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  • 151.
    Wang, Zhaohui
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Xu, Chao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tammela, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Zhang, Peng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Conducting Polymer Paper-Based Cathodes for High-Areal-Capacity Lithium–Organic Batteries2015In: Energy Technology, ISSN 2194-4296, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 563-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting polymers have been considered for use as cathode materials in rechargeable lithium‐ion batteries (LIBs) since 1981 but problems with poor cycling stability, rapid self‐discharge, and low energy and power densities have so far limited their applicability. Herein it is shown that nanostructured freestanding conducting polymer composites [e.g., polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PANI)] can be used to circumvent these shortcomings. Freestanding and binder‐free PPy and cellulose‐based composites can straightforwardly be used as versatile organic cathode materials for LIBs. The composite, reinforced with chopped carbon filaments (CCFs), exhibited a large active mass loading of approximately 10 mg cm−2, an areal capacity of 1.0 mAh cm−2 (corresponding to 102 mAh g−1), and stable cycling. With an active mass loading of 4.4 mg cm−2, a capacity of 0.22 mAh cm−2 (corresponding to 58 mAh g−1) was found for current densities of 5 A g−1 yielding discharge times of approximately 40 seconds, and a capacity retention of 91 % over 100 cycles was obtained at 0.2 A g−1. The present method constitutes a straightforward approach for the manufacturing of high‐performance freestanding electroactive conducting‐polymer‐based paper‐like electrodes for use in inexpensive and sustainable, high‐performance organic LIBs.

  • 152.
    Wikberg, J. Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Dahbi, M.
    ECME, LP2E2M, FST Marrakech, University Cadi Ayyad.
    Saadoune, I.
    ECME, LP2E2M, FST Marrakech, University Cadi Ayyad.
    Gustafsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Dimensionality crossover and frustrated spin dynamics on a triangular lattice2010In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 81, no 22, p. 224411-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigations of the magnetic behavior of the layered oxide, LiNi0.65Co0.25Mn0.10O2, through ac and time-dependent susceptibility, dc linear and nonlinear susceptibility as well as neutron-diffraction measurements are presented. A ferrimagneticlike spin ordering appears at 119 K with a spontaneous magnetization coexisting with spin frustration in two dimensions (2D). At lower temperature, a cluster-glass transition is found at 17.4 K indicating a transformation to a completely frustrated state in three dimensions (3D). A dimensionality crossover with temperature, from 2D to 3D, in a magnetically frustrated system has been demonstrated. The observed magnetic behavior is believed to originate from a percolating system of spin clusters defined by disordered and frustrated exchange interactions and the findings conform well with predictions of the percolation cluster model.

  • 153.
    Wikberg, J. Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Dahbi, Mohammed
    ECME, LP2E2M, FST Marrakech, University Cadi Ayyad.
    Saadoune, Ismael
    ECME, LP2E2M, FST Marrakech, University Cadi Ayyad.
    Gustafsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Magnetic order, aging, and spin frustration in a percolating spin system, LiNi0.8Co0.1Mn0.1O22010In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 108, no 8, p. 083909-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structural and magnetic properties of the Li layered oxide, LiNi0.8Co0.1Mn0.1O2, have been studied by means of x-ray diffraction, dc magnetization, ac linear, and nonlinear susceptibility as well as by magnetic aging and temperature cycling experiments. A percolating spin system interacting via antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic superexchange interactions of different strength induce a ferrimagnetic quasilong-range order with a transition temperature Tc ≈ 70 K, a Weiss temperature of −25 K and an effective magnetic moment of 2.07 μB. On cooling below Tc the two-dimensional (2D) triangular lattice built up of edge-sharing metal oxide octahedras first exhibits a 2D spin glass like behavior followed by complete spin frustration in three dimensions below 30 K. The findings correlate well with expectations for a ferrimagnetic reentrant cluster glass system as well as with predictions of the percolating cluster model.

  • 154.
    Xu, Chao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Jeschull, Fabian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brant, William R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Role of LiTDI Additive in LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2/ Graphite Lithium-Ion Batteries at Elevated Temperatures2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 165, no 2, p. A40-A46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The poor thermal stability of conventional LiPF6-based electrolytes is one of the major obstacles for today's lithium-ion batteries. Recently, lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-( trifluoromethyl) imidazolide (LiTDI) has demonstrated to be highly efficient in scavenging moisture from the electrolyte and thereby improving electrolyte stability. In this context, effects of the LiTDI additive on LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC)/graphite cells are evaluated at a temperature of 55 degrees C. With the incorporation of LiTDI, an improved cycling performance of NMC/graphite cells was achieved, and the impedance increase at the NMC/electrolyte interface was significantly mitigated. Furthermore, LiTDI exhibited a profound influence on the interfacial chemistries in the full cell, and LiTDI-derived species were found on the surfaces of both the cathode and the anode. The SEI layer formed on graphite anodes was more homogenous in morphology and consisted of larger amounts of LiF and fewer oxygen-containing species, as compared to graphite in additive-free cells. This study shows that LiTDI is a promising electrolyte additive for NMC/graphite cells operated at elevated temperatures, highlighting that the influence of the LiTDI additive is worth exploring also in other battery chemistries.

  • 155.
    Xu, Chao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lindgren, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Philippe, Bertrand
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Gorgoi, Mihaela
    Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Germany.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Improved Performance of the Silicon Anode for Li-Ion Batteries: Understanding the Surface Modification Mechanism of Fluoroethylene Carbonate as an Effective Electrolyte Additive2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 2591-2599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon as a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries has attracted tremendous attention due to its high theoretical capacity, and fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) was used as an electrolyte additive, which significantly improved the cyclability of silicon-based electrodes in this study. The decomposition of the FEC additive was investigated by synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) giving a chemical composition depth-profile. The reduction products of FEC were found to mainly consist of LiF and -CHF-OCO2-type compounds. Moreover, FEC influenced the lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) decomposition reaction and may have suppressed further salt degradation. The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed from the decomposition of ethylene carbonate (EC) and diethyl carbonate (DEC), without the FEC additive present, covered surface voids and lead to an increase in polarization. However, in the presence of FEC, which degrades at a higher reduction potential than EC and DEC, instantaneously a conformal SEI was formed on the silicon electrode. This stable SEI layer sufficiently limited the emergence of large cracks and preserved the original surface morphology as well as suppressed the additional SEI formation from the other solvent. This study highlights the vital importance of how the chemical composition and morphology of the SEI influence battery performance.

  • 156.
    Xu, Chao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Renault, Stevén
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Ebadi, Mahsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Wang, Zhaohui
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Björklund, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Guyomard, Dominique
    Univ Nantes, CNRS, UMR 6502, Inst Mat Jean Rouxel IMN, F-44322 Nantes 3, France..
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    LiTDI: A Highly Efficient Additive for Electrolyte Stabilization in Lithium-Ion Batteries2017In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 2254-2263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The poor stability of LiPF6-based electrolytes has always been a bottleneck for conventional lithium-ion batteries. The presence of inevitable trace amounts of moisture and the operation of batteries at elevated temperatures are particularly detrimental to electrolyte stability. Here, lithium 2trifluoromethy1-4,5-dicyanoimidazole (LiTDI) is investigated as a moisture-scavenging electrolyte additive and can sufficiently suppress the hydrolysis of LiPF6. With 2 wt % LiTDI, no LiPF6 degradation can be detected after storage for 35 days, even though the water level in the electrolyte is enriched by 2000 ppm. An improved thermal stability is also obtained by employing the LiTDI additive, and the moisture-scavenging mechanism is discussed. The beneficial effects of the LiTDI additive on battery performance are demonstrated by the enhanced capacity retention of both the LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC)/Li and NMC/graphite cells at 55 degrees C. In particular, the increase in cell voltage hysteresis is greatly hindered when LiTDI is presented in the electrolyte. Further development of the LiTDI additive may allow the improvement of elevated-temperature batteries, as well as energy savings by reducing the amount of effort necessary for dehydration of battery components.

  • 157.
    Xu, Chao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Sun, Bing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Torbjorn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hahlin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Interface layer formation in solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries: an XPS study2014In: JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 2, no 20, p. 7256-7264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first characterization studies of the interface layer formed between a Li-ion battery electrode and a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) are presented here. SPEs are well known for their electrochemical stability and excellent safety, and thus considered good alternatives to conventional liquid/gel electrolytes in high-energy density battery devices. This work comprises studies of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation in SPE-based graphite|Li cells using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SPEs based on high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI) salt are studied. Large amounts of LiOH are observed, and the XPS results indicate a correlation with moisture contamination in the SPEs. The water contents are quantitatively determined to be in the range of hundreds of ppm in the pure PEO as well as in the polymer electrolytes, which are prepared by a conventional SPE preparation method using different batches of PEO and at different drying temperatures. Moreover, severe salt degradation is observed at the graphite-SPE interface after the 1st discharge, while the salt is found to be more stable at the Li-SPE interface or when using LiTFSI-based liquid electrolyte equivalents.

1234 151 - 157 of 157
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