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  • 151.
    Stalfors, J
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris, Sabbatsberg, Stockholm.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Månsson, Ingemar
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Roos, Kristian
    Capio Lundby, Göteborg.
    Hessén Söderman, Anne-Charlotte
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Tonsil surgery efficiently relieves symptoms, Analysis of 54 696 paqtients in The National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden2012In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 132, no 5, p. 533-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONCLUSION:

    Patients operated with tonsillar surgery report a high degree of symptom relief 6 months after surgery.

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to analyze symptom relief 6 months after tonsil surgery in relation to age, indication, surgical procedure, primary bleeding and unplanned postoperative visits. The National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden offers data from 54,696 patients registered during 1997-2008.

    METHODS:

    This was a prospective assessment by questionnaire. Data were collected using three questionnaires, two completed by professionals and one 6 months postoperatively by the parents/patients.

    RESULTS:

    Among 54,696 patients, the most common surgical indications were obstruction (49.7%), followed by recurrent tonsillitis (35.2%). Symptom relief 6 months after surgery was high in all indication groups (>92%), and highest for patients operated on the indication peritonsillitis (>98%). The indications obstruction, recurrent tonsillitis or chronic tonsillitis reported a high degree (>96%) of symptom relief. Of the patients who underwent tonsillectomy with adenoidectomy, 97.5% were symptom-free compared to 96% of patients who had tonsillectomy alone and 96.1% who underwent tonsillotomy (p < 0.0001). In all, 13.9% of patients required an unplanned visit to the clinic postoperatively. Only 148 of 54,696 patients reported worsening of symptoms after surgery.

  • 152.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    et al.
    Öron-, näs- och halskliniken, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris specialistvård, Sabbatsbergs sjukhus, Stockholm.
    Hessén Söderman, Anne-Charlotte
    Öron-, näs- och halskliniken, Karolinska Universitettsjukhuset, Danderyd.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Odhagen, Erik
    Öron-, näs- och halskliniken, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås.
    Padoan, Serge
    Öron-, näs- och halskliniken, Kristianstad.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Öron-, näs- och halskliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Nationellt kvalitetsregister för tonsilloperation. Öron- näs- och halssjukvård. Årsrapport 20112012Report (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris Sabbatsberg Hospital, Stockholm.
    Hessén Söderman, Anne- Charlotte
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Roos, Kristian
    Capio Lundby Hospital, Göteborg.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Presentation of large datavolumes with the valuecompass - a qualitive method2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cognitive inhibition, WMC, and speech-recognition-in-noise2015In: 3rd International conference in Cognitive Hearing Science and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive abilities are important for a number of human attributes, such as making sense of communication, holding information active in memory, and making decisions. When it is the goal to focus on a single target voice, and resist intrusions from irrelevant information, cognitive inhibition can aid us in our endeavour. Cognitive inhibition is thought to support and co-operate with working memory. Abilities such as cognitive inhibition and working memory are also important for speech processing, even more so when listening to speech under adverse conditions. In order to assess different difficulties that can arise in every day listening situations, it´s of importance to have solid methods for measuring cognitive abilities. In the present study we present a task assessing cognitive inhibition, and how it relates to individual working memory capacity (WMC), and speech-recognition-in-noise. Forty-six young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a speech-in-noise test. Our results suggest that individuals with high WMC, also exhibit good cognitive inhibition. The results also indicate that those who perform well in the cognitive inhibition task need less favourable signal-to-noise-ratios in the speech-recognition task. Our findings indicate that capacity to resist semantic interference can be used to predict performance in speech-recognition tasks when listening under adverse conditions. 

  • 155.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Executive function and speech- in- noise perception: the role of inhibition2013In: Aging and Speech Communication, 2013 / [ed] Larry E Humes, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Little is known about the relation between the ability to inhibit irrelevant information and perceiving speech-in-noise and the effects of hearing loss and ageing on this relationship. In settings where a listening task is difficult, individuals use both their hearing and cognitive abilities to process the auditory information. To perceive speech in noise, one must focus on the relevant information and at the same time inhibit the processing of irrelevant information. Results from recent studies indicate that older adults have difficulties singling out speech in noise, and selectively attend to target speech while inhibiting irrelevant information.

     

    The purpose of the project is to increase theoretical knowledge concerning the relation between age, perceiving speech-in-noise and inhibition. The pilot study involved the administration of a test battery consisting of audiological, cognitive and speech perception tests. The results of a series of ANOVAs and correlational analyses will be presented to show differences in performance and the relation between performance on the cognitive, audiological and speech-perception tasks. Upon completion, the results of this study will be used to compare younger individuals´ performance with older adults with and without hearing loss to determine the effect of age and hearing ability on the relation between capacity to inhibit irrelevant information and speech-in-noise recognition.

  • 156.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Informational masking in spoken communication - Developing the Swedish "Hayling" sentences2013In: 11th EFAS Congress.  Föredrags Abstract. Otorhinolaryngologia Hungarica, 59:2, 101, 2013, p. 101-101Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Informational masking in spoken communication – developing the Swedish "Hayling"-sentences2013In: Abstract book: 2nd International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2013, p. 164-164Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Informational masking inspoken communication- Developing the Swedish "Hayling" sentences2013In: Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for communication. 16-19 June 2013, Linköping, Sweden, Abstract, p164, 2013, p. 164-164Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 159.
    Sundberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Peebo, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    In vitro tympanic membrane position identification with a co-axial fiber optic otoscope2011In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 097002-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Otitis media diagnosis can be assisted by measuring the shape of the tympanic membrane. We have developed an ear speculum for an otoscope, including spatially distributed source and detector optical fibers, to generate source-detector intensity matrices (SDIMs), representing the curvature of surfaces. The surfaces measured were a model ear with a latex membrane and harvested temporal bones including intact tympanic membranes. The position of the tympanic membrane was shifted from retracted to bulging by air pressure and that of the latex membrane by water displacement. The SDIM was normalized utilizing both external (a sheared flat plastic cylinder) and internal references (neutral position of the membrane). Data was fitted to a two-dimensional Gaussian surface representing the shape by its amplitude and offset. Retracted and bulging surfaces were discriminated for the model ear by the sign of the Gaussian amplitude for both internal and external reference normalization. Tympanic membranes were separated after a two-step normalization: first to an external reference, adjusted for the distance between speculum and the surfaces, and second by comparison with an average normally positioned SDIM from tympanic membranes. In conclusion, we have shown that the modified otoscope can discriminate between bulging and retracted tympanic membranes in a single measurement, given a two-step normalization. (C) 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.3622486]

  • 160.
    Sundewall Thoren, Elisabet
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Internet Interventions for Hearing Loss2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the two studies presented in this research forum article was to develop audiological rehabilitation programs for experienced hearing aid users and evaluate them in online versions. In this research forum article, the differences between the two studies are discussed. Method: Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were performed evaluating the efficacy of online rehabilitation, including professional guidance by an audiologist. In each RCT, the effects of the online programs were compared with the effects measured in a control group. Results: The results from the first RCT showed a significant increase in activity and participation for both groups with participants in the intervention group improving more than those in the control group. At the 6-month follow-up, after the study, the significant increase was maintained; however, amounts of increase in the two groups were no longer significantly different. The results from the second RCT showed significant increase in activity and participation for the intervention group, although the control group did not improve. Conclusions: The results from the RCTs provide evidence that the Internet can be used to deliver rehabilitation to hearing-aid users and that their problems are reduced by the intervention; however, the content of the online rehabilitation program requires further investigation.

  • 161.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Professional online rehabilitation of hearing-impaired adults2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Sundqvist, Annette
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Jönsson, Radoslava
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Understanding minds: Early cochlear implantation and the development of theory of mind in children with profound hearing impairment2014In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 538-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The present study investigates how auditory stimulation from cochlear implants (CI) is associated with the development of Theory of Mind (ToM) in severely and profoundly hearing impaired children with hearing parents. Previous research has shown that deaf children of hearing parents have a delayed ToM development. This is, however, not always the case with deaf children of deaf parents, who presumably are immersed in a more vivid signing environment.

    Methods

    Sixteen children with CI (4.25 to 9.5 years of age) were tested on measures of cognitive and emotional ToM, language and cognition. Eight of the children received their first implant relatively early (before 27 months) and half of them late (after 27 months). The two groups did not differ in age, gender, language or cognition at entry of the study. ToM tests included the unexpected location task and a newly developed Swedish social–emotional ToM test. The tests aimed to test both cognitive and emotional ToM. A comparison group of typically developing hearing age matched children was also added (n = 18).

    Results

    Compared to the comparison group, the early CI-group did not differ in emotional ToM. The late CI-group differed significantly from the comparison group on both the cognitive and emotional ToM tests.

    Conclusion

    The results revealed that children with early cochlear implants solved ToM problems to a significantly higher degree than children with late implants, although the groups did not differ on language or cognitive measures at baseline. The outcome suggests that early cochlear implantation for deaf children in hearing families, in conjunction with early social and communicative stimulation in a language that is native to the parents, can provide a foundation for a more normalized ToM development.

  • 163.
    Sundström, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Repetition of words and non-words in typically developing children: The role of prosody2014In: First language, ISSN 0142-7237, E-ISSN 1740-2344, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 428-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, segmental and prosodic aspects of word repetition and non-word repetition in typically developing children aged four to six years were investigated. Focus was on developmental differences, and on how tonal word accent and word length affect segment production accuracy. Prosodically controlled words and non-words were repeated by 44 Swedish-speaking children. Repetition accuracy for both words and non-words increased with age, and was higher for words than non-words. Further, tonal word accents I and II provided different conditions for segment repetition in favor of accent II during both word repetition and non-word repetition for older children, but only during word repetition for younger children. This suggests age-dependent differences regarding how prosody is stored and integrated with segments. The findings have theoretical significance regarding the role of prosody in the perception, processing and production of phonological information. There are also clinical implications concerning the interpretation of repetition tasks and the potential use of prosody in speech and language intervention.

  • 164.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris Sabbatsberg Hospital, Stockholm.
    Hessén Söderman, Anne- Charlotte
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Roos, Kristian
    Capio Lundby Hospital, Göteborg.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Adenotonsillotomy; first line treatment for pediatric sleep disordered breathing?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris Sabbatsberg Hospital, Stockholm.
    Hessén Söderman, Anne- Charlotte
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Roos, Kristian
    Capio Lundby Hospital, Göteborg.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Pediatric tonsillotomy; a comparison of high- and low radiofrequency techniques with regard to postoperative bleeding, pain, infection and symptom relief2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    et al.
    Öron-näs- och halskliniken, Ryhovs länssjukhus, Jönköping.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Öron- näsa- halskliniken, Aleris specialistvård Sabbatsberg, Stockholm.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Hessén-Söderman, Anne-Charlotte
    Öron- näsa- halskliniken, Aleris specialistvård Sabbatsberg, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Odhagen, Erik
    Öron-näs-halsmottgningen, Södra Älvsborgs sjukhus, Borås.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Öron-näs och halsmottagningen, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Radiofrequency tonsillotomy in Sweden 2009-20122014In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 271, no 6, p. 1823-1827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish National Registry for TonsilSurgery has been operational since 1997. All ENT clinicsin Sweden are encouraged to submit data for all patientsscheduled for tonsil surgery. Preoperatively, age, genderand indication are recorded. Postoperatively, method(tonsillectomy or tonsillotomy), technique, and perioperativecomplications are recorded. Postoperative bleedings,pain, infections, and symptom relief are assessed throughquestionnaires. An earlier report from this registry showedthat tonsillotomy had become more common than tonsillectomyin children with tonsil-related upper airwayobstruction. The aim of this study was to categorize whichinstruments were used for tonsillotomy in Sweden and tocompare their outcome and complication rate. All children2–18 years, reported to the registry from March 2009 untilSeptember 2012, who underwent tonsillotomy on theindication upper airway obstruction, were included in thestudy. 1,676 patients were identified. In 1,602 cases(96 %), a radiofrequency instrument was used. The postoperativebleeding rate was low (1.2 %) and the degree ofsymptom relief was high (95.1 %). Three different radiofrequencyinstruments (ArthroCare Coblation, EllmanSurgitron, and Sutter CURIS) were used in 96 % of thepatients. There were no significant differences in thenumber of postoperative bleedings, postoperative infectionsor symptom relief between the instruments. The onlydifference found was in the number of days on analgesics,where more days were registered after use of Coblation.In Sweden, radiofrequency tonsillotomy is the dominantsurgical technique used for tonsil hypertrophy causingupper airway obstruction in children. There are no significantdifferences in outcome between the different radiofrequencyinstruments except for number of days onanalgesics after surgery.

  • 167.
    Södersten, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Thorsdotter, Malina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Terström, Sten
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Long-term Measures of Voice Use and Environmental Noise Levels using a Portable Voice Accumulator2011In: Pan European Voice Conference (PEVOC9), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High vocal demands and speaking in environmental noise have both been identified as risk factors for voice disorders. Long-term field documentation of voice use might provide important information on those factors. The purpose was to explore how long representative measurements need to be, and whether long-term data from the field can usefully supplement voice assessments made in the laboratory. Eight patients diagnosed with occupational voice disorders were chosen consecutively from a waiting list for voice therapy at the Karolinska University Hospital. They were matched to vocally healthy colleagues regarding gender, occupation and work place. The sixteen participants underwent a series of voice assessments in the laboratory: audio recording, voice range profile, laryngostroboscopy, and subjective evaluations using the Voice Handicap Index. A long-term registration during 14 days was performed for each participant using the portable voice accumulator VoxLog. Voxlog has a neck collar with an accelerometer measuring fundamental frequency and phonation time, and a microphone measuring the level of voice intensity and of environmental noise.  The participants wore the Voxlog from morning to night for two full weeks.  They kept a diary of daily activities and rated voice symptoms four times daily. Preliminary results show that data obtained from the first week were similar to data from the second week; and that fundamental frequency and voice intensity were higher in the field than in the laboratory. The results provide a basis for discussion about valid voice outcome measures.

  • 168.
    Taylor, Rachael L.
    et al.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Schulin, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Goonetilleke, Samanthi
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Welgampola, Miriam S.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Does Electrode Impedance Affect the Recording of Ocular Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potentials?2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 969-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In evoked potential testing, it is common practice to abrade the skin surface as a means of reducing and balancing electrode impedance. The effects of skin preparation and electrode impedance on ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) prevalence and amplitudes are not known. Purpose: We sought to determine whether comparable oVEMP waveforms could be recorded without excessive skin preparation. Research Design: This was a prospective study with a repeated-measures (within-subjects) design. Study Sample: The study group comprised 20 healthy participants (12 females and 8 males) ages 21-57 yr. Data Collection and Analysis: oVEMP reflexes were recorded in response to air-conducted and bone-conducted (AC and BC) stimuli in three conditions. In the first condition (no skin preparation), electrodes were simply placed over the skin surface. For the second condition (moderate skin preparation), oVEMP testing was repeated after the skin had been prepared with 70% isopropyl alcohol swabs. oVEMPs recorded in these two conditions were then compared with those recorded using a third conventional protocol whereby the skin was abraded with skin preparation gel until electrode impedances were low and balanced. For BC stimuli, reflex amplitudes and latencies were compared using a repeated-measures general linear model. For AC stimuli, rates of reflex detection were analyzed using a generalized estimating equation. Nonparametric Friedman tests were used to compare AC oVEMP amplitudes across the three conditions. Results: There was no significant effect of electrode impedance on reflex amplitudes, latencies, or rates of detection (p greater than 0.05). The results indicated significant stimulus-related artifact (greater than= 3 mu V) in 25 of 40 recordings under the high-impedance condition in response to BC stimulation. The stimulus artifact was detectable in 12 of 40 recordings after moderate skin preparation and in 5 recordings after skin abrasion. Conclusions: Comparable rates of reflex detection and oVEMP amplitudes were recorded in the three conditions, implying that rigorous rubbing of the facial skin is largely unnecessary in clinical oVEMP testing. However, for oVEMPs recorded in response to a single-polarity stimulus, reducing and balancing electrode impedances with either isopropyl alcohol wipes or skin abrasion may help reduce unwanted stimulus artifact.

  • 169.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ahlström, Christer
    VTI, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Peters, Björn
    VTI, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Olle
    VTI, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden .
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive workload and visual behavior in elderly drivers with hearing loss2014In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 377-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To examine eye tracking data and compare visual behavior in individuals with normal hearing (NH) and with moderate hearing loss (HL) during two types of driving conditions: normal driving and driving while performing a secondary task.

    Methods

    24 participants with HL and 24 with NH were exposed to normal driving and to driving with a secondary task (observation and recall of 4 visually displayed letters). Eye movement behavior was assessed during normal driving by the following performance indicators: number of glances away from the road; mean duration of glances away from the road; maximum duration of glances away from the road; and percentage of time looking at the road. During driving with the secondary task, eye movement data were assessed in terms of number of glances to the secondary task display, mean duration of glances to the secondary task display, and maximum duration of glances to the secondary task display. The secondary task performance was assessed as well, counting the number of correct letters, the number of skipped letters, and the number of correct letters ignoring order.

    Results

    While driving with the secondary task, drivers with HL looked twice as often in the rear-view mirror than during normal driving and twice as often as drivers with NH regardless of condition. During secondary task, the HL group looked away from the road more frequently but for shorter durations than the NH group. Drivers with HL had fewer correct letters and more skipped letters than drivers with NH.

    Conclusions

    Differences in visual behavior between drivers with NH and with HL are bound to the driving condition. Driving with a secondary task, drivers with HL spend as much time looking away from the road as drivers with NH, however with more frequent and shorter glances away. Secondary task performance is lower for the HL group, suggesting this group is less willing to perform this task. The results also indicate that drivers with HL use fewer but more focused glances away than drivers with NH, they also perform a visual scan of the surrounding traffic environment before looking away towards the secondary task display.

  • 170.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VTI, Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Peters, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VTI, Linköping.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hearing Loss and transport2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research regarding importance of auditory information in traffic situations is limited and not very up to date. Studies performed in several countries around 1980 state that hearing disorders or deafness should not be an exclusion criterion for driver’s license, since individuals with hearing loss are not considered as an increased risk to traffic safety. Research made tend to answer the question if road users with hearing loss pose a higher risk than road users with normal hearing. Possible risks which road users with a hearing disorder are exposed to have not yet been investigated.

     

    According to brief discussions with individuals with hearing loss, concerns include; signing while driving, trying to speech read passenger while driving, hearing emergency sirens, knowing the direction from which a sound is coming, hearing seatbelt warning or other warnings your car may give.

    Hearing loss is often age related. With longer life length and increasing transport habits of older people, the proportion of older road users (and road users with hearing loss) increase. Furthermore, support systems in cars tend to use auditory signals for warnings, which make them less accessible for users with hearing disorders. Other modalities for warning signals (light or vibration) could be a solution.

     

    Auditory information is an issue also for road users with normal hearing; cars tend to be more silent and could therefore be hard to notice for vulnerable road users, bicycle riders with music players more or less isolate themselves from surrounding impressions. This presentation invites to a discussion regarding traffic situations where auditory information is important and how support could be given if necessary.

  • 171.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VTI, Linköping .
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Peters, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VTI, Linköping.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hörselnedsättning, trafiksäkerhet och mobilitet: En enkätstudie2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine how road users with different degree of hearing loss experience safety and mobility in transport situations compared to road users without hearing loss.

    Methods: The participants were recruited from the local branch of HRF. A hearing control group, matched on age, gender and geographical location, was selected from a commercial database. The individuals with hearing hearing-loss were grouped into four groups according the degree of their hearing-loss.

    Results: Hearing loss affects some specific aspects regarding transport situations, while others remain unaffected. Individuals with hearing loss are not as likely to have a driving license, but for those who have, hearing loss has no effect on mileage per year. Loss of hearing has an effect on criteria for choosing transportation, but the use of each transportation mode is unaffected. Degree of hearing loss affects most questions regarding hearing in relation to driver abilities, while avoidance of specific traffic situations or environments is only associated with hearing loss in specific situations. Hearing loss has only minor effect on the factors causing inattention when driving and on the interest in a warning system for driver inattention. The general interest in a warning system for driver inattention is high.

    Conclusions: Hearing loss influences the prevalence of driving license and criteria for choosing transportation, however has no effect on the frequency of any transportation mode. In general, in this study, respondents with profound hearing loss are less concerned, indicating that they might be coping. The interest in warning system for inattention and the attitude towards strengthening of auditory information in traffic situations is high regardless of hearing category. This suggests further research on coping strategies and on design of support systems accessible for drivers with hearing loss.

  • 172.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VTI, Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Peters, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VTI, Linköping.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Trafikanter med hörselnedsättning: En enkätstudie2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hörselintryckens betydelse för trafikanten är ett tämligen outforskat område. Studier som genomförts har främst handlat om exklusionskriterier för körkort och man har då kommit fram till att hörselskadade inte utgör en större risk än hörande bilförare. Således utgör inte hörselskada eller dövhet ett hinder för körkort. Det saknas dock forskning kring vilka risker individer utsätts för då hörselintrycken i trafiken helt eller delvis faller bort. Enligt SCB finns det 1.3 miljoner invånare i Sverige som har svårigheter att höra i en eller flera olika situationer. Den vanligaste typen av hörselnedsättning är åldersrelaterad. Ökad livslängd samt vanan att själv kunna transportera sig lätt, gör att vi får allt fler äldre bilförare och därmed även allt fler bilförare med nedsatt hörsel. En annan relevant aspekt handlar om den ökande andelen stödsystem i bilarna, vilka ofta använder sig av auditiva signaler (t.ex. varningar, GPS navigering). För maximal nytta av sådana system är det viktigt att de är tillgängliga för samtliga trafikantgrupper. Man bör därför undersöka möjligheten att använda sig av andra eller ytterligare signalmodaliteter, t.ex. ljus eller vibrationer. En ytterligare aspekt är att fordon blir allt tystare, vilket innebär att även trafikanter utan hörselnedsättning får mindre auditiv information eller feedback. Då kan det vara svårt att som oskyddad trafikant höra en bil som utgör en risk. Även oskyddade trafikanter med hörlurar kan gå miste om dylik information.

    På VTI har ett doktorandprojekt inletts tillsammans med forskarskolan HEAD (HEaring And Deafness) vid LiU i syfte att utreda hörselintryckens betydelse för trafiksäkerheten. Projektet inleds med en kartläggning av transportvanor hos olika grupper av individer med hörselnedsättning i Sverige med hjälp av en webenkät som skickats ut under maj 2011. Vid analysen kommer en kategorisering i grupper att göras på basis av deras hörsel (Audiogram). Projektet genomförs i samverkan med Hörselskadades Riksförbund (HRF) som ställt sig positiva till den här forskningen och de har varit behjälpliga med att rekrytera deltagare. Enkäten kommer även att skickas till en kontrollgrupp av hörande individer. Undersökning har genom gått etisk prövning. Resultaten av studien kommer att presenteras på Transportforum 2012.

  • 173.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Peters, Björn
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Herbert, Nicholas
    Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds, UK.
    Holmqvist, Kenneth
    University of Lund, Sweden.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Black, Alexander
    School of Optometry, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hearing loss and a supportive tactile signal in a navigation system: Effects on driving behavior and eye movements2013In: Journal of Eye Movement Research, E-ISSN 1995-8692, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An on-road study was conducted to evaluate a complementary tactile navigation signal on driving behaviour and eye movements for drivers with hearing loss (HL) compared to drivers with normal hearing (NH). 32 participants (16 HL and16 NH) performed two preprogrammed navigation tasks. In one, participants received only visual information, while the other also included a vibration in the seat to guide them in the correct direction. SMI glasses were used for eye tracking,recording the point of gaze within the scene. Analysis was performed on predefined regions. A questionnaire examined participant's experience of the navigation systems. Hearing loss was associated with lower speed, higher satisfaction with the tactile signal and more glances in the rear view mirror. Additionally, tactile support led to less time spent viewing the navigation display.

  • 174.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Peters, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive workload and driving behavior in persons with hearing loss2013In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 21, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To compare the effect of cognitive workload in individuals with and without hearing loss, respectively, in driving situations with varying degree of complexity.

    Methods

    24 participants with moderate hearing loss (HL) and 24 with normal hearing (NH) experienced three different driving conditions: Baseline driving; Critical events with a need to act fast; and a Parked car event with the possibility to adapt the workload to the situation. Additionally, a Secondary task (observation and recalling of 4 visually displayed letters) was present during the drive, with two levels of difficulty in terms of load on the phonological loop. A tactile signal, presented by means of a vibration in the seat, was used to announce the Secondary task and thereby simultaneously evaluated in terms of effectiveness when calling for driver attention. Objective driver behavior measures (M and SD of driving speed, M and SD of lateral position, time to line crossing) were accompanied by subjective ratings during and after the test drive.

    Results

    HL had no effect on driving behavior at Baseline driving, where no events occurred. Both during Secondary task and at the Parked car event HL was associated with decreased mean driving speed compared to baseline driving. The effect of HL on the Secondary task performance, both at Baseline driving and at the lower Difficulty Level at Critical events, was more skipped letters and fewer correctly recalled letters. At Critical events, task difficulty affected participants with HL more. Participants were generally positive to use vibrations in the seat as a means for announcing the Secondary task.

    Conclusions

    Differences in terms of driving behavior and task performance related to HL appear when the driving complexity exceeds Baseline driving either in the driving task, Secondary task or a combination of both. This leads to a more cautious driving behavior with a decreased mean driving speed and less focus on the Secondary task, which could be a way of compensating for the increasing driving complexity. Seat vibration was found to be a feasible way to alert drivers with or without HL.

  • 175.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Peters, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Drivers with hearing loss and the design of driver support system. A simulator study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Peters, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hearing impairments and transport2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden .
    Peters, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden .
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Influence of Hearing Loss on Transport Safety and Mobility2013In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 117-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To examine how road users with different degree of hearing loss experience safety and mobility in transport situations, compared to road users with normal hearing.

    Methods

    A questionnaire study was conducted with participants recruited from the local branch of The Swedish hard of hearing society. A normal hearing control group, matched on age, gender and geographical location, was selected from a commercial database. The response rate was 35 % (n = 194) in the group with Hearing Loss (HL) and 42 % (n = 125) in the group with Normal Hearing (NH). The individuals with hearing loss were grouped into four groups according to the degree of their hearing loss (mild, moderate, severe and profound).

    Results

    Hearing loss affected some specific aspects regarding transport situations, while others remained unaffected. Individuals with hearing loss were not as likely to have a driving license, but for those who have, hearing loss had no effect on mileage per year. Loss of hearing had an effect on criteria for choosing mode of transportation, but in the aggregate, no difference between the groups could be shown in the distribution of how much each mode of transportation was used. With a few exceptions, hearing loss did not affect the ratings of importance of hearing for different transportation modes. Hearing loss affected most questions regarding hearing and driver abilities, while avoidance of specific traffic situations was not associated with hearing loss. Hearing loss had only minor effects on the factors causing inattention when driving, and on the interest in a warning system for driver inattention. The interest in a warning system for driver inattention was high regardless of hearing category.

    Conclusions

    Hearing loss influences the prevalence of driving license and criteria for choosing mode of transportation, however has no effect on the distribution of how much each mode of transportation was used. In general, in this study, respondents with higher degree of hearing loss were less concerned about the effect of hearing loss, indicating that they might be using coping strategies. The interest in warning system for inattention and the attitude towards strengthening of auditory information in traffic situations is high regardless of hearing category. This suggests further research on coping strategies and on design of support systems accessible for drivers with hearing loss.

  • 178.
    Thorén, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    A randomized controlled trial evaluating the effects of online rehabilitative intervention for adult hearing-aid users2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 452-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Previous research shows that the internet can be used in the rehabilitation of hearing aid users. By further developing the online program, it might be possible to foster behavioral changes that will positively affect hearing aid users.

    Design: A randomized controlled study with two groups of participants. The intervention group underwent a five-week online intervention while the control group was referred to a waiting-list. Questionnaires were used as outcome measures.

    Study Sample: Seventy-six experienced hearing aid users participated in the study, ranging in age from 26 to 81 years (mean 69.3 years).

    Results: The findings showed significant improvements in the intervention group after the intervention, measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly. The effects were maintained and improved at the follow-up. Furthermore, the results indicated that the participants in the intervention group improved at two items of the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, and the effects were partly maintained at the followup. Finally, significant improvements in the domain of psychosocial wellbeing were found at the follow-up.

    Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that the internet can be used to deliver intervention of rehabilitation to hearing aid users.

  • 179.
    Thorén, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Internet Access and Use in Adults With Hearing Loss2013In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 15, no 5, p. e91-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The future rehabilitation of adults with hearing loss is likely to involve online tools used by individuals at home. Online tools could also be useful for people who are not seeking professional help for their hearing problems. Hearing impairment is a disability that increases with age, and increased age is still associated with reduced use of the Internet. Therefore, to continue the research on online audiological rehabilitative tools for people with hearing loss, it is important to determine if and to what extent adults with hearing loss use the Internet.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To evaluate the use of the Internet and email in a group of adults with hearing loss and to investigate if their use of Internet and email differed between genders, among different age groups, and how it compared with the general population in Sweden.

    METHODS:

    Questionnaires containing multiple-choice questions about Internet access, email use, and educational level were mailed to individuals with hearing loss, who were registered as patients at a hearing aid clinic. Out of the 269 invited participants, 158 returned a completed questionnaire, which was a response rate of 58.7%.

    RESULTS:

    The results showed that 60% (94/158) of the participants with hearing loss used computers and the Internet. The degree of hearing loss in the group of participants did not explain the level of Internet usage, while factors of age, gender, and education did (P<.001). More men than women used the Internet (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.32-4.91, P<.001). Use of the Internet was higher in the youngest age group (25-64 years) compared to the oldest age group (75-96 years, P=.001). A higher usage of the Internet was observed in the participants with hearing loss, especially the elderly, when compared with the general population of Sweden (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.23-3.17, P=.04).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    We conclude that the use of computers and the Internet overall is at least at the same level for people with hearing loss as for the general age-matched population in Sweden, but that this use is even higher in specific age groups. These results are important for the future work in developing and evaluating rehabilitative educational online tools for adults with hearing loss.

  • 180.
    van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gauffin, Helena
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Ulrici, Daniel
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Language deficits in Epilepsy, an fMRI study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive functions in people with epilepsy are affected by focality, number of generalized seizures, side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) or the underlying disease (Kwan, 2001). Newly diagnosed patients have cognitive deficits even before starting on AEDs. Performance declines already in the first year after diagnosis and the impairment continues in the following years (Taylor, 2010; Baker, 2011). In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) the hippocampal damage seems to be progressive and accompanied by thinning of neocortex (Briellmann, 2002; Bernhardt, 2009). Widespread structural and functional abnormalities in left TLE can affect more distant networks (Bonilha, 2009); a damage pattern also seen in right TLE (Karunanayaka, 2011).

  • 181.
    van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, T
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Neural Adaptability During Sentence Reading: Higher Language Ability but nor Semantic Sentence Complexity Increases Neural Activity, SNL (Soc Neurobiol Language).2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 182.
    van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Laterality shifts in neural activation coupled to language ability2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The right-hemispheric homologues to Broca’s and Wernicke’s area play an important, but currently poorly understood role in language ability. In the current study, we tested 27 healthy adults for their language ability. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data when the participants performed a sentence reading and a word fluency task. The fMRI data were used to calculate a measure of brain laterality – the laterality index – in the inferior frontal gyrus, the superior and middle temporal gyrus, and the angular gyrus. These laterality measurements were correlated with performance scores on language tasks administered prior to fMRI. We expected to see that high performance was characterized by a more efficient, i.e. decreased, neural activation pattern in typical language areas. Furthermore, we expected to see activation in additional, right-hemispheric brain regions in high performing subjects as a sign of neural adaptability.

    High performance in a test measuring subtle language deficits (BeSS test) was related to increased activation in the right middle temporal gyrus when the participants were reading sentences. Thus, semantic ability correlated negatively with laterality in the temporal lobe, but not in the frontal lobe. For increased verbal fluency ability, we did observe a decreased left-hemispheric dominance in the inferior frontal gyrus when the participants were generating words. Increased task demands in the word generation task were not related to brain activation, but in the sentence reading task, the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus did exhibit an increase in activation when the sentences increased in difficulty. This result was independent of individual language ability. Increased brain activation at increased difficulty of a language task is interpreted as a sign that the brain recruits additional resources upon higher demands. The negative correlation between language ability and laterality in the in right-hemispheric middle temporal gyrus indicates a higher degree of neural adaptability in the temporal lobes of high skilled individuals.

  • 183.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ledin, Torbjön
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bågesund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Health Care, Centre for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Impaired Postural Balance in Turner Syndrom2013In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 537-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An impaired body balance has been found in Turner syndrome (TS) in clinical tests like Rombergs’s test and walking on a balance beam. The aim of the study was to assess postural balance in TS subjects with specific balance testing using dynamic posturography and relate to body composition. Nineteen TS subjects (20–57 years) were included. Balance was measured with dynamic posturography (Equitest) and compared with 19 sex and age-matched controls (22–59 years). Equitest, visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems were provoked with increasing difficulty (6 tests, SO1–SO6) and body sway was measured with a dual forceplate. Body composition was measured with DXA. No difference was found between the TS subjects and the controls on fixed platform with open eyes (SO1), with closed eyes (SO2), with stable platform and visual disorientation (SO3), or on unstable platform with open eyes (SO4). In the difficult tests on unstable platform the TS subjects did worse compared with controls both in the test with eyes closed (SO5), p<0.01, and in the test with visual disorientation (SO6), p<0.05. Composite (a merge of all six recordings) was significantly lower in the TS-group, p<0.05. In the TS group high total body weight was related to worse outcome on tests SO5, SO6, and composite, while total bone mass, age, height, or waist showed no significant association with balance scores. Our findings indicate that TS could have an increased risk for falling due to impaired ability to manage complex coordination tasks.

  • 184.
    Wass, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Orthographic learning in children with hearing impairment2011In: First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2011, p. 126-126Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Early in reading development, children generally read by using phonological decoding strategies where words are read letter by letter. Later in reading development, orthographic decoding strategies are generally used by most readers. This means that whole words are recognized directly through a process of comparing written words to mental orthographic representations, i.e. long-term memories of written words.This strategy is quicker and more efficient for reading familiar words.The process of building up a mental orthographic lexicon in long term memory is often referred to as orthographic learning (e.g. Share, 2004). In children with normal hearing and typical development, those who are better at phonological decoding also become better at constructing their orthographic lexicon. Children with cochlear implants (CI) have demonstrated relatively high reading skills despite less favorable cognitive prerequisites in terms of phonological representations, phonological working memory, phonological skills and lexical access (Asker-Árnason et al., 2007, Wass et al., 2010).The present study explores the acquistion orthographic representations in children who use CI and children who have moderate hearing impairments and use hearing aids (HA). The performance of each group was compared to that of hearing children matched for grade, nonverbal intelligence and gender.The results indicated that the children with CI did not have significantly different orthographic learning ability than their comparison group but had slightly poorer reading comprehension. The children with HA performed significantly poorer than their comparison group on orthographic learning but had similar reading skills as their comparison group on all measures of reading.

  • 185.
    Westin, Vendela
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Schulin, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Stalby, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wisung, Gisela
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, M
    Olofsson, U
    Ermedahl-Bydairk, Ulrika
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Randomized Controlled trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for tinnitus distress2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 186.
    Wilhelmsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Josephson, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phenomenographic study of basic science understanding-senior medical students' conceptions of fatigue2013In: Education for Health, ISSN 1357-6283, E-ISSN 1469-5804, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Helping students learn to apply their newly learned basic science knowledge to clinical situations is a long-standing challenge for medical educators. This study aims to describe how medical students' knowledge of the basic sciences is construed toward the end of their medical curriculum, focusing on how senior medical students explain the physiology of a given scenario. Methods A group of final-year medical students from two universities was investigated. Interviews were performed and phenomenographic analysis was used to interpret students' understanding of the physiology underlying the onset of fatigue in an individual on an exercise bicycle.

    RESULTS: Three categories of description depict the qualitatively different ways the students conceptualized fatigue. A first category depicts well integrated physiological and bio-chemical knowledge characterized by equilibrium and causality. The second category contains conceptions of finite amount of substrate and juxtaposition of physiological concepts that are not fully integrated. The third category exhibits a fragmented understanding of disparate sections of knowledge without integration of basic science and clinical knowledge.

    DISCUSSION: Distinctive conceptions of fatigue based with varying completeness of students' understanding characterized the three identified categories. The students' conceptions of fatigue were based on varying understanding of how organ systems relate and of the thresholds that determine physiological processes. Medical instruction should focus on making governing steps in biological processes clear and providing opportunity for causal explanations of clinical scenarios containing bio-chemical as well as clinical knowledge. This augments earlier findings by adding descriptions in terms of the subject matter studied about how basic science is applied by students in clinical settings.

  • 187.
    Wireklint, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Health-related quality of life after tonsillotomy versus tonsillectomy in young adults: 6 years postsurgery follow-up2012In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 269, no 8, p. 1951-1958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The indication for tonsil surgery is tonsillitis or obstructive symptoms due to tonsillar hypertrophy, associated with morbidity affecting health related quality of life (HRQL). Surgery performed is either tonsillectomy (TE) or partial intra capsular tonsillectomy/tonsillotomy (TT). TT is associated with fewer postoperative complications and rapid recovery, but with risk for regrowth of tonsillar tissue and return of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) or infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of TT and TE in young adults relating to HRQL and well-being as consequence of obstructive symptoms or ENT-infections after 6 years versus effect after 1 year. Young adults with symptoms of tonsillar hyperplasia were randomized to TE (44) or TT (32). Patients were assessed prior to surgery and 1 and 6 years postoperatively. Short Form 36 and the EuroQul Visual Analog Scale evaluated HRQL. Questionnaire was used to explore well-being, obstruction symptoms and infections. Patient BMI was calculated. Six years after surgery, 91 % of young adults (TE39/TT29) reported persisting benefits in well-being, reduced obstructive problems and fewer infections. Some patients in both groups reported a slight increase in snoring compared to 1 year after surgery, but still less than before surgery. Obesity was more frequent among those snoring. Both TT and TE in young adults yielded HRQL improvements and reduction in symptoms defining SDB persisting through 6 years postsurgery. Results indicated that both surgical methods were equally effective. Findings favor choice of TT due to lesser postoperative morbidity.

  • 188.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rydberg, Emelie
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, School of Health and Medical Science, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Örebro University.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The psychological process from avoidance to acceptance in adults with acquired hearing impairment2014In: Hearing, Balance and Communication, ISSN 2169-5717, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explored the psychological process from avoidance to acceptance in adults with acquired hearing impairment. Study design: A descriptive qualitative interview study was conducted in Sweden in 2010. Participants were 18 adults with an acquired sensorineural hearing impairment aged 50-70 years, who had recently obtained hearing aids at the Audiology Clinic of the Örebro University Hospital. The sample included both first-time hearing aid users (n = 10) and experienced hearing aid users (n = 8). Each participant took part in one semi-structured interview. Qualitative content analysis was performed on the manifest content of the interview transcripts. Results: Participants described the process from avoidance to acceptance as a slow and gradual process rooted in the awareness of the frequency and severity of hearing disability and of its psychological consequences. Facilitators included adaptive coping mechanisms, other peoples comments and positive experiences, accessibility of help-seeking and routine health assessments. In contrast, barriers included maladaptive coping mechanisms and stigma. Conclusions: Participants described the process of acceptance as a personal process that involved, to some extent, their social network of family, friends and colleagues. It was also a trade-off between the consequences of untreated hearing impairment and the threat to normal identity that, through stigma, hearing impairment carries. Further studies are needed to fully investigate the role of access to information on hearing impairment acceptance. How professionals and society can facilitate the process of acceptance should also be a focus of future research efforts. 

  • 189.
    Zarenoe, Ramesh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Corticosteroid Treatment of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Randomized Triple-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial2012In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 523-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effect of Prednisolone and placebo on the recovery of unilateral idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Design: Prospective, randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting: Four tertiary and 10 secondary referral centers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients: Of 103 patients randomly assigned, 93 were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. The patients, aged 18 to 80 years, were seeking care within 1 week after onset of acute unilateral sensorineural hearing loss with a mean decrease of 30 dB or greater in the 3 most affected contiguous frequencies. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIntervention: Patients were randomly assigned in permuted blocks of 10 to receive Prednisolone or placebo in tapering doses from 60 mg for 3 days and, thereafter, 10 mg less each day until Day 8. If complete recovery, no more medication given, otherwise medication continued at 10 mg per day until Day 30. Final follow-up was after 3 months with audiogram; 47 patients received Prednisolone and 46 placebo. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain Outcome Measure: The primary endpoint was efficacy of treatment on recovery at Day 90. Secondary endpoints were prognostic factors for hearing recovery. Analyses were by modified intention-to-treat and per protocol. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Hearing improvement for 47 Prednisolone-treated patients was 25.5 +/- 27.1 dB compared to 26.4 +/- 26.2 dB for 46 placebo-treated patients at Day 8 and 39 +/- 20.1 dB versus 35.1 +/- 38.3 dB after 3 months. Vertigo had significant negative effect on hearing improvement and inflammatory signs in the laboratory workup-a positive prognostic effect, irrespective of treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Prednisolone in customary dosage does not seem to influence recovery of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  • 190.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    A cohort study of patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss in a Swedish population2013In: Auris, nasus, larynx, ISSN 0385-8146, E-ISSN 1879-1476, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 41-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe a large cohort of patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in Sweden, and also to explore the possibility of finding potential possible differences between various diagnoses within SNHL. It is also of great interest to see how a multidisciplinary team was used in the different subgroups and the frequency of hearing aids use in patients with tinnitus.

    METHODS: Medical records of all patients who had received the diagnosis SNHL in Östergötland County, Sweden between 2004 and 2007 were reviewed. Patients between 20 and 80 years with tinnitus and a pure tone average (PTA) lower than 70dB HL were included in the study. Patients were excluded from the analyses if they had a cochlear implantation, middle ear disorders or had a hearing loss since birth or childhood. The investigators completed a form for each included patient, covering background facts, and audiograms taken at the yearly check up.

    RESULTS: Of a total 1672 patients' medical record review, 714 patients were included. The majority of patients (79%) were in the age group over 50 years. In male patients with bilateral tinnitus, the PTA for the left ear was significantly higher than for the right ear. The results regarding the configuration of hearing loss revealed that 555 patients (78%) had symmetric and 159 (22%) asymmetric hearing loss. Retrocochlear examinations were done in 372 patients and MRI was the most common examination. In all patients, 400 had no hearing aids and out of those 220 had unilateral tinnitus and 180 patients had bilateral tinnitus. 219 patients had a PTA>20dB HL and did not have any hearing aid. Results demonstrated that the Stepped Care model was not used widely in the daily practice. In our study, patients with bilateral-, unilateral hearing loss or Mb Ménière were the most common patients included in the Stepped Care model.

    CONCLUSION: In a large cohort of patients with SNHL and tinnitus, despite their hearing loss only 39% had hearing aids. It was observed that the medical record review often showed a lack of information about many background factors, such as; patients' general health condition, which could be a quality factor that needs improvement. Our results show that the Stepped Care model could be an effective option for providing a better access for tinnitus-focused treatment, although the number of patients in this study who were included in the Stepped Care model was low.

  • 191.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Quality of life in patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss2014In: B-ENT, ISSN 1781-782X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life in patients with tinnitus and SNHL, to investigate patients’ mental and physical health and to measure the level of satisfaction concerning the care experienced by the patients.

    Methods: Three questionnaires related to patients` physical and psychological health, were mailed to 714 Swedish patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss.

    Results: Female patients had significantly higher Tinnitus Handicap Inventory scores than male patients. Patients who were satisfied with the care they obtained had significantly higher PTA. It was found that the satisfied group had significantly lower THI-scores. In the dissatisfied group, 61% of patients had no hearing aids compared to 42% in the satisfied group.

    Conclusion: Our cohort of patients estimated their life quality and general health at a good level almost 4.5 years after their first report of tinnitus. Another finding was that 47% of patients were not satisfied with the treatment they obtained. In the dissatisfied group, 61% of patients had no hearing aids. Further research is required to find an approach that could motivate patients with both tinnitus and hearing impairment to use hearing aids.

  • 192.
    Zetterqvist Westin, Vendela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Schulin, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Karlsson, Marianne
    Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping.
    Zare Noe, Reza
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery.
    Olofsson, Ulrike
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Stalby, Magnus
    Psykologpartners, Linköping.
    Wisung, Gisela
    Psykologpartners, Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy versus Tinnitus Retraining Therapy in the treatment of tinnitus: A randomised controlled trial2011In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 49, no 11, p. 737-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study compared the effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) with Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT) on tinnitus impact in a randomised controlled trial. Sixty-four normal hearing subjects with tinnitus were randomised to one of the active treatments or a wait-list control (WLC). The ACT treatment consisted of 10 weekly 60min sessions. The TRT treatment consisted of one 150min session, one 30min follow-up and continued daily use of wearable sound generators for a recommended period of at least 8h/day for 18 months. Assessments were made at baseline, 10 weeks, 6 months and 18 months. At 10 weeks, results showed a superior effect of ACT in comparison with the WLC regarding tinnitus impact (Cohen's d=1.04), problems with sleep and anxiety. The results were mediated by tinnitus acceptance. A comparison between the active treatments, including all assessment points, revealed significant differences in favour of ACT regarding tinnitus impact (Cohen's d=0.75) and problems with sleep. At 6 months, reliable improvement on the main outcome measure was found for 54.5% in the ACT condition and 20% in the TRT condition. The results suggest that ACT can reduce tinnitus distress and impact in a group of normal hearing tinnitus patients.

  • 193.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Aktiv kommunikation - 5 års erfarenhet av Aktiv kommunikation2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 194.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    ELSA 85:: En kartläggning av  85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörapparatanvändning2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    ELSA 85: En kartläggning av 85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörappsratanvändning2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hearing care of older adults beyond the audiology clinic2014In: Hearing care of older adults beyond the audiology clinic, 2014, p. 117-118Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether or not older adults are actively seeking hearing health care, they may be unaware of the extent of their audiometric hearing loss, they may not expect to benefit from using hearing aids, they may  hold  ageist  self-stereotypes, and/or  have  low  self-efficacy  for  managing  hearing-related problems. According to the Health Belief Model, such conditions are not conducive to action-taking or positive sustained rehabilitative outcomes. In addition to more traditional clinic-based audiology rehabilitation services, a community-based health-promoting approach to increasing information and providing a more positive outlook about hearing health care options could be useful in predisposing older adults to seek help and achieve better rehabilitative outcomes. Community-based strategies to promote successful hearing health may also be crucial in reinforcing the maintenance of hearing aid use  and  hearing-related  behavior  changes  after  rehabilitation  has  been  provided.  A  community-based  approach  would  involve  new  partnerships  between  audiologists  and  other  health professionals and service providers working with older adults in the community, including primary care  physicians  and  geriatricians.  Such  partners  could  help  to  promote  earlier  identification  and awareness of hearing-related problems, and reduce the stigma of hearing loss and wearing hearing aids.  For  older  people affected  by  multiple  physical  and/or  mental  health  issues  it  is  even  more important to determine the most appropriate rehabilitation options for each person. Decision-making and  rehabilitation  planning,  delivery  and  monitoring  for  these  cases  demands  increased collaboration  with  other  health  professionals,  family  caregivers  and  significant  others  so  that participation in everyday activities and quality of life can be optimized. This presentation will discuss different approaches based on the Health Belief Model that could be augment more traditional clinic-based hearing health care for the older in short and long-term.

  • 197.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hearing difficulties, uptake and outcomes of hearing aids in people 85 years of age2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    County Council Östergotland, Hearing Clinic, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    County Council Östergotland, Hearing Clinic, Linköping, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Short- and Long-Term Effects of the Modified Swedish Version of the Active Communication Education (ACE) Program for Adults with Hearing Loss2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 848-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, there is a lack of evidence-based rehabilitation programs for hearing loss. The Active Communication Education program (ACE) has successfully been used in Australia and was translated and evaluated in a Swedish pilot study. The pilot study included 23 participants (age 87 yr). No statistically significant effects were found, but the qualitative assessments indicated that this population found the program to be beneficial. The participants requested more focus on the psychosocial consequences of hearing loss, and the modules in the original ACE program were modified. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effects of a modified Swedish version of the ACE program in a population aged 39-82 yr old. Research Design: Design was a between-group and within-group intervention study. Study Sample: The participants were recruited from the hearing health clinic in Linkoping during 2010 and 2012. A total of 73 participante agreed to undergo the ACE, and 67 (92%) completed three or more sessions. Intervention: The ACE program consists of five weekly 2 hr group sessions with 6 to 10 participants per group. Data Collection and Analysis: The outcomes were measured before initiation of the program, 3 wk after program completion, and 6 mo after program completion and included communication strategy use, activity and participation, health-related quality of life, and anxiety and depression. In addition, outcomes were measured after program completion using the International Outcome Inventory Alternative Interventions, a modified version of the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement, and qualitative feedback was obtained about the response to the program and actions taken as a result of participation. The treatment effects were examined using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results: Statistically significant effects were found for communication strategy use, activity and participation, and psychosocial well-being. Statistically significant effects were found for gender and degree of hearing loss, indicating that women and those with mild hearing loss significantly improved communication strategies. Conclusions: It is suggested that the program be implemented as part of regular audiological rehabilitation and offered in an early stage of rehabilitation.

  • 199.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Australia .
    A Preliminary Evaluation of the Active Communication Education Program in a Sample of 87-Year-Old Hearing Impaired Individuals2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research suggests that audiological rehabilitation for older adults could include group communication programs in addition to hearing aid fitting or as an alternative to hearing aid fitting for those people who do not wish to proceed with hearing aids. This pilot study was a first attempt to evaluate a Swedish version of such a program, Active Communication Education (ACE), which had been developed and previously evaluated in Australia (Hickson et.al, 2007a). Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the use of the ACE program in an older-old population of people aged 87 yr in Sweden. Research Design: A within-subject intervention study. Study Sample: The participants were recruited from the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment (ELSA), a population-based study of the functional abilities of all inhabitants of the city of Linkoping aged 85 yr in 2007. Participants who responded to the hearing related items in the ELSA study were approached for this study; 29 people agreed to undertake ACE, and 23 (79%) completed three or more sessions. Intervention: The ACE program consists of five weekly 2 hr group sessions with six to ten participants per group. Data Collection and Analysis: Self-report measures of communication strategy use, activity and participation, health-related quality of life, and depression were obtained preprogram, 3 wk postprogram, and 6 mo postprogram. Within-group changes and effect sizes were calculated. In addition, outcomes were measured postprogram using the International Outcome Inventory Alternative Interventions (IOI-AI; Noble, 2002) and a modified version of the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement (COSI; Dillon et al, 1997; Hickson et al, 2007b), and qualitative feedback was obtained. Results: The effect size of ACE was small (0.03-0.27), and, in the sample of 23 included in this pilot study, differences in pre- and postprogram assessments were not statistically significant. Results from the IOI-Al and the modified COSI indicated that these elderly participants found the program to be beneficial, and 90% stated that the course had increased their ability to deal with hearing loss and the problems it creates. Conclusions: This preliminary investigation indicates the potential benefits of ACE for older adults, and further research is needed with larger numbers of participants in different age groups to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the ACE program for a general Swedish population.

  • 200.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Active Communication Education program in two Swedish samples2012Conference paper (Other academic)
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