERTp in thyroid cancer, a property that has previously only been attributable to GABP.

  • 213. Burger, Koert NJ
    et al.
    Beulens, Joline WJ
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Spijkerman, Annemieke MW
    Sluik, Diewertje
    Boeing, Heiner
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Teucher, Birgit
    Dethlefsen, Claus
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Kyro, Cecilie
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Bendinelli, Benedetta
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Crowe, Francesca
    Allen, Naomi
    Noethlings, Ute
    Dietary fiber, carbohydrate quality and quantity, and mortality risk of individuals with diabetes mellitus2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8, p. e43127-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dietary fiber, carbohydrate quality and quantity are associated with mortality risk in the general population. Whether this is also the case among diabetes patients is unknown.Objective: To assess the associations of dietary fiber, glycemic load, glycemic index, carbohydrate, sugar, and starch intake with mortality risk in individuals with diabetes. Methods: This study was a prospective cohort study among 6,192 individuals with confirmed diabetes mellitus (mean age of 57.4 years, and median diabetes duration of 4.4 years at baseline) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Dietary intake was assessed at baseline (1992-2000) with validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, while adjusting for CVD-related, diabetes-related, and nutritional factors. Results: During a median follow-up of 9.2 y, 791 deaths were recorded, 306 due to CVD. Dietary fiber was inversely associated with all-cause mortality risk (adjusted HR per SD increase, 0.83 [95% CI, 0.75-0.91]) and CVD mortality risk (0.76[0.64-0.89]). No significant associations were observed for glycemic load, glycemic index, carbohydrate, sugar, or starch. Glycemic load (1.42[1.07-1.88]), carbohydrate (1.67[1.18-2.37]) and sugar intake (1.53[1.12-2.09]) were associated with an increased total mortality risk among normal weight individuals (BMI <= 25 kg/m(2); 22% of study population) but not among overweight individuals (P interaction <= 0.04). These associations became stronger after exclusion of energy misreporters. Conclusions: High fiber intake was associated with a decreased mortality risk. High glycemic load, carbohydrate and sugar intake were associated with an increased mortality risk in normal weight individuals with diabetes.

  • 214. Burman, P.
    et al.
    Mattsson, A. F.
    Johannsson, G.
    Höybye, C.
    Holmer, H.
    Dahlqvist, P.
    Berinder, K.
    Edén Engström, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Ekman, B.
    Erfurth, E. M.
    Svensson, J.
    Wahlberg, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Karlsson, F. A.
    Deaths Among Adult Patients With Hypopituitarism: Hypocortisolism During Acute Stress, and De Novo Malignant Brain Tumors Contribute to an Increased Mortality2013In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 1466-1475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased standardized mortality rate. The basis for this has not been fully clarified. Objective: To investigate in detail the cause of death in a large cohort of patients with hypopituitarism subjected to long-term follow-up. Design and Methods: All-cause and cause-specific mortality in 1286 Swedish patients with hypopituitarism prospectively monitored in KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) 1995-2009 were compared to general population data in the Swedish National Cause of Death Registry. In addition, events reported in KIMS, medical records, and postmortem reports were reviewed. Main Outcome Measures: Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated, with stratification for gender, attained age, and calendar year during follow-up. Results: An excess mortality was found, 120 deaths vs 84.3 expected, SMR 1.42 (95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.70). Infections, brain cancer, and sudden death were associated with significantly increased SMRs (6.32, 9.40, and 4.10, respectively). Fifteen patients, all ACTH-deficient, died from infections. Eight of these patients were considered to be in a state of adrenal crisis in connection with death (medical reports and post-mortem examinations). Another 8 patients died from de novo malignant brain tumors, 6 of which had had a benign pituitary lesion at baseline. Six of these 8 subjects had received prior radiation therapy. Conclusion: Two important causes of excess mortality were identified: first, adrenal crisis in response to acute stress and intercurrent illness; second, increased risk of a late appearance of de novo malignant brain tumors in patients who previously received radiotherapy. Both of these causes may be in part preventable by changes in the management of pituitary disease.

  • 215. Burman, P.
    et al.
    Mattsson, A. F.
    Johannsson, G.
    Höybye, C.
    Holmer, H.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Berinder, K.
    Engström, B. E.
    Ekman, B.
    Erfurth, E. M.
    Svensson, J
    Wahlberg, J.
    Karlsson, F. A.
    Deaths among adult patients with hypopituitarism: hypocortisolism during acute stress, and de novo malignant brain tumors contribute to an increased mortality2013In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 1466-1475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased standardized mortality rate. The basis for this has not been fully clarified.

    Objective: To investigate in detail the cause of death in a large cohort of patients with hypopituitarism subjected to long-term follow-up.

    Design and Methods: All-cause and cause-specific mortality in 1286 Swedish patients with hypopituitarism prospectively monitored in KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) 1995-2009 were compared to general population data in the Swedish National Cause of Death Registry. In addition, events reported in KIMS, medical records, and postmortem reports were reviewed.

    Main Outcome Measures: Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated, with stratification for gender, attained age, and calendar year during follow-up.

    Results: An excess mortality was found, 120 deaths vs 84.3 expected, SMR 1.42 (95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.70). Infections, brain cancer, and sudden death were associated with significantly increased SMRs (6.32, 9.40, and 4.10, respectively). Fifteen patients, all ACTH-deficient, died from infections. Eight of these patients were considered to be in a state of adrenal crisis in connection with death (medical reports and post-mortem examinations). Another 8 patients died from de novo malignant brain tumors, 6 of which had had a benign pituitary lesion at baseline. Six of these 8 subjects had received prior radiation therapy.

    Conclusion: Two important causes of excess mortality were identified: first, adrenal crisis in response to acute stress and intercurrent illness; second, increased risk of a late appearance of de novo malignant brain tumors in patients who previously received radiotherapy. Both of these causes may be in part preventable by changes in the management of pituitary disease.

  • 216.
    Burman, Pia
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Dept Endocrinol, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Edén-Engström, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Endocrinol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Schwarcz, Erik
    Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Internal Med, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Endocrinol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Limited value of cabergoline in Cushing's disease: a prospective study of a 6-week treatment in 20 patients2016In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 174, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context and objective: The role of cabergoline in Cushing's disease (CD) remains controversial. The experience is limited to case reports and few open studies that report the effects determined after >= 1 month of treatment. In prolactinomas and dopamine-responsive GH-secreting tumours, effects of cabergoline are seen within days or weeks. Here, we searched for short-term effects of cabergoline in CD. Design: Twenty patients (19 naive and one recurrent) were included in a prospective study. Cabergoline was administered in increasing doses of 0.5-5 mg/week over 6 weeks. Methods: Urinary free cortisol (UFC) 24 h, morning cortisol and ACTH, and salivary cortisol at 0800, 1600 and 2300 h were determined once weekly throughout. Diurnal curves (six samples) of serum cortisol were measured at start and end. Results: At study end, the median cabergoline dose was 5 mg, range 2.5-5 mg/week. The prolactin levels, markers of compliance, were suppressed in all patients. During the treatment, hypercortisolism varied, gradual and dose-dependent reductions were not seen. Five patients had a >50% decrease of UFC, three had a >50% rise of UFC. Salivary cortisol at 2300 h showed a congruent >50% change with UFC in two of the five cases with decreased UFC, and in one of the three cases with increased UFC. One patient with decreases in both UFC and 2300 h salivary cortisol also had a reduction in diurnal serum cortisol during the course of the study. Conclusions: Cabergoline seems to be of little value in the management of CD. Only one patient had a response-like pattern. Given the known variability of disease activity in CD, this might represent a chance finding.

  • 217.
    Busse, N.
    et al.
    Univ Bremen, Islet Biol Lab, Bremen, Germany..
    Paroni, F.
    Richardson, S. J.
    Univ Exeter, Sch Med, Islet Biol Exeter IBEx, Exeter, Devon, England..
    Frisk, Gun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Laiho, J. E.
    Univ Tampere, Dept Virol, Tampere, Finland..
    Oikarinen, M.
    Univ Tampere, Dept Virol, Tampere, Finland..
    Hyoty, H.
    Univ Tampere, Dept Virol, Tampere, Finland..
    Morgan, N. G.
    Univ Exeter, Sch Med, Islet Biol Exeter IBEx, Exeter, Devon, England..
    Maedler, K.
    Univ Bremen, Islet Biol Lab, Bremen, Germany..
    Detection of beta cell virus infection in type 1 diabetes by short fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, p. S170-S171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 218. Butwicka, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Frisen, Louise
    Almqvist, Catarina
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Risks of Psychiatric Disorders and Suicide Attempts in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study2015In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To assess the risk of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts in children with type 1 diabetes and their healthy siblings. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a population-based case-cohort study of individuals born in Sweden between 1973 and 2009. Children with type 1 diabetes (n = 17,122) and their healthy siblings (n = 18,847) were identified and followed until their 18th birthday. Their risk of psychiatric disorders was compared with that of matched control subjects. RESULTS The risk of psychiatric morbidity in children with type 1 diabetes compared with the general population was tripled within 6 months after the onset of diabetes (hazard ratio [HR] 3.0 [95% CI 2.7-3.4]) and doubled within the total observation period (HR 2.1 [95% CI 2.0-2.2]). An increased risk was noted in suicide attempts (HR 1.7 [95% CI 1.4-2.0]) and in most categories of psychiatric disorders. The risk of psychiatric disorders in probands declined from HR 2.7 (95% CI 2.2-3.3) for those in the cohort born 1973-1986 to 1.9 (95% CI 1.8-2.0) in those born 1997-2009. The risk for any psychiatric disorders among siblings of patients with type 1 diabetes was estimated to be HR 1.1 (95% CI 1.0-1.1), and there was no increased risk in any of the specific category of disorders. CONCLUSIONS Children with type 1 diabetes are at high risk of psychiatric disorders, which seems to be a consequence of the disease rather than due to a common familial etiology. The results support recommendations on comprehensive mental health surveillance in children with type 1 diabetes, especially in recently diagnosed children.

  • 219. Byberg, L
    et al.
    Siegbahn, A
    Berglund, L
    McKeigue, P
    Reneland, R
    Lithell, H
    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity is independently related to both insulin sensitivity and serum triglycerides in 70-year-old men.1998In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 258-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been discussed as a part of the insulin resistance syndrome. However, it is not clear whether the relationship between PAI-1 and insulin resistance is independent of or mediated by increased triglycerides levels. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PAI-1 activity is associated with insulin sensitivity independently of serum triglycerides (sTG) and of other potential confounders. Seventy-year-old men (n=871), participating in a cohort study undergoing extensive metabolic investigations, had blood samples taken for determination of PAI-1 activity. Insulin sensitivity was determined by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. In multivariate correlation and regression analyses, insulin sensitivity was a statistically significant determinant of PAI-1 activity (partial r=-.12; P<.001), independent of sTG, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, and other potential confounders. The levels of sTG were also independently related to PAI-1 activity (partial r=.18; P<.001). The relationships between PAI-1 and insulin sensitivity and sTG were independent of fasting glucose levels. Aggregation of risk factors of the insulin resistance syndrome was associated with increased activity of PAI-1 in men with normal glucose tolerance. We conclude that PAI-1 activity is related to insulin sensitivity and sTG, independently of each other and of other potential confounders, and that increased levels of PAI-1 should be regarded as a component of the insulin resistance syndrome.

  • 220.
    Bysani, Madhusudhan
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Scania Univ Hosp, Diabet Ctr, Dept Clin Sci,Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Agren, Rasmus
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sci Life Lab, Natl Bioinformat Infrastruct Sweden, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Davegardh, Cajsa
    Lund Univ, Scania Univ Hosp, Diabet Ctr, Dept Clin Sci,Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Volkov, Petr
    Lund Univ, Scania Univ Hosp, Diabet Ctr, Dept Clin Sci,Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Ronn, Tina
    Lund Univ, Scania Univ Hosp, Diabet Ctr, Dept Clin Sci,Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Unneberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bacos, Karl
    Lund Univ, Scania Univ Hosp, Diabet Ctr, Dept Clin Sci,Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Ling, Charlotte
    Lund Univ, Scania Univ Hosp, Diabet Ctr, Dept Clin Sci,Epigenet & Diabet Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    ATAC-seq reveals alterations in open chromatin in pancreatic islets from subjects with type 2 diabetes2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 7785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impaired insulin secretion from pancreatic islets is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Altered chromatin structure may contribute to the disease. We therefore studied the impact of T2D on open chromatin in human pancreatic islets. We used assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-seq) to profile open chromatin in islets from T2D and non-diabetic donors. We identified 57,105 and 53,284 ATAC-seq peaks representing open chromatin regions in islets of nondiabetic and diabetic donors, respectively. The majority of ATAC-seq peaks mapped near transcription start sites. Additionally, peaks were enriched in enhancer regions and in regions where islet-specific transcription factors (TFs), e.g. FOXA2, MAFB, NKX2.2, NKX6.1 and PDX1, bind. Islet ATAC-seq peaks overlap with 13 SNPs associated with T2D (e.g. rs7903146, rs2237897, rs757209, rs11708067 and rs878521 near TCF7L2, KCNQ1, HNF1B, ADCY5 and GCK, respectively) and with additional 67 SNPs in LD with known T2D SNPs (e.g. SNPs annotated to GIPR, KCNJ11, GLIS3, IGF2BP2, FTO and PPARG). There was enrichment of open chromatin regions near highly expressed genes in human islets. Moreover, 1,078 open chromatin peaks, annotated to 898 genes, differed in prevalence between diabetic and non-diabetic islet donors. Some of these peaks are annotated to candidate genes for T2D and islet dysfunction (e.g. HHEX, HMGA2, GLIS3, MTNR1B and PARK2) and some overlap with SNPs associated with T2D (e.g. rs3821943 near WFS1 and rs508419 near ANK1). Enhancer regions and motifs specific to key TFs including BACH2, FOXO1, FOXA2, NEUROD1, MAFA and PDX1 were enriched in differential islet ATAC-seq peaks of T2D versus non-diabetic donors. Our study provides new understanding into how T2D alters the chromatin landscape, and thereby accessibility for TFs and gene expression, in human pancreatic islets.

  • 221.
    Caballero-Corbalán, José
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Islet Transplantation a Technical Challenge: Studies on Human Pancreas Preservation and Enzymatic Digestion2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Islet transplantation has found its niche in diabetes treatment. It has contributed to a better quality of life and better glycemic control of patients with diabetes suffering from severe hypoglycemia that are not eligible for vascularized pancreas transplantation. Islet isolation is a technically challenging procedure. The different studies within this doctoral thesis aim to improve and standardize different steps in the isolation procedure. They are in particular looking to improve human pancreas preservation during cold storage, to optimize islet release from the exocrine tissue and to assess whether the isolated islet yield can be predicted from a biopsy.

    We found that pancreas preservation with pre-oxygenated perfluorodecalin (two-layer method) did not improve the ischemic tolerance of the human pancreas as compared to cold storage with the University of Wisconsin (UW) solution. Furthermore, in pancreas with long cold ischemia time (CIT) (>10 hours), Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate (HTK) had a limited preservation capacity as compared with the UW solution with respect to isolation outcome. We also found that during enzymatic pancreas digestion, Vitacyte HA was able to provide a similar islet yield and quality as Serva NB1 with less collagenase activity and shorter digestion time. We further describe the first experience with a new GMP manufactured enzyme called Liberase MTF-S for successful human islet isolation. Finally, we found that the isolated islet yield could not be predicted from a biopsy taken from the head of the pancreas concerning solely morphological parameters of the islets tissue.

    The improvement of pancreas preservation will allow for marginal organs with prolonged cold ischemia time to expand the donor pool. Better knowledge of how the pancreatic extracellular matrix is digested by collagenase will lead to a fast and predictable islet release from the exocrine tissue. By standardizing the isolation procedure and improving organ selection we will increase the success rate in human islet isolation, thereby making islet transplantation available for more patients.

  • 222. Calissendorff, Jan
    et al.
    Maret, Eva
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science.
    Falhammar, Henrik
    Ileal neuroendocrine tumors and heart: not only valvular consequences2015In: Endocrine (Basingstoke), ISSN 1355-008X, E-ISSN 1559-0100, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 743-755Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ileal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) often progress slowly, but because of their generally nonspecific symptoms, they have often metastasized to local lymph nodes and to the liver by the time the patient presents. Biochemically, most of these patients have increased levels of whole blood serotonin, urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and chromogranin A. Imaging work-up generally comprises computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, or in recent years positron emission tomography with Ga-68-labeled somatostatin analogs, allowing for detection of even sub-cm lesions. Carcinoid heart disease with affected leaflets, mainly to the right side of the heart, is a well-known complication and patients routinely undergo echocardiography to diagnose and monitor this. Multitasking surgery is currently recognized as first-line treatment for ileal NETs with metastases and carcinoid heart disease. Open heart surgery and valve replacement are advocated in patients with valvular disease and progressive heart failure. When valvulopathy in the tricuspid valve results in right-sided heart failure, a sequential approach, performing valve replacement first before intra-abdominal tumor-reductive procedures are conducted, reduces the risk of bleeding. Metastases to the myocardium from ileal NETs are seen in <1-4.3% of patients, depending partly on the imaging technique used, and are generally discovered in those affected with widespread disease. Systemic treatment with somatostatin analogs, and sometimes alpha interferon, is first-line medical therapy in metastatic disease to relieve hormonal symptoms and stabilize the tumor. This treatment is also indicated when heart metastases are detected, with the addition of diuretics and fluid restriction in cases of heart failure. Myocardial metastases are rarely treated by surgical resection.

  • 223. Cameron, F. J.
    et al.
    Skinner, T. C.
    de Beaufort, C. E.
    Hoey, H.
    Swift, P. G. F.
    Aanstoot, H.
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Martul, P.
    Chiarelli, F.
    Daneman, D.
    Danne, T.
    Dorchy, H.
    Kaprio, E. A.
    Kaufman, F.
    Kocova, M.
    Mortensen, H. B.
    Njølstad, P. R.
    Phillip, M.
    Robertson, K. J.
    Schoenle, E. J.
    Urakami, T.
    Vanelli, M.
    Ackermann, R. W.
    Skovlund, S. E.
    Are family factors universally related to metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes?2008In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 463-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To assess the importance of family factors in determining metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes in 19 countries.

    METHODS: Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes aged 11-18 years, from 21 paediatric diabetes care centres, in 19 countries, and their parents were invited to participate. Questionnaires were administered recording demographic data, details of insulin regimens, severe hypoglycaemic events and number of episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Adolescents completed the parental involvement scale from the Diabetes Quality of Life for Youth--Short Form (DQOLY-SF) and the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire (DFRQ). Parents completed the DFRQ and a Parental Burden of Diabetes score. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) was analysed centrally on capillary blood.

    RESULTS: A total of 2062 adolescents completed a questionnaire, with 2036 providing a blood sample; 1994 parents also completed a questionnaire. Family demographic factors that were associated with metabolic outcomes included: parents living together (t = 4.1; P < 0.001), paternal employment status (F = 7.2; d.f. = 3; P < 0.001), parents perceived to be over-involved in diabetes care (r = 0.11; P < 0.001) and adolescent-parent disagreement on responsibility for diabetes care practices (F = 8.46; d.f. = 2; P < 0.001). Although these factors differed between centres, they did not account for centre differences in metabolic outcomes, but were stronger predictors of metabolic control than age, gender or insulin treatment regimen.

    CONCLUSIONS: Family factors, particularly dynamic and communication factors such as parental over-involvement and adolescent-parent concordance on responsibility for diabetes care appear be important determinants of metabolic outcomes in adolescents with diabetes. However, family dynamic factors do not account for the substantial differences in metabolic outcomes between centres 

  • 224. Campanella, Gianluca
    et al.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Tumino, Rosario
    Fiorito, Giovanni
    Guarrera, Simonetta
    Iacoviello, Licia
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    de Kok, Theo M. C. M.
    Georgiadis, Panagiotis
    Kleinjans, Jos C. S.
    Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Lillycrop, Karen A.
    May, Anne M.
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Murray, Robert
    Riboli, Elio
    Verschuren, Monique
    Lund, Eiliv
    Mode, Nicolle
    Sandanger, Torkjel M.
    Fiano, Valentina
    Trevisan, Morena
    Matullo, Giuseppe
    Froguel, Philippe
    Elliott, Paul
    Vineis, Paolo
    Chadeau-Hyam, Marc
    Epigenome-wide association study of adiposity and future risk of obesity-related diseases2018In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2022-2035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obesity is an established risk factor for several common chronic diseases such as breast and colorectal cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases; however, the biological basis for these relationships is not fully understood. To explore the association of obesity with these conditions, we investigated peripheral blood leucocyte (PBL) DNA methylation markers for adiposity and their contribution to risk of incident breast and colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction.

    Methods: DNA methylation profiles (Illumina Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip) from 1941 individuals from four population-based European cohorts were analysed in relation to body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip and waist-height ratio within a meta-analytical framework. In a subset of these individuals, data on genome-wide gene expression level, biomarkers of glucose and lipid metabolism were also available. Validation of methylation markers associated with all adiposity measures was performed in 358 individuals. Finally, we investigated the association of obesity-related methylation marks with breast, colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction within relevant subsets of the discovery population.

    Results: We identified 40 CpG loci with methylation levels associated with at least one adiposity measure. Of these, one CpG locus (cg06500161) in ABCG1 was associated with all four adiposity measures (P = 9.07×10−8 to 3.27×10−18) and lower transcriptional activity of the full-length isoform of ABCG1 (P = 6.00×10−7), higher triglyceride levels (P = 5.37×10−9) and higher triglycerides-to-HDL cholesterol ratio (P = 1.03×10−10). Of the 40 informative and obesity-related CpG loci, two (in IL2RB and FGF18) were significantly associated with colorectal cancer (inversely, P < 1.6×10−3) and one intergenic locus on chromosome 1 was inversely associated with myocardial infarction (P < 1.25×10−3), independently of obesity and established risk factors.

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that epigenetic changes, in particular altered DNA methylation patterns, may be an intermediate biomarker at the intersection of obesity and obesity-related diseases, and could offer clues as to underlying biological mechanisms.

  • 225. Campanella, Gianluca
    et al.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Tumino, Rosario
    Fiorito, Giovanni
    Guarrera, Simonetta
    Iacoviello, Licia
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    de Kok, Theo M. C. M.
    Georgiadis, Panagiotis
    Kleinjans, Jos C. S.
    Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Lillycrop, Karen A.
    May, Anne M.
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Murray, Robert
    Riboli, Elio
    Verschuren, Monique
    Lund, Eiliv
    Mode, Nicolle
    Sandanger, Torkjel M.
    Fiano, Valentina
    Trevisan, Morena
    Matullo, Giuseppe
    Froguel, Philippe
    Elliott, Paul
    Vineis, Paolo
    Chadeau-Hyam, Marc
    Epigenome-wide association study of adiposity and future risk of obesity-related diseases2018In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2022-2035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Obesity is an established risk factor for several common chronic diseases such as breast and colorectal cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases; however, the biological basis for these relationships is not fully understood. To explore the association of obesity with these conditions, we investigated peripheral blood leucocyte (PBL) DNA methylation markers for adiposity and their contribution to risk of incident breast and colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction. Methods DNA methylation profiles (Illumina Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip) from 1941 individuals from four population-based European cohorts were analysed in relation to body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip and waistheight ratio within a meta-analytical framework. In a subset of these individuals, data on genome-wide gene expression level, biomarkers of glucose and lipid metabolism were also available. Validation of methylation markers associated with all adiposity measures was performed in 358 individuals. Finally, we investigated the association of obesity-related methylation marks with breast, colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction within relevant subsets of the discovery population. Results We identified 40 CpG loci with methylation levels associated with at least one adiposity measure. Of these, one CpG locus (cg06500161) in ABCG1 was associated with all four adiposity measures (P=9.07×10−8 to 3.27×10−18) and lower transcriptional activity of the full-length isoform of ABCG1 (P=6.00×10−7), higher triglyceride levels (P=5.37×10−9) and higher triglycerides-to-HDL cholesterol ratio (P=1.03×10−10). Of the 40 informative and obesity-related CpG loci, two (in IL2RB and FGF18) were significantly associated with colorectal cancer (inversely, P<1.6×10−3) and one intergenic locus on chromosome 1 was inversely associated with myocardial infarction (P<1.25×10−3), independently of obesity and established risk factors. Conclusion Our results suggest that epigenetic changes, in particular altered DNA methylation patterns, may be an intermediate biomarker at the intersection of obesity and obesity-related diseases, and could offer clues as to underlying biological mechanisms.

  • 226. Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J. E.
    et al.
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Noethlings, Ute
    Freisling, Heinz
    Overvad, Kim
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Katzke, Verena A.
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Masala, Giovanna
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Chamosa, Saioa
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Winkvist, Anna
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Sluik, Diewertje
    Boeing, Heiner
    Beulens, Joline W. J.
    Isocaloric substitution of carbohydrates with protein: the association with weight change and mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes2015In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 14, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The health impact of dietary replacement of carbohydrates with protein for patients with type 2 diabetes is still debated. This study aimed to investigate the association between dietary substitution of carbohydrates with (animal and plant) protein and 5-year weight change, and all-cause and cardiovascular (CVD) mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: The study included 6,107 diabetes patients from 15 European cohorts. Patients with type 1 diabetes were excluded. At recruitment, validated country-specific food-frequency questionnaires were used to estimate dietary intake. Multivariable adjusted linear regression was used to examine the associations between dietary carbohydrate substitution with protein and 5-year weight change, and Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for (CVD) mortality.

    Results: Annual weight loss of patients with type 2 diabetes was 0.17 (SD 1.24) kg. After a mean follow-up of 9.2 (SD 2.3)y, 787 (13%) participants had died, of which 266 (4%) deaths were due to CVD. Substitution of 10 gram dietary carbohydrate with total (ß = 187 [75;299]g) and animal (ß = 196 [137;254]g) protein was associated with mean 5-year weight gain. Substitution for plant protein was not significantly associated with weight change (β = 82 [−421;584]g). Substitution with plant protein was associated with lower all-cause mortality risk (HR = 0.79 [0.64;0.97]), whereas substitution with total or animal protein was not associated with (CVD) mortality risk.

    Conclusions: In diabetes patients, substitution with plant protein was beneficial with respect to weight change and all-cause mortality as opposed to substitution with animal protein. Therefore, future research is needed whether dietary guidelines should not actively promote substitution of carbohydrates by total protein, but rather focus on substitution of carbohydrates with plant protein.

  • 227.
    Capdevila, Jaume
    et al.
    Vall Hebron Univ Hosp, VHIO, Barcelona, Spain.
    Bodei, Lisa
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, New York, NY USA.
    Davies, Philippa
    Royal Free Hosp, Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, London, England.
    Gorbounova, Vera
    Inst Russian Acad Med Sci, Dept Oncol, Moscow, Russia.
    Jensen, Robert T.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Knigge, Ulrich P.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Surg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krejs, Guenter J.
    Med Univ Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Krenning, Eric
    Erasmus MC, Cyclotron Rotterdam BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    O'Connor, Juan Manuel
    Alexander Fleming Inst, Caba, Argentina.
    Peeters, Marc
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Rindi, Guido
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Fdn Policlin Univ A Gemelli IRCCS Roma, Rome, Italy.
    Salazar, Ramon
    Catalan Inst Oncol, Oncobell Program, IDIBELL, Cerca,Ciberonc, Barcelona, Spain.
    Vullierme, Marie-Pierre
    Beaujon Hop Assistance Publ, Radiol Dept, Paris, France.
    Pavel, Marianne E.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Univ Klinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
    Sundin, Anders (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Welin, Staffan (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Unmet Medical Needs in Metastatic Lung and Digestive Neuroendocrine Neoplasms2019In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unmet medical needs are not infrequent in oncology, and these needs are usually of higher magnitude in rare cancers. The field of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has evolved rapidly during the last decade, and, currently, a new WHO classification is being implemented and several treatment options are available in the metastatic setting after the results of prospective phase III clinical trials. However, several questions are still unanswered, and decisions in our daily clinical practice should be made with limited evidence. In the 2016 meeting of the advisory board of the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS), the main unmet medical needs in the metastatic NENs setting were deeply discussed, and several proposals to try to solve them are presented in this article, including biomarkers, imaging, and therapy.

  • 228. Capozza, Korey
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.
    Black, Jeff
    Bello, Nelly
    Lence, Clare
    Oostema, Steve
    North, Christie
    Going Mobile With Diabetes Support: A Randomized Study of a Text Message–Based Personalized Behavioral Intervention for Type 2 Diabetes Self-Care2015In: Diabetes Spectrum, ISSN 1040-9165, E-ISSN 1944-7353, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Patients with type 2 diabetes often fail to achieve self-management goals. This study tested the impact on glycemic control of a two-way text messaging program that provided behavioral coaching, education, and testing reminders to enrolled individuals with type 2 diabetes in the context of a clinic-based quality improvement initiative. The secondary aim examined patient interaction and satisfaction with the program.

    Methods. Ninety-three adult patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (A1C >8%) were recruited from 18 primary care clinics in three counties for a 6-month study. Patients were randomized by a computer to one of two arms. Patients in both groups continued with their usual care; patients assigned to the intervention arm also received from one to seven diabetes-related text messages per day depending on the choices they made at enrollment. At 90 and 180 days, A1C data were obtained from the electronic health record and analyzed to determine changes from baseline for both groups. An exit survey was used to assess satisfaction. Enrollment behavior and interaction data were pulled from a Web-based administrative portal maintained by the technology vendor.

    Results. Patients used the program in a variety of ways. Twenty-nine percent of program users demonstrated frequent engagement (texting responses at least three times per week) for a period of ≥90 days. Survey results indicate very high satisfaction with the program. Both groups’ average A1C decreased from baseline, possibly reflecting a broader quality improvement effort underway in participating clinics. At 90 and 180 days, there was no statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups in terms of change in A1C (P >0.05).

    Conclusions. This study demonstrated a practical approach to implementing and monitoring a mobile health intervention for self-management support across a wide range of independent clinic practices.

  • 229. Cardoso, Joao C. R.
    et al.
    Larhammar, Dan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Comparative evolution of peptide hormone-binding GPCRs: A route to understanding functional complexity2014In: General and Comparative Endocrinology, ISSN 0016-6480, E-ISSN 1095-6840, Vol. 209, no SI, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Proteinuria early in the development of hypertension2014In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 32, no 12, p. 2351-2352Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Carlbom, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Pancreatic perfusion and subsequent response to glucose in healthy individuals and patients with type 1 diabetes2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, no 9, p. 1968-1972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to investigate pancreatic perfusion and its response to a glucose load in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus compared with non-diabetic ('healthy') individuals.

    METHODS: Eight individuals with longstanding type 1 diabetes and ten sex-, age- and BMI-matched healthy controls underwent dynamic positron emission tomography scanning with (15)O-labelled water before and after intravenous administration of glucose. Perfusion in the pancreas was measured. Portal and arterial hepatic perfusion were recorded as references.

    RESULTS: Under fasting conditions, total pancreatic perfusion was on average 23% lower in the individuals with diabetes compared with healthy individuals. Glucose increased total pancreatic and portal hepatic blood perfusion in healthy individuals by 48% and 38%, respectively. In individuals with diabetes there was no significant increase in either total pancreatic or portal hepatic perfusion.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Individuals with type 1 diabetes have reduced basal pancreatic perfusion and a severely impaired pancreatic and splanchnic perfusion response to intravenous glucose stimulation.

  • 232.
    Carlbom, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    [(11)C]5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan PET for Assessment of Islet Mass During Progression of Type 2 Diabetes2017In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 1286-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [(11)C]5-hydroxy-tryptophan ([(11)C]5-HTP) PET of the pancreas has been shown to be a surrogate imaging biomarker of pancreatic islet mass. The change in islet mass in different stages of type 2 diabetes (T2D) as measured by non-invasive imaging is currently unknown. Here, we describe a cross-sectional study where subjects at different stages of T2D development with expected stratification of pancreatic islet mass were examined in relation to non-diabetic individuals. The primary outcome was the [(11)C]5-HTP uptake and retention in pancreas, as a surrogate marker for the endogenous islet mass.We found that metabolic testing indicated a progressive loss of beta cell function, but that this was not mirrored by a decrease in [(11)C]5-HTP tracer accumulation in the pancreas. This provides evidence of retained islet mass despite decreased beta cell function. The results herein indicates that beta cell dedifferentiation, and not necessarily endocrine cell loss, constitute a major cause of beta cell failure in T2D.

  • 233.
    Carlhäll, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal obesity (Class I-III), gestational weight gain and maternal leptin levels during and after pregnancy: a prospective cohort study2016In: BMC Obesity, ISSN 2052-9538, Vol. 3, no 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Maternal obesity is accompanied by maternal and fetal complications during and after pregnancy. The risks seem to increase with degree of obesity. Leptin has been suggested to play a role in the development of obesity related complications. Whether maternal leptin levels differ between obese and morbidly obese women, during and after pregnancy, have to our knowledge not been previously described. Neither has the association between maternal leptin levels and gestational weight gain in obese women. The aim was to evaluate if maternal plasma leptin levels were associated with different degrees of maternal obesity and gestational weight gain.

    Methods

    Prospective cohort study including women categorized as obesity class I-III (n = 343) and divided into three gestational weight gain groups (n = 304). Maternal plasma leptin was measured at gestational week 15, 29 and 10 weeks postpartum. Maternal Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated from early pregnancy weight. Gestational weight gain was calculated using maternal weight in delivery week minus early pregnancy weight. The mean value and confidence interval of plasma-leptin were analysed with a two-way ANOVA model. Interaction effect between BMI and gestational weight gain group was tested with a two-way ANOVA model.

    Results

    The mean maternal leptin concentrations were significantly higher in women with obesity class III compared to women in obesity class I, at all times when plasma leptin were measured. The mean leptin concentrations were also significantly higher in women with obesity class II compared to women in obesity class I, except in gestational week 29. There was no difference in mean levels of plasma leptin between the gestational weight gain groups. No significant interaction between BMI and gestational weight gain group was found.

    Conclusions

    Plasma leptin levels during and after pregnancy were associated with obesity class but not with degree of gestational weight gain. These results are in concordance with epidemiological findings where the risk of obstetric complications increases with increased maternal obesity class. The effect on obstetric outcome by degree of gestational weight gain is less pronounced than the adverse effects associated with maternal obesity.

  • 234.
    Carlsen, Esben Andreas
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Dept Clin Physiol Nucl Med & PET, Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biomed Sci, Cluster Mol Imaging, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Fazio, Nicola
    European Inst Oncol IRCCS, Div Gastrointestinal Med Oncol & Neuroendocrine T, IEO, Milan, Italy.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Neuroendocrine Tumor Unit, Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat
    Univ Hosp Bonn, Dept Nucl Med, Bonn, Germany.
    Grana, Chiara Maria
    European Inst Oncol IRCCS, Div Nucl Med, IEO, Milan, Italy.
    Zandee, Wouter T.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Cwikla, Jaroslaw
    Univ Warmia & Mazury, Med Sch, Olsztyn, Poland.
    Walter, Martin A.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Dept Nucl Med, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Oturai, Peter Sandor
    Rigshosp, Dept Clin Physiol Nucl Med & PET, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rinke, Anja
    Univ Hosp Giess & Marburg, Dept Gastroenterol, Marburg, Germany.
    Weaver, Andrew
    Churchill Hosp, Dept Oncol, Oxford, England.
    Frilling, Andrea
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Surg & Canc, London, England.
    Gritti, Sara
    European Inst Oncol IRCCS, Div Gastrointestinal Med Oncol & Neuroendocrine T, IEO, Milan, Italy.
    Arveschoug, Anne Kirstine
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Nucl Med & PET, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Meirovitz, Amichay
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Oncol, Jerusalem, Israel;Hadassah Hebrew Univ, Med Ctr, Radiat Therapy Unit, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Knigge, Ulrich
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biomed Sci, Cluster Mol Imaging, Copenhagen, Denmark;Rigshosp, Dept Surg Gastroenterol, Copenhagen, Denmark;Rigshosp, Dept Clin Endocrinol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorbye, Halfdan
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Oncol, Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.
    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in gastroenteropancreatic NEN G3: a multicenter cohort study2019In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 227-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an established treatment of metastatic neuroendocrine tumors grade 1-2 (G1-G2). However, its possible benefit in high-grade gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN G3) is largely unknown. We therefore aimed to assess the benefits and side effects of PRRT in patients with GEP NEN G3. We performed a retrospective cohort study at 12 centers to assess the efficacy and toxicity of PRRT in patients with GEP NEN G3. Outcomes were response rate, disease control rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity. We included 149 patients (primary tumor: pancreatic n = 89, gastrointestinal n = 34, unknown n = 26). PRRT was first-line (n = 30), second-line (n = 62) or later-line treatment (n = 57). Of 114 patients evaluated, 1% had complete response, 41% partial response, 38% stable disease and 20% progressive disease. Of 104 patients with documented progressive disease before PRRT, disease control rate was 69%. The total cohort had median PFS of 14 months and OS of 29 months. Ki-67 21-54% (n = 125) vs Ki-67 >= 55% (n = 23): PFS 16 vs 6 months (P < 0.001) and OS 31 vs 9 months (P < 0.001). Well (n = 60) vs poorly differentiated NEN (n = 62): PFS 19 vs 8 months (P < 0.001) and OS 44 vs 19 months (P < 0.001). Grade 3-4 hematological or renal toxicity occurred in 17% of patients. This large multicenter cohort of patients with GEP NEN G3 treated with PRRT demonstrates promising response rates, disease control rates, PFS and OS as well as toxicity in patients with mainly progressive disease. Based on these results, PRRT may be considered for patients with GEP NEN G3.

  • 235.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Shepherd, Maggie
    Univ Exeter, England.
    Ellard, Sian
    Univ Exeter, England; Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Weedon, Michael
    Univ Exeter, England.
    Lernmark, Ake
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Forsander, Gun
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Colclough, Kevin
    Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Brahimi, Qefsere
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Valtonen-Andre, Camilla
    Univ and Reg Labs Reg, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Sten A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Elding Larsson, Helena
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ortqvist, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Groop, Leif
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Marcus, Claude
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hattersley, Andrew T.
    Univ Exeter, England.
    Absence of Islet Autoantibodies and Modestly Raised Glucose Values at Diabetes Diagnosis Should Lead to Testing for MODY: Lessons From a 5-Year Pediatric Swedish National Cohort Study2020In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 82-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Identifying maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) in pediatric populations close to diabetes diagnosis is difficult. Misdiagnosis and unnecessary insulin treatment are common. We aimed to identify the discriminatory clinical features at diabetes diagnosis of patients with glucokinase (GCK), hepatocyte nuclear factor-1A (HNF1A), and HNF4A MODY in the pediatric population.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Swedish patients (n = 3,933) aged 1–18 years, diagnosed with diabetes May 2005 to December 2010, were recruited from the national consecutive prospective cohort Better Diabetes Diagnosis. Clinical data, islet autoantibodies (GAD insulinoma antigen-2, zinc transporter 8, and insulin autoantibodies), HLA type, and C-peptide were collected at diagnosis. MODY was identified by sequencing GCKHNF1A, and HNF4A, through either routine clinical or research testing.

    RESULTS The minimal prevalence of MODY was 1.2%. Discriminatory factors for MODY at diagnosis included four islet autoantibody negativity (100% vs. 11% not-known MODY; P = 2 × 10−44), HbA1c (7.0% vs. 10.7% [53 vs. 93 mmol/mol]; P = 1 × 10−20), plasma glucose (11.7 vs. 26.7 mmol/L; P = 3 × 10−19), parental diabetes (63% vs. 12%; P = 1 × 10−15), and diabetic ketoacidosis (0% vs. 15%; P = 0.001). Testing 303 autoantibody-negative patients identified 46 patients with MODY (detection rate 15%). Limiting testing to the 73 islet autoantibody-negative patients with HbA1c <7.5% (58 mmol/mol) at diagnosis identified 36 out of 46 (78%) patients with MODY (detection rate 49%). On follow-up, the 46 patients with MODY had excellent glycemic control, with an HbA1c of 6.4% (47 mmol/mol), with 42 out of 46 (91%) patients not on insulin treatment.

    CONCLUSIONS At diagnosis of pediatric diabetes, absence of all islet autoantibodies and modest hyperglycemia (HbA1c <7.5% [58 mmol/mol]) should result in testing for GCK, HNF1A, and HNF4A MODY. Testing all 12% patients negative for four islet autoantibodies is an effective strategy for not missing MODY but will result in a lower detection rate. Identifying MODY results in excellent long-term glycemic control without insulin.

  • 236.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nowak, Christoph
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ödeshög.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Cityhälsan Centrum, Norrköping.
    Sundstrom, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Carrero, Juan Jesus
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA; Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA; Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Dalarna Univ, Sweden.
    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is a potential biomarker of both diabetic kidney disease and future cardiovascular events in cohorts of individuals with type 2 diabetes: a proteomics approach2019In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a leading risk factor for end-stage renal disease and is one of the most important risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. It is possible that novel markers portraying the pathophysiological underpinning processes may be useful. Aim: To investigate the associations between 80 circulating proteins, measured by a proximity extension assay, and prevalent DKD and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in type 2 diabetes. Methods: We randomly divided individuals with type 2 diabetes from three cohorts into a two-thirds discovery and one-third replication set (total n = 813, of whom 231 had DKD defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate amp;lt;60 mg/mL/1.73 m(2) and/or urinary albumin-creatinine ratio amp;gt;= 3 g/mol). Proteins associated with DKD were also assessed as predictors for incident major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in persons with DKD at baseline. Results: Four proteins were positively associated with DKD in models adjusted for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, glucose control, and diabetes medication: kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation increment, 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.14); growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15, OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.16-1.69); myoglobin (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.30-1.91), and matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP-10, OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.17-1.74). In patients with DKD, GDF-15 was significantly associated with increased risk of MACE after adjustments for baseline age, sex, microalbuminuria, and kidney function and (59 MACE events during 7 years follow-up, hazard ratio per standard deviation increase 1.43 [95% CI 1.03-1.98]) but not after further adjustments for cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion: Our proteomics approach confirms and extends previous associations of higher circulating levels of GDF-15 with both micro- and macrovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Our data encourage additional studies evaluating the clinical utility of our findings.

  • 237.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Östgren, C. J.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Lanne, T.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nyström, F. H.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    The association between endostatin and kidney disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes2016In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. - Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, is considered to be a marker of kidney disease and a risk factor for its related mortality. However, less is known of the role of endostatin in diabetes and the development of diabetic nephropathy. For this reason, our study investigated the associations between circulating endostatin and the prevalence and progression of kidney disease, and its mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods. - This was a cohort study of 607 patients with T2D (mean age: 61 years, 44% women). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was used to assess the patients' kidney function decline and mortality. Results. - Of the total study cohort, 20 patients declined by >= 20% in eGFR over 4 years, and 44 died during the follow-up (mean duration: 6.7 years). At baseline, participants with diabetic nephropathy (defined as eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and/or microalbuminuria [defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) > 3 g/mol] had higher median levels of endostatin than those without nephropathy (62.7 mu g/L vs 57.4 mu g/L, respectively; P = 0.031). In longitudinal analyses adjusted for age, gender, baseline eGFR and ACR, higher endostatin levels were associated with a higher risk of decline (>= 20% in eGFR, OR per 1 SD increase: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.13-2.65) and a higher risk of mortality (HR per 1 SD increase: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07). Conclusion. - In patients with T2D, circulating endostatin levels can predict the progression of kidney disease and mortality independently of established kidney disease markers. The clinical usefulness of endostatin as a risk marker in such patients merits further studies.

  • 238.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Nystrom, Fredrik H
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Länne, Toste
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Jennersjö, Pär
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Association of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 with nephropathy, cardiovascular events, and total mortality in type 2 diabetes2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) contribute to experimental diabetic kidney disease, a condition with substantially increased cardiovascular risk when present in patients. Therefore, we aimed to explore the levels of sTNFRs, and their association with prevalent kidney disease, incident cardiovascular disease, and risk of mortality independently of baseline kidney function and microalbuminuria in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. In pre-defined secondary analyses we also investigated whether the sTNFRs predict adverse outcome in the absence of diabetic kidney disease.

    METHODS: The CARDIPP study, a cohort study of 607 diabetes patients [mean age 61 years, 44 % women, 45 cardiovascular events (fatal/non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke) and 44 deaths during follow-up (mean 7.6 years)] was used.

    RESULTS: Higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were associated with higher odds of prevalent kidney disease [odd ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) increase 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.32-1.93, p < 0.001 and OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001, respectively]. In Cox regression models adjusting for age, sex, glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 predicted incident cardiovascular events [hazard ratio (HR) per SD increase, 1.66, 95 % CI 1.29-2.174, p < 0.001 and HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.13-1.91, p = 0.004, respectively]. Results were similar in separate models with adjustments for inflammatory markers, HbA1c, or established cardiovascular risk factors, or when participants with diabetic kidney disease at baseline were excluded (p < 0.01 for all). Both sTNFRs were associated with mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: Higher circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with diabetic kidney disease, and predicts incident cardiovascular disease and mortality independently of microalbuminuria and kidney function, even in those without kidney disease. Our findings support the clinical utility of sTNFRs as prognostic markers in type 2 diabetes.

  • 239.
    Carlsson, Lena M. S.
    et al.
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peltonen, Markku
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ahlin, Sofie
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anveden, Åsa
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bouchard, Claude
    Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge LA, United States.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jacobson, Peter
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lönroth, Hans
    Institute of Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Maglio, Cristina
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Näslund, Ingmar
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro län, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pirazzi, Carlo
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Romeo, Stefano
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöholm, Kajsa
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Elisabeth
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Per-Arne
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Lars
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bariatric Surgery and Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in Swedish Obese Subjects2012In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 367, no 8, p. 695-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Weight loss protects against type 2 diabetes but is hard to maintain with behavioral modification alone. In an analysis of data from a nonrandomized, prospective, controlled study, we examined the effects of bariatric surgery on the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

    METHODS: In this analysis, we included 1658 patients who underwent bariatric surgery and 1771 obese matched controls (with matching performed on a group, rather than individual, level). None of the participants had diabetes at baseline. Patients in the bariatric-surgery cohort underwent banding (19%), vertical banded gastroplasty (69%), or gastric bypass (12%); nonrandomized, matched, prospective controls received usual care. Participants were 37 to 60 years of age, and the body-mass index (BMI; the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) was 34 or more in men and 38 or more in women. This analysis focused on the rate of incident type 2 diabetes, which was a prespecified secondary end point in the main study. At the time of this analysis (January 1, 2012), participants had been followed for up to 15 years. Despite matching, some baseline characteristics differed significantly between the groups; the baseline body weight was higher and risk factors were more pronounced in the bariatric-surgery group than in the control group. At 15 years, 36.2% of the original participants had dropped out of the study, and 30.9% had not yet reached the time for their 15-year follow-up examination.

    RESULTS: During the follow-up period, type 2 diabetes developed in 392 participants in the control group and in 110 in the bariatric-surgery group, corresponding to incidence rates of 28.4 cases per 1000 person-years and 6.8 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively (adjusted hazard ratio with bariatric surgery, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.13 to 0.21; P< 0.001). The effect of bariatric surgery was influenced by the presence or absence of impaired fasting glucose (P = 0.002 for the interaction) but not by BMI (P = 0.54). Sensitivity analyses, including end-point imputations, did not change the overall conclusions. The postoperative mortality was 0.2%, and 2.8% of patients who underwent bariatric surgery required reoperation within 90 days owing to complications.

    CONCLUSIONS: Bariatric surgery appears to be markedly more efficient than usual care in the prevention of type 2 diabetes in obese persons. (Funded by the Swedish Research Council and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01479452.)

  • 240.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sedigh, Amir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Rotem, Avi
    Zimermann, Baruch
    Grinberg, Helena
    Goldman, Tali
    Barkai, Uriel
    Avni, Yuval
    Westermark, Gunilla T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlbom, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Antaros Medical AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Olerud, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Transplantation of macroencapsulated human islets within the bioartificial pancreas βAir to patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus2018In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 1735-1744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macroencapsulation devices provide the dual possibility to immunoprotect transplanted cells while also being retrievable; the latter bearing importance for safety in future trials with stem-cell derived cells. However, macroencapsulation entails a problem with oxygen supply to the encapsulated cells. The βAir device solves this with an incorporated refillable oxygen tank. This phase 1 study evaluated the safety and efficacy of implanting the βAir device containing allogeneic human pancreatic islets to patients with type 1 diabetes. Four patients were transplanted with 1-2 βAir devices, each containing 155000-180000 IEQ (i.e. 1800-4600 IEQ per kg body weight), and monitored for 3-6 months, followed by the recovery of devices. Implantation of the βAir device was safe and successfully prevented immunization and rejection of the transplanted tissue. However, although beta cells survived in the device, only minute levels of circulating C-peptide were observed with no impact on metabolic control. Fibrotic tissue with immune cells was formed in capsule surroundings. Recovered devices displayed a blunted glucose-stimulated insulin response, and amyloid formation in the endocrine tissue. We conclude that the βAir device is safe and can support survival of allogeneic islets for several months, although the function of the transplanted cells was limited.

  • 241.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Disruption of Insulin Receptor Signaling in Endothelial Cells Shows the Central Role of an Intact Islet Blood Flow for In Vivo beta-Cell Function2015In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 700-702Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Halt the Progression of Type 1 Diabetes?2015In: Current Diabetes Reports, ISSN 1534-4827, E-ISSN 1539-0829, Vol. 15, no 7, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No treatment to halt the progressive loss of insulin-producing beta-cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus has yet been clinically introduced. Strategies tested have at best only transiently preserved beta-cell function and in many cases with obvious side effects of drugs used. Several studies have suggested that mesenchymal stromal cells exert strong immunomodulatory properties with the capability to prevent or halt diabetes development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. A multitude of mechanisms has been forwarded to exert this effect. Recently, we translated this strategy into a first clinical phase I/IIa trial and observed no side effects, and preserved or even increased C-peptide responses to a mixed meal tolerance test during the first year after treatment. Future blinded, larger studies, with extended follow-up, are clearly of interest to investigate this treatment concept.

  • 243.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Schwarcz, Erik
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Preserved Beta-Cell Function in Type 1 Diabetes by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells2015In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 587-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The retention of endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetes is an attractive clinical goal, which opens possibilities for long-term restoration of glucose metabolism. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) constitute, based on animal studies, a promising interventional strategy for the disease. This prospective clinical study describes the translation of this cellular intervention strategy to patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes. Twenty adult patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes were enrolled and randomized to MSC treatment or to the control group. Residual beta-cell function was analyzed as C-peptide concentrations in blood in response to a mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT) at one-year follow-up. In contrast to the patients in the control arm, who showed loss in both C-peptide peak values and C-peptide when calculated as area under the curve during the first year, these responses were preserved or even increased in the MSC-treated patients. Importantly, no side effects of MSC treatment were observed. We conclude that autologous MSC treatment in new onset type 1 diabetes constitute a safe and promising strategy to intervene in disease progression and preserve beta-cell function.

  • 244. Carlsson, S
    et al.
    Andersson, T
    Araghi, M
    Galanti, R
    Lager, A
    Lundberg, M
    Nilsson, P
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Pedersen, N L
    Trolle-Lagerros, Y
    Magnusson, C
    Smokeless tobacco (snus) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes: results from five pooled cohorts2017In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 281, no 4, p. 398-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Smoking and nicotine exposure increase insulin resistance and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Swedish smokeless tobacco (snus) is high in nicotine, and its use is prevalent in Scandinavian countries, but few studies have investigated snus use in relation to diabetes risk.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the association between snus use and risk of type 2 diabetes using pooled data from five cohorts.

    METHODS: Analyses were based on prospective studies conducted between 1990 and 2013 including 54 531 never-smoking men and 2441 incident cases of type 2 diabetes identified through screening, self-reporting and hospital and prescription registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were assessed and adjusted for age, body mass index, educational level, alcohol consumption and physical activity.

    RESULTS: Compared to never users, the HR of type 2 diabetes was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.00-1.32) in current users of snus. In individuals consuming 5-6 boxes per week, the HR was 1.42 (95% CI: 1.07-1.87); in those consuming ≥7 boxes per week, the HR was 1.68 (95% CI: 1.17-2.41). Each additional box of snus consumed per week yielded an HR of 1.08 (95% CI: 1.01-1.16).

    CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that high consumption of snus is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. The risk was similar to that in smokers, implying that smokers will not reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes by changing to snus use. The results also support the notion that nicotine increases the risk of type 2 diabetes.

  • 245. Carlsson, S.
    et al.
    Andersson, T.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Dorkhan, M.
    Groop, L.
    Lofvenborg, J. Edwall
    Hjort, R.
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Rasouli, B.
    Storm, P.
    Tuomi, T.
    Family history of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and the risk of LADA-results from a population-based study of incident cases2014In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 57, no S1, p. S80-S80Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Carlström, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Liu, Ming
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Yang, Ting
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zollbrecht, Christa
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Huang, Liyue
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Peleli, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borniquel, Sara
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kishikawa, Hiroaki
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hezel, Michael
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Persson, A. Erik G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Weitzberg, Eddie
    Karolinska Inst, Div Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Jon O.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cross-talk Between Nitrate-Nitrite-NO and NO Synthase Pathways in Control of Vascular NO Homeostasis2015In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 295-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Inorganic nitrate and nitrite from endogenous and dietary sources have emerged as alternative substrates for nitric oxide (NO) formation in addition to the classic L-arginine NO synthase (NOS)-dependent pathway. Here, we investigated a potential cross-talk between these two pathways in the regulation of vascular function. Results: Long-term dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate (0.1 and 1mmol kg(-1) day(-1)) in rats caused a reversible dose-dependent reduction in phosphorylated endothelial NOS (eNOS) (Ser1177) in aorta and a concomitant increase in phosphorylation at Thr495. Moreover, eNOS-dependent vascular responses were attenuated in vessels harvested from nitrate-treated mice or when nitrite was acutely added to control vessels. The citrulline-to-arginine ratio in plasma, as a measure of eNOS activity, was reduced in nitrate-treated rodents. Telemetry measurements revealed that a low dietary nitrate dose reduced blood pressure, whereas a higher dose was associated with a paradoxical elevation. Finally, plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate increased in mice that were treated with a low dietary nitrate dose and decreased with a higher dose. Innovation and Conclusions: These results demonstrate the existence of a cross-talk between the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway and the NOS-dependent pathway in control of vascular NO homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 295-306.

  • 247. Carlzon, Daniel
    et al.
    Svensson, Johan
    Petzold, Max
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Tivesten, Asa
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Both Low and High Serum IGF-1 Levels Associate With Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Elderly Men2014In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 99, no 11, p. E2308-E2316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Most previous prospective studies suggest that low serum IGF-1 associates with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events whereas other studies suggest that high serum IGF-1 associates with increased risk of CVD events. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that not only low, but also high serum IGF-1 levels associate with increased risk of CVD events in elderly men. Setting and Design: Serum IGF-1 levels were measured in 2901 elderly men (age 69-81 years) included in the Swedish cohort of the prospective, population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS), Sweden cohort. Data for CVD events were obtained from national Swedish registers with no loss of followup. Results: During followup (median, 5.1 y) 589 participants experienced a CVD event. The association between serum IGF-1 and risk of CVD events was nonlinear, and restricted cubic spline Cox regression analysis revealed a U-shaped association between serum IGF-1 levels and CVD events (P < .01 for nonlinearity). Low as well as high serum IGF-1 (quintile 1 or 5 vs quintiles 2-4) significantly associated with increased risk for CVD events (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.25, 95% confidence interval, [CI], 1.02-1.54; and HR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.10-1.66, respectively). These associations remained after adjustment for prevalent CVD and multiple risk factors. High serum IGF-1 associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events but not with risk of cerebrovascular events. Conclusions: Both low and high serum IGF-1 levels are risk markers for CVD events in elderly men. The association between high serum IGF-1 and CVD events is mainly driven by CHD events.

  • 248.
    Carobbio, Stefania
    et al.
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Hagen, Rachel M.
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Lelliott, Christopher J.
    Department of Biosciences, CVGI IMED, AstraZeneca Research and Development, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Slawik, Marc
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Endocrine Research Unit, Medizinische Klinik-Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.
    Medina-Gomez, Gema
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, , Madrid, Spain.
    Tan, Chong-Yew
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Sicard, Audrey
    Laboratory of Obesity, Institute of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases (I2MC), Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France.
    Atherton, Helen J.
    MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Barbarroja, Nuria
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Hospital Virgen de la Victoria, CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Malaga, Spain.
    Bjursell, Mikael
    Department of Biosciences, CVGI IMED, AstraZeneca Research and Development, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad
    Department of Biosciences, CVGI IMED, AstraZeneca Research and Development, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Virtue, Sam
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Tuthill, Antoinette
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Lefai, Etienne
    Lyon CarMeN Laboratory, Human Nutrition Research Center, Lyon1 University, Lyon, France.
    Laville, Martine
    Lyon CarMeN Laboratory, Human Nutrition Research Center, Lyon1 University, Lyon, France.
    Wu, Tingting
    Department of Biosciences, CVGI IMED, AstraZeneca Research and Development, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Considine, Robert V.
    Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis IN, United States.
    Vidal, Hubert
    Lyon CarMeN Laboratory, Human Nutrition Research Center, Lyon1 University, Lyon, France.
    Langin, Dominique
    Laboratory of Obesity, Institute of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases (I2MC), Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France; Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Toulouse, France.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Medicine, Obesity Research Unit, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tinahones, Francisco J.
    Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel
    Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Institut d'Investigació Biomédica de Girona, CIBERobn Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Girona, Spain.
    Griffin, Julian L.
    MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Sethi, Jaswinder K.
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    López, Miguel
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Department of Physiology, CIMUS, University of Santiago de Compostela-Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Vidal-Puig, Antonio
    Metabolic Research Laboratories, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Adaptive changes of the Insig1/SREBP1/SCD1 set point help adipose tissue to cope with increased storage demands of obesity2013In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 62, no 11, p. 3697-3708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidemic of obesity imposes unprecedented challenges on human adipose tissue (WAT) storage capacity that may benefit from adaptive mechanisms to maintain adipocyte functionality. Here, we demonstrate that changes in the regulatory feedback set point control of Insig1/SREBP1 represent an adaptive response that preserves WAT lipid homeostasis in obese and insulin-resistant states. In our experiments, we show that Insig1 mRNA expression decreases in WAT from mice with obesity-associated insulin resistance and from morbidly obese humans and in in vitro models of adipocyte insulin resistance. Insig1 downregulation is part of an adaptive response that promotes the maintenance of SREBP1 maturation and facilitates lipogenesis and availability of appropriate levels of fatty acid unsaturation, partially compensating the antilipogenic effect associated with insulin resistance. We describe for the first time the existence of this adaptive mechanism in WAT, which involves Insig1/SREBP1 and preserves the degree of lipid unsaturation under conditions of obesity-induced insulin resistance. These adaptive mechanisms contribute to maintain lipid desaturation through preferential SCD1 regulation and facilitate fat storage in WAT, despite on-going metabolic stress.

  • 249.
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Bollerslev, Jens
    Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Immunohistochemistry for transcription factor T-Pit as a tool in diagnostics of corticotroph pituitary tumours2018In: Pituitary, ISSN 1386-341X, E-ISSN 1573-7403, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 443-443Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 250.
    Casar-Borota, Olivera
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Oslo University Hospital, University of Oslo and Uppsala University.
    Heck, Ansgar
    Schulz, Stefan
    Nesland, Jahn Marthin
    Ramm-Pettersen, Jon
    Lekva, Tove
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Bollerslev, Jens
    Expression of SSTR2a, but not of SSTRs 1, 3, or 5 in Somatotroph Adenomas Assessed by Monoclonal Antibodies Was Reduced by Octreotide and Correlated With the Acute and Long-Term Effects of Octreotide2013In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 98, no 11, p. E1730-E1739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Reduced expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) in somatotroph adenomas and their potential down-regulation after medical treatment may explain the unsatisfactory response to octreotide in particular acromegalic patients. The expression of SSTRs other than SSTR2a has not been studied in large, unselected cohorts using novel rabbit monoclonal antibodies. Objective: We aimed to determine the expression of SSTRs 1, 2a, 3, and 5 in somatotroph adenomas, to correlate expression with clinical characteristics and the response to octreotide, and to ascertain whether preoperative octreotide treatment affected SSTR expression. Design, Setting, Patients: The study included 78 adenomas from patients operated on consecutively during 2000 to 2010. After exclusion of 13 patients, immunohistochemical analysis with rabbit monoclonal antibodies against SSTRs 1, 2a, 3, and 5 (clones UMB-7, -1, -5, and -4) was performed on 65 adenomas. Intervention: Twenty-eight patients received preoperative octreotide, and 37 patients were operated on without pretreatment. Twenty-six patients were randomized to direct surgery (n = 13) or to octreotide pretreatment (n = 13). Main Outcome Measure: SSTR expression was evaluated using a 12-grade scoring system. The responses to the octreotide test dose (GH reduction) and to 6 months of octreotide (IGF-I reduction) were measured. Results: The majority of adenomas showed membranous expression of SSTRs 2a and 5. SSTR2a expression was reduced in the pretreated group and correlated with the acute octreotide test results and the effect of octreotide treatment. In a linear regression model with SSTR2 a expression as the determinant, the correlation with the acute test response improved after adjustment for medical pretreatment. Conclusion: Rabbit monoclonal antibodies are reliable markers of SSTRs in somatotroph adenomas. SSTR2a expression correlated with the response to octreotide and was reduced after octreotide treatment, indicating the need for adjustment when SSTR2a expression is correlated with baseline characteristics. Evaluation of SSTR subtypes may be an important aspect of improving the medical treatment for acromegaly.

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