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  • 151.
    Anderzen Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Leibring, Ingela
    Fear and coping during treatment for acute lymphatic leukemia: from the perspective of children 5-9 years old2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The concept of fear can be defined as ”an unpleasant often strong emotion caused by expectation of danger”. It is reasonable to believe that fear and coping of fear, can vary during the course of treatment for ALL. The aim of the present study was to describe a longitudinal perspective on fear related to having ALL, based on children’s perspective, as well as to describe the strategies these children use when experiencing fear.

    Design: The study has a longitudinal descriptive qualitative design. Three girls and 10 boys, initially aged 5-9 were interviewed once to three times during their treatment period (approximately two months after the diagnosis, after one year and at the end of the 2.5-year long treatment). In total, 35 interviews were conducted. Data were analyzed using a matrix-based qualitative analysis method.

    Results: The children described fear of being subjected to needles and related to having a feeding tube, to remove adhesive tape and taking tablets, as well as fear related to the bodily changes caused by the ALL. Existential fears were most frequently mentioned at end of treatment. The children wanted to participate in their care. They used cognitive strategies, such as ”thinking the right way” and emotional strategies, such as crying out loud and kicking. The fears changed over time, but the fear of being subjected to needles remained for half of the children, but was less intense at the end of treatment. The strategies developed, and became more sophisticated over the treatment period.

    Conclusion: The fear changed throughout the course of treatment, and so did the strategies used. It is reasonable to believe that the need for support also vary, which is a topic for future research.

  • 152.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Leibring, I.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health- Science and Technology- Department of Health Sciences- Nursing, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Fear and Coping During Treatment for Acute Lymphatic Leukemia - from the Perspective of Children 5-9 Years Old2018In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 65, no Suppl.2, p. S598-S598Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives: The concept of fear can be defined as ”an unpleasant often strong emotion caused by expectation of danger”. It is reasonable to believe that fear and coping of fear, can vary during the course of treatment for ALL. The aim of the present study was to describe a longitudinal perspective on fear related to having ALL, based on children's perspective, as well as to describe the strategies these children use when experiencing fear.

    Design/Methods: The study has a longitudinal descriptive qualitative design. Three girls and 10 boys, initially aged 5-9 were interviewed once to three times during their treatment period (approximately two months after the diagnosis, after one year and at the end of the 2.5-year long treatment). In total, 35 interviews were conducted. Data were analyzed using a matrix-based qualitative analysis method.

    Results: The children described fear of being subjected to needles and related to having a feeding tube, removing adhesive tape and taking tablets, as well as fear related to the bodily changes caused by the ALL. Existential fears were most frequently mentioned at the end of treatment. The children wanted to participate i n their care. They used cognitive strategies, such as ”thinking the right way” and emotional strategies, such as crying out loud and kicking. The fears changed over time, but the fear of being subjected to needles remained for half of the children, but was less intense at the end of treatment. The strategies developed, and became more sophisticated over the treatment period.

    Conclusions: The fear changed throughout the course of treatment, and so did the strategies used. It is reasonable to believe that the need for support also vary, which i s a topic for future research.

  • 153.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Aktuell forskare om barn med cancer, deras rädsla och sättet den hanteras på2008In: Barnbladet, ISSN 0349-1994, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 45-46Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 154.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Att hantera rädsla hos barn med cancer2008In: Onkologi i Sverige, ISSN 1653-1582, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 14-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 155.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Existentiella rädslor hos barn med cancer: föräldrars och vårdpersonals berättelser2007In: Omsorg: Nordisk tidsskrift for Palliativ Medisin, ISSN 0800-7489, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 33-39Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Sörlie, Venke
    Högskolan i Bodö.
    Embodied suffering: experiences of fear in adolescent girls with cancer2008In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 129-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, fear in adolescents with cancer has been sparsely described from an emic perspective. The aim of this study was to illuminate fear in adolescents with personal experience of cancer. The participants were six adolescent girls between the age of 14 and 16 years who were no longer under active treatment for cancer but still went for regular check-ups. Open interviews were conducted. Data were analysed according to the phenomenological hermeneutic method. In the result one main theme was identified: `an embodied fear — a threat to the personal self'. This theme was built up by three separate but intertwined themes: `experiencing fear related to the physical body', `experiencing existential fear' and `experiencing fear related to the social self'. In the comprehensive understanding the fear was interpreted from youth cultural aspects as well as a holistic perspective. The importance of professionals taking the whole person and their situation into account when meeting the fear is underlined.

  • 157. Andisheh, B.
    et al.
    Edgren, M.
    Belkic, Dzevad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mavroidis, P.
    Brahme, A.
    Lind, B. K.
    A Comparative Analysis of Radiobiological Models for Cell Surviving Fractions at High Doses2013In: Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment (Trykt), ISSN 1533-0346, E-ISSN 1533-0338, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many years the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been widely used to describe the effects of total dose and dose per fraction at low-to-intermediate doses in conventional fractionated radiotherapy. Recent advances in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have increased the interest in finding a reliable cell survival model, which will be accurate at high doses, as well. Different models have been proposed for improving descriptions of high dose survival responses, such as the Universal Survival Curve (USC), the Kavanagh-Newman (KN) and several generalizations of the LQ model, e.g. the Linear-Quadratic-Linear (LQL) model and the Pade Linear Quadratic (PLQ) model. The purpose of the present study is to compare a number of models in order to find the best option(s) which could successfully be used as a fractionation correction method in SRT. In this work, six independent experimental data sets were used: CHOAA8 (Chinese hamster fibroblast), H460 (non-small cell lung cancer, NSLC), NCI-H841 (small cell lung cancer, SCLC), CP3 and DU145 (human prostate carcinoma cell lines) and U1690 (SCLC). By detailed comparisons with these measurements, the performance of nine different radiobiological models was examined for the entire dose range, including high doses beyond the shoulder of the survival curves. Using the computed and measured cell surviving fractions, comparison of the goodness-of-fit for all the models was performed by means of the reduced e-test with a 95% confidence interval. The obtained results indicate that models with dose-independent final slopes and extrapolation numbers generally represent better choices for SRT. This is especially important at high doses where the final slope and extrapolation numbers are presently found to play a major role. The PLQ, USC and LQL models have the least number of shortcomings at all doses. The extrapolation numbers and final slopes of these models do not depend on dose. Their asymptotes for the cell surviving fractions are exponentials at low as well as high doses, and this is in agreement with the behaviour of the corresponding experimental data. This is an important improvement over the LQ model which predicts a Gaussian at high doses. Overall and for the highlighted reasons, it was concluded that the PLQ, USC and LQL models are theoretically well-founded. They could prove useful compared to the other proposed radiobiological models in clinical applications for obtaining uniformly accurate cell surviving fractions encountered in stereotactic high-dose radiotherapy as well as at medium and low doses.

  • 158.
    Andisheh, Bahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A comparative analysis of radio-biological models for cell-surviving fractions at high dosesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For many years the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been widely used to describe the effects of total dose and dose per fraction at low-to-intermediate doses in conventional fractionated radiotherapy. Recent advances in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have increased the interest in finding a reliable cell survival model, which will be accurate at high doses, as well. Different models have been proposed improving descriptions of high dose survival responses, such as the Universal Survival Curve (USC), the     Kavanagh-Newman (KN) and several generalizations of the LQ model, e.g. the Linear-Quadratic-Linear (LQL) model, the Padé Linear Quadratic (PLQ) model, etc. The purpose of the present study is to compare a number of models in order to find the best option(s) which could successfully be used as fractionation correction method in SRT.

    In this work, six independent experimental data sets were used: CHOAA8 (Chinese hamster fibroblast), H460 (non-small cell lung cancer, NSLC), NCI-H841 (small cell lung cancer, SCLC), CP3 and DU145 (human     prostate carcinoma cell lines) and U1690 (SCLC). By detailed comparisons with these measurements, the validity of nine different radiobiological models was examined for the entire dose range, including high doses   beyond the shoulder of the survival curves.

    Using the computed and measured cell surviving fractions, comparison of the goodness-of-fit for all the models was performed by means of the reduced χ2 test for a 95% confidence interval. The obtained results indicate that models with dose-independent final slopes and extrapolation numbers generally represent better choices for SRT. This is especially important at high doses where the final slope and extrapolation numbers are     presently found to play a major role.

    The PLQ, USC and LQL models have the least number of shortcomings at all doses. The extrapolation      numbers and final slopes of these models do not depend on dose. Their asymptotes for the cell surviving      fractions are exponentials at low as well as high doses, and this is in agreement with the behaviour of the    corresponding experimental data. This is an important improvement over the LQ model which predicts a Gaussian at high doses. Overall and for the highlighted reasons, it was concluded that the PLQ, USC and LQL models are theoretically well-founded and, as such, could prove useful and practical choices compare to other proposed radiobiological models in clinical applications for obtaining uniformly accurate cell surviving fractions encountered in stereotactic high-dose radiotherapy as well as at medium and low doses.

  • 159.
    Andisheh, Bahram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Belkic, D.
    Mavroidis, Panayiotis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Alahverdi, M.
    Lind, B. K.
    Improving the therapeutic ratio in stereotactic radiosurgery: optimizing treatment protocols based on kinetics of repair of sublethal radiation damage2013In: Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment (Trykt), ISSN 1533-0346, E-ISSN 1533-0338, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 349-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sublethal damage after radiation exposure may become lethal or be repaired according to repair kinetics. This is a well-established concept in conventional radiotherapy. It also plays an important role in single-dose stereotactic radiotherapy treatments, often called stereotactic radiosurgery, when duration of treatment is extended due to source decay or treatment planning protocol. The purpose of this study is to look into the radiobiological characteristics of normal brain tissue and treatment protocols and find a way to optimize the time course of these protocols. The general problem is nonlinear and can be solved numerically. For numerical optimization of the time course of radiation protocol, a biexponential repair model with slow and fast components was considered. With the clinically imposed constraints of a fixed total dose and total treatment time, three parameters for each fraction (dose-rate, fraction duration, time of each fraction) were simultaneously optimized. A biological optimization can be performed by maximizing the therapeutic difference between tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability. Specifically, for gamma knife radiosurgery, this approach can be implemented for normal brain tissue or tumor voxels separately in a treatment plan. Differences in repair kinetics of normal tissue and tumors can be used to find clinically optimized protocols. Thus, in addition to considering the physical dose in tumor and normal tissue, we also account for repair of sublethal damage in both these tissues.

  • 160. Andreassen, Björn
    et al.
    Holmberg, Rickard
    Brahme, Anders
    Janek Strååt, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Medical Radiation Physics (together with KI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    PET/CT measurements and GEANT4 simulations of the inducedpositron activity from high energy scanned photon beamsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Andreasson, Ellinore
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Do patients benefit from reoperation of progressive glioblastoma?2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 162. Andren, O.
    et al.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Falt, A.
    Ulvskog, E.
    Davidsson, S.
    Thellenberg Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hjalm-Eriksson, M.
    Cabazitaxel followed by androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly improves time to progression in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC): A randomized, open label, phase III, multicenter trial2017In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Andræ, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Facing death: physicians' difficulties and coping strategies in cancer care1994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if the treatment of cancer has developed over the last decades 50% of the patients still die of their cancer. The doctor's way of dealing with his and his patient's anxiety must surely be of significance for the treatment the patient receives.

    In the first part of the thesis earlier studies of physicians' stress and ways of coping are reported. There is a lack of systematic studies which show how doctors working with cancer patients adjust to this work. The aim of this investigation is to study cancer doctors' difficulties and coping strategies. The theoretical frame of the study embraces parts of psychoanalytical theory and coping models, emphasizing that both unconscious and conscious psychological processes play their part in the coping process.

    The second, empirical part of the study includes 23 physicians strategically selected out of a population of physicians who work with institutional care and who have daily contact with adult cancer patients. The main method of data collection has been a series of recorded interviews. The focus of the interview was the physician's perception of how he reacts, thinks, talks and acts in different phases of the cancer disease. To illustrate the defence strategies of the interviewers, the projective percept-genetic test, the "Defence Mechanism Test" (DMT) is used. The "Structural Analysis of Social Behaviour" (SASB) has been used to study the doctors' self image.

    The results indicate that the stated difficulties deeply affect the doctor as a human being. The statements reflect conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to authority, conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to frightening and injuring, conflicting feelings and wishes in relation to intimacy/distance. Thirty themes of coping strategies frequently recur and they have been grouped into seven categories. Most of the doctors "seek knowledge" and support from scientific literature. The majority of them state that attempting to "solve a problem" is their main strategy. Most of the doctors "seek support " as a part of their coping strategy. An interesting observation is that the doctors to a higher extent "seek a relation" to their patients rather than to their colleagues. Almost one third use "denial of the severity of a situation" as their main strategy. All the doctors consciously or unconsciously use "diverting strategies", i.e. undertake tasks which are devoid of contact with patients, such as research and administration or other activities which allow them to avoid the patient. One third use "projective manoeuvres" but this is never a main strategy.

    In the third part of the study the credibility of the results and their pedagogical and practical implications are discussed.

  • 164.
    Andrén, Ove
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Fall, Katja
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Rubin, Mark A.
    Bismar, Tarek A.
    Karlsson, M.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Mucci, Lorelei A.
    MUC-1 gene is associated with prostate cancer death: a 20-year follow-up of a population-based study in Sweden2007In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 97, no 6, p. 730-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anti-adhesion mucins have proven to play an important part in the biology of several types of cancer. Therefore, we test the hypothesis that altered expression of MUC-1 is associated with prostate cancer progression. We retrieved archival tumour tissue from a population-based cohort of 195 men with localised prostate cancer (T1a-b, Nx, M0) that has been followed for up to 20 years with watchful waiting. Semi-automated, quantitative immunohistochemistry was undertaken to evaluate MUC-1 expression. We modelled prostate cancer-specific death as a function of MUC-1 levels accounting for age, Gleason grade and tumour extent, and calculated age-adjusted and multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HR). Men that had tumours with an MUC-intensity lower or higher than normal tissue had a higher risk of dying in prostate cancer, independent of tumour extent and Gleason score (HR 5.1 and 4.5, respectively). Adjustment for Gleason grade and tumour stage did not alter the results. Men with a Gleason score >=7 and MUC-1 deviating from the normal had a 17 (RR=17.1 95% confidence interval=2.3–128) times higher risk to die in prostate cancer compared with men with Gleason score <7 and normal MUC-1 intensity. In summary, our data show that MUC-1 is an independent prognostic marker for prostate cancer death.

  • 165. Andrén, Ove
    et al.
    Garmo, H.
    Mucci, L.
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Fall, Katja
    Incidence and mortality of incidental prostate cancer: a Swedish register-based study2009In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 170-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a national register-based study of incidence trends and mortality of incidental prostate cancer in Sweden, we found that a significant proportion (26.6%) of affected men diagnosed died of their disease, which challenges earlier descriptions of incidental prostate cancer as a non-lethal disease.

  • 166.
    Andrén, Ove
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Urology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Widmark, A.
    Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fält, A.
    Ulvskog, E.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Oncology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Davidsson, Sabina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Urology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, C. Thellenberg
    Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hjälm-Eriksson, M.
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cabazitaxel followed by androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly improves time to progression in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC): A randomized, open label, phase III, multicenter trial2017In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 28, no Suppl. 5, article id 811PArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Grénman, Reidar
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, and Medical Biochemistry, University of Turku, Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Thunell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Polymorphism of FGFR4 in cancer development and sensitivity to cisplatin and radiation in head and neck cancer2009In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 23-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposition of the FGFR4 Gly/Arg polymorphism for development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and, furthermore, to examine if the FGFR4 Arg(388) allele can be associated with resistance to chemo-and radiotherapy.

    When analysing 110 tumour biopsies a significant 1.7-fold increased risk to develop HNSCC in individuals carrying the Gly(388) allele (p = 0.026) was found. Moreover a 2-fold increased risk for mates harbouring the Gly(388) allele (p = 0.031) to develop HNSCC was detected. In 39 HNSCC cell lines the role of the Arg(388) allele for radiation and cisplatin sensitivity was investigated. Our results show no rote of the Arg(388) allele for the radiosensitivity (p = 0.996) but indicate a tendency to increased cisplatin sensitivity (p = 0.141). When screening the transmembrane and kinase domains in the FGFR4 gene a novel mutation, probably generating a truncated protein lacking exons 14-18, was found in six of eight selected cell lines.

    Taken together, we have here identified a marker that predicts the risk to develop HNSCC and possibly the sensitivity to cisplatin as well as a novel. mutation in the FGFR4 gene.

  • 168.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedlinski, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Epidermal growth factor is a biomarker for poor cetuximab response in tongue cancer cells2016In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target for treatment in tongue cancer. Here, EGFR ligands were evaluated for their potential uses as predictive biomarkers of cetuximab treatment response.

    Methods: In three tongue cancer cell lines the influences of epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin (AR), and epiregulin (EPR) on tumour cell proliferation and cetuximab response were evaluated by the addition of recombinant human (rh) proteins or the siRNA-mediated downregulation of endogenous ligand production.

    Results: EGF or AR downregulation suppressed the proliferation of all investigated cell lines. Furthermore, all cell lines displayed increased cetuximab resistance upon the addition of rhEGF, whereas EGF silencing resulted in an improved cetuximab response in one cell line.

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that EGF and AR are critical components of the EGFR signalling network required for full proliferative potential. Moreover, EGF is a potential predictive biomarker of poor cetuximab response and a possible treatment target.

  • 169.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ceder, Rebecca
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grafström, Roland
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Grénman, Reidar
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 and -13 expression associate to cisplatin resistance in head and neck cancer cell lines.2009In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 866-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is a common treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Cisplatin is the backbone of chemotherapy regimens used to treat HNSCC. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify predictive markers for cisplatin treatment outcome in HNSCC. The intrinsic cisplatin sensitivity (ICS) was determined in a panel of tumour cell lines. From this panel, one sensitive and two resistant cell lines were selected for comparative transcript profiling using microarray analysis. The enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO) categories in sensitive versus resistant cell lines were assessed using the Gene Ontology Tree Machine bioinformatics tool. In total, 781 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed and 11 GO categories were enriched. Transcripts contributing to this enrichment were further analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) for identification of key regulator genes. IPA recognized 20 key regulator genes of which five were differentially expressed in sensitive versus resistant cell lines. The mRNA level of these five genes was further assessed in a panel of 25 HNSCC cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. Among these key regulators, MMP-7 and MMP-13 are implicated as potential biomarkers of ICS. Taken together, genome-wide transcriptional analysis identified single genes, GO categories as well as molecular networks that are differentially expressed in HNSCC cell lines with different ICS. Furthermore, two novel predictive biomarkers for cisplatin resistance, MMP-7 and MMP-13, were identified.

  • 170.
    Anthony, L.
    et al.
    Univ Kentucky, Lexington, KY USA..
    Kulke, M. H.
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Hoersch, D.
    Zent Klin Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany..
    Bergsland, E.
    UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehens Canc Ctr, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Lombard-Bohas, C.
    Hosp Civils Lyon, Hop Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France..
    Kunz, P.
    Stanford Univ, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA..
    Valle, J. W.
    Univ Manchester, Christie NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Kassler-Taub, K.
    Lexicon Pharmaceut Inc, The Woodlands, TX USA..
    Fleming, R.
    Charite, Berlin, Germany..
    Pavel, M.
    Charite, Berlin, Germany..
    Impact of Concomitant Medication on Efficacy of Telotristat Ethyl - A Post Hoc Subgroup Analysis of the Phase 3 TELESTAR Study in Carcinoid Syndrome2017In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 105, p. 212-212Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 171. Antoniou, A. C.
    et al.
    Beesley, J.
    McGuffog, L.
    Sinilnikova, O. M.
    Healey, S.
    Neuhausen, S. L.
    Ding, Y. C.
    Rebbeck, T. R.
    Weitzel, J. N.
    Lynch, H. T.
    Isaacs, C.
    Ganz, P. A.
    Tomlinson, G.
    Olopade, O. I.
    Couch, F. J.
    Wang, X.
    Lindor, N. M.
    Pankratz, V. S.
    Radice, P.
    Manoukian, S.
    Peissel, B.
    Zaffaroni, D.
    Barile, M.
    Viel, A.
    Allavena, A.
    Dall'Olio, V.
    Peterlongo, P.
    Szabo, C. I.
    Zikan, M.
    Claes, K.
    Poppe, B.
    Foretova, L.
    Mai, P. L.
    Greene, M. H.
    Rennert, G.
    Lejbkowicz, F.
    Glendon, G.
    Ozcelik, H.
    Andrulis, I. L.
    Thomassen, M.
    Gerdes, A. -M
    Sunde, L.
    Cruger, D.
    Jensen, U. B.
    Caligo, M.
    Friedman, E.
    Kaufman, B.
    Laitman, Y.
    Milgrom, R.
    Dubrovsky, M.
    Cohen, S.
    Borg, A.
    Jernström, H.
    Lindblom, A.
    Rantala, J.
    Stenmark-Askmalm, M.
    Melin, B.
    Nathanson, K.
    Domchek, S.
    Jakubowska, A.
    Lubinski, J.
    Huzarski, T.
    Osorio, A.
    Lasa, A.
    Durán, M.
    Tejada, M. -I
    Godino, J.
    Benitez, J.
    Hamann, U.
    Kriege, M.
    Hoogerbrugge, N.
    Van Der Luijt, R. B.
    Van Asperen, C. J.
    Devilee, P.
    Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.
    Blok, M. J.
    Aalfs, C. M.
    Hogervorst, F.
    Rookus, M.
    Cook, M.
    Oliver, C.
    Frost, D.
    Conroy, D.
    Evans, D. G.
    Lalloo, F.
    Pichert, G.
    Davidson, R.
    Cole, T.
    Cook, J.
    Paterson, J.
    Hodgson, S.
    Morrison, P. J.
    Porteous, M. E.
    Walker, L.
    Kennedy, M. J.
    Dorkins, H.
    Peock, S.
    Godwin, A. K.
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.
    De Pauw, A.
    Mazoyer, S.
    Bonadona, V.
    Lasset, C.
    Dreyfus, H.
    Leroux, D.
    Hardouin, A.
    Berthet, P.
    Faivre, L.
    Loustalot, C.
    Noguchi, T.
    Sobol, H.
    Rouleau, E.
    Nogues, C.
    Frénay, M.
    Vénat-Bouvet, L.
    Hopper, J. L.
    Daly, M. B.
    Terry, M. B.
    John, E. M.
    Buys, S. S.
    Yassin, Y.
    Miron, A.
    Goldgar, D.
    Singer, C. F.
    Dressler, A. C.
    Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.
    Pfeiler, G.
    Hansen, T. V. O.
    Jnson, L.
    Agnarsson, B. A.
    Kirchhoff, T.
    Offit, K.
    Devlin, V.
    Dutra-Clarke, A.
    Piedmonte, M.
    Rodriguez, G. C.
    Wakeley, K.
    Boggess, J. F.
    Basil, J.
    Schwartz, P. E.
    Blank, S. V.
    Toland, A. E.
    Montagna, M.
    Casella, C.
    Imyanitov, E.
    Tihomirova, L.
    Blanco, I.
    Lazaro, C.
    Ramus, S. J.
    Sucheston, L.
    Karlan, B. Y.
    Gross, J.
    Schmutzler, R.
    Wappenschmidt, B.
    Engel, C.
    Meindl, A.
    Lochmann, M.
    Arnold, N.
    Heidemann, S.
    Varon-Mateeva, R.
    Niederacher, D.
    Sutter, C.
    Deissler, H.
    Gadzicki, D.
    Preisler-Adams, S.
    Kast, K.
    Schönbuchner, I.
    Caldes, T.
    De La Hoya, M.
    Aittomäki, K.
    Nevanlinna, H.
    Simard, J.
    Spurdle, A. B.
    Holland, H.
    Chen, X.
    Platte, R.
    Chenevix-Trench, G.
    Easton, D. F.
    Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Implications for risk prediction2010In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 70, no 23, p. 9742-9754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10-11 - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.

  • 172. Antoniou, A. C.
    et al.
    Sinilnikova, O. M.
    McGuffog, L.
    Healey, S.
    Nevanlinna, H.
    Heikkinen, T.
    Simard, J.
    Spurdle, A. B.
    Beesley, J.
    Chen, X.
    Neuhausen, S. L.
    Ding, Y. C.
    Couch, F. J.
    Wang, X.
    Fredericksen, Z.
    Peterlongo, P.
    Peissel, B.
    Bonanni, B.
    Viel, A.
    Bernard, L.
    Radice, P.
    Szabo, C. I.
    Foretova, L.
    Zikan, M.
    Claes, K.
    Greene, M. H.
    Mai, P. L.
    Rennert, G.
    Lejbkowicz, F.
    Andrulis, I. L.
    Ozcelik, H.
    Glendon, G.
    Gerdes, A. -M
    Thomassen, M.
    Sunde, L.
    Caligo, M. A.
    Laitman, Y.
    Kontorovich, T.
    Cohen, S.
    Kaufman, B.
    Dagan, E.
    Baruch, R. G.
    Friedman, E.
    Harbst, K.
    Barbany-Bustinza, G.
    Rantala, J.
    Ehrencrona, H.
    Karlsson, P.
    Domchek, S. M.
    Nathanson, K. L.
    Osorio, A.
    Blanco, I.
    Lasa, A.
    Benítez, J.
    Hamann, U.
    Hogervorst, F. B. L.
    Rookus, M. A.
    Collee, J. M.
    Devilee, P.
    Ligtenberg, M. J.
    van der Luijt, R. B.
    Aalfs, C. M.
    Waisfisz, Q.
    Wijnen, J.
    van Roozendaal, C. E. P.
    Peock, S.
    Cook, M.
    Frost, D.
    Oliver, C.
    Platte, R.
    Evans, D. G.
    Lalloo, F.
    Eeles, R.
    Izatt, L.
    Davidson, R.
    Chu, C.
    Eccles, D.
    Cole, T.
    Hodgson, S.
    Godwin, A. K.
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.
    Buecher, B.
    Léoné, M.
    Bressac-de Paillerets, B.
    Remenieras, A.
    Caron, O.
    Lenoir, G. M.
    Sevenet, N.
    Longy, M.
    Ferrer, S. F.
    Prieur, F.
    Goldgar, D.
    Miron, A.
    John, E. M.
    Buys, S. S.
    Daly, M. B.
    Hopper, J. L.
    Terry, M. B.
    Yassin, Y.
    Singer, C.
    Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.
    Staudigl, C.
    Hansen, T. V. O.
    Barkardottir, R. B.
    Kirchhoff, T.
    Pal, P.
    Kosarin, K.
    Offit, K.
    Piedmonte, M.
    Rodriguez, G. C.
    Wakeley, K.
    Boggess, J. F.
    Basil, J.
    Schwartz, P. E.
    Blank, S. V.
    Toland, A. E.
    Montagna, M.
    Casella, C.
    Imyanitov, E. N.
    Allavena, A.
    Schmutzler, R. K.
    Versmold, B.
    Engel, C.
    Meindl, A.
    Ditsch, N.
    Arnold, N.
    Niederacher, D.
    Deißler, H.
    Fiebig, B.
    Suttner, C.
    Schönbuchner, I.
    Gadzicki, D.
    Caldes, T.
    de la Hoya, M.
    Pooley, K. A.
    Easton, D. F.
    Chenevix-Trench, G.
    Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers2009In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 18, no 22, p. 4442-4456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 × 10-4]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case-control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not. 

  • 173. Antoniou, Antonis C
    et al.
    Beesley, Jonathan
    McGuffog, Lesley
    Sinilnikova, Olga M
    Healey, Sue
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    Ding, Yuan Chun
    Rebbeck, Timothy R
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N
    Lynch, Henry T
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Ganz, Patricia A
    Tomlinson, Gail
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I
    Couch, Fergus J
    Wang, Xianshu
    Lindor, Noralane M
    Pankratz, Vernon S
    Radice, Paolo
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Peissel, Bernard
    Zaffaroni, Daniela
    Barile, Monica
    Viel, Alessandra
    Allavena, Anna
    Dall'Olio, Valentina
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Szabo, Csilla I
    Zikan, Michal
    Claes, Kathleen
    Poppe, Bruce
    Foretova, Lenka
    Mai, Phuong L
    Greene, Mark H
    Rennert, Gad
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Glendon, Gord
    Ozcelik, Hilmi
    Andrulis, Irene L
    Thomassen, Mads
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    Sunde, Lone
    Cruger, Dorthe
    Birk Jensen, Uffe
    Caligo, Maria
    Friedman, Eitan
    Kaufman, Bella
    Laitman, Yael
    Milgrom, Roni
    Dubrovsky, Maya
    Cohen, Shimrit
    Borg, Åke
    Jernström, Helena
    Lindblom, Annika
    Rantala, Johanna
    Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nathanson, Kate
    Domchek, Susan
    Jakubowska, Ania
    Lubinski, Jan
    Huzarski, Tomasz
    Osorio, Ana
    Lasa, Adriana
    Durán, Mercedes
    Tejada, Maria-Isabel
    Godino, Javier
    Benitez, Javier
    Hamann, Ute
    Kriege, Mieke
    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline
    van der Luijt, Rob B
    van Asperen, Christi J
    Devilee, Peter
    Meijers-Heijboer, EJ
    Blok, Marinus J
    Aalfs, Cora M
    Hogervorst, Frans
    Rookus, Matti
    Cook, Margaret
    Oliver, Clare
    Frost, Debra
    Conroy, Don
    Evans, D Gareth
    Lalloo, Fiona
    Pichert, Gabriella
    Davidson, Rosemarie
    Cole, Trevor
    Cook, Jackie
    Paterson, Joan
    Hodgson, Shirley
    Morrison, Patrick J
    Porteous, Mary E
    Walker, Lisa
    Kennedy, M John
    Dorkins, Huw
    Peock, Susan
    Godwin, Andrew K
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    de Pauw, Antoine
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    Bonadona, Valérie
    Lasset, Christine
    Dreyfus, Hélène
    Leroux, Dominique
    Hardouin, Agnès
    Berthet, Pascaline
    Faivre, Laurence
    Loustalot, Catherine
    Noguchi, Tetsuro
    Sobol, Hagay
    Rouleau, Etienne
    Nogues, Catherine
    Frénay, Marc
    Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence
    Hopper, John L
    Daly, Mary B
    Terry, Mary B
    John, Esther M
    Buys, Saundra S
    Yassin, Yosuf
    Miron, Alexander
    Goldgar, David
    Singer, Christian F
    Dressler, Anne Catharina
    Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne
    Pfeiler, Georg
    Hansen, Thomas VO
    Jønson, Lars
    Agnarsson, Bjarni A
    Kirchhoff, Tomas
    Offit, Kenneth
    Devlin, Vincent
    Dutra-Clarke, Ana
    Piedmonte, Marion
    Rodriguez, Gustavo C
    Wakeley, Katie
    Boggess, John F
    Basil, Jack
    Schwartz, Peter E
    Blank, Stephanie V
    Toland, Amanda Ewart
    Montagna, Marco
    Casella, Cinzia
    Imyanitov, Evgeny
    Tihomirova, Laima
    Blanco, Ignacio
    Lazaro, Conxi
    Ramus, Susan J
    Sucheston, Lara
    Karlan, Beth Y
    Gross, Jenny
    Schmutzler, Rita
    Wappenschmidt, Barbara
    Engel, Christoph
    Meindl, Alfons
    Lochmann, Magdalena
    Arnold, Norbert
    Heidemann, Simone
    Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda
    Niederacher, Dieter
    Sutter, Christian
    Deissler, Helmut
    Gadzicki, Dorothea
    Preisler-Adams, Sabine
    Kast, Karin
    Schönbuchner, Ines
    Caldes, Trinidad
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    Aittomäki, Kristiina
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Simard, Jacques
    Spurdle, Amanda B
    Holland, Helene
    Chen, Xiaoqing
    Platte, Radka
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    Easton, Douglas F
    Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction2010In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 70, no 23, p. 9742-9754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10(-11) - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.

  • 174.
    Antonodimitrakis, Pantelis Clewemar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Olofsson, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Neuroendocrine tumors with syndromic vasoactive intestinal polypeptide hypersecretion: a retrospective study2017In: International Journal of Endocrine Oncology, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 9-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide producing neuroendocrine tumors are rare and cause severe hormonal symptoms. Patients/methods: Eighteen patients with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide producing neuroendocrine tumors were analyzed with reviews of medical records, radiology and tumor tissue specimens. Results: Twelve patients (67%) had liver metastases at diagnosis. Chemotherapy, somatostatin analogs and interferon were given as medical therapies. Streptozocin/5-fluorouracil produced an objective response in 40% of the evaluable patients. Somatostatin analogs gave a clinical/biochemical response in eight out of nine patients. Transarterial embolization of the liver and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy was given to refractory cases. Sixteen patients died during the observation period. The median overall survival from diagnosis was 102 months. Conclusion: Systemic chemotherapy and somatostatin analogs should be given in cases of advanced disease or for hormonal symptoms.

  • 175.
    Antonovic, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Brahme, Anders
    Furusawa, Yoshiya
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Radiobiological description of the LET dependence of the cell survival of oxic and anoxic cells irradiated by carbon ions2013In: Journal of radiation research, ISSN 0449-3060, E-ISSN 1349-9157, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light-ion radiation therapy against hypoxic tumors is highly curative due to reduced dependence on the presence of oxygen in the tumor at elevated linear energy transfer (LET) towards the Bragg peak. Clinical ion beams using spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) are characterized by a wide spectrum of LET values. Accurate treatment optimization requires a method that can account for influence of the variation in response for a broad range of tumor hypoxia, absorbed doses and LETs. This paper presents a parameterization of the Repairable Conditionally-Repairable (RCR) cell survival model that can describe the survival of oxic and hypoxic cells over a wide range of LET values, and investigates the relationship between hypoxic radiation resistance and LET. The biological response model was tested by fitting cell survival data under oxic and anoxic conditions for V79 cells irradiated with LETs within the range of 30 – 500 keV/μm. The model provides good agreement with experimental cell survival data for the range of LET investigated, confirming the robustness of the parameterization method. This new version of the RCR model is suitable for describing the biological response of mixed populations of oxic and hypoxic cells and at the same time taking into account the distribution of doses and LETs in the incident beam and its variation with depth in tissue. The model offers a versatile tool for the selection of LET and dose required in the optimization of the therapeutic effect, without severely affecting normal tissue in realistic tumors presenting highly heterogeneous oxic and hypoxic regions.

  • 176.
    Antonovic, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Furusawa, Yoshiya
    National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet.
    Relative clinical effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy: theoretical modelling for H&N tumours2015In: Journal of radiation research, ISSN 0449-3060, E-ISSN 1349-9157, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 639-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparison of the efficiency of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) administered with the same number of fractions might be of limited clinical interest, since a wide range of fractionation patterns are used clinically today. Due to advanced photon treatment techniques, hypofractionation is becoming increasingly accepted for prostate and lung tumours, whereas patients with head and neck tumours still benefit from hyperfractionated treatments. In general, the number of fractions is considerably lower in carbon ion RT. A clinically relevant comparison would be between fractionation schedules that are optimal within each treatment modality category. In this in silico study, the relative clinical effectiveness (RCE) of carbon ions was investigated for human salivary gland tumours, assuming various radiation sensitivities related to their oxygenation. The results indicate that, for hypoxic tumours in the absence of reoxygenation, the RCE (defined as the ratio of D50 for photons to carbon ions) ranges from 3.5 to 5.7, corresponding to carbon ion treatments given in 36 and 3 fractions, respectively, and 30 fractions for photons. Assuming that interfraction local oxygenation changes take place, results for RCE are lower than that for an oxic tumour if only a few fractions of carbon ions are used. If the carbon ion treatment is given in more than 12 fractions, the RCE is larger for the hypoxic than for the well-oxygenated tumour. In conclusion, this study showed that in silico modelling enables the study of a wide range of factors in the clinical considerations and could be an important step towards individualisation of RT treatments.

  • 177.
    Antonovic, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Lindblom, Emely
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Bassler, Niels
    Furusawa, Yoshiya
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy: the influence of local oxygenation changes2014In: Journal of radiation research, ISSN 0449-3060, E-ISSN 1349-9157, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 902-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of carbon ion radiotherapy on hypoxic tumors has recently been questioned because of low linear energy transfer (LET) values in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypoxia and local oxygenation changes (LOCs) in fractionated carbon ion radiotherapy. Three-dimensional tumors with hypoxic subvolumes were simulated assuming interfraction LOCs. Different fractionations were applied using a clinically relevant treatment plan with a known LET distribution. The surviving fraction was calculated, taking oxygen tension, dose and LET into account, using the repairable–conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER was well above unity for all fractionations. For the hypoxic tumor, the tumor control probability was considerably higher if LOCs were assumed, rather than static oxygenation. The beneficial effect of LOCs increased with the number of fractions. However, for very low fraction doses, the improvement related to LOCs did not compensate for the increase in total dose required  for tumor control. In conclusion, our results suggest that hypoxia can influence the outcome of carbon ion radiotherapy because of the non-negligible oxygen effect at the low LETs in the SOBP. However, if LOCs occur, a relatively high level of tumor control probability is achievable with a large range of fractionation schedules for tumors with hypoxic subvolumes, but both hyperfractionation and hypofractionation should be pursued with caution.

  • 178.
    Antonovic, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Emely
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Bassler, Niels
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Furusawa, Yoshiya
    National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy: the influence of local oxygenation changes2014In: Journal of radiation research, ISSN 0449-3060, E-ISSN 1349-9157, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 902-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of carbon ion radiotherapy on hypoxic tumors has recently been questioned because of low linear energy transfer (LET) values in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypoxia and local oxygenation changes (LOCs) in fractionated carbon ion radiotherapy. Three-dimensional tumors with hypoxic subvolumes were simulated assuming interfraction LOCs. Different fractionations were applied using a clinically relevant treatment plan with a known LET distribution. The surviving fraction was calculated, taking oxygen tension, dose and LET into account, using the repairable–conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER was well above unity for all fractionations. For the hypoxic tumor, the tumor control probability was considerably higher if LOCs were assumed, rather than static oxygenation. The beneficial effect of LOCs increased with the number of fractions. However, for very low fraction doses, the improvement related to LOCs did not compensate for the increase in total dose required  for tumor control. In conclusion, our results suggest that hypoxia can influence the outcome of carbon ion radiotherapy because of the non-negligible oxygen effect at the low LETs in the SOBP. However, if LOCs occur, a relatively high level of tumor control probability is achievable with a large range of fractionation schedules for tumors with hypoxic subvolumes, but both hyperfractionation and hypofractionation should be pursued with caution.

  • 179. Araghi, Marzieh
    et al.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Lundberg, Michael
    Lager, Anton
    Engström, Gunnar
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Knutsson, Anders
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Trolle Lagerros, Ylva
    Bellocco, Rino
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Östergren, Per-Olof
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Use of moist oral snuff (snus) and pancreatic cancer: pooled analysis of nine prospective observational studies2017In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 141, no 4, p. 687-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While smoking is a well-established risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the effect of smokeless tobacco is less well understood. We used pooled individual data from the Swedish Collaboration on Health Effects of Snus Use to assess the association between Swedish snus use and the risk of pancreatic cancer. A total of 424,152 male participants from nine cohort studies were followed up for risk of pancreatic cancer through linkage to health registers. We used shared frailty models with random effects at the study level, to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for confounding factors. During 9,276,054 person-years of observation, 1,447 men developed pancreatic cancer. Compared to never-snus use, current snus use was not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.83–1.11) after adjustment for smoking. Swedish snus use does not appear to be implicated in the development of pancreatic cancer in men. Tobacco smoke constituents other than nicotine or its metabolites may account for the relationship between smoking and pancreatic cancer.

  • 180. Araghi, Marzieh
    et al.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Lundberg, Michael
    Liu, Zhiwei
    Ye, Weimin
    Lager, Anton
    Engström, Gunnar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Knutsson, Anders
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Bellocco, Rino
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Östergren, Per-Olof
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Smokeless tobacco (snus) use and colorectal cancer incidence and survival: Results from nine pooled cohorts2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Although smoking is considered to be an established risk factor for colorectal cancer, the current evidence on the association between smokeless tobacco and colorectal cancer is scant and inconclusive. We used pooled individual data from the Swedish Collaboration on Health Effects of Snus Use to assess this association.

    METHODS: A total of 417,872 male participants from nine cohort studies across Sweden were followed up for incidence of colorectal cancer and death. Outcomes were ascertained through linkage to health registers. We used shared frailty models with random effects at the study level to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

    RESULTS: During 7,135,504 person-years of observation, 4170 men developed colorectal cancer. There was no clear association between snus use and colorectal cancer overall. Exclusive current snus users, however, had an increased risk of rectal cancer (HR 1.40: 95% CI 1.09, 1.79). There were no statistically significant associations between snus use and either all-cause or colorectal cancer-specific mortality after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, from a large sample, do not support any strong relationships between snus use and colorectal cancer risk and survival among men. However, the observed increased risk of rectal cancer is noteworthy, and in merit of further attention.

  • 181. Arase, Mayu
    et al.
    Horiguchi, Kana
    Ehata, Shogo
    Morikawa, Masato
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tsutsumi, Shuichi
    Aburatani, Hiroyuki
    Miyazono, Kohei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Koinuma, Daizo
    Transforming growth factor-beta-induced lncRNA-Smad7 inhibits apoptosis of mouse breast cancer JygMC(A) cells2014In: Cancer Science, ISSN 1347-9032, E-ISSN 1349-7006, Vol. 105, no 8, p. 974-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta exhibits both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic effects on epithelial cells in a context-dependent manner. The anti-apoptotic function of TGF-beta is mediated by several downstream regulatory mechanisms, and has been implicated in the tumor-progressive phenotype of breast cancer cells. We conducted RNA sequencing of mouse mammary gland epithelial (NMuMG) cells and identified a long non-coding RNA, termed lncRNA-Smad7, which has anti-apoptotic functions, as a target of TGF-beta lncRNA-Smad7 was located adjacent to the mouse Smad7 gene, and its expression was induced by TGF-beta in all of the mouse mammary gland epithelial cell lines and breast cancer cell lines that we evaluated. Suppression of lncRNA-Smad7 expression cancelled the anti-apoptotic function of TGF-beta In contrast, forced expression of lncRNA-Smad7 rescued apoptosis induced by a TGF-beta type I receptor kinase inhibitor in the mouse breast cancer cell line JygMC(A). The anti-apoptotic effect of lncRNA-Smad7 appeared to occur independently of the transcriptional regulation by TGF-beta of anti-apoptotic DEC1 and pro-apoptotic Bim proteins. Small interfering RNA for lncRNA-Smad7 did not alter the process of TGF-beta-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, phosphorylation of Smad2 or expression of the Smad7 gene, suggesting that the contribution of this lncRNA to TGF-beta functions may be restricted to apoptosis. Our findings suggest a complex mechanism for regulating the anti-apoptotic and tumor-progressive aspects of TGF-beta signaling.

  • 182. Arason, Adalgeir
    et al.
    Gunnarsson, Haukur
    Johannesdottir, Gudrun
    Jonasson, Kristjan
    Bendahl, Pär-Ola
    Gillanders, Elizabeth M
    Agnarsson, Bjarni A
    Jönsson, Göran
    Pylkäs, Katri
    Mustonen, Aki
    Heikkinen, Tuomas
    Aittomäki, Kristiina
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johannsson, Oskar TH
    Møller, Pål
    Winqvist, Robert
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Borg, Åke
    Barkardottir, Rosa B
    Genome-wide search for breast cancer linkage in large Icelandic non-BRCA1/2 families2010In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. R50-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromosomes 2p, 6q and 14q are candidate sites for genes contributing together to high breast cancer risk. A polygenic model is supported, suggesting the joint effect of genes in contributing to breast cancer risk to be rather common in non-BRCA1/2 families. For genetic counselling it would seem important to resolve the mode of genetic interaction.

  • 183.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kopeć, Mariusz
    University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland.
    Gudowska, Irena
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Modelling of a proton spot scanning system using MCNP62017In: INTERNATIONAL NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE 2016, Institute of Physics (IOP), 2017, Vol. 860, article id 012025Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to model the characteristics of a clinical proton spot scanning beam using Monte Carlo simulations with the code MCNP6. The proton beam was defined using parameters obtained from beam commissioning at the Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden. Simulations were evaluated against measurements for proton energies between 60 and 226 MeV with regard to range in water, lateral spot sizes in air and absorbed dose depth profiles in water. The model was also used to evaluate the experimental impact of lateral signal losses in an ionization chamber through simulations using different detector radii. Simulated and measured distal ranges agreed within 0.1 mm for R90 and R80, and within 0.2 mm for R50. The average absolute difference of all spot sizes was 0.1 mm. The average agreement of absorbed dose integrals and Bragg-peak heights was 0.9%. Lateral signal losses increased with incident proton energy with a maximum signal loss of 7% for 226 MeV protons. The good agreement between simulations and measurements supports the assumptions and parameters employed in the presented Monte Carlo model. The characteristics of the proton spot scanning beam were accurately reproduced and the model will prove useful in future studies on secondary neutrons.

  • 184.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Gudowska, Irena
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    The Skandion Clinic, Sweden.
    Impact of irradiation setup in proton spot scanning brain therapy on organ doses from secondary radiation2018In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 180, no 1-4, p. 261-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Monte Carlo model of a proton spot scanning pencil beam was used to simulate organ doses from secondary radiation produced from brain tumour treatments delivered with either a lateral field or a vertex field to one adult and one paediatric patient. Absorbed doses from secondary neutrons, photons and protons and neutron equivalent doses were higher for the vertex field in both patients, but the differences were low in absolute terms. Absorbed doses ranged between 0.1 and 43 μGy.Gy−1 in both patients with the paediatric patient receiving higher doses. The neutron equivalent doses to the organs ranged between 0.5 and 141 μSv.Gy−1 for the paediatric patient and between 0.2 and 134 μSv.Gy−1 for the adult. The highest neutron equivalent dose from the entire treatment was 7 mSv regardless of field setup and patient size. The results indicate that different field setups do not introduce large absolute variations in out-of-field doses produced in patients undergoing proton pencil beam scanning of centrally located brain tumours.

  • 185.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Stockholm University.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Are IMRT treatments in the head and neck region increasing the risk of secondary cancers?2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 1041-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been increasingly employed for treating head and neck (H&N) tumours due to its ability to produce isodoses suitable for the complex anatomy of the region. The aim of this study was to assess possible differences between IMRT and conformal radiation therapy (CRT) with regard to risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancies for H&N tumours.

    Material and Methods: IMRT and CRT plans were made for 10 H&N adult patients and the resulting treatment planning data were used to calculate the risk of radiation-induced malignancies in four different tissues. Three risk models with biologically relevant parameters were used for calculations. The influence of scatter radiation and repeated imaging sessions has also been investigated.

    Results: The results showed that the total lifetime risks of developing radiation-induced secondary malignancies from the two treatment techniques, CRT and IMRT, were comparable and in the interval 0.9-2.5%. The risk contributions from the primary beam and scatter radiation were comparable, whereas the contribution from repeated diagnostic imaging was considerably smaller.

    Conclusion: The results indicated that the redistribution of the dose characteristic to IMRT leads to a redistribution of the risks in individual tissues. However, the total levels of risk were similar between the two irradiation techniques considered.

  • 186.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Linköping University, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Are IMRT treatments in the head and neck region increasing the risk of secondary cancers?2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 1041-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been increasingly employed for treating head and neck (H&N) tumours due to its ability to produce isodoses suitable for the complex anatomy of the region. The aim of this study was to assess possible differences between IMRT and conformal radiation therapy (CRT) with regard to risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancies for H&N tumours. Material and methods. IMRT and CRT plans were made for 10 H&N adult patients and the resulting treatment planning data were used to calculate the risk of radiation-induced malignancies in four different tissues. Three risk models with biologically relevant parameters were used for calculations. The influence of scatter radiation and repeated imaging sessions has also been investigated. Results. The results showed that the total lifetime risks of developing radiation-induced secondary malignancies from the two treatment techniques, CRT and IMRT, were comparable and in the interval 0.9-2.5%. The risk contributions from the primary beam and scatter radiation were comparable, whereas the contribution from repeated diagnostic imaging was considerably smaller. Conclusion. The results indicated that the redistribution of the dose characteristic to IMRT leads to a redistribution of the risks in individual tissues. However, the total levels of risk were similar between the two irradiation techniques considered.

  • 187.
    Armakolas, Athanasios
    et al.
    Department of Experimental Physiology, Medical School, University of Athens.
    Stathopoulos, George P.
    First Oncology Clinic, Errikos Dunant Hospital, Athens.
    Nezos, Adrianos
    Department of Experimental Physiology, Medical School, University of Athens.
    Theos, Apostolos
    Department of Experimental Physiology, Medical School, University of Athens.
    Stathaki, Martha
    Department of Experimental Physiology, Medical School, University of Athens.
    Koutsilieris, Michael
    Department of Experimental Physiology, Medical School, University of Athens.
    Subdivision of molecularly-classified groups by new gene signatures in breast cancer patients2012In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 2255-2263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gene expression patterns as well as gene interactions are under investigation for their involvement in tumour heterogeneity. The molecular classification of breast cancer based on hormone receptor expression, grade and HER2 receptor levels, is indicative but not adequate enough to complete the prognostic data. The objectives of this study were to validate the prognostic value of 19 genes, solely, and as parts of classifiers (sets of genes), in breast cancer patients and to determine whether the expression of these genes and classifiers is correlated with breast cancer molecular classification. Gene expression was examined in the blood of 88 breast cancer patients and 50 healthy controls using multiplex quantitative real-time PCR. Patients with a second primary malignancy showed a statistically significant difference when compared with: i) patients with a single breast cancer, for an 8-gene classifier (p<0.02); and ii) healthy individuals (classifier FBX033, FLJ339115) (p<0.01), with respect to gene expression. The classifier ENY2, USP38 was associated with the development of primary breast cancer. A newly established classifier (ENY2, USP38, RPS7, Osbpl-1 and ETF1) indicated a statistically significant association with HER2 subtype patients, compared to patients with a different molecular classification (p<0.04). The gene FLJ33915 was differentially expressed in a subgroup of HER2-positive patients with infiltrated axillary lymph nodes (p<0.028). We validated the prognostic value of 4 classifiers for primary and second primary malignancy. Evidence of a classifier predicting the HER2 subtype and the gene FLJ33915 which subdivides HER2 subtype patients is also presented.

  • 188. Armstrong, Andrew J.
    et al.
    Anand, Aseem
    Edenbrandt, Lars
    Bondesson, Eva
    Bjartell, Anders
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sternberg, Cora N.
    Pili, Roberto
    Tuvesson, Helen
    Nordle, Örjan
    Carducci, Michael A.
    Morris, Michael J.
    Phase 3 Assessment of the Automated Bone Scan Index as a Prognostic Imaging Biomarker of Overall Survival in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2018In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 944-951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone, and bone metastases are associated with pathologic fractures, pain, and reduced survival. Bone disease is routinely visualized using the technetium Tc 99m(Tc-99m) bone scan; however, the standard interpretation of bone scan data relies on subjective manual assessment of counting metastatic lesion numbers. There is an unmet need for an objective and fully quantitative assessment of bone scan data.

    Objective: To clinically assess in a prospectively defined analysis plan of a clinical trial the automated Bone Scan Index (aBSI) as an independent prognostic determinant of overall survival (OS) in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

    Design, Setting, and Participants: This investigationwas a prospectively planned analysis of the aBSI in a phase 3 multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of tasquinimod (10TASQ10). Men with bone metastatic chemotherapy-naive CRPC were recruited at 241 sites in 37 countries between March 2011 and August 2015. The statistical analysis plan to clinically evaluate the aBSI was prospectively defined and locked before unmasking of the 10TASQ10 study. The analysis of aBSI was conducted between May 25, 2016, and June 3, 2017.

    Main Outcomes and Measures: The associations of baseline aBSI with OS, radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS), time to symptomatic progression, and time to opiate use for cancer pain.

    Results: Of the total 1245 men enrolled, 721 were evaluable for the aBSI. The mean (SD) age (available for 719 men) was 70.6 (8.0) years (age range, 47-90 years). The aBSI population was representative of the total study population based on baseline characteristics. The aBSI (median, 1.07; range, 0-32.60) was significantly associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.20; 95% CI, 1.14-1.26; P < .001). The median OS by aBSI quartile (lowest to highest) was 34.7, 27.3, 21.7, and 13.3 months, respectively. The discriminative ability of the aBSI (C index, 0.63) in prognosticating OS was significantly higher than that of the manual lesion counting (C index, 0.60) (P = .03). In a multivariable survival model, a higher aBSI remained independently associated with OS (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.11; P = .03). A higher aBSI was also independently associated with time to symptomatic progression (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.13-1.23; P < .001) and time to opiate use for cancer pain (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.14-1.30; P < .001).

    Conclusions and Relevance: To date, this investigation is the largest prospectively analyzed study to validate the aBSI as an independent prognostic imaging biomarker of survival in mCRPC. These data support the prognostic utility of the aBSI as an objective imaging biomarker in the design and eligibility of clinical trials of systemic therapies for patients with mCRPC.

  • 189.
    Armuand, G. M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rodriguez-Wallberg, K. A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Reprod Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmros, J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Paediat Oncol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Arvidson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Lampic, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wettergren, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Physicians' self-reported practice behaviour regarding fertility-related discussions in paediatric oncology in Sweden2017In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1684-1690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate practice behaviours of Swedish physicians with regard to discussing the impact of cancer treatment on fertility with paediatric oncology patients and their parents, and to identify factors associated with such discussions.

    Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted targeting all physicians in Sweden working in paediatric oncology care settings. Participants responded to a questionnaire measuring practice behaviour, attitudes, barriers, and confidence in knowledge. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with seldom discussing fertility.

    Results: More than half of the physicians routinely talked with their patients/parents about the treatment's potential impact on fertility (male patients: 62%; female patients: 57%; P = 0.570). Factors associated with less frequently discussing fertility with patients/parents were working at a non-university hospital (male patients: OR 11.49, CI 1.98-66.67; female patients: OR 33.18, CI 4.06-271.07), concerns that the topic would cause worry (male patients: OR 8.23, CI 1.48-45.89; female patients: OR 12.38, CI 1.90-80.70), and perceiving the parents as anxious (male patients: OR 7.18, CI 1.20-42.85; female patients: OR 11.65, CI 1.32-103.17).

    Conclusions: Based on our findings, we recommend structured training in how to communicate about fertility issues in stressful situations, which in turn might increase fertility-related discussions in paediatric oncology.

  • 190.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog-Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Correction: Reproductive Patterns Among Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Survivors in Sweden: A Population-Based Matched-Cohort Study (vol 35, pg 1577, 2018)2018In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 36, no 20Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 191.
    Arnerlöv, Conny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Prediction of prognosis in human breast cancer: a study on clinicopathologic and cytometric prognostic factors1991Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was undertaken to evaluate some important prognostic factors in human breast cancer. The prognostic value of accepted clinicopathological factors such as the presence of axillary lymph node métastasés, histologic grade, clinical and pathological stage was confirmed.

    In a cohort of stage T3,T4,M0 breast cancer with 91 patients (paper I) DNA ploidy by static cytometry (SCM) turned out to be the most important prognostic factor. In a cohort of stage T2,M0 breast cancer with 99 patients (paper III) the presence of involved axillary nodes and low histologic grade were independent prognostic factors. According to life-table analyses DNA ploidy by flow cytometty (FCM) and SCM were significant prognostic predictors for survival but S-phase fraction (SPF) was not. The significant discrimination between euploid and aneuploid tumours was seen also among the node-negative patients. In a patient material with 158 tumours of predominantly low stages (73% T0,T1, papers IV and V) and calculated mammographie tumour volume doubling time (DT) DNA ploidy by FCM gave no significant prognostic information. A computer program was used to calculate SPF from the histograms obtained by FCM. SPF with a cut-off value of 7.5% between tumours with high and low proliferation rate was a highly significant and independent prognostic factor for survival. The other independent prognostic predictors were low histologic grade, the presence of involved axillary nodes and stage II and III (versus stage I).

    DT values for 158 patients (papers IV and V) varied between 0.6 and 65.8 months (mean 10.9 months) and 11 tumours showed no growth at all between mammographies. The median value of 9.0 months was chosen as cut-off point between slow and fast growing tumours. The prognostic power of DT was however low, and the difference between slow and fast growing tumours was significant only for distant disease-free survival. Seventy-one of the 158 tumours were detected by mammographie screening. The screening detected carcinomas with predominantly long DT:s were discovered at an early stage and showed favourable characteristics concerning DNA ploidy and SPF.

    FCM was a rapid and reliable method for DNA analysis with a better prognostic discrimination between euploid and aneuploid groups than SCM (papers II and III).

    SPF, DNA ploidy and histologic grade are significantly correlated to one another but show no strong correlation to the presence of axillary lymph node métastasés. There is also a significant correlation between DT on one hand and DNA ploidy and SPF on the other hand.

    In conclusion the classic prognostic factors are still valuable. DNA ploidy as a single prognostic factor seems to have a relatively low prognostic power and seems to be of limited clinical value. SPF is a highly significant prognostic predictor for breast cancer of low stage, but the clinical value is not defined.

  • 192. Arnold, Melina
    et al.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael
    Kee, Frank
    O'Doherty, Mark George
    Ordóñez-Mena, José Manuel
    Wilsgaard, Tom
    May, Anne Maria
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Hendrik Bas
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Bray, Freddie
    Jenab, Mazda
    Soerjomataram, Isabelle
    Overweight duration in older adults and cancer risk: a study of cohorts in Europe and the United States2016In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 893-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have shown that cancer risk related to overweight and obesity is mediated by time and might be better approximated by using life years lived with excess weight. In this study we aimed to assess the impact of overweight duration and intensity in older adults on the risk of developing different forms of cancer. Study participants from seven European and one US cohort study with two or more weight assessments during follow-up were included (n = 329,576). Trajectories of body mass index (BMI) across ages were estimated using a quadratic growth model; overweight duration (BMI ≥ 25) and cumulative weighted overweight years were calculated. In multivariate Cox models and random effects analyses, a longer duration of overweight was significantly associated with the incidence of obesity-related cancer [overall hazard ratio (HR) per 10-year increment: 1.36; 95 % CI 1.12-1.60], but also increased the risk of postmenopausal breast and colorectal cancer. Additionally accounting for the degree of overweight further increased the risk of obesity-related cancer. Risks associated with a longer overweight duration were higher in men than in women and were attenuated by smoking. For postmenopausal breast cancer, increased risks were confined to women who never used hormone therapy. Overall, 8.4 % of all obesity-related cancers could be attributed to overweight at any age. These findings provide further insights into the role of overweight duration in the etiology of cancer and indicate that weight control is relevant at all ages. This knowledge is vital for the development of effective and targeted cancer prevention strategies.

  • 193.
    Arora, Manish
    et al.
    Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA; Cellular and Molecular Pathology Research Unit, Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Population Oral Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Weuve, Jennifer
    Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
    Fall, Katja
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mucci, Lorelei A.
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA; Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
    An exploration of shared genetic risk factors between periodontal disease and cancers: a prospective co-twin study2010In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 171, no 2, p. 253-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biologic mechanisms underlying associations of periodontal disease with cancers remain unknown. The authors propose that both conditions share common genetic risk factors. They analyzed associations between baseline periodontal disease, measured by questionnaire-recorded tooth mobility, and incident cancers, identified by linkage with national registries, between 1963 and 2004 in 15,333 Swedish twins. The authors used co-twin analyses to control for familial factors and undertook analyses restricted to monozygotic twins to further control for confounding by genetic factors. They observed 4,361 cancer cases over 548,913 person-years. After adjustment for covariates, baseline periodontal disease was associated with increased risk of several cancers ranging from 15% for total cancer (proportional hazard ratio (HR) = 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 1.32) to 120% for corpus uterine cancer (HR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.16, 4.18). Periodontal disease was also associated with increased risk of colorectal (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.13, 2.33), pancreatic (HR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.14, 3.75), and prostate (HR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.07) cancers. In co-twin analyses, dizygotic twins with baseline periodontal disease showed a 50% increase in total cancer risk (HR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.17), but in monozygotic twins this association was markedly attenuated (HR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.63, 1.81). Similar patterns emerged for digestive tract cancers, suggesting that shared genetic risk factors may partially explain associations between periodontal disease and cancers.

  • 194. Arroyo, Vidal M.
    et al.
    Lupo, Philip J.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University.
    Styring, Emelie
    Zaikova, Olga
    Papworth, Karin
    Umeå University.
    Soft tissue sarcoma clinical presentation, treatment, and survival in adolescents and young adults compared to older adults: A report from the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group2018In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 78, no 13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Five-year survival rates for those diagnosed with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) have improved significantly among children and older adults (OAs), but these same trends have not been observed for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). While these disparities could be due to differences in biology or treatment, few studies have evaluated STS occurrence and outcome in AYAs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate differences between adolescents and young adults (AYAs) and older adults (OAs) diagnosed with STS by stratifying analysis by: (1) clinical presentation; (2) treatment; and (3) survival.

    Methods: Data were obtained from the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) Central Register, which includes information on 5,747 patients from Sweden and Norway, diagnosed with a STS during 1986-2011. Variables included: age at diagnosis, metastasis at diagnosis, tumor size, histology, adjuvant treatment, date of death or last follow-up. AYAs were defined as those diagnosed ages 15-39 years. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed using t-tests. Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were compared between AYAs and OAs using Kaplan-Meier estimates and log-rank tests. All analyses were conducted overall and by common STS subtypes.

    Results: Overall and by STS subtype, there were significant differences between AYAs and OAs on presentation, treatment, and survival. The distribution of STS subtypes was different between OAs and AYAs. For example, OAs were more likely to be diagnosed with leiomyosarcoma compared to AYAs (18% vs. 10%, p<0.001), whereas AYAs were more likely to be diagnosed with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST, 9% vs. 4%, p<0.001). OAs were also more likely to have larger tumors (>5 cm, 67% vs. 52%, p<0.001) and higher malignancy grade (grade IV, 45% vs. 31%, p<0.001). Interestingly, AYAs were more likely to be treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy compared to OAs (12% vs. 5%, p<0.001). There were also differences within STS subtypes. For example, OAs were more likely to have metastasis compared to AYAs if diagnosed with leiomyosarcoma (18% vs. 10%, p=0.04). In most scenarios AYAs had significantly better OS and RFS compared to OAs, other than for MPNST (OS: p=0.19, RFS: p=0.28).

    Conclusions: There were several differences between AYAs and OAs on STS presentation, treatment, and outcome. AYAs not only had differences in terms of STS subtypes but also tumor size and malignancy grade within subtypes. Additional work is needed to characterize the biology underlying these differences, which will inform future treatment strategies for both AYAs and OAs with STS.

  • 195.
    Arslan, Alan A
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine.
    Clendenen, Tess V
    Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine.
    Koenig, Karen L
    Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Enquist, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Ågren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Sjodin, Hubert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine.
    Shore, Roy E
    Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine.
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Circulating vitamin d and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer2009In: Journal of oncology, ISSN 1687-8450, Vol. 2009, p. 672492-672500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a nested case-control study within two prospective cohorts, the New York University Women's Health Study and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study, to examine the association between prediagnostic circulating levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) and the risk of subsequent invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). The 25(OH)D levels were measured in serum or plasma from 170 incident cases of EOC and 373 matched controls. Overall, circulating 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the risk of EOC in combined cohort analysis: adjusted OR for the top tertile versus the reference tertile, 1.09 (95% CI, 0.59-2.01). In addition, there was no evidence of an interaction effect between VDR SNP genotype or haplotype and circulating 25(OH)D levels in relation to ovarian cancer risk, although more complex gene-environment interactions may exist.

  • 196. Arslan, Alan A.
    et al.
    Koenig, Karen L.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Shore, Roy E.
    Chen, Yu
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Circulating Estrogen Metabolites and Risk of Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women2014In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1290-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has been hypothesized that predominance of the 2-hydroxylation estrogen metabolism pathway over the 16 alpha-hydroxylation pathway may be inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Methods: We examined the associations of invasive breast cancer risk with circulating 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1), 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone (16 alpha-OHE1), and the 2-OHE1: 16 alpha-OHE1 ratio in a case-control study of postmenopausal women nested within two prospective cohorts: the New York University Women's Health Study (NYUWHS) and the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort (NSMSC), with adjustment for circulating levels of estrone, and additional analyses by tumor estrogen receptor (ER) status. Levels of 2-OHE1 and 16 alpha-OHE1 were measured using ESTRAMET 2/16 assay in stored serum or plasma samples from 499 incident breast cancer cases and 499 controls, who were matched on cohort, age, and date of blood donation. Results: Overall, no significant associations were observed between breast cancer risk and circulating levels of 2-OHE1, 16 alpha-OHE1, or their ratio in either cohort and in combined analyses. For 2-OHE1, there was evidence of heterogeneity by ER status in models adjusting for estrone (P <= 0.03). We observed a protective association of 2-OHE1 with ER + breast cancer [multivariate-adjusted OR for a doubling of 2-OHE1, 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.94; P = 0.02)]. Conclusions: In this study, higher levels of 2-OHE1 were associated with reduced risk of ER + breast cancer in postmenopausal women after adjustment for circulating estrone. Impact: These results suggest that taking into account the levels of parent estrogens and ER status is important in studies of estrogen metabolites and breast cancer.

  • 197.
    Arthur, R.
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England;Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA.
    Williams, R.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Orphan Biovitrum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lambe, M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hammar, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;AstraZeneca, Global Med Dev Med Evidence & Observat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Walldius, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Robinsson, D.
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Jungner, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;CALAB Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Van Hemelrijck, M.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Serum inflammatory markers in relation to prostate cancer severity and death in the Swedish AMORIS study2018In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 11, p. 2254-2262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation is a well-documented driver of cancer development and progression. However, little is known about its role in prostate carcinogenesis. Thus, we examined the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin, albumin and white blood cells (WBC) with prostate cancer (PCa) severity (defined by PCa risk category and clinicopathological characteristics) and progression (defined by PCa death). We selected 8,471 Swedish men with newly diagnosed PCa who had exposure measurements taken approximately 14 years prior to diagnosis. We calculated odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the associations between the inflammatory markers and PCa severity using logistic regression, while Cox proportional hazard regression was used for the associations with overall and PCa death. Serum CRP levels were associated with increased odds of high risk and metastatic PCa, and high PSA levels (20 mu g/L) (OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.06-1.56, 1.32; 1.05-1.65 and 1.51; 1.26-1.81, respectively). Similarly, higher haptoglobin levels were associated with increased odds of metastatic PCa, high PSA level and possibly high grade PCa (1.38; 1.10-1.74, 1.50; 1.17-1.93 and 1.25; 1.00-1.56, respectively). Albumin was positively associated with Gleason 4+3 tumour (1.38; 1.02-1.86) and overall death (HRunit increase in log: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.11-2.30), but inversely associated with high risk PCa and high PSA levels (20 mu g/L) (0.71; 0.56-0.89 and 0.72; 0.5 9-0.90). WBC was associated with increased odds of T3-T4 PCa. Except for albumin, none of these markers were associated with PCa death or overall death. Systemic inflammation as early as 14 years prior to diagnosis may influence prostate cancer severity. What's new? High levels of C-reactive protein can presage a particularly malignant prostate cancer, new results show. Cancers certainly arise in the wake of chronic inflammation, but it's not known exactly how markers of inflammation initiate prostate cancer. Here, the authors show that systemic inflammation can worsen the severity of the cancer, even if it occurred long before the cancer's onset. High levels of CRP and haptoglobin, they found, were associated with prostate cancer with high PSA and metastasis. The question remains whether inflammation pushes cancer cells into a more malignant mode, or selects for the more dangerous cells early on.

  • 198. Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Moller, Henrik
    Garmo, Hans
    Holmberg, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Hakan
    Lambe, Mats
    Hammar, Niklas
    Walldius, Göran
    Robinson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Association between baseline serum glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol, and prostate cancer risk categories2016In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1307-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle-related risk factors such as hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia have been associated with several cancers. However, studies exploring their link with prostate cancer (PCa) clinicopathological characteristics are sparse and inconclusive. Here, we investigated the associations between serum metabolic markers and PCa clinicopathological characteristics. The study comprised 14,294 men from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) cohort who were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2011. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the relation between glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol and PCa risk categories, PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage. Mean age at time of PCa diagnosis was 69 years. Men with glucose levels >6.9 mmol/L tend to have PSA<4 mu g/L, while those with glucose levels of 5.6-6.9 mmol/L had a greater odds of PSA>20 mu g/L compared to PSA 4.0-9.9 mu g/L. Hypertriglyceridemia was also positively associated with PSA>20 mu g/L. Hyperglycemic men had a greater odds of intermediate-and high-grade PCa and advanced stage or metastatic PCa. Similarly, hypertriglyceridemia was positively associated with high-grade PCa. There was also a trend toward an increased odds of intermediate risk localized PCa and advanced stage PCa among men with hypertriglyceridemia. Total cholesterol did not have any statistically significant association with any of the outcomes studied. Our findings suggest that high serum levels of glucose and triglycerides may influence PCa aggressiveness and severity. Further investigation on the role of markers of glucose and lipid metabolism in influencing PCa aggressiveness and severity is needed as this may help define important targets for intervention.

  • 199.
    Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England..
    Møller, Henrik
    Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England..
    Garmo, Hans
    Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England.;Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England.;Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Departments of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University.
    Malmstrom, Hakan
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lambe, Mats
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hammar, Niklas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;AstraZeneca Sverige, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Walldius, Goran
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Dept Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Robinson, David
    Departments of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University.
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;CALAB Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Association between baseline serum glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol, and prostate cancer risk categories2016In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1307-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle-related risk factors such as hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia have been associated with several cancers. However, studies exploring their link with prostate cancer (PCa) clinicopathological characteristics are sparse and inconclusive. Here, we investigated the associations between serum metabolic markers and PCa clinicopathological characteristics. The study comprised 14,294 men from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) cohort who were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2011. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the relation between glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol and PCa risk categories, PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage. Mean age at time of PCa diagnosis was 69 years. Men with glucose levels >6.9 mmol/L tend to have PSA<4 mu g/L, while those with glucose levels of 5.6-6.9 mmol/L had a greater odds of PSA>20 mu g/L compared to PSA 4.0-9.9 mu g/L. Hypertriglyceridemia was also positively associated with PSA>20 mu g/L. Hyperglycemic men had a greater odds of intermediate-and high-grade PCa and advanced stage or metastatic PCa. Similarly, hypertriglyceridemia was positively associated with high-grade PCa. There was also a trend toward an increased odds of intermediate risk localized PCa and advanced stage PCa among men with hypertriglyceridemia. Total cholesterol did not have any statistically significant association with any of the outcomes studied. Our findings suggest that high serum levels of glucose and triglycerides may influence PCa aggressiveness and severity. Further investigation on the role of markers of glucose and lipid metabolism in influencing PCa aggressiveness and severity is needed as this may help define important targets for intervention.

  • 200. Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Møller, Henrik
    Garmo, Hans
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Malmström, Håkan
    Lambe, Mats
    Hammar, Niklas
    Walldius, Göran
    Robinson, David
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Serum glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol in relation to prostate cancer death in the Swedish AMORIS study2019In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 195-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Lifestyle-related conditions such as obesity are associated with prostate cancer progression, but the associations with hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are unclear. This study, therefore, aims to examine the association of glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol with prostate cancer death. Methods: From the Swedish AMORIS cohort, we selected 14,150 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1996 and 2011 who had prediagnostic measurements of serum glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regressionmodels were used to determine the hazard ratios for death in relation to the aforementioned metabolic markers. Results: Using clinical cut-off points, a non-significant positive association was observed between glucose and prostate cancer death. When compared to those with glucose in the lowest quartile, those in the highest quartile had greater risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.19; 95% CI 1.02-1.39). However, neither total cholesterol nor triglycerides were associated with prostate cancer death. Glucose and triglycerides were positively associated with overall, cardiovascular, and other deaths. Hypercholesterolemia was only associated with risk of CVD death. Conclusion: Our results suggest that glucose levels may influence prostate cancer survival, but further studies using repeated measurements are needed to further elucidate how glucose levels may influence prostate cancer progression.

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