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  • 151.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo, Printed electronics.
    Electrolyte-gated transistors used in printed organic electronic applications2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Integration of printed electronic components into versatile systems on flexible substrates2013In: Innovative Printed Smart Objects (IPSO), invited oral presentation, Gardanne, France, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A technology platform based on electrochemical transistors and electrochromic displays printed from organic materials on flexible substrates is presented. The devices are manufactured by using standard printing tools and operated below 3 V, and the device manufacturing is further simplified by that only a small set of materials is employed. Examples of printed electronic systems will be presented, such as active and passive matrix addressed displays, touchless sensor interfaces, secure user authentication applications and a novel approach to obtain reconfigurable systems utilizing self-adhesive active materials.

  • 153.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Integration of printed electronic components into versatile systems on flexible substrates2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo, Printed electronics.
    Roll to roll printable technology platform consisting of electrolyte-based components2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo, Printed electronics.
    Kawahara, J
    Roll to roll printable technology platform consisting of electrolyte-based components2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 156.
    Andersson, Hanna
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Vattenhaltmätning i konfektyr och sylt med Karl Fishermetoden2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract (in English)

    The task for the diploma work was to develop methods for measuring of moisture content by the Karl Fischer method, in jam, jelly sweets, and fudge.

    The start premises was a for the company whole new equipment, which should be started up. Then programs should be developed for different kind of samples.

    In the task it was as well included to develop methods for dissolving the different kind of samples, since the Karl Fischer method demands completely dissolved sample material.

  • 157.
    Andersson, J
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTHB.
    Ageing of Flexographic Printed Model Cellulose Surfaces and Determination of the Mechanisms Behind Ageing2009In: Pulp & paper Canada, ISSN 0316-4004, Vol. 110, no 7-8, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of storage conditions on the ink detachment efficiency of

    water-based flexographic ink printed onto model cellulose surfaces and

    handsheets was investigated. It was shown that UV light, elevated

    temperatures, longer storage time, increasing surface roughness, and

    increasing surface hydrophobicity all had a negative effect on ink

    detachment. It was also shown that the ink's chemical and structural

    characteristics changed when stored at elevated temperatures. No

    chemical or structural changes could be observed for the ink when

    stored under UV light.

     

  • 158.
    Andersson, Jim
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Umeki, Kentaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Furusjö, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kirtania, Kawnish
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Multiscale Reactor Network Simulation of an Entrained Flow Biomass Gasifier: Model Description and Validation2017In: Energy Technology, ISSN 2194-4288, Vol. 5, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the development of a multiscale equivalent reactor network model for pressurized entrained flow biomass gasification to quantify the effect of operational parameters on the gasification process, including carbon conversion, cold gas efficiency, and syngas methane content. The model, implemented in the commercial software Aspen Plus, includes chemical kinetics as well as heat and mass transfer. Characteristic aspects of the model are the multiscale effect caused by the combination of transport phenomena at particle scale during heating, pyrolysis, and char burnout, as well as the effect of macroscopic gas flow, including gas recirculation. A validation using experimental data from a pilot-scale process shows that the model can provide accurate estimations of carbon conversion, concentrations of main syngas components, and cold gas efficiency over a wide range of oxygen-to-biomass ratios and reactor loads. The syngas methane content was most difficult to estimate accurately owing to the unavailability of accurate kinetic parameters for steam methane reforming.

  • 159.
    Andersson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Lifetime estimation of lithium-ion batteries for stationary energy storage system2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the continuing transition to renewable inherently intermittent energy sources like solar- and wind power, electrical energy storage will become progressively more important to manage energy production and demand. A key technology in this area is Li-ion batteries. To operate these batteries efficiently, there is a need for monitoring of the current battery state, including parameters such as state of charge and state of health, to ensure that adequate safety and performance is maintained. Furthermore, such monitoring is a step towards the possibility of the optimization of battery usage such as to maximize battery lifetime and/or return on investment. Unfortunately, possible online measurements during actual operation of a lithium-ion battery are typically limited to current, voltage and possibly temperature, meaning that direct measurement of battery status is not feasible. To overcome this, battery modeling and various regression methods may be used. Several of the most common regression algorithms suggested for estimation of battery state of charge and state of health are based on Kalman filtering. While these methods have shown great promise, there currently exist no thorough analysis of the impact of so-called filter tuning on the effectiveness of these algorithms in Li-ion battery monitoring applications, particularly for state of health estimation. In addition, the effects of only adjusting the cell capacity model parameter for aging effects, a relatively common approach in the literature, on overall state of health estimation accuracy is also in need of investigation.

    In this work, two different Kalman filtering methods intended for state of charge estimation: the extended Kalman filter and the extended adaptive Kalman filter, as well as three intended for state of health estimation: the dual extended Kalman filer, the enhanced state vector extended Kalman filer, and the single weight dual extended Kalman filer, are compared from accuracy, performance, filter tuning and practical usability standpoints. All algorithms were used with the same simple one resistor-capacitor equivalent circuit battery model. The Li-ion battery data used for battery model development and simulations of filtering algorithm performance was the “Randomized Battery Usage Data Set” obtained from the NASA Prognostics Center of Excellence. 

    It is found that both state of charge estimators perform similarly in terms of accuracy of state of charge estimation with regards to reference values, easily outperforming the common Coulomb counting approach in terms of precision, robustness and flexibility. The adaptive filter, while computationally more demanding, required less tuning of filter parameters relative to the extended Kalman filter to achieve comparable performance and might therefore be advantageous from a robustness and usability perspective. Amongst the state of health estimators, the enhanced state vector approach was found to be most robust to initialization and was also least taxing computationally. The single weight filter could be made to achieve comparable results with careful, if time consuming, filter tuning. The full dual extended Kalman filter has the advantage of estimating not only the cell capacity but also the internal resistance parameters. This comes at the price of slow performance and time consuming filter tuning, involving 17 parameters. It is however shown that long-term state of health estimation is superior using this approach, likely due to the online adjustment of internal resistance parameters. This allows the dual extended Kalman filter to accurately estimate the SoH over a full test representing more than a full conventional battery lifetime. The viability of only adjusting the capacity in online monitoring approaches therefore appears questionable. Overall the importance of filter tuning is found to be substantial, especially for cases of very uncertain starting battery states and characteristics.

  • 160.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Almqvist, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Minami, Ichiro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Semi-deterministic chemo-mechanical model of boundary lubrication2012In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 156, p. 343-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model for tribofilm growth is developed. The model is used in combination with numerical contact mechanics tools to enable evaluation of the combined effects of chemistry and contact mechanics. The model is tuned with experimental data and is thereafter applied to rough surfaces. The growth of the tribofilm is evaluated for 3 different contact cases and short-term tribofilm growth behaviour is analyzed. The results show how tribofilms grow in patches. The model is expected to be used as a tool for analysis of the interaction between rough surfaces.

  • 161.
    Andersson, Kerstin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lignin in wastewater generated by mechalical pulping: Chemical characterisation and removal by adsorption2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Andersson, Kerstin I
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Eriksson, Marie
    SCA R&D Ctr, SE-85121 Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Removal of Lignin from Wastewater Generated by Mechanical Pulping Using Activated Charcoal and Fly Ash: Adsorption Isotherms and Thermodynamics2011In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 50, no 13, p. 7722-7732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin-related material found in wastewater from thermomechanical pulping resists conventional biological treatment, entailing the use of advanced removal methods. In this work, the use of adsorption for removing lignin-related material was investigated. Activated charcoal and fly ash were used to study the adsorption behavior of lignin and to determine the adsorption capacities of these two adsorbents. Experimental data were fitted to various isotherm equations to find the best description of the sorption systems, and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Fly ash exhibited good sorption properties, although its sorption capacity was inferior to that of activated charcoal. Both the Freundlich and Langmuir equations provided reasonable models of the sorption processes, and the thermodynamic parameters indicated that sorption onto activated charcoal is endothermic, whereas sorption onto fly ash appears to be exothermic. Fly ash is a low-cost material that is often available on-site and offers an interesting alternative to high-cost advanced wastewater treatment systems for removing recalcitrant organic materials.

  • 163.
    Andersson, Kerstin I.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Eriksson, Marie
    SCA R&D Ctr, SE-85121 Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Removal of Lignin from Wastewater Generated by Mechanical Pulping Using Activated Charcoal and Fly Ash: Adsorption Kinetics2011In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 50, no 13, p. 7733-7739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possible application of adsorption for the removal of lignin-related material found in wastewater generated by mechanical pulping was investigated. Activated charcoal and fly ash were used as adsorbents in batch experiments. The lignin-related material exhibited properties well-suited for adsorption onto both adsorbents, although the sorption capacity of activated charcoal exceeds that of fly ash. The experimental data were fitted to pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order rate kinetic expressions, and an attempt was made to find the rate-limiting step involved in the adsorption processes. The results showed that lignin adsorption onto both activated charcoal and fly ash follows pseudo-second-order rate kinetics and that both boundary-layer diffusion and intraparticle diffusion are likely involved in the rate-limiting mechanisms. Adsorption is an interesting option in advanced wastewater treatment, and fly ash appears to be a suitable low-cost adsorbent for recalcitrant organic pollutants.

  • 164.
    Andersson, Kerstin I
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    SCA R and D Centre, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Lignin removal from wastewater by adsorption2009In: Proceedings - 2009 International Mechanical Pulping Conference, IMPC 2009, 2009, p. 280-285Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin contributes to residual COD in wastewater after biological treatment. Available methods for removal of recalcitrant material like lignin, e.g. chemical oxidation and coagulation, are associated with heavy operational expenses. Stringent discharge requirements demand new cost-effective methods for removal of recalcitrant COD. Adsorption is an important mechanism for lignin removal in biological wastewater treatment. A study of lignin, using activated carbon as a model adsorbent, was performed to learn more about the adsorption behaviour of lignin. At the adsorbent dose 4 g/L and an initial lignin concentration of 0.5 g/L, 77% of the lignin was removed after six hours. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo second-order rate expression and no temperature dependency could be observed in the temperature range studied.

     

     

  • 165.
    Andersson Krohn, Robert
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Biomethane via Woodroll® - Investigation of Revenues & Profitability Analysis2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Woodroll® is a gasification technology developed by Cortus that produces synthetic gas (syngas) from biomass. Syngas can be used in several different applications. One interesting option is to convert it further into biomethane, which can be used as automotive fuel or replace natural gas in gas grids. The revenues and profitability of biomethane production is heavily dependent on policy instruments and support schemes. These subsidies can be either direct, where the producer receives a feed-in tariff for biomethane production, or indirect, where consumption rather than production is stimulated.

    This work has investigated which revenues that can be expected from biomethane production via Woodrooll® in Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany, the UK, France and Italy, both in terms of amounts and risks. A profitability analysis have also been carried out to preliminary compare the returns in the different countries, where two different scenarios for different revenues have been analyzed for two different feedstock prices.

    The results showed that the Netherlands and Italy provides the potentially highest revenues. However, there are uncertainty factors associated with all cases. Sweden and Germany offers indirect support and negative market trends. The Netherlands and the UK are the only options that provide a feed-in tariff for biomethane production via gasification. In the Netherlands the tariff can be secured before making investment decision but is only disbursed for 12 years. The UK offers a fixed feed-in tariff for 20 years but the tariff is secured first after plant start-up and the tariff may be reduced on a quarterly basis. In fact, the tariff has been reduced with 40 % over the last 24 months, but there are discussions on introducing a separate tariff for gasification. Italy has the support schemes that potentially offer the highest revenues, but gasification is currently not eligible for support. The latter also holds for France, which may be an interesting case in the future.

    If risk is to be minimized, Cortus may either focus on the Netherlands or await the discussions in the UK and France on introducing a gasification tariff. The work on standardization of biomethane use should also be followed since Italy offers the potentially highest return of the investigated countries. It is also recommended to look further for other cases. The best-case scenario for the risk averse is the one that provides a fixed tariff for 20 years and in which the tariff can be secured before an investment decision is taken.

  • 166.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Stocklassa, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Klintberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Control Systems For Gas-Expanded Liquids In Microreactors2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Andersson, Mike
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Oulu, Finland, SenSiC AB, Kista, Sweden .
    Bastuck, Manuel
    Saarland University, Lab for Measurement Technology, Germany.
    Huotari, Joni
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Lappalainen, Jyrki
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Schuetze, Andreas
    Saarland University, Germany.
    Puglisi, Donatella
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    SiC-FET sensors for selective and quantitative detection of VOCs down to ppb level2016In: Procedia Engineering, ISSN 1877-7058, E-ISSN 1877-7058, Vol. 168, p. 216-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increased interest in development of cheap, simple means for indoor air quality monitoring, and specifically in relation to certain well-known pollutant substances with adverse health effects even at very low concentrations, such as different Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), this contribution aims at providing an overview of the development status of the silicon carbide field effect transistor (SiC FET) based sensor platform for ppb level detection of VOCs. Optimizing the transducer design, the gas-sensitive material(s) composition, structure and processing, its mode of operation - applying temperature cycled operation in conjunction with multivariate data evaluation - and long-term performance it has been possible to demonstrate promising resultsregarding the sensor technology’s ability to achieve both single-digit ppb sensitivity towards e.g. naphthalene as well as selective detection of individual substances in a mixture of different VOCs.

  • 168. Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Johansson, Kristina
    Ljungqvist, Carl-Henrik
    Thuvander, Fredrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Paper Surface Centre. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
    Determining the strain to failure for constrained pulp fibres by means of single-fibre2002In: Appita Journal, Vol. vol 55 no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 169. Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Johansson, Kristina
    Ljungqvist, Carl-Henrik
    Thuvander, Fredrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Paper Surface Centre. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
    Determining the strain to failure for constrained pulp fibres by means of single-fibre fragmentation2002In: Appita Journal 55(2002)3, 224-229Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    BTG Process Solutions, Sweden.
    Wilke, Caroline
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. BTG Process Solutions, Sweden.
    Akhlesh, Mathur
    BTG Process Solutions, Singapore.
    Smith, Dan
    BTG Process Solutions, USA.
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Measurement of Dissolved Lignin, and its Impact in Fiberline Unit Operations2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    BTG Instruments.
    Wilke, Caroline
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. BTG Instruments.
    Biazzo, Tom
    BTG Americas Inc.
    Van Fleet, Rick
    BTG Americas Inc..
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Beder-Miller, Sandra
    BTG Americas Inc..
    Is Conductivity the Best Measurement of Bleach Plant Carryover?2015In: Pulp & paper Canada, ISSN 0316-4004, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 172. Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    Wilson, David
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    An improved kinetic model structure for softwood kraft cooking2003In: Nordic Pulp and Paper Research Journal, Vol. vol 18 no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 173. Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    Wilson, David
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Model based kraft cooking optimisation2003In: Nordic Pulp and Paper Research Journal, Vol. vol 18 no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 174. Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    Wilson, David
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Using validated continuous kraft digester models for profile optimisation2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 175. Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    Wilson, David
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Validating continuous kraft digester kinetic models with online NIR measurements2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 176. Andersson, Niclas
    et al.
    Wilson, David
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Lindström, Tomas
    Organic matter content in black liquor inside and outside chips during kraft cooking2001In: Paperi ja Puu, Vol. vol 83 no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Andersson, Rasmus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Evaluation of two hydrocyclone designs for pulp fractionation2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The process conditions and fractionation efficiency of two hydrocyclone designs, a novel and a conventional conical design, were evaluated. The novel design comprised a modified inlet section, where the pulp suspension had to pass a narrow ring-shaped opening, and a very compact fractionation zone. The influence of feed concentration and fine fraction mass ratio was studied. The trials were performed with never-dried, unrefined bleached chemical softwood pulp. Fractionation efficiency was evaluated in terms of change of surface roughness of handsheets made out of the fractions and the feed pulp respectively.

    The fractionation efficiency increased considerably with decreasing fine fraction mass ratio, especially at higher feed concentrations. This finding prompted a hypothesis on the existence of a radial gradient in the composition of the suspension inside the novel hydrocyclone. Using the novel hydrocyclone in a feed-forward fractionation system would therefore prove to be more favourable as a larger total fine fraction of better properties can be obtained. A three-stage feed-forward fractionation system was evaluated in laboratory scale. Here, it was indeed possible to extract fine fractions with improved surface properties in each of the three consecutive stages. All three fine fractions had about the same surface roughness.

    The fractionation performance of the novel design was benchmarked against that of a conventional, best available technology (BAT) design. In terms of fractionation efficiency, the BAT design performed better. However, the fractions produced with the novel hydrocyclone had a much smaller difference in concentration, implying a much less pronounced enrichment of fines in the fine fraction. It is unclear, to what extent the lower share of latewood fibres and the increased fines content, respectively, contributed to the improved surface roughness of the fine fractions. However, it is clear that the lower enrichment of fines in the novel hydrocyclone makes it easier to install it in industrial applications without a need for auxiliary equipment to redistribute large water flows.

     

  • 178.
    Andersson, Richard L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Mallon, Peter E.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Olsson, Richard T.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Micromechanics of toughness improved electrospun PMMA fibers with embedded cellulose as tested under in-situ microscopyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Andersson, Richard L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mallon, P. E.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Olsson, Richard T.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Micromechanical Tensile Testing of Cellulose-Reinforced Electrospun Fibers Using a Template Transfer Method (TTM)2012In: Journal of polymers and the environment, ISSN 1064-7546, E-ISSN 1572-8900, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 967-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A template transfer method (TTM) and a fiber fixation technique were established for fiber handling and micro tensile stage mounting of aligned and non-aligned electrospun fiber mats. The custom-made template had been precut to be mounted on a variety of collectors, including a rapidly rotating collector used to align the fibers. The method eliminated need for direct physical interaction with the fiber mats before or during the tensile testing since the fiber mats were never directly clamped or removed from the original substrate. By using the TTM it was possible to measure the tensile properties of aligned poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) fiber mats, which showed a 250 % increase in strength and 450 % increase in modulus as compared to a non-aligned system. The method was further evaluated for aligned PMMA fibers reinforced with cellulose (4 wt%) prepared as enzymatically derived nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC). These fibers showed an additional increase of 30 % in both tensile strength and modulus, resulting in a toughness increase of 25 %. The fracture interfaces of the PMMA-NFC fibers showed a low amount of NFC pull-outs, indicating favorable phase compatibility. The presented fiber handling technique is universal and may be applied where conservative estimates of mechanical properties need to be assessed for very thin fibers.

  • 180.
    Andersson, Richard L.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Micromechanical, Antimicrobial and Filtration Properties of Electrospun Fiber Mats2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Andersson, Robert
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
    Catalytic conversion of syngas to higher alcohols over MoS2-based catalysts2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present thesis concerns catalytic conversion of syngas (H2+ CO) into a blend of methanol and higher alcohols, an attractive way of producing fuels and chemicals. This route has the potential to reduce the oil dependence in the transport sector and, with the use of biomass for the syngas generation, produce CO2-neutral fuels.

    Alkali promoted MoS2-based catalysts show a high selectivity to higher alcohols, while at the same time being coke resistant, sulfur tolerant and displaying high water-gas shift activity. This makes this type of catalyst especially suitable for being used with syngas derived from biomass or coal which typically has a low H2/CO-ratio.

    This thesis discusses various important aspects of higher alcohol synthesis using MoS2-based catalysts and is a summary of four scientific papers. The first part of the thesis gives an introduction to how syngas can be produced and converted into different fuels and chemicals. It is followed by an overview of higher alcohol synthesis and a description of MoS2-based catalysts. The topic alcohol for use in internal combustion engines ends the first part of the thesis.

    In the second part, the experimental part, the preparation of the MoS2-based catalysts and the characterization of them are handled. After describing the high-pressure alcohol reactor setup, the development of an on-line gas chromatographic system for higher alcohol synthesis with MoS2 catalysts is covered (Paper I). This method makes activity and selectivity studies of higher alcohol synthesis catalysts more accurate and detailed but also faster and easier. Virtually all products are very well separated and the established carbon material balance over the reactor closed well under all tested conditions. The method of trace level sulfur analysis is additionally described.

    Then the effect of operating conditions, space velocity and temperature on product distribution is highlighted (Paper II). It is shown that product selectivity is closely correlated with the CO conversion level and why it is difficult to combine both a high single pass conversion and high alcohol selectivity over this catalyst type. Correlations between formed products and formation pathways are additionally described and discussed. The CO2 pressure in the reactor increases as the CO conversion increases, however, CO2 influence on formation rates and product distribution is to a great extent unclear. By using a CO2-containing syngas feed the effect of CO2 was studied (Paper III).

    An often emphasized asset of MoS2-based catalysts is their sulfur tolerance. However, the use of sulfur-containing feed and/or catalyst potentially can lead to incorporation of unwanted organic sulfur compounds in the product. The last topic in this thesis covers the sulfur compounds produced and how their quantity is changed when the feed syngas contains H2S (Paper IV). The effect on catalyst activity and selectivity in the presence of H2S in the feed is also covered.

  • 182.
    Andersson, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Boutonnet, Magali
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Järås, Sven
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Correlation patterns and effect of syngas conversion level for product selectivity to alcohols and hydrocarbons over molybdenum sulfide based catalysts2012In: Applied Catalysis A: General, ISSN 0926-860X, E-ISSN 1873-3875, Vol. 417, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of the present study was to investigate the effect of the operation conditions, space velocity and temperature, on product distribution for a K-Ni-MoS2 catalyst for mixed alcohol synthesis from syngas. All experiments were performed at 91 bar pressure and constant H-2/CO=1 syngas feed ratio. For comparison, results from a non-promoted MoS2 catalyst are presented. It was found that the CO conversion level for the K-Ni-MoS2 catalyst very much decides the alcohol and hydrocarbon selectivities. Increased CO conversion by means of increased temperature (tested between 330 and 370 degrees C) or decreased space velocity (tested between 2400 and 18,000 ml/(g(cat) h)), both have the same effect on the product distribution with decreased alcohol selectivity and increased hydrocarbon selectivity. Increased CO conversion also leads to a greater long-to-short alcohol chain ratio. This indicates that shorter alcohols are building blocks for longer alcohols and that those alcohols can be converted to hydrocarbons by secondary reactions. At high temperature (370 degrees C) and low space velocity (2400 ml/(g(cat) h)) the selectivity to isobutanol is much greater than previously reported (9%C). The promoted catalyst (K-Ni-MoS2) is also compared to a non-promoted (MoS2) catalyst: the promoted catalyst has quite high alcohol selectivity, while almost only hydrocarbons are produced with the non-promoted catalyst. Another essential difference between the two catalysts is that the paraffin to olefin ratio within the hydrocarbon group is significantly different. For the non-promoted catalyst virtually no olefins are produced, only paraffins, while the promoted catalyst produces approximately equal amounts of C-2-C-6 olefins and paraffins. Indications of olefins being produced by dehydration of alcohols were found. The selectivity to other non-alcohol oxygenates (mostly short esters and aldehydes) is between 5 and 10%C and varies little with space velocity but decreases slightly with increased temperature. Very strong correlation patterns (identical chain growth probability) and identical deviations under certain reaction conditions between aldehyde and alcohol selectivities (for the same carbon chain length) indicate that they derive from the same intermediate. Also olefin selectivity is correlated to alcohol selectivity, but the correlation is not as strong as between aldehydes and alcohols. The selectivity to an ester is correlated to the selectivity to the two corresponding alcohols, in the same way as an ester can be thought of as built from two alcohol chains put together (with some H-2 removed). This means that, e.g. methyl acetate selectivity (C-3) is correlated to the combination of methanol (C-1) and ethanol (C-2) selectivities.

  • 183.
    Andersson, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Influence of metal ions on lignin-based carbon fiber quality2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon fiber is a lightweight, versatile material with many current and potential applications. To be able to expand the market for carbon fiber composites in other areas than special applications the production costs must be reduced. One way of accomplishing this could be to use a less expensive raw material where lignin is a good example as it can be provided at lower cost, is renewable and abundantly available compared to commercially used raw materials today.

    So far, the mechanical properties of lignin-based carbon fibers are inferior relative to commercial carbon fibers. For lignin-based carbon fibers to enter the commercial market more research is necessary to gain knowledge of the conversion of lignin to carbon fiber. The LightFibre project investigates the possibilities to produce carbon fibers based on a mixture of softwood kraft lignin and cellulose. The kraft lignin is isolated from black liquor in the kraft/sulfate process with the LignoBoost process. This master thesis project was conducted within in the LightFibre project and evaluated whether metal ions generally present in kraft lignin had an influence on the final carbon fiber quality in terms of mechanical properties and morphology. The mechanical properties were determined with tensile testing, the morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the relative abundance of studied elements with electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

    The influence of the chosen metal ions was tested by impregnation of dry-jet wet spun prefibers based on 70 wt.% softwood kraft lignin and 30 wt.% dissolving pulp cellulose. The fibers were impregnated in room temperature with solutions containing Na2SO4, K2SO4, MgSO4, FeSO4 and Al2(SO4)3 salts where the cations were the focus in these trials. The concentrations used for impregnation were 0.2 and 1M of the cations.

    The obtained mechanical properties of the carbon fibers of the samples impregnated with different metal ions did not deviate significantly from the reference which had a tensile strength of 870 MPa and tensile modulus of 68 GPa. The analysis of morphology with SEM showed no defects or damage of any of the fibers. Therefore, it was concluded that the impregnated metal ions: K+, Na+, Al3+, Mg2+ and Fe2+ at the obtained levels in the fibers cause no effects on the fibers during the stabilization and carbonization that affects the mechanical performance of final carbon fiber.  The amount of potassium in one of the samples was estimated to 0.1 wt.%.

    From the results of this study it may be suggested that the general recommendation of <0.1 wt.% ash in lignin can be exceeded, for dry-jet wet-spun kraft lignin/cellulose-based carbon fibers.

  • 184.
    Andersson, Sven
    et al.
    SP.
    Bäfver, Linda
    SP.
    Davidsson, Kent
    SP.
    Pettersson, Jens
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Schmidt, Hans
    SP.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Yngvesson, Johan
    SP.
    Skrubberintegrerat vått elfilter, WESP2012Report (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Andrae, Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Numerical Studies of Wall Effects of Laminar Flames2001Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical simulations have been done with the CHEMKINsoftware to study different aspects of wall effects in thecombustion of lean, laminar and premixed flames in anaxisymmetric boundary-layer flow.

    The importance of the chemical wall effects compared to thethermal wall effects caused by the development of the thermaland velocity boundary layer has been investigated in thereaction zone by using different wall boundary conditions, walltemperatures and fuel/air ratios. Surface mechanisms include acatalytic surface (Platinum), a surface that promotesrecombination of active intermediates and a completely inertwall with no species and reactions as the simplest possibleboundary condition.

    When hydrogen is the model fuel, the analysis of the resultsshow that for atmospheric pressure and a wall temperature of600 K, the surface chemistry gives significant wall effects atthe richer combustion case (f=0.5), while the thermal andvelocity boundary layer gives rather small effects. For theleaner combustion case (f=0.1) the thermal and velocityboundary layer gives more significant wall effects, whilesurface chemistry gives less significant wall effects comparedto the other case.

    For methane as model fuel, the thermal and velocity boundarylayer gives significant wall effects at the lower walltemperature (600 K), while surface chemistry gives rather smalleffects. The wall can then be modelled as chemically inert forthe lean mixtures used (f=0.2 and 0.4). For the higher walltemperature (1200 K) the surface chemistry gives significantwall effects.

    For both model fuels, the catalytic wall unexpectedlyretards homogeneous combustion of the fuel more than the wallthat acts like a sink for active intermediates. This is due toproduct inhibition by catalytic combustion. For hydrogen thisoccurs at atmospheric pressure, but for methane only at thehigher wall temperature (1200 K) and the higher pressure (10atm).

    As expected, the overall wall effects (i.e. a lowerconversion) were more pronounced for the leaner fuel-air ratiosand at the lower wall temperatures.

    To estimate a possible discrepancy in flame position as aresult of neglecting the axial diffusion in the boundary layerassumption, calculations have been performed with PREMIX, alsoa part of the CHEMKIN software. With PREMIX, where axialdiffusion is considered, steady, laminar, one-dimensionalpremixed flames can be modelled. Results obtained with the sameinitial conditions as in the boundary layer calculations showthat for the richer mixtures at atmospheric pressure the axialdiffusion generally has a strong impact on the flame position,but in the other cases the axial diffusion may beneglected.

    Keywords:wall effects, laminar premixed flames,platinum surfaces, boundary layer flow

  • 186.
    Andrae, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Björnbom, Pehr
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Wall Effects of Laminar Hydrogen Flames over Platinum and Inert Surfaces2000In: AIChE Journal, ISSN 0001-1541, E-ISSN 1547-5905, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 1454-1460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different aspects of wall effects in the combustion of lean, laminar and stationary hydrogen flames in an axisymmetric boundary-layer flow were studied using numerical simulations with the program CRESLAF. The importance of the chemical wall effects compared to thermal wall effects caused by heat transfer to a cold wall was investigated in the reaction zone by using different combustion systems at atmospheric pressure. Surface mechanisms include a catalytic surface, an inert surface that promotes radical recombinations, and a completely inert wall used as reference was the simplest possible boundary condition. The analysis of the results show that for the richer combustion case ( = 0.5) the surface chemistry gives significant wall effects, while the thermal and velocity boundary layer gives rather small effects. But for the leaner combustion case ( = 0.1) the thermal and velocity boundary layer gives more significant wall effects, while surface chemistry gives less significant wall effects compared to the other case. As expected, the overall wall effects were more pronounced for the leaner combustion case.

  • 187.
    Andrae, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Björnbom, Pehr
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Edsberg, Lennart
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Numerical studies of wall effects with laminar methane flames2002In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 128, no 1-2, p. 165-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wall effects in the combustion of lean methane mixtures have been studied numerically using the CHEMKIN software. To gain a deeper understanding of the flame-wall interaction in lean burn combustion, and in particular the kinetic and thermal effects, we have simulated lean and steady methane/air flames in a boundary layer flow. The gas-phase chemistry is modeled with the GRI mechanism version 1.2. Boundary conditions include an inert wall, a recombination wall and catalytic combustion of methane. Different pressures, wall temperatures and fuel-air ratios are used to address questions such as which part of the wall effects is most important at a given set of conditions. As the results are analyzed it can be seen that the thermal wall effects are more significant at the lower wall temperature (600 K) and the wall can essentially be modeled as chemical inert for the lean mixtures used. At the higher wall temperature (1,200 K), the chemical wall effects become more significant and at the higher pressure (10 atm) the catalytic surface retards homogeneous combustion of methane more than the recombination wall because of product inhibition. This may explain the increased emissions of unburned fuel observed in engine studies, when using catalytic coatings on the cylinder walls. The overall wall effects were more pronounced for the leaner combustion case (phi = 0.2). When the position of the reaction zone obtained from the boundary layer calculations is compared with the results from a one-dimensional premixed flame model, there is a small but significant difference except at the richer combustion case (phi = 0.4) at atmospheric pressure, where the boundary layer model may not predict the flame position for the given initial conditions.

  • 188.
    Andrae, Johan C. G.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Johansson, A.
    Björnbom, Pehr
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Rosen, A.
    OH desorption energies for a palladium catalyst characterised by kinetic modelling and laser-induced fluorescence2004In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 563, no 03-jan, p. 145-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A kinetic model for the H-2/O-2 reaction on a polycrystalline palladium catalyst has been constructed using CHEMKIN in order to understand the coverage-dependent OH desorption energy. Each adsorbed oxygen atom was modelled to cover four I'd surface sites. The yield of OH and the water production were measured with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and microcalorimetry respectively as a function of the relative hydrogen concentration, alpha(H2). The temperature of the catalyst was 1300 K, the total pressure was 13 Pa and the flow was set to 100 SCCM. In fitting the model to the experimental data, the OH desorption energy E-OH(d) was found to have a first-order coverage dependence according to: E-OH(d)(theta) = E-OH(d)(0) - Btheta, where B is a constant set to 92 kJ/mol. The desorption energy at zero coverage E-OH(d)(0) was determined to be 226 kJ/mol. The model could also qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the apparent desorption energy as a function of alpha(H2); therefore it is believed that the coverage could be predicted by the model. The values for E-OH(d)(theta) were calculated as a function of alpha(H2). From the results of a sensitivity analysis and rate of production calculations' there are strong reasons to believe that the main water-forming reaction on Pd at 1300 K is the hydrogen addition reaction, H + OH reversible arrow H2O. Enthalpy diagrams for the water-forming reactions are also presented.

  • 189.
    Andrae, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Reaction Engineering.
    Johansson, David
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Reaction Engineering.
    Björnbom, Pehr
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Reaction Engineering.
    Risberg, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Kalghatgi, Gautam
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Cooxidation in the auto-ignition of primary reference fuels and n-heptane/toluene blends2005In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 140, no 4, p. 267-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auto-ignition of fuel mixtures was investigated both theoretically and experimentally to gain further understanding of the fuel chemistry. A homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine was run under different operating conditions with fuels of different RON and MON and different chemistries. Fuels considered were primary reference fuels and toluene/n-heptane blends. The experiments were modeled with a single-zone adiabatic model together with detailed chemical kinetic models. In the model validation, co-oxidation reactions between the individual fuel components were found to be important in order to predict HCCI experiments, shock-tube ignition delay time data, and ignition delay times in rapid compression machines. The kinetic models with added co-oxidation reactions further predicted that an n-heptane/toluene fuel with the same RON as the corresponding primary reference fuel had higher resistance to auto-ignition in HCCI combustion for lower intake temperatures and higher intake pressures. However, for higher intake temperatures and lower intake pressures the n-heptane/toluene fuel and the PRF fuel had similar combustion phasing.

  • 190.
    Andrae, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Johansson, David
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Bursell, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Fakhrai, Reza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Manrique Carrera, Arturo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    High-pressure catalytic combustion of gasified biomass in a hybrid combustor2005In: Applied Catalysis A: General, ISSN 0926-860X, E-ISSN 1873-3875, Vol. 293, no 1-2, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalytic combustion of synthetic gasified biomass was conducted in a high-pressure facility at pressures ranging from 5 to 16 bars. The catalytic combustor design considered was a hybrid monolith (400 cpsi, diameter 3.5 cm, length 3.6 cm and every other channel coated). The active phase consisted of 1 wt.% Pt/gamma-Al2O3 With wash coat loading of total monolith 15 wt.%. In the interpretation of the experiments, a twodimensional boundary layer model was applied successfully to model a single channel of the monolith. At constant inlet velocity to the monolith the combustion efficiency decreased with increasing pressure. A multi-step surface mechanism predicted that the flux of carbon dioxide and water from the surface increased with pressure. However, as the pressure (i.e. the Reynolds number) was increased, unreacted gas near the center of the channel penetrated significantly longer into the channel compared to lower pressures. For the conditions studied (lambda = 46, T-in = 218-257 degrees C and residence time similar to 5 ms), conversion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were diffusion limited after ignition, while methane never ignited and was kinetically controlled. According to the kinetic model surface coverage of major species changed from CO, H and CO2 before ignition to O, OH, CO2 and free surface sites after ignition. The model predicted further that for constant mass flow combustion efficiency increased with pressure, and was more pronounced at lower pressures (2.5-10 bar) than at higher pressures (> 10 bar).

  • 191. Andreasson, Bo
    et al.
    Forsström, Jennie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    The porous structure of pulp fibres with different yields and its influence on paper strength2003In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 111-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The porous structure of the interior of papermaking fibres is a well-known important property of the fibres. Changes of this structure will influence tensile and burst strength of paper formed from the fibres and a change in pore size of the pores within the fibre wall is also important for the ability of molecules to diffuse in and out of the fibre wall. Relevant examples of this latter effect are the removal of lignin during cooking and the addition of performance chemicals during papermaking. In this paper, pore sizes and the pore size distribution of unbleached softwood fibres have been studied. A well-characterised fibre material consisting of laboratory cooked spruce and pine pulp of various lignin contents was used. Pore size and pore size distribution were measured by studies of the relaxation behaviour of 2H in fibres saturated with 2H2O. Beside this the total and surface charge of the fibres were also measured together with strength properties of papers from unbeaten fibres. For both pulps, there is a maximum in pore radius at a yield around 46%. Calculations of fibre wall volume from water retention values and yield levels show that there is a discontinuity in pore radius as a function of the fibre wall volume around a yield of 51%. It is suggested that this discontinuity is caused by the breakdown of the hemicellulose/lignin matrix within the fibre wall at this yield level. The strength of the papers formed from the fibres shows a correlation with the surface charge of the fibres. Based on the change in surface charge with yield and the change in total charge with yield, this correlation is suggested to be due to an opening up of the external part of the fibre wall. This stresses the importance of the chemical composition and physical structure of the outer layer of the fibre wall.

  • 192.
    Andreasson, Ulrika
    et al.
    SCA Packaging Research, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Ink release from printed surfaces: new methodology and initial insights to the true mechanisms behind ink detachment2001Report (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Cellulose binders for electric double-layer capacitor electrodes: The influence of cellulose quality on electrical properties2018In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 141, p. 342-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose derivatives are widely used as binders and dispersing agents in different applications. Binders composed of cellulose are an environmentally friendly alternative to oil-based polymer binding agents. Previously, we reported the use of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) as binders in electrodes for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). In addition to good mechanical stability, we demonstrated that CNFs enhanced the electrical performance of the electrodes. However, cellulose fibers can cover a broad range of length scales, and the quality requirements from an electrode perspective have not been thoroughly investigated. To evaluate the influence of fiber quality on electrode properties, we tested seven samples with different fiber dimensions that are based on the same kraft pulp. To capture the length scale from fibers to nanofibrils, we evaluated the performance of the untreated kraft pulp, refined fibers, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and CNFs. Electrodes with kraft pulp or refined fibers showed the lowest electrical resistivity. The specific capacitances of all EDLCs were surprisingly similar, but slightly lower for the EDLC with CNFs. The same electrode sample with CNFs also showed a slightly higher equivalent series resistance (ESR), compared to those of the other EDLCs. Graphite dispersions with MFC showed the best dispersion stability. 

  • 194.
    André, Magnus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    New Methods for the Determination of Sorption Capacities and Sorption-Related Properties of Intact Rock2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 195.
    André, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Malmström, Maria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Neretnieks, Ivar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Determination of sorption properties of intact rock samples: New methods based on electromigration2009In: Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, ISSN 0169-7722, E-ISSN 1873-6009, Vol. 103, no 3-4, p. 71-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new methods for determining sorption coefficients in large rock samples have been developed. The methods use electromigration as a means to speed up the transport process, allowing for fast equilibration between rock sample and tracer solution. An electrical potential gradient acts as a driving force for transport in addition to the concentration gradient and forces the cations through the rock sample towards the cathode. The electrical potential gradient induces both electromigration and electroosmotic flow with a resulting solute transport that is large compared to diffusive fluxes. In one of the methods, the solute is driven through the sample and collected at the cutlet side. In the other, simpler method, the rock sample is equilibrated by circulating the solute through the sample. The equilibration of rock samples, up to 5 cm in length, with an aqueous solution has been accomplished within days to months. Experiments using cesium as a sorbing tracer yield results consistent with considerably more time demanding in-diffusion experiments. These methods give lower distribution coefficients than those obtained using traditional batch experiments with crushed rock. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 196.
    André, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Malmström, Maria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Neretnieks, Ivar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Rapid surface area determination of crystalline rock using impedance spectroscopyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 197.
    André, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Malmström, Maria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Neretnieks, Ivar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Specific surface area determinations on intact drillcores and evaluation of extrapolation methods for rock matrix surfaces2009In: Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, ISSN 0169-7722, E-ISSN 1873-6009, Vol. 110, no 1-2, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel in crystalline bedrock is investigated in several countries. For this storage scenario, the host rock is the third and final barrier for radionuclide migration. Sorption reactions in the crystalline rock matrix have strong retardative effects on the transport of radionuclides. To assess the barrier properties of the host rock it is important to have sorption data representative of the undisturbed host rock conditions. Sorption data is in the majority of reported cases determined using crushed rock. Crushing has been shown to increase a rock samples sorption capacity by creating additional surfaces. There are several problems with such an extrapolation. In studies where this problem is addressed, simple models relating the specific surface area to the particle size are used to extrapolate experimental data to a value representative of the host rock conditions. In this article, we report and compare surface area data of five size fractions of crushed granite and of 100 mm long drillcores as determined by the Brunauer Emmet Teller (BET)-method using N-2-gas. Special sample holders that could hold large specimen were developed for the BET measurements. Surface area data on rock samples as large as the drillcore has not previously been published. An analysis of this data show that the extrapolated value for intact rock obtained from measurements on crushed material was larger than the determined specific surface area of the drillcores, in some cases with more than 1000%. Our results show that the use of data from crushed material and current models to extrapolate specific surface areas for host rock conditions can lead to over estimation interpretations of sorption ability. The shortcomings of the extrapolation model are discussed and possible explanations for the deviation from experimental data are proposed.

  • 198.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    AFM adhesion imaging for the comparison of polyelectrolyte complexes and polyelectrolyte multilayers2012In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 8, no 32, p. 8298-8301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adhesion and topography of dry surfaces treated with polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) and multilayers (PEMs) of PAH/PAA or CPAM/silica nanoparticles were studied using AFM adhesion mapping. PEMs gave higher adhesion than did PECs for the PAH/PAA system, but adhesion did not differ significantly between PEMs and PECs for the CPAM/silica system. The latter system displayed multiple release patterns, interpreted as disentanglements and tentatively ascribed to nanoparticle presence. AFM adhesion mapping is valuable for analysing PEC and PEM. The measurements should, however, be combined with separate force measurements for a more complete picture of the adhesion.

  • 199. Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Polyelectrolyte Complexes for Tailoring of Wood Fibre Surfaces2014In: Polyelectrolyte Complexes In The Dispersed And Solid State II: Application Aspects, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) provides new opportunities for surface engineering of solid particles in aqueous environments to functionalize the solids either for use in interactive products or to tailor their adhesive interactions in the dry and/or wet state. This chapter describes the use of PECs in paper-making applications where the PECs are used for tailoring the surfaces of wood-based fibres. Initially a detailed description of the adsorption process is given, in more general terms, and in this respect both in situ formed and pre-formed complexes are considered. When using in situ formed complexes, which were intentionally formed by the addition of oppositely charged polymers, it was established that the order of addition of the two polyelectrolytes was important, and by adding the polycation first a more extensive fibre flocculation was found. PECs can also form in situ by the interaction between polyelectrolytes added and polyelectrolytes already present in the fibre suspension originating from the wood material, e. g. lignosulphonates or hemicelluloses. In this respect the complexation can be detrimental for process efficiency and/or product quality depending on the charge balance between the components, and when using the PECs for fibre engineering it is not recommended to rely on in situ PEC formation. Instead the PECs should be pre-formed before addition to the fibres. The use of pre-formed PECs in the paper-making process is described as three sub-processes: PEC formation, adsorption onto surfaces, and the effect on the adhesion between surfaces. The addition of PECs, and adsorption to the fibres, prior to formation of the paper network structure has shown to result in a significant increase in joint strength between the fibres and to an increased strength of the paper made from the fibres. The increased joint strength between the fibres is due to both an increased molecular contact area between the fibres and an increased molecular adhesion. The increased paper strength is also a result of an increased number of fibre/fibre contacts/unit volume of the paper network.

  • 200. Annergren, Göran
    et al.
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Sulfate cooking - a commercially dominating and continously improving pulping process2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sulfite cooking was earlier the dominating pulping process but sulfate (kraft) cooking is today the most important process for the production of chemical pulps and high-yield pulps. One important reason for this development of the sulfate process is its ability to efficiently use different wood species, in particular different hardwood species. Another reason is that bleached hardwood sulfate pulps have become a strong competitor to bleached softwood sulfite pulps. The pros and cons of sulfate cooking are discussed in this report and compared with sulfite cooking.

     

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