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  • 2001.
    Widstrand, Carl Gösta
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    African co-operatives and efficiency1972Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1971 the Scandinavian Institute of African Studies and the East and Central African Office of the International Co-operative Alliance organized a seminar entitled "Efficiency in the Performance of Co-operatives" and it was held at the Co-operative College, Langata, Kenya. The papers in this volume are introductory papers sent to the participants before the seminar, as well as statements made by members of various organizations participating. Although the approaches seem different, there is one similarity to the co-operatives; all of the authors are trying in one way or another to answer the question: "What is co-operative efficiency?"

  • 2002.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assmo, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Home: The Arena for Sustainable development - A Conceptual Discussion2010In: International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, ISSN 1832-2077, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 319-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary society, the environment is often regarded as a global issue that requires international attention However, the global problem surrounding the environment can be regarded as a symptom and result of the everyday activities of people at a local level. A focus on a local level can be identified as a focus on the household, which consists of individuals who live together and is a space where everyday life is organised and takes place. Depending on the different academic disciplinary contexts in which they operate, various interpretations and analyses of the household and everyday life within the household will vary. Even in daily political languages there are different meanings and interpretations. The aim of this paper is to distinguish and discuss the implications of viewing the home in three different contexts; as a physical dwelling, as a node of economic resource management, and finally as a dwelling for a social and emotional family. These three dimensions of everyday life are related to the three dimensions of sustainable development and an analysis that can identify and integrate these dimensions can provide possibilities for creating sustainable development processes combining local and global solutions to ways of living.

  • 2003.
    Wilk, Julie
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How do researchers view  the role of local knowledge in natural resource management?2009In: International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, ISSN 1832-2077, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 25-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementing sound natural resource management is a complex issue and a synergy of knowledge from all stakeholders, representing local and outside interests, is the only means to attain sustainable solutions. The results from interviews with a number of researchers in least developed countries have shown that although indigenous knowledge is acknowledged in the local sphere as site-specific, it is scientific knowledge that is considered universally valid and superior. In conflicting circumstances, local knowledge is often considered wrong without recognizing the existence of different contexts, world views or goals and the many examples of the fallibility of science. As researchers, reflecting upon and understanding one’s own world view and perceptions of different sources of knowledge is important as it affects the way that knowledge held by local communities is treated and whether or not it is included in research and development projects and policy documents.

  • 2004.
    Wiltgren, Layal Kasselias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Import: Ungdomar skapar etniska kategoriseringar2014In: Barn, ISSN 0800-1669, no 4, p. 31-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary ethnicity research agrees that ethnicity, like other identity categories, is a social construct.In this article I aim to illustrate how youth in a segregated junior high school on the outskirts of Stockholm,humorously use the term import to categorize newly arrived immigrants. Although the term refers tophysical movement it is mainly concerned with matters of style and behavior. The term is, however, open,fluid and inclusive as the youth themselves can, in a playful manner, move in and out of the category. Theoverarching study, of which this article is part, is based on a yearlong fieldwork following two eight gradeclasses where all the students have the experience of migration within their families.

  • 2005.
    Wiman-Lindqvist, Emelie Elenora
    Linköping University, Department of Religion and Culture.
    Den listiga prinsessan Mandelbloms mödomsspegel: Hur unga kvinnor med muslimsk bakgrund förhåller sig till sexualitet2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay focuses on the relationship between Islam, secularism, girls and sexuality. These categories problematize gender and how it affects identity processes of young women with a Muslim background. Sexuality is especially emphasized. The Muslim background is placed in contrast to the prescribed norms and ideals of the Swedish society/context concerning gender, sexuality and identity and this essay analyses how young women create gender and identity and which possibilities and strategies they have and use to negotiate about space in the relationship to other people. A girls’ relationship to her own and others’ sexuality is precisely what makes her a girl, but more importantly, also to which kind of girl. What does the secularization do with gender- and identity processes and does it change the views on sexuality? In what way do the experiences and conceptions of young Muslim women differ from Swedish girls? This is what this essay will focus on.

  • 2006.
    Wimark, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Sexuality and Emotions Situated in Time and Space2019In: Affective Dimensions of Fieldwork and Ethnography / [ed] Thomas Stodulka, Samia Dinkelaker, Ferdiansyah Thajib, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 157-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, I discuss sexual emotions erupting during fieldwork and argue that sexualities are situated in time and space. In order to understand these emotions, we need to recognize that sexualities are conceptualized in many ways and that different ways of expressing sexuality coexist and are interlinked. Drawing from experiences from three fieldwork periods, I propose a framework for analyzing researcher emotions with an emphasis on individuals without ignoring structure and context. Building on the life course concept, this entails thinking of affect as divided into a “feeling position” and “feeling experience.” Developing a unique feeling position, closest to an understanding of a mental state, it is deeply individual and dependent on the bodies, structures and contexts as individuals go through in life. Feeling positions both enable and disable feeling experiences in the daily lives, i.e., the expressed emotions at any point of time. However, feeling experiences also feed back to the position and ultimately prompt individual change. The fieldwork experiences discussed in this chapter demonstrate how sexuality and race, albeit from a privileged position, are conceived in different ways depending on time and space. Traveling through these times and spaces means being interpellated in ways, perhaps other than learned, and simultaneously adding yet other ways to be understood. These potentially confusing situations can become tangible through the emotions expressed or felt in the field. Applying the proposed life course concept is one way to made sense of these situations.

  • 2007. Winthereik, Brit Ross
    et al.
    Lutz, Peter A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Suchman, Lucy A.
    Verran, Helen
    Attending to Screens and Screenness: Guest editorial for special issue of Encounters2011In: STS Encounters, ISSN 1904-4372, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2008.
    Woldegiorgis, Birhanu Desta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology, Cultural Anthropology.
    A Blue Print or a Mirage: An Anthropological Study of agricultural and institutional practices, engagements and development discourse in Ethiopia2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is an exploration of the institutional engagement between farmers and government, as well as a discourse about the development process in Ethiopia. The discussions are based on the fieldwork conducted from January 2012 to March 2012 in the eastern Ahmara region of the Dewa Chefa district (woreda). The ethnographic material will show how the public’s opinion is altered by the government and national media in terms of the discourse on development, economic growth and change of a farmer’s life. The discourses portray an unrealistic view of real, existing practices and engagements among the farmers and the agricultural bureau in the woreda.

    The main argument of the thesis is to show how the government's development discourses have multiple purposes that are not only attributed to the development practices and engagements, but also to the political realities and relations which exist between the government and the rural agricultural people. The thesis will explain how engagements, practices and discourses are strategized by the government and its institutions to assert power and to ensure farmers’ compliance. Also, it will explain the farmers' engagements and practices, and their strategies to deal with the development process and the government's strategies to assert power.  

    The theoretical framework is based on the deconstructive, or anthropological development critique. It will argue that understanding development as governmentality and discourses will be vital in discussing development as a power relationship and way of controlling others and extending government's power over its subjects. In such a view of development as nation state construction, the thesis will explain how development knowledge and discourse are reworked, reformulated and multiplied as new forms of knowledge and discourses to serve the purpose of the government in power within the nation.

  • 2009.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    'Hard times' in Lithuania: Crisis and 'discourses of discontent' in post-communist society2010In: Ethnography, ISSN 1466-1381, E-ISSN 1741-2714, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 487-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the intersection of global recession with the underlying crisis of neo-liberalism in Baltic Lithuania, and the disappointment of expectations regarding the promised benefits of free market capitalism for the citizens of post-communist society. Drawing on an empirical analysis of Lithuania, a new European Union member state and former Soviet republic, the post-communist trajectory of neo-liberal economic and social development is critiqued. Global economic and financial crisis has resulted in a social and economic ‘shock’. It occurred in an environment already marked by disappointment, alienation and high outward migration. Through an analysis of ‘voice’ expressed in ‘discourses of discontent’, the article attempts to chart the impact of ‘hard times’. It predicts a new ‘exit’ in the form of a surge of outward migration resulting from the failures of ‘voice’, and the concerning possibility of ‘internal exit’.

  • 2010.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Economic Crisis, Austerity, and Migration: Exploring the Failed Trajectory of Neoliberal Post-Communism2012In: Socioeconomic Outcomes of the Global Financial Crisis: Theoretical Discussion and Empirical Case Studies / [ed] Ulrike Schuerkens, Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 38-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter ethnographically explores popular responses to the impacts of the global economic and financial crisis in Lithuania. It analyzes emergent “discourses of discontent” resulting from the collapse of mass living standards and expectations with its onset. It suggests that the failure of “voice,” as manifested in expressions of popular discontent and social dialogue, will result in the migratory “exit” of many of the disillusioned and increasingly desperate population. The impact of the crisis is all the more severe given previously burgeoning economic growth and rising expectations. Post-communist states such as Lithuania, having embraced a neo-liberal path of rapid economic transition to the free market, with minimal regard to considerations of social justice, now face gathering popular discontent and social turbulence.

  • 2011.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The semiotics of working class speech2007In: CCCS Selected Working Papers: Volume 1 / [ed] A. Gray, J. Campbell, M. Erickson, S. Hanson, S. and H. Wood, London: Routledge , 2007, 1, p. 504-535Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of classic essays focuses on the theoretical frameworks that informed the work of the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at the University of Birmingham, the methodologies and working practices that the Centre developed for conducting academic research and examples of the studies carried out under the auspices of the Centre.

    This volume is split into seven thematic sections that are introduced by key academics working in the field of cultural studies, and includes a preface by eminent scholar, Stuart Hall. The thematic sections are:

    • Literature and Society
    • Popular Culture and Youth Subculture
    • Media
    • Women's Studies and Feminism
    • Race
    • History
    • Education and Work.
  • 2012.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Aesthetics at the Ballet: Looking at "National " Style, Body and Clothing in the London Dance World2002In: British Subjects: An Anthropology of Britain, Berg Publishers, Oxford , 2002, p. 67-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2013.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    An anthropological perspective on literary arts in Ireland2012In: A companion to the anthropology of Europe / [ed] Ullrich Kockel, Máiréad Nic Craith, Jonas Frykman, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, p. 537-550Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2014.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropologist in the Irish Literary World: Reflexivity through Studying Sideways2014In: Anthropology Now and Next: Essays in Honour of Ulf Hannerz / [ed] Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Christina Garsten, Shalini Renderia, New York: Berghahn Books, 2014, p. 147-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2015.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ballet culture and the market: a transnational perspective2012In: Dancing cultures: globalization, tourism and identity in the anthropology of dance / [ed] Hélène Neveu Kringelbach and Jonathan Skinner, New York: Berghahn Books, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2016.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Colm Tóibín as travel writer2010In: NIS: Nordic Irish Studies, ISSN 1602-124X, E-ISSN 2002-4517, Vol. 9, p. 109-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2017.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Color and cultural identity in Ireland2012In: Color and design / [ed] Marilyn DeLong and Barbara Martinson, Oxford: Berg Publishers, 2012, p. 101-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2018.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Commentary: Fixity and Forms of Dance Circulation2012In: Journal for the Anthropological Study of Human Movement, ISSN 0891-7124, E-ISSN 2152-1115, Vol. 17, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2019.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Dance, Anthropology of2015In: International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences: Vol. 5 / [ed] James D. Wright, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015, 2 uppl., p. 666-670Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dance as a topic for systematic anthropological investigation was established in the 1960s. As the Western category of dance did not always work in a cross-cultural perspective, bounded rhythmical movements were identified, as well as dance events. Dance is an expression of wider social and cultural situations, often indicating transition or conflict, as well as unity. Dance anthropologists study all forms of dance, Western and non-Western, ranging from ritual dance and social dance to streetdance and staged dance performance. Dance and movement are understood in relation to theories of the body and gender, and to ethnicity, nationalism, and transnationality.

  • 2020.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Dance Ethnography2013In: Oxford Bibliographies, Oxford University Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2021.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Dancing at the Crossroads: Memory and Mobility in Ireland2009Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ´Dancing at the crossroads´used to be an opportunity for young people to meet and enjoy themselves on mild summer evenings in the Irish countryside until this practice was banned by the Public Dance Halls Act of 1935. Now a key metaphor in Irish cultural and political life, ´dancing at the crossorads´also crystallizes the argument of this book: Irish dance, from Riverdance (the commerical show) to competitive dancing, and dance theatre, conveys that Ireland is in a crossroads situation. Irish dance, with a firm base in a distinctly Irish tradition, is becoming a permanent part of European modernity. While this book highlights the captivating tensions and ties surrounding debates on Irish dance, it also aims to extend broader understandings of place, mobility and rooted cosmpolitanism.

  • 2022.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Dancing at the Crossroads: Memory and Mobility in Ireland2007Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Dancing at the crossroads" used to be an opportunity for young people to meet and enjoy themselves on mild summer evenings in the Irish countryside until this practice was banned by the Public Dance Halls Act of 1935. Now a key metaphor in Irish cultural and political life, "dancing at the crossroads" also crystallizes the argument of this book: Irish dance, from Riverdance (the commericial show) to competitive dancing and dance theatre, conveys that Ireland is in a crossroads situations. Irish dance, with a firm base in a distinctly Irish tradition, is becoming a prominent part of European modernity. While this book highlights the captivating tensions and ties surrounding debates on Irish dance, it also aims to extend broader understandings of place, mobility and rooted cosmopolitanism.

  • 2023.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Disaporic Divides: Location and Orientations of "Home" in Pooneh Rohi's Araben2018In: World literatures: exploring the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 119-128Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter draws on a literary anthropological project which explores the social world of the young generation of diaspora writers and their work (fiction, plays, journalism) in Sweden. It uncovers experiences of racism in a country which boasts an ethnically inclusive policy while identifying instances of literary cosmopolitanism from within. Pooneh Rohi´s novel The Arab (2013) circles around the idea of home in terms of homelessness, and the designation “stranger” as the protagonist leads his lonely life in snow-covered Stockholm where he moved decades ago from Iran. For “the Arab” is actually Persian, but is taken to be an Arab in the Swedish context. Sweden is not home to him, he is homeless in his heart. A young woman in the novel is also from Iran, but she is so well integrated that people think she was adopted. Her childhood memories from Iran are now a mirage from the past, a fading scent of salt from the sea. Later, her longing for “that part of the room that is invisible in the mirror” gets stronger.

  • 2024.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Diversifying from Within: Diaspora Writings in Sweden2018In: The Composition of Anthropology: How Anthropological Texts are Written / [ed] Morten Nielsen, Nigel Rapport, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 122-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helena Wulff´s chapter begins with an essay drawing on her ongoing literary anthropological study of diaspora fiction writers and their work in Sweden who, she argues, are diversifying the country from within. The essay engages with the work of Pooneh Rohi born in Iran, who is a new voice while Jonas Hassen Khemiri, of Tunisian background, is an established writer. In addition to writing fiction, they sometimes do journalism. By uncovering often cruel experiences of racism in a country which boasts an inclusive policy, yet has an expanding anti-immigration party (the Sweden Democrats) diaspora writers have an impact on political and cultural debate in Sweden, also because they take on the role as public intellectuals. In her Commentary, Wulff explains how Text came about, how it goes back to her intellectual history that was founded during her upbringing when she first became a habitual reader, and later with her education in comparative literature and anthropology that eventually would make her an anthropological writer. Inspired by her research on the ballet world where desire and technique are key for creativity to spring up, Wulff suggests that this is the case in anthropological writing, as well. As to the recent genealogy of the essay, it is an account of preparations for a major multi-disciplinary research program on world literatures which was funded in 2016.      

  • 2025.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ethereal Expression: Paradoxes of Ballet as a Global Physical Culture2008In: Ethnography, ISSN 1466-1381, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 518-536Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2026.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ethnografiction and reality in contemporary Irish literature2013In: Novel approaches to anthropology: contributions to literary anthropology / [ed] Marilyn Cohen, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2013, p. 205-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2027.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ethnografiction: Irish Relations in the Writing of Éilís Ní Dhuibhne2009In: Éilís Ní Dhuibhne: Perspectives / [ed] Rebecca Pelan, Galway: Arlen House , 2009, p. 245-261Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2028.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Experiencing the Ballet Body: Pleasure, Pain, Power2006In: The Musical Human: Rethinking John Blacking´s Ethnomusicology in the 21st Century, Ashgate Press, Aldershot , 2006, p. 125-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2029.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Foreword New York: Lexington Books2018In: Apprenticeship Pilgrimage: Developing Expertise through Travel and Training / [ed] Lauren Miller Griffith, Jonathan S. Marion, Lexington Books, 2018, p. vii-xiChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2030.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gathörnets kulturprocesser: Tonårsflickor och etnicitet i södra London1989In: Tecken i tiden: Sju texter om ungdomskultur, Symposion, Stockholm , 1989, p. 69-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2031.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Global spridning för lokala teman: Crime Fiction as World Literature, Louise Nilsson, David Damrosch & Theo D'haen (red.)2017In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 6, p. 66-68Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2032.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Greater Than Its Size: Ireland in Literature and Life2017In: Small Countries: Structures and Sensibilities / [ed] Ulf Hannerz, Andre Gingrich, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017, p. 301-316Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2033.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "High" Arts and the Market: An Uneasy Partnership in the Transnational World of Ballet2005In: The Sociology of Art: Ways of Seeing, Palgrave, Basingstoke , 2005, p. 171-182Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2034.
    Wulff, helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Imagining landscapes: past, present and future, edited by Janowski, Monica and Tim Ingold2013In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 585-586Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2035.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    In Favour of Flexible Forms: Multi-Sited Fieldwork2015In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 355-357Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2036.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Instances of inspiration: interviewing dancers and writers2012In: The interview: an ethnographic approach / [ed] Jonathan Skinner, London: Berg Publishers, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2037.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Inter-racial Friendship: Consuming Youth Styles, Ethnicity and Teenage Femininity in South London1995In: Youth Cultures: A Cross-Cultural Perspective, Routledge, London , 1995, p. 63-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2038.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introducing the Anthropologist as Writer: Across and Within Genres2016In: The Anthropologist as Writer: Genres and Contexts in the Twenty-First Century / [ed] Helena Wulff, New York: Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking existing conversations in anthropology as a point of departure, the mission of this volume is twofold: first, to identify different writing genres that anthropologists actually engage with; second, to argue for the usefulness and necessity for anthropologists of taking  writing as a craft seriously and of writing across and within genres in new ways. This introductory chapter contextualizes anthropological writing historically and theoretically, moves on to my own experience of writing cultural (dance) journalism as one instance of broadening anthropological writing, and concludes by offering an overview of ways of writing anthropology as discussed in the following chapters: in relation to the making of an anthropological career, ethnographic writing, journalistic and popular writing, and writing across genres. 

  • 2039.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introducing Youth Culture in its Own Right: The State of the Art and New Possibilities1995In: Youth Cultures: A Cross-Cultural Perspective, Routledge, London , 1995, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2040.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: The Cultural Study of Mood and Meaning2007In: The Emotions: A Cultural Reader, Berg Publishers, Oxford , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introductory chapter provides a critical review of the study of emotions in anthropology, sociology, psychology and cultural studies. It discusss cultural and social science research on emotions in relation to the major topics of the Reader: opening with the study of emotions in terms of culture, biology and ecology, and moving on to captivating cases of happiness, fear and envy, as well as to investigations into love and hate; anger, shame and grief, desire and expectations, and the emotional self and identity. Based on classic articles on emotions, the Reader applies a cross-cultural perspective which reveals a whole range of new issues in the study of emotions brought out in commissioned articles. This chapter offers an analytical synthesis of the study of emotions, which will show the force, richness and omnipresence of emotions in modern social life.

  • 2041.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ireland in the World, the World in Ireland2015In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 142-143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2042.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Jazz i Ghana: musik som kosmopolitism2015In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2043.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Literary Readings as Performance: On the Career of Contemporary Writers in the New Ireland2008In: Anthropological Journal on European Cultures, ISSN 1755-2923, E-ISSN 1755-2931, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 98-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on an anthropological study of the social organisation of the world of Irish writers, this article investigates the literary reading as performance which has become central for the career and promotion of contemporary writers. How is the reading - live as well as recorded - constituted, and how is it experienced from the writer's point of view? The data are derived from participant observation and interviews at literary festivals and conferences, writers' retreats, book launches and more informal situations with writers, as well as from fiction and essays by the writers. For this article, I asked some of the writers to write short texts on the reading. It turned out that the frames of the reading as performance reach beyond the reading event, and also that a reading includes elements of risk, such as not attracting a big enough audience or performing badly. Finally, the article considers the changing role of the ethnographer.

  • 2044.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Litterär gestaltning på Irland2011In: Resultatdialog 2011, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2011, p. 172-178Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2045.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Longing for the Land: Emotions, Memory, and Nature in Irish Travel Advertisements2007In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 527-541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With its large diaspora, Ireland has a long tradition of travel ranging from emigration to return migration, expatriate visits as well as tourism. Although Irish tourism increased substantially with the climax of the so-called Celtic Tiger in the early 1990s, Ireland was a major tourist destination even before that. This article explores emotions, memory and nature in images (in travel catalogues and on the Internet) advertising Ireland in a global context. The images target Irish expatriates, indigenous tourists and non-Irish tourists in Europe, the United States and Australia. Images featuring pastoral landscapes, rural harmony and dramatic cliffs can be emotionally evocative in different ways, exemplifying people’s social relationships to their environment. Central themes in the images are expatriate emotions of displacement, longing and nostalgia often connected with Irish nationalism while at the same time managing to include non-Irish people. This confirms the notion of images as ambiguous, yet points at the possibility of steering the viewer’s attention through a caption including “home” and “our land”. The article also focuses on expatriare emotions that recur in the narrative of Irish travel advertisements in an increasingly globalized world.

  • 2046.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Manhattan as a Magnet: Place and Circulation among young Swedes2017In: America observed: On an International Anthropology of the United States / [ed] Virginia R. Dominguez, Jasmin Habib, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 31-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2047.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Memories in Motion: The Irish Dancing Body2005In: Body & Society, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2048.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Mobilitet och plats: om danstraditioner i förändring2009In: Estetiska lärprocesser: upplevleser, praktiker och kunskapsformer / [ed] Fredrik Lindstrand och Staffan Selander, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, p. 193-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2049.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Multi-Sited Ethnography: Problems and Possibilities in the Translocation of Research Methods2014In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 198-199Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2050.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Perspectives towards Ballet Performance: Exploring, Repairing and Maintaining Frames1998In: Ritual, Performance, Media, Routledge, London , 1998, p. 104-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
383940414243 2001 - 2050 of 2119
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