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  • 19701.
    Österman, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    What Does Calculating Have to Do With Mathematics?: Wittgenstein, Dewey, and Mathematics Education in Sweden2017In: A Companion to Wittgenstein on Education / [ed] Peters Michael A., Stickney, Jeff, Springer Publishing Company, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19702.
    Österman, Tove
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Bråting, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Dewey and mathematical practice: revisiting the distinction between procedural and conceptual knowledge2019In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 457-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We identify a recent trend in school mathematics as well as in some of the research literature in mathematics education: an emphasis on the practical uses of mathematics and an increased emphasis on verbalizations as opposed to numerical and computational skills. With tools provided by John Dewey, an early advocate of contextual and practical knowledge, we analyse the common research framework for discussing mathematical knowledge in terms of the procedural and the conceptual. We argue that procedural and conceptual knowledge should not be seen as opposites, and that the tendency to treat them as such might be avoided by emphasising the notion of operational skill. We argue that this is important in order for the students to gain both the contextual knowledge and the computational skill entailed in mathematical knowledge.

  • 19703.
    Österman, Tove
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Bråting, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Får eleverna lära sig matematik i skolan?2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19704.
    Österman, Tove
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Bråting, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Mindre snack – mer räkneverkstad2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19705.
    Österman, Tove
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Gustavsson, MichaelHållén, Elinor
    Vad ska en svensk kunna?: Utbildningens dimma - intressenas spel2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 19706.
    Österström, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    En karolinsk treenighet: Om medvetandet kring konfessionell identitetsbildning inom den svenska armén 1700-17222015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 19707.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Auschwitz, Adorno and the Ambivalence of Representation: The Holocaust as a Point of Reference in Contemporary Literature2015In: Revisiting Holocaust Representation in the Post-Witness Era / [ed] Tanja Schult & Diana Popescu, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 183-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19708.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Den nya generationens svek: Modernismens självrannsakan och Hagar Olssons essäer vid tiderna kring två världskrig2018In: Historiska och litteraturhistoriska studier, ISSN 0073-2702, Vol. 93, p. 181-204Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19709.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Dikt och demokrati: Hagar Olssons stridsrop i andra världskrigets skugga2015In: Horisont (Svenska Österbottens litteraturförening), ISSN 0439-5530, no 1, p. 39-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19710.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Dikten i "den nya fredens värld". Litteraturdebatt i tidskriften Samtid och Framtid 1944–19492016In: Samlaren: tidskrift för svensk litteraturvetenskaplig forskning, ISSN 0348-6133, E-ISSN 2002-3871, Vol. 137, p. 181-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The poem in “the new world of peace”. The literary debate in the magazine Samtid och Framtid 1944–1949 (Dikten i ”den nya fredens värld”. Litteraturdebatt i tidskriften Samtid och Framtid 1944–1949)

    This paper analyses the literature debate in the Swedish magazine Samtid och Framtid 1944–1949. The magazine was first published at the end of World War II on the initiative of publisher Johan Hansson. After an interesting start, the terms of the debate in the magazine were changed after a power struggle on the editorial level. Thus, the magazine never became the influential arena for literary discussions that it originally had the potential for. With their initial focus on how to construct a new post-war world, the debates in the magazine, however, provide interesting material for an analysis of a discursive struggle, in which attempts were made to renegotiate the position of literature in society. This analysis is conducted through a perspective that focuses on the debaters’ use of metaphors, but also their specific experiences of the past and their expectations for the future. Central oppositions between aesthetic and com­mitted ideals are highlighted, but also between individualism and collectivism. It is additionally demonstrated that the debates successively turned more concrete, focusing not least on the very influential Swedish literary generation of the 1940s.

  • 19711.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Elfenbenstornet under belägring: Legitimering och mobilisering av humaniora i Sverige 1937–19472016In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648, p. 155-175Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19712.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Elfenbenstornet under belägring: Legitimering och mobilisering av humaniora i Sverige 1937-19472014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there have been intense discussions about the humanities and their role in society. Internationally, as well as in a Swedish context, the humanities have been regarded to be in a state of crisis. However, these discussions usually demonstrate a lack of historical perspectives based on thorough empirical research. The notion of a crisis needs to be historicized.

    In this study, a case is being examined where the relationship between science and society was renegotiated. In the context of World War II, a discourse has been identified in a borderland between science and politics through an analysis of Swedish journals and anthologies during the time period 1937-1947. Historical actors were then highlighting that the humanities faced several challenges. The study argues that these discussions should be regarded as parts of a renegotiation of the humanities’ social contract. In the context of the war and fundamental societal changes, there occurred a greater pressure than before to mobilize science socially in order to make science appear as a legitimate undertaking. For the humanities, such demands seemed to conflict with their scientific ethos. During the interwar period this ethos was often based on a norm that demanded the drawing of a strict boundary between science and politics. But if they did not mobilize socially, scholars risked getting blamed for being isolated in the so-called ‘ivory tower’. How the humanities could be effectively mobilized in order to satisfy the needs of society while still maintaining their legitimacy in a scientific context emerged as a fundamental problem with no clear solutions. Part of this problem was the exclusion of the humanities from politically hegemonic narratives of society’s development, in contrast to natural and social sciences. Reactions to specific historical experiences and distinct expectations for the future thus seem – at least on a discursive level – to have put the humanities in a state of marginalization as early as the time period examined in this thesis.

  • 19713.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Friktionernas krig: Albrecht von Lantingshausen och landsättningen vid Lokalaks2011In: Militärhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0283-8400, Vol. 2009-2010, p. 341-363Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19714.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Gunnar Aspelin och historismens kris: En filosofs envig med historietänkandets problem2013In: Personhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0031-5699, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 23-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19715.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Historietänkandets problem: Gunnar Aspelin och historismens kris under det omvälvande 1900-talet2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 19716.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Holocaust Memory Today (Conference report)2013Other (Other academic)
  • 19717.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Humanioras historia som ett globalt forskningsfält2017In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 4, p. 11-12Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19718.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    IDEA & DEBATE Contemporary history of knowledge history2018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 678-687Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19719.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Krigets historiografiska funktion: Framställningar av krig i svensk historieskrivning 1747–18572013In: Militärhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0283-8400, Vol. 2011-2012, p. 33-68Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19720.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Kunskapshistoriens samtidsrelevans2018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 4, p. 678-687Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19721.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    ”Oh, the humanities!”: Nya perspektiv på humanioras historia och samhällsroll2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19722.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Performative Commemoration of Painful Pasts (Conference Report)2016Other (Other academic)
  • 19723.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Planlös forskning?: Svensk humaniora som undantag i ljuset av 1960-talets internationaliserings- och planeringskrav2018In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648, p. 255-275Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19724.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Review of Dennis A. Ahlburg, ed., The Changing Face of Higher Education: Is There an International Crisis in the Humanities? International Studies in Higher Education. Abingdon: Routledge, 2019.2019In: History of Humanities, ISSN 2379-3163, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 515-518Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19725.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    The Discursive Marginalization of the Humanities: Debates on the “Humanist Problem” in the Early 1960s Swedish Welfare State2018In: History of Humanities, ISSN 2379-3163, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 351-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of the great postwar expansion of higher education, the influential Swedish university commission of 1955 predicted that the future job market would not be able to absorb the increasing number of humanities graduates. These large cohorts of young people were not easily incorporated into the grand narratives of the Swedish social democratic welfare state, based on assumptions of rapid material and technological progress. In contrast to a clear demand for medical, technological, and social scientific knowledge, the humanities were associated with traditionalism and an outdated concept of Bildung. The threat of future unemployment became known as the “humanist problem” and was widely debated through the early 1960s. A platform for that debate was a magazine called Humanisten (The humanist), published by a new trade union for young people educated in the humanities. Humanisten made practical attempts to mobilize the humanities as a valuable resource for society. By analyzing these initiatives as responses to the university commission and to a general imperative of social relevance, I argue that the discursive practices of the debates contributed to a marginalization of the humanities by treating them as an anomaly and labeling them as a “social problem” for the welfare state. By approaching “the humanities” as an actors’ category, I hope this national case study will help develop a history of the humanities that looks beyond the condition of individual disciplines.

  • 19726.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Universitetet mellan det förflutna och framtiden: Ett historiskt projekt i ruiner?2016In: Arche - tidskrift för psykoanalys, humaniora och arkitektur, ISSN 2000-7817, no 56-57, p. 222-233Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19727.
    Östh Gustafsson, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Universitetsdebatt i skuggan av Brexit2018In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 2, p. 54-57Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19728.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Academic Centuries2005Book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 19729.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Akademiska sekel2003Book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 19730.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas, History of Science.
    Carolina Rediviva och de projekterade rummen2009In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19731.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    De böcker som bränns1998In: Biblis: tidskrift för bokhistoria, bibliografi, bokhantverk, samlande, ISSN 1403-3313, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 19732.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Det öppna biblioteket: Carolina Rediviva, Carl XIV Johan och de projekterade rummen2005Report (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The library-building Carolina Rediviva was erected in Uppsala between 1811 and 1841, partly due to the needs of the University library to expand its space for books. However only partly, since the building also was needed as museum, to house the University’s collections of antiquities, manuscripts, coins and medals, for teaching, i.e. giving lectures and demonstrations of physics, and storing the physics’ instruments, and for festivities such as academic ceremonies and musical concerts. Last but not least the building was a monument of the newly elected heir of the Swedish throne, Carl Johan, who as Crown Prince and University Chancellor served as an important initiator of the library project.

    This study shows that the (actually quite stressed) functions of museum, space for teaching and festivities in no way lessened the buildings role of library, but rather underlined it. The consequence, though, was that the architecture must be carefully planned so that access to concerts, museums or lectures was not muddled with access to the book-rooms. Further, the study follows the project of building a multifunctional library up close, with its financial difficulties, architectural considerations, the library conditions of the time and the different aspects of it being a royal monument.

  • 19733.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avd. för vetenskapshistoria.
    Feminismens idéer2006Collection (editor) (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthology containing historical texts (1761-2000), presenting Western feminism och women's movement, in seven themes: Enlightenment and liberalism, Socialist feminism, The discussion on double standards, Psychoanalysis, Feminism and welfare Sweden, Historiography of women's history, and Sexual liberation.

    Introduction (50 pp) to the texts and a biographical dictionnary (also by the editor) over relevant persons is added.

    Texts by: Hedvig Charlotta Nordenflycht, Marie Gouze, Anna Maria Lenngren, Fredrika Bremer, Carl Jonas Love Almquist, Harriet Taylor Mill, John Stuart Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, K. A. Wieth-Knudsen, August Bebel, J. J. Bachofen, Kata Dalström, Charles Fourier, Emma Goldman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Clara Zetkin, Aleksandra Kollontaj, August Strindberg, Mathilda Malling, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, Elisabeth Grundtvig, Frida Steenhoff, Hinke Bergegren, Elin Wägner, Sigmund Freud, C. G. Jung, Wilhelm Reich, Clara Thompson, Karin Boye, Melanie Klein, Juliet Mitchell, Mathilda Betham, Fortunée de Briquet, Wilhelmina Stålberg & Per G. Berg, Ellen Fries, Virginia Woolf, Alice Lyttkens, Simone de Beauvoir, Karin Westman Berg, Elise Ottesen-Jensen, Alva Myrdal, Viola Klein, Barbro Alving, Anna Lenah Elgström, Monica Boëthius, Alfred C. Kinsey, Betty Friedan, Lars Ullerstam, Kate Millett, Kristina Ahlmark Michanek, Leif Silbersky & Carlösten Nordmark, Shere Hite, Sonja Åkesson, Göran Palm, Märta Tikkanen

  • 19734.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avd. för vetenskapshistoria.
    Feminismens klassiker: Kompendium för kvällskurs2002Collection (editor) (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Antologi av fack- och skönlitterära källtexter från mitten av 1700-talet till slutet av 1900-talet. Ett uppslagsverk över författarna och andra relevanta personer (sammanställt av redaktören) finns i kompendiet.

    Texter av: Hedvig Charlotta Nordenflycht, Marie Gouze, Anna Maria Lenngren, Carl Jonas Love Almquist, Harriet Taylor Mill, John Stuart Mill, Elin Wägner, August Bebel, August Strindberg, Mathilda Malling, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, Elisabeth Grundtvig, Frida Steenhoff, Sigmund Freud, Rosa Mayreder, Mathilda Betham, Fortunée de Briquet, Wilhelmina Stålberg, Per G. Berg, Ellen Fries, Alice Lyttkens, Karin Westman Berg, Elise Ottesen-Jensen, Alva Myrdal, Viola Klein, Wilhelm Reich, Alfred C. Kinsey, Kristina Ahlmark Michanek, Sonja Åkesson, Shere Hite, Göran Palm, Mary Daly, Gerd Brantenberg, Rigmor Robert, Kerstin Uvnäs Moberg, Nina Björk

  • 19735.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Gyneceum: Biografisk uppslagsbok2006In: Feminismens idéer, Studentlitteratur, Lund , 2006, p. 342-361Chapter in book (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Biographical dictionary over persons mentioned in the introduction (also by the editor) to the texts.

    Anthology containing historical texts (1761-2000), presenting Western feminism och women's movement, in seven themes: Enlightenment and liberalism, Socialist feminism, The discussion on double standards, Psychoanalysis, Feminism and welfare Sweden, Historiography of women's history, and Sexual liberation.

    Texts by: Hedvig Charlotta Nordenflycht, Marie Gouze, Anna Maria Lenngren, Fredrika Bremer, Carl Jonas Love Almquist, Harriet Taylor Mill, John Stuart Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, K. A. Wieth-Knudsen, August Bebel, J. J. Bachofen, Kata Dalström, Charles Fourier, Emma Goldman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Clara Zetkin, Aleksandra Kollontaj, August Strindberg, Mathilda Malling, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, Elisabeth Grundtvig, Frida Steenhoff, Hinke Bergegren, Elin Wägner, Sigmund Freud, C. G. Jung, Wilhelm Reich, Clara Thompson, Karin Boye, Melanie Klein, Juliet Mitchell, Mathilda Betham, Fortunée de Briquet, Wilhelmina Stålberg & Per G. Berg, Ellen Fries, Virginia Woolf, Alice Lyttkens, Simone de Beauvoir, Karin Westman Berg, Elise Ottesen-Jensen, Alva Myrdal, Viola Klein, Barbro Alving, Anna Lenah Elgström, Monica Boëthius, Alfred C. Kinsey, Betty Friedan, Lars Ullerstam, Kate Millett, Kristina Ahlmark Michanek, Leif Silbersky & Carlösten Nordmark, Shere Hite, Sonja Åkesson, Göran Palm, Märta Tikkanen

  • 19736.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Hur har läsandet utvecklats över seklen?: (Tema läsning: www.forskning.se)2006Other (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 19737.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Introduktion: till Feminismens idéer2006In: Feminismens idéer, Studentlitteratur, Lund , 2006, p. 7-50Chapter in book (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction (50 pp) to anthology containing historical texts (1761-2000), presenting Western feminism och women's movement, in seven themes: Enlightenment and liberalism, Socialist feminism, The discussion on double standards, Psychoanalysis, Feminism and welfare Sweden, Historiography of women's history, and Sexual liberation.

    Texts by: Hedvig Charlotta Nordenflycht, Marie Gouze, Anna Maria Lenngren, Fredrika Bremer, Carl Jonas Love Almquist, Harriet Taylor Mill, John Stuart Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, K. A. Wieth-Knudsen, August Bebel, J. J. Bachofen, Kata Dalström, Charles Fourier, Emma Goldman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Clara Zetkin, Aleksandra Kollontaj, August Strindberg, Mathilda Malling, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, Elisabeth Grundtvig, Frida Steenhoff, Hinke Bergegren, Elin Wägner, Sigmund Freud, C. G. Jung, Wilhelm Reich, Clara Thompson, Karin Boye, Melanie Klein, Juliet Mitchell, Mathilda Betham, Fortunée de Briquet, Wilhelmina Stålberg & Per G. Berg, Ellen Fries, Virginia Woolf, Alice Lyttkens, Simone de Beauvoir, Karin Westman Berg, Elise Ottesen-Jensen, Alva Myrdal, Viola Klein, Barbro Alving, Anna Lenah Elgström, Monica Boëthius, Alfred C. Kinsey, Betty Friedan, Lars Ullerstam, Kate Millett, Kristina Ahlmark Michanek, Leif Silbersky & Carlösten Nordmark, Shere Hite, Sonja Åkesson, Göran Palm, Märta Tikkanen

  • 19738.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas, History of Science.
    Kampen om fakulteterna2008In: Kunskapens kretsar: Essäer om kunskap, bildning och vetenskap genom tiderna / [ed] Charlotte Christensen-Nugues, Gunnar Broberg & Svante Nordin, Stockholm: Signum , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19739.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas, History of Science.
    Linnéminnet2007In: Linnéfest och doktorspromotion i Uppsala den 23 och 26 maj 2007, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2007, p. 10-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carl Linnaeus is the best-known Uppsala University scientist of all time and the celebration of his memory has been far from a matter for Uppsala alone, or even Sweden. On May 25 and 26, 1807, the centenary of the birth of Linnaeus was celebrated in Uppsala and Växjö. The marking of anniversaries had previously been purely a sacred phenomenon, which made the 1807 Linnaeus festivities a pioneering jubilee, focusing on science. In connection with these celebrations, the Linneanum building was opened in the Botanical Garden and speeches were held by two of Linnaeus’ disciples, the professor of botany, Carl Peter Thunberg, and the botany teacher, Adam Afzelius. The foundation of the edifice had been laid in the presence of king Gustaf III as early as 1787, and even the name marks its monumental purpose. In Växjö a speech was given by yet another disciple, physician Sven A. Hedin, whose speech also was read in Uppsala the same day by a Smolandish student named Pehr Sjöbring, later professor in Orientalistics. Hedin had initiated the celebration in the landscape of Småland, by collecting means for a Linnaeus bust by Jonas Forsslund.

    The planning of the festivities were marked by disagreeances on several points. The correct date of Linnaeus' birthday was not yet agreed upon. Adam Afzelius did not approve of the celebration in Småland, but also used the occasion to promote his own academic career. The Smolandish student nation in Uppsala felt abused by Sven Hedin and the Uppsala professors, when their participation was demanded and not asked for. And Carl Peter Thunberg was not altogether sure that his former teacher diserved the attention, since Linnaeus had not donated his collections to to the University.

    On October 12, 1829, a statue of Linnaeus by Johan Niclas Byström, donated by the Uppsala students, was unveiled to complement the Linneanum. The historian and poet Erik Gustaf Geijer spoke on the solemn occasion. In 1829 exactly one century had passed since Linnaeus, then a student, met Professor Olof Celsius in the University’s Botanical Garden and thereby found a patron who would enable his early career. This 100th anniversary offered Geijer a pretext to invoke associations to the key relationship between students and their leaders, which he likened to plants flourishing at the foot of an ancient oak. The Student Choir sang about Linnaeus' unveiling of the mysteries of nature. This celebration was initiated by the soon-to-be founded Student Corps of Uppsala.

    In 1841 the conferment ceremony for medical doctors became a celebration of the centenary of Linnaeus recieving the chair. Israel Hwasser, also professor of medicine, spoke of Linnaeus as a romantic philosopher of nature, a "seer", well aware of the powers of nature. During the course of the 19th century Linnaeus became a Swedish national monument, the ideal picture of a pious, truth-seeking scientist, more and more frequently supplied with the epithet “the prince of flowers”, coined by the Swedish nationalist poet Carl Snoilsky who, in his Linnean poems, depicted Linnaeus as the young child touched by floral genius.

    Great pains were taken to cherish the memory of Linnaeus on the 100th anniversary of his death, in both Uppsala and the rest of Sweden. On January 10, 1878, the University arranged a memorial service for Linnaeus on the centenary of his decease. Two other Linnaeus celebrations took place in Uppsala in 1878. Småland student nation celebrated Linneaus for being its inspektor of many years, and the Student Science Society arranged an academic symposium about the subject of their celebration. Not long after this centenary, the State and the University purchased Linnaeus' summer home, Hammarby, which soon became a museum.

    In May 1907 the bicentenary of the birth of Linnaeus was marked in a great many Swedish towns. The 1907 anniversary can be regarded as a culmination, not only of the Linnaeus cult, but also of what the author August Strindberg likened to the “era of assassinations and jubilees.” This time as well, Uppsala was the centre of attention, with its University celebrating its great alumnus on May 23–24. The town was adorned with flags, flowers, and plants, and several members of the royal family were in attendance. The University’s ceremony was carried out in the Grand Auditorium at University Hall, which was filled with guests from near and far. The following day a special Linnaeus conferment ceremony was held in the Cathedral for all four of the University’s faculties. The list of honorary doctors included the English botanist Francis Darwin (son of Charles); the secretary of the Royal Society, Archibald Geikie; the secretary of the Linnean Society of London, Benjamin Daydon Jackson; and its former president, William Carruthers, although the Swedish doctors h.c. outnumbered the foreign ones. Among those receiving honorary doctorates was the Swedish prince and artist Eugen and author Selma Lagerlöf. It was the first time Uppsala University paid tribute to a woman in this way.

    During the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, Linnaeus was portrayed on chocolate bars, bottled water and stamps, and in 1965 he became the first non-royal person to appear on a bank-note. When the Swedish Linnean Society, formed in 1917, celebrated its 50th anniversary, they presented Linnaeus in an exhibition on his international qualities. By then, jubilant celebrations in the spirit of romantic nationalism were hardly the ideal. However, this did not prevent the memory of Linnaeus from being celebrated on January 10, 1978, on the bicentenary of his death. In Uppsala Cathedral a commemorative service was held, followed by a Linnaeus concert. The president of the Swedish Linnaeus Society, Carl-Johan Clemedson, dissociated himself from the panegyrics of the past, stressing in his celebratory lecture that Linnaeus was not an infallible prince of flowers, but “in all his academic greatness” was, on the contrary, a human being with flaws and shortcomings. During the 1978 anniversary an international symposium was held, commencing at the Linnean Society of London and continuing a few days later in Uppsala, at Linnaeus’ Hammarby, and at the Royal Academy of Sciences in Stockholm.

    By pondering the forms, proportions, and expressions of the celebration of Linnaeus, it is possible to trace shifts in the image of Linnaeus over time. The Linnaean tradition itself has become an object of study, as has the celebration and description of other scientists such as Darwin, Newton etc. Various ages have highlighted different aspects, aspects which are important for the historical and social understanding of science in its respective time.

  • 19740.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Litteraturens uppodling: Läsesällskap och litteraturkritik som politisk strategi kring sekelskiftet 18002000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the dissertation is to study the distribution of literature as a means to disseminate knowledge in the context of two reading societies and three critical journals based in Uppsala and Åbo. This dissemination, regarded as a strategy towards social and political reform, took place in these societies and journals, which were geographically, biographically, intentionally and functionally connected.

    I argue that the distribution of literature was part of a cultivation scheme in which intellectuals engaged towards the end of the 18th century, including both commonly held reform eorts and controversial enlightenment thought. The belief in progress, the power of knowledge and the possibilities to improve society, industry, religion and the sciences, were the basis of the cultivation scheme. The immediate target group for the cultivation scheme was "the educated classes" - the social elite inuencing the larger public through schools, churches, newspapers and by setting examples in their immediate surroundings as well as through legal, political and economic decisions.

    The reading societies were founded in Uppsala 1797 and Åbo 1798. Their collections of books and periodicals have been examined from the foundation and 15-20 years onwards. The reviews in Litteratur-Tidning (Uppsala, 1795-1797), Journal för Svensk Litteratur (Uppsala & Stockholm, 1797-1812) and Allmän Litteratur-Tidning (Åbo, 1803) were written and edited by members and/or initiators of the reading societies Pehr Afzelius (1760-1843), Anders Gustaf Ekeberg (1767-1813), Frans Michael Franzén (1772-1847), Johan Gadolin (1760-1852), Benjamin Höijer (1767-1812), Henrik Gabriel Porthan (1739-1804), Gustaf Abraham Silverstolpe (1772-1824) and Jacob Tengström (1755-1832).

  • 19741.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avd för vetenskapshistoria.
    Making memorials: Early Celebrations of Linnaeus2008In: The Linnean: Newsletter and proceedings of the Linnean Society of London, ISSN 0950-1096, Vol. The Linnaean Legacy: Three Centurys after his birth, no Special Issue 8, p. 35-44Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 19742.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas, History of Science.
    Myntkabinettets kammmmare2009In: Opus mixtum: Uppsatser kring Uppsala universitets myntkabinett / [ed] Harald Nilsson, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2009, 1, p. 157-169Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the early decades of the 19th century, there were people wishing to let the new university building, Carolina Rediviva, house a number of the collections visitorscame to see. Plans were made for special coin and medallion rooms and Chief Librarian Johan Henric Schröder (1791-1857) envisioned a museum of antiquities, but in the end the numismatic collection remained in the Senate’s House, where it had been moved in 1787, and only the books were moved.

  • 19743.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Nordiska tidskrifter och språk i Nordens universitetsstäder: Den nordiska mosaiken: Humanistdagarna 15-16 mars 19971997In: Den nordiska mosaiken: Humanistdagarna 15-16 mars 1997, 1997, p. 379-Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 19744.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Snillekommittén och teknologin: 1820-talets diskussion om universitet och tillämpningsskolor2004In: Med hammare och fackla: Sancte Örjens gilles årsbok, ISSN 0543-2162, no 38, p. 205-250Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 19745.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Spexets historia2005In: 21 år av NoNSEns: : Norrlands nations spexensemble 1984-2005 i fickformat (för stora fickor): Festskrift till NoNSEns 21-årsjubileum den 16 april 2005, Staffan Westerlund, Uppsala , 2005, p. 170-Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 19746.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas, History of Science.
    Stenius d. y., Jacob, Svenskt biografiskt lexikon, H. 1622008Other (Other academic)
  • 19747.
    Östholm, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Avdelningen för vetenskapshistoria.
    Syndafloden från tryckpressarna: ’Skräpkulturens’ tidlösa farlighet2000In: Tvärsnitt: humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning, no 2, p. 14-27Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 19748.
    Östholm, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas, History of Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology, Ethnology.
    Frängsmyr, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas, History of Science.
    Linné som festföremål, symbol och monument: En hoppets fest för vetenskaplig odling2007In: Låt inte råttor eller mal fördärva-: Linnésamlingar i Uppsala : Uppsala universitets jubileumsbok, Uppsala: Hallgren & Fallgren , 2007, p. 179-207Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carl Linnaeus is the best-known Uppsala University scientist of all time. It follows that the celebration of his memory has been far from a matter for Uppsala alone, or even Sweden. As early as 1788 the Linnean Society was established in London, and two years later his bust was erected in Jardin des Plantes in Paris. On May 25 and 26, 1807, the centenary of the birth of Linnaeus was celebrated. The marking of anniversaries had previously been purely a sacred phenomenon, which made the 1807 Linnaeus festivities a pioneering jubilee, focusing on science. In connection with these celebrations, the Linneanum building was opened in the Botanical Garden and speeches were held by two of Linnaeus’ disciples, the professor of botany, Carl Peter Thunberg, and the botany teacher, Adam Afzelius. The foundation of the edifice had been laid in the presence of Gustaf III as early as 1787, and even the name marks its monumental purpose.

    On October 12, 1829, the Linneanum was complemented by a statue of Linnaeus by Johan Niclas Byström, which was unveiled on that date. The historian and poet Erik Gustaf Geijer spoke on the solemn occasion, which was attended by Linnaeus’ daughters. In 1829 exactly one century had passed since Linnaeus met Professor Olof Celsius in the University’s Botanical Garden and thereby found a patron who would enable his early career. This 100th anniversary offered Geijer a pretext to invoke associations to the key relationship between students and their leaders, which he likened to plants flourishing at the foot of an ancient oak. Celebrating Linnaeus, Geijer stressed, was not merely a festival of commemoration but also a “festival of hope for the cultivation of knowledge.”

    During the course of the 19th century Linnaeus became a Swedish national monument, the ideal picture of a pious, truth-seeking scientist, more and more frequently supplied with the epithet “the prince of flowers”. It is thus no surprise that great pains were taken to cherish the memory of Linnaeus on the 100th anniversary of his death, in both Uppsala and the rest of Sweden. On January 10, 1878, the University arranged a memorial service for Linnaeus on the centenary of his decease. The ceremony was carried out in the grand auditorium at the upper secondary school, and the new professor of botany, Thore Magnus Fries, was the main speaker. His colleague from the Faculty of Medicine, Frithiof Holmgren, had penned a cantata for the same occasion, which was used again at the 1907 bicentenary. Two other Linnaeus celebrations took place in Uppsala in 1878. Småland student nation celebrated Linneaus for being its inspektor of many years, and the Student Science Society arranged an academic symposium about the subject of their celebration.

    In May 1907 the bicentenary of the birth of Linnaeus was marked in a great many Swedish towns. Without doubt, the 1907 anniversary can be regarded as a culmination, not only of the Linnaeus cult, but also of what the author August Strindberg somewhat hyperbolically likened to the “era of assassinations and jubilees.” This time as well, Uppsala was the center of attention, with its University celebrating its great alumnus on May 23–24. The entire city was adorned with flags, flowers, and plants, and several members of the royal family were in attendance. The University’s ceremony was carried out in the Grand Auditorium at University Hall, which was filled with guests from near and far. The following day a special Linnaeus conferment ceremony was held in the Cathedral for all four of the University’s faculties. The list of honorary doctors included the English botanist Francis Darwin (son of Charles); the secretary of the Royal Society, Archibald Geikie; the secretary of the Linnean Society of London, Benjamin Daydon Jackson; and its former president, William Carruthers. The Swedish prince and artist Eugen was among those receiving honorary doctorates, as was the author Selma Lagerlöf. It was the first time Uppsala University paid tribute to a woman in this way. The conferment ceremony was followed by a stately gala banquet in the Grand Auditorium, University Hall.

    By the late 1970s the times had changed, and jubilant celebrations in the spirit of romantic nationalism were hardly the ideal. However, this did not prevent the memory of Linnaeus from being celebrated on January 10, 1978, on the bicentenary of his death. In Uppsala Cathedral a commemorative service was held, followed by a Linnaeus concert, where works by Ralph Vaughan Williams and Karl-Erik Welin were featured. The president of the Swedish Linnaeus Society, Carl-Johan Clemedson, dissociated himself from the panegyrics of the past, stressing in his celebratory lecture that Linnaeus was not an infallible prince of flowers, but “in all his academic greatness” was, on the contrary, a human being with flaws and shortcomings. During the 1978 anniversary an international symposium was held, commencing at the Linnean Society of London and continuing a few days later in Uppsala, at Linnaeus’ Hammarby, and at the Royal Academy of Sciences in Stockholm.

    By pondering the forms, proportions, and expressions of the celebration of Linnaeus, it is possible to trace a shift in the image of Linnaeus over time. The Linnaean tradition itself has indeed become an object of study. Various ages have been moved to highlight different aspects, but few people would deny that the commemoration of Linnaeus today, just as in 1829, is “a festival of hope for the cultivation of knowledge.”

  • 19749.
    Östholm, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Prytz, Cristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Less than Ideal?: Making a Living Before and Outside Marriage2016In: Making a Living, Making a Difference: Making a Living Before and Outside Marriage / [ed] Maria Ågren, New York: Oxford University Press, 2016, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19750. Östling, Johan
    et al.
    Josephson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Karlsohn, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    The Humboldtian tradition and its transformations2014In: The Humboldtian tradition: origins and legacies / [ed] Peter Josephson, Thomas Karlsohn & Johan Östling, Leiden, Boston, Tokyo: Brill Academic Publishers, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
392393394395396 19701 - 19750 of 19770
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