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  • 151.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Botaniksektionen.
    Lindenbergia2006In: Flora of Somalia, 2006, p. 282-284Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 152.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Botaniksektionen.
    Notulae Systematicae Lexicon Cactacearum Spectantes III: Rebutia2003In: Cactaceae Systematics Initiatives, ISSN 1470-9805, no 14, p. 9-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Botaniksektionen.
    Revision of the disjunct genus Campylanthus (Scrophulariaceae)2003In: Edinburgh J. Bot., Vol. 60, no 2, p. 131-174Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Botaniksektionen.
    Typification of Echinopsis pugionacantha2005In: Cactaceae Systematics Initiatives, ISSN 1470-9804, no 19, p. 24-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Hjertson, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Henrot, Jacqueline
    BSP TSG/3, Seria KB 3534, Brunei.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Campylanthus hajarensis sp. nov. and a new record of Campylanthus (Scrophulariaceae) from Oman2008In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 26, no 1-2, p. 35-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Campylanthus hajarensis sp. nov. from a limestone gorge in the Hajar Mts in northern Oman, is described and illustrated. This is the first species of Campylanthus to be discovered in northern Oman. In addition, Campylanthus antonii, previously known only from Yemen, is recorded from the Dhofar Region in Oman.

  • 156.
    Hjertson, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    A new species of Campylanthus (Scrophulariaceae) from Somalia2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 707-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Campylanthus reconditus sp. nov., from limestone hills in north-eastern Somalia, is described and illustrated.

  • 157. Hognabba, Filip
    et al.
    Pino-Bodas, Raquel
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Myllys, Leena
    Stenroos, Soili
    Phylogenetic position of the crustose Stereocaulon species2014In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships of Stereocaulon with emphasis on the crustose taxa were studied based on nuclear ribosomal ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and partial beta-tubulin sequences. The placement of four of the six crustose species currently included in the genus has previously been confirmed based on molecular data. It has, however, remained unresolved whether the crustose growth form is a plesiomorphic or apomorphic feature within Stereocaulon, due to contradictory placements of the crustose species in earlier studies. The aim of this study was to clarify the position of the crustose species by including additional data, especially of S. nivale and S. plicatile, which have not been included in previous analyses. The inclusion of S. plicatile in the genus is of particular interest as it is the only species in the genus with submurifrom to muriform ascospores. Altogether 37 specimens representing 31 species of the ingroup, including all the crustose Stereocaulon species, were incorporated in the analyses. Conventional, as well as direct optimization parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses were performed. The results show that the crustose species do not form a monophyletic entity and that the crustose growth form is a plesiomorphic feature within Stereocaulon. The crustose S. nivale and S. plicatile are nested within the genus and their inclusion in Stereocaulon is thereby confirmed. The nested position of S. plicatile indicates that the submuriform to muriform spore type has been gained independently within the genus. Here, S. plicatile is also reported for the first time from Scandinavia.

  • 158.
    Holm, L. & Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Proposal to conserve the name Sphaeria myriocarpa Fr. : Fr. (Fungi) with a conserved type1996In: Taxon, Vol. 45, p. 317-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 159. Holmqvist, Bertil
    et al.
    Nysten, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Bergkristall2004In: Geologiskt forum, ISSN 1104-4721, Vol. 11, no 41, p. 18-25Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 160.
    Holmqvist, Bertil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Nysten, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Smaragditgabbro i Alperna2002In: Geologiskt Forum, Vol. 34, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 161. Huerta-Espino, J.
    et al.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Velásquez, C.
    Herrera-Foessel, C.A.
    Figueroa-Lopez, P.
    First Report of Ramularia cercosporelloides on Carthamus tinctorius in Northwestern Mexico2006In: Plant Diseases, Vol. 90, p. 1552-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 162. Högström, Anette E. S.
    et al.
    Jensen, Sören
    Palacios, Teodoro
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    New information on the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition in the Vestertana Group, Finnmark, northern Norway, from trace fossils and organic-walled microfossils2013In: Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-196X, E-ISSN 1502-5322, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 95-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Vestertana Group on the Digermul Peninsula, Finnmark, northern Norway, presents one of the few, potentially continuous Ediacaran-Cambrian sections in Scandinavia. Trace fossils provide the main age constraint, with the boundary traditionally placed at the base of the Breidvika Formation. Here, we provide trace-fossil evidence to show that this boundary is at least as low as the third cycle of the Manndraperelva Member, Stahpogieddi Formation, where Treptichnus pedum is associated with trilobed trace fossils. Organic-walled microfossils from the same stratigraphic interval include Granomarginata prima and the first report from Scandinavia of Cochleatina. The second cycle of the Manndraperelva Member contains trace fossils, including treptichnids and ?Cochlichnus isp. tentatively interpreted as latest Ediacaran. Reports of palaeopascichnids suggest a late Ediacaran age for the first cycle. The age of lower parts of the Stahpogieddi Formation is poorly constrained but discoidal Ediacara-type fossils, vendotaenids, and possible simple trace fossils, suggest that the middle part of the Innerelva Member is younger than c. 560 Ma.

  • 163.
    Högström, Anette E. S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Sturkell, Erik
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Lindström, Maurits
    Ormo, Jens
    Concentric impact structures in the Palaeozoic of Sweden - the Lockne and Siljan craters2010In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 132, no 1, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ordovician age Lockne and Devonian Siljan craters are two of the largest impact structures in northern Europe. Both formed in targets with a thick, low-strength upper layer. This target configuration is known to generate concentric crater structures with an outer, shallow crater in the low-strength layer, surrounding a central, deeper crater in the more resistant substrate. The concentric craters of Lockne and Siljan are excellent models for studies of similar concentric craters on Earth and elsewhere in the Solar system. Several structural issues remain, and drilling through the craters within the Swedish Deep Drilling Program intends to address the following: the extent of the craters with respect to the time of impact; the effects of cratering on the basement; and the role of basement structure for the crater formation. A problem for the Lockne crater is the relation to the Caledonian orogeny and the lateral extension of the ejecta blanket - the rim is interrupted by a radial depression that has been interpreted both as primary and secondary, tectonically induced. A second feature to study is the deeper and older (1.82-1.80 Ga) NNW-SSE shear zones that cut the basement. In the Siljan area the development of mega block associations comprising the infilling of the graben is disputed. The blocks may either be formed by sagging of peripheral parts of the fault blocks or alternatively by major radial movement involving kilometre long transport.

  • 164.
    Högström, Anette
    et al.
    Tromsø universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Firsk, Åsa
    Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Zurich University.
    Om ett dike i Siljansringen – ett historiskt klimatperspektiv2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 165.
    Högström, Anette
    et al.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Evolution of early biota and complex ecosystems: the Digermul succession of northern Norway2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Högström, Anette
    et al.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    The Lower Cambrian Duolbasgaissa Formation, the Digermul Peninsula, northern Norway2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Högström, Anette
    et al.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Univerität Göttingen, Germany.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Novis, Linn K.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Agic, Heda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Moczydlowska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    New occurrences and extension of the stratigraphical range of discoidal Ediacara‑type fossils on the Digermul Peninsula, northern Norway2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Scandinavia the evolutionary events across the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition can only be studied in continuous section on the Digermul Peninsula, northern Norway, in the siliciclastic Stáhpogiedde Formation. This roughly 500 m-thick unit comprises, in ascending order, the Lillevannet, Innerelva and Manndraperelva members. Trace fossils, including Treptichnus pedum, and organic-walled microfossils, including Granomarginata prima, position the base of the Cambrian in the upper part of the Manndraperelva Member. Some 20 years ago discoidal Ediacara-type fossils were found in the middle part of Innerelva Member. Recent field seasons have provided abundant new material of Aspidella-type fossils and extended their stratigraphical range to within about 15 m above the Lillevannet Member. The exclusive presence of discoidal forms may reflect a taphonomic bias and/or be evidence of a greater age than that of the more diverse Ediacaran assemblages. That the latter may be the case is indicated by the stratigraphic proximity of the lowest occurrences of Aspidella to the Mortensnes diamictite, recently tentatively considered a Gaskiers glaciation equivalent (c.580 Ma). This raises the question of hitherto unrecognised breaks in sedimentation in the Stáhpogiedde Formation. In order to explore this question we have sampled the succession for organic-walled microfossils, detrital mineral geochronology and sediment geochemistry.

  • 168.
    Högström, Anette
    et al.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    New olenellid trilobites of the Digermul Peninsula, Finnmark, Northern Norway –Constraints on lower Cambrian biostratigraphy2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ediacaran to Early Ordovician succession on the Digermul Peninsula measures 1500m,mostly consisting of well-preserved siliciclastics. The Ediacaran–Cambrian transitionhere contains a rich suite of trace fossils comparable with that of the GSSP section inNewfoundland. New discoveries of Treptichnus pedum indicate that the upper part ofthe Manndraperelva Member is Cambrian. The first trilobites are found in the Uppermember of the Doulbasgaissa Formation. Previously only a few Kjerulfia lata specimenswere known, but fieldwork in the Summer of 2011 added new material of this species anda new Elliptocephala species. Both Kjerulfia lata and acritarchs place the trilobite-bearinglevel in the Holmia kjerulfia Assemblage Zone. The higher stratigraphic position of theDoulbasgaissa Formation suggested by Nielsen and Schovsbo (2011) is thus contradicted.With three olenellids and other shelly fauna, the Holmia kjerulfia Assemblage Zone in theMjösa area shows a diversity not seen on Digermul. However, the two olenellids in Digermulare unusual in Baltoscandia, where most species are known from isolated occurrences and fewor incomplete specimens. Comparison with the new material and constraints using acritarchsshould provide significant improvements on the correlation of this level in Baltoscandia.

  • 169.
    Högström, Anette
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Suzuki, Jutaro
    Armoured annelids and molluscs from the Upper Ordovician Boda Limestone, central Sweden2009In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 131, no 3, p. 245-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sclerites of machaeridians (Annelida) and polyplacophorans (Mollusca) from the UpperOrdovician (Katian–Hirnantian) Boda Limestone of the Siljan district, central Sweden are described forthe first time. Four taxa of machaeridians were found, but with one exception they are either known froma single isolated sclerite or only one type of sclerite. The largest taxon is represented by an inner modifiedsclerite of Plumulites sp. A from Osmundsberget Quarry. The complete scleritome is estimated to havereached a length of 12–15 cm. A more diverse material allows the description of Plumulites eueides sp.nov. from Kallholn Quarry. Within smaller cavities in Solberga Quarry minute sclerites of two taxa werefound; Lepidocoleus sp., and Turrilepas sp. The latter record represents the third known Ordovicianoccurrence and the youngest from that period. Association with minute blind trilobites andconcentrations of tiny articulated ostracodes suggest that these small cavities represented cryptichabitats. Two polyplacophoran sclerites are also described: one intermediate sclerite of Chelodes sp. Afrom Jutja¨rn Quarry, with only the outer surface exposed, and one intermediate sclerite of Spicuchelodes?sp. from Kallholn Quarry, with only the inner surface exposed. These represent rare examples ofOrdovician chitons recorded from outside Laurentian terranes.

  • 170.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Suzuki, Jutaro
    Late Ordovician sclerites in the Siljan District, Sweden.2007In: WOGOGOB 2007, 9th meeting of the WOrking Group on Ordovician Geology Of Baltoscandia: Fieldguide and Abstracts, 2007, p. 110-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Isolated and semi-articulated sclerites of machaeridians are common in the Upper Ordovician (lower Nabala Stage) Fjäcka Shale of the Siljan District in Sweden. The organic rich shale offers a high preservation potential, preserving a dysaerobic, quiet deepwater environment. In the succeeding carbonate mounds of the Boda Limestone (Nabala-Porkuni stage) machaeridians and other sclerite bearing animals have hitherto been unknown. Though still rare, the presence of various sclerites in environments such as the carbonate mud mounds is

    not surprising, as many of these taxa are widespread stratigraphically, geographically and environmentally.

    Amongst the machaeridian sclerites perhaps the most striking find are a few minute sclerites from pockets in the Kallholn and Solberga quarries. These animals are associated with minute fauna of gastropods, ostracodes and complete trilobites, which may have belonged to a cryptofauna. However, the presence of

    such faunas in the fossil record is difficult to prove. The diversity of the machaeridian sclerites is high with different genera represented in different settings; it also seems to indicate a higher presence of machaeridians than what is shown at present.

  • 171.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Wickström, Linda M.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    20-årsjubileum 2007: WOGOGOB2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 172.
    Högström, Anette
    et al.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    McIlroy, Duncan
    Memorial University of Newfoundland.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Agic, Heda
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palaeopascichnus from the Ediacaran of the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway and the age of the Varanger Ice Age2018In: 5th International Palaeontological Conference, 2018, p. 292-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palaeopascichnids are possibly the longest-ranging macroscopic Ediacaran fossils (ca. 565-542 Ma).They are bedding plane-parallel modular fossils composed of series of closely spaced millimeter sizedcircular, sausage- or kidney- shaped units. Earlier regarded as trace fossils, they are now seen as bodyfossils: possible xenophyophoran protists or protists of uncertain affinities. The Cryogenian to lower Cambrian succession (Vestertana group) exposed on the Digermulen Peninsula starts with the glacial Smalfjorden, interglacial Nyborg and glacial Mortensnes fms, collectively known as the Varanger Ice Age.Together with the succeeding Stáhpogieddi Fm. they reflect changes from global icehouse to greenhouse conditions. The Stáhpogieddi Fm. starts with the Lillevannet Mbr. followed by the Indreelva Mbr., yielding Ediacara-type fossils. The highest member in the Stáhpogieddi Fm, the Manndrapselva Mbr, contains the Ediacaran- Cambrian boundary. Palaeopascichnus is found at three horizons within the Stáhpogieddi Fm. The youngest, within the Manndrapselva Mbr., is latest Ediacaran, based on associated trace fossils, as well as occurring below trace fossils from the Treptichnus pedum ichnozone. Palaeopascichnus is also present near the base of the Manndrapselva Mbr. The oldest occurrence is from a horizon transitional between the Lillevannet and Indreelva Mbrs. Age constraints on the Varangerian glacial deposits are poor and their relationship to Neoproterozoic glacial events is equivocal. Studies over the last several decades have placed the Smalfjorden Fm. within the globally developed Marinoan glaciation (ca. 645–635 Ma) based on the presence of cap dolostones. The Mortensnes Fm. has been aligned within the Ediacaran Gaskiers glaciation(ca. 580 Ma) on the basis of carbon isotope stratigraphy. However, alternative interpretations exist,including that of a Marinoan affinity for all of the Varanger ice age. Palaeopascichnus at the Lillevannet Mbr. to Indreelva Mbr. transition indicates that this part of the succession is younger than 565 Ma. Because the transition between the Mortensnes Fm. and the succeeding Stáhpogieddi Fm. is seemingly without major breaks in sedimentation, this is consistent with a Gaskiers, or younger age for the Mortensnes Fm. An older age (Marinoan) requires the discovery of major breaks in the sedimentary record.

  • 173.
    Högström, Anette
    et al.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Novis, Linn
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ou, Zhiji
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Exploring the Ediacaran Biota of the Digermulen Peninsula, Northern Norway2015In: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol 47, no 7., 2015, Vol. 47Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digermulen Peninsula in northern Norway is the only locality that has yielded Ediacara-type fossils inScandinavia. The Peninsula exhibits an Ediacaran to Lower Ordovician succession consisting of roughly 3000 mof siliciclastic deposits formed in a foreland basin marginal to Baltica. In 2011 a restudy of the Ediacaran deposits(1000 m thick) was launched resulting in new finds that promise to establish the Digermulen Peninsula as asignificant new Ediacaran biota locality. First described in the 1990´s the assemblage is dominated by medusoidtypefossils, such as Cyclomedusa, Ediacaria?, Beltanella and Nimbia? now possibly reinterpreted astaphomorphs of the broadly defined Aspidella as exemplified by the Fermeuse assemblage in Newfoundland.Previous field seasons have produced abundant new material of discoidal forms (tentatively Aspidella), the lowestin stratigraphic proximity to the glacial Mortensnes diamictite (tentatively c. 580 Ma). Recent fieldwork during thesummer of 2015 yielded the first specimen of a multi-vaned Ediacara-type fossil from the Innerelva Member of theStáhpogiedde Formation not far from where the first discoidal fossils were found in the 90´s. Reconstructed toreach approximately 7.5 – 8 cm above the sediment surface this organism appears to have a roughly sphericalshape with three or more vanes, but more detailed study is needed. We know little of the holdfast structure but itappears to possess a generalized Aspidella-like morphology, emphasizing the variety of organisms that may havehad very similar holdfasts. In addition to Aspidella sp., well-preserved Hiemalora are present in these beds.Another important find are several specimens of Palaeopascichnus from near the base of the Innerelva Membermaking them the oldest non-stromatolite macroscopic fossils in Scandinavia. Future work for the DigermulenEarly Life Research Group will focus on extensive excavation and sampling of this important interval to increasethe understanding of the Ediacaran record on the Peninsula.

  • 174.
    Høyberget, Magne
    et al.
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Funke, Bjørn
    Gjelleråsveien 10, N–1481 Hagan, Norway.
    Nakrem, Hans Arne
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Pb.1172 Blindern, N–0318 Oslo, Norway.
    The shelly fauna and biostratigraphy of the lower Cambrian (provisional series 2, stage 4) Evjevik Member, Ringstrand Formation in the Mjøsa area, Norway2015In: Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-196x, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 23-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New, extensive fossil material collected in situ from the lower Cambrian Evjevik Member in the Mjøsa type area, southern Norway, allows a reevaluationof the faunal distribution and diversity of the ‘Ornamentaspislinnarssoni Zone. Described taxa include three holmiid, six ellipsocephalidand one eodiscoid trilobite in addition to five helcionelloid molluscs. A Holmia species with affinities to the Swedish H. lapponica is common in the Evjevik Member. Librigenae, thoracic segments and pygidia from the poorly known, but biostratigraphically important trilobite ’Ornamentaspislinnarssoni (Kiær, 1917) are documented for the first time. The species is redescribed and transferred to Ellipsocephalus. Helcionelloid molluscs arerepresented by Helcionella antiqua (Kiær, 1917), Stenotheca norvegica (Resser, 1938), Mackinnonia puppis n. sp., Mackinnonia? sp. and Latouchella sp.These are similar to taxa reported from coeval strata at Gislövshammar in southern Sweden and may prove to have biostratigraphical potential. TheHolmia kjerulfi Zone, the Ellipsocephalus linnarssoni Zone and the Comluella? scanicaEllipsocephalus lunatus Zone are readily recognised in theLower Allochthon of the Mjøsa area and are in this report treated as distinctive, successive zones. New illustrations are provided of the brachiopod Magnicanalis rotundata (Kiær, 1917), together with the enigmatic fossil Mongolitubulus Missarzhevsky, 1977, recorded for the first time in Norway.

  • 175.
    Høyberget, Magne
    et al.
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ei internasjonal gruppe forskere finner spor etter utviklingen av det første, komplekse økosystemet på kloden. De leter i Finnmark2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 176.
    Høyberget, Magne
    et al.
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fantastiske fossilfunn fra Finnmark2016In: Stein, ISSN 0802-9121, Vol. 1, p. 15-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 177.
    Høyberget, Magne
    et al.
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Fantastiske fossilfunn i Finnmark2017In: Naturen, Vol. 141, p. 94-100Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [no]

    Ei internasjonal forskergruppe har gjennom fem sesonger arbeidet på Digermulhalvøya i Vestertana, Finnmark og gjort oppsiktsvekkende fossilfunn. Dette dreier seg om intet mindre enn fossiler fra dyrerikets spede begynnelse og vil være med på å bidra til forståelsen av dyrerikets opprinnelse og evolusjon. Noen av de tidligste, flercellede organismene og symmetriens inntog i dyreriket er registrert og samlet inn. Disse blir omtalt som ediacarafossiler, eller ediacarafaunaen, og er vanskelige å plassere i dyregrupper vi kjenner i dag. De første krypesporene etter bilaterale dyr, med målrettede bevegelser på jakt etter næring og utviklingen mot den kambriske eksplosjonen blir forsket på og gir dermed et innblikk i det første, komplekse økosystemet på kloden vår. Dette er blant de funnene som i de neste årenes løp vil bli beskrevet av Digermulen Early Life Research Group, ledet fra Tromsø Museum.

  • 178.
    Iamonico, Duilio
    et al.
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Lab Phytogeog & Appl Geobot, Dept PDTA, Sect Environm & Landscape, I-00196 Rome, Italy..
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Typification of the Linnaean name Doronicum bellidiastrum (Asteraceae)2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 1304-1305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A lectotype is designated for the Linnaean name Doronicum bellidiastrum using material from LINN

  • 179. in Arcadia, Linda
    et al.
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    (2053) Proposal to conserve the name Megaspora verrucosa (Ach.) L. Arcadia & A. Nordin against M. verrucosa Hafellner & V. Wirth (lichenised Ascomycota)2012In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 464-465Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 180. Isakar, M.
    et al.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Lower Cambrian helcionelloid molluscs from Estonia2007In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 129, no 3, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pleurotomaria? kunda pik, 1926 was correctly referred to the genus Aldanella Vostokova, 1962 more than 30 years ago, although its affinities are still debated. It has been described by several authors as a gastropod on account of its helically coiled shell but it is here referred to the Class Helcionelloida, a group of Cambrian-Ordovician untorted molluscs which are usually bilaterally symmetrical. A sub-sutural, spiral muscle scar trace on the internal mould is described, as is a possible attachment area on the umbilical shoulder. Impressions of a prismatic shell structure are present in the apical region. In the lower Cambrian (proposed Cambrian Series 1) Kestla Member of the Lontova Formation, Aldanella kunda occurs together with Anabarella Vostokova, 1962, another helcionelloid that is also characteristic of Cambrian Series 1 in Siberia. Scenella(?) discinoides Schmidt, 1888 from the slightly younger Tiskre Formation (Cambrian Series 2) was originally assigned to a genus widely interpreted as a mollusc, but this species has been re-interpreted recently as a possible stem group brachiopod.

  • 181.
    Israelsson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Observations on some unusual cell types in the enigmatic worm Xenoturbella (phylum uncertain)2006In: Tissue & Cell, ISSN 0040-8166, E-ISSN 1532-3072, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 233-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inner epithelially organized gastrodermis of the enigmatic simple worms of the genus Xenoturbella contains numerous partly phagocytized cells of two kinds, ciliated cells (PCCs) and muscle cells (PMCs). PCCs and PMCs have features of undifferentiated cells and do not derive from differentiated adult cells. Homology of phagocytized cells to pulsatile bodies in acoel and nemertodermatid flatworms is therefore rejected. The phagocytized cells might represent an hitherto unknown process of regeneration in Xenoturbella. The phagocytized material contains as much DNA as in all mitochondria and nuclei of the living cells. This is probably caused by lack of digestion of nucleic acids. The genome size of Xenoturbella bocki was determined. It has a C-value of about 0.55 pg.

  • 182.
    Israelsson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Ultrastructural aspects of the 'statocyst' of Xenoturbella (Deuterostomia) cast doubt on its function as a georeceptor2007In: Tissue & Cell, ISSN 0040-8166, E-ISSN 1532-3072, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 171-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "statocyst" in the enigmatic worm Xenoturbella is a structure containing motile flagellated cells. It is situated inside the subepidermal membrane complex (between epidermis and muscular layers) in the anterior end of the body. The motile cells contain a lipophilic retractile body ("statolith"). and a series of vesicles from small dense core vesicles presumably formed from the retractile body to large vesicles with dense aggregates of filamentous tubules that become exocytized through secretion. It is unlikely that the statocyst is a georeceptor (true statocyst); maybe it has an endocrine function.

  • 183.
    Israelsson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Xenoturbella (Deuterostomia) probably feeds on dissolved organic matter2008In: Marine Biology Research, ISSN 1745-1000, E-ISSN 1745-1019, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 384-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enigmatic deuterostome Xenoturbella does ubiquitously contain exogenous nucleic acids. This has been used in several papers as proof of selective feeding by Xenoturbella on nuculid bivalves. However, their feeding biology is unknown and exogenous nucleic acids might not originate from their main nutrient source. I have examined the possible pathways of nutrient uptake. The animals neither took up cells nor dissolved dyes through the 'mouth'. Instead, they possessed extensive pinocytosis through the epidermis. Therefore, it is probable that the main source of nutrients is dissolved organic matter uptaken through the epidermis. This does not exclude that phagocytosis in the gastrodermis does occur, e.g. due to direct expose of the gastrodermis during asexual reproduction. The ubiquitously present exogenous nucleic acids in Xenoturbella probably do originate from such events and not from their main food source.

  • 184.
    Israelsson, Olle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Budd, Graham
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. paleobiologi.
    Eggs and embryos in Xenoturbella (phyllum uncertain) are not ingested prey.2005In: Dev. Genes Evol., Vol. 215, p. 358-363Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 185. Ito, Tsuyoshi
    et al.
    Nishimura, Takeshi D.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Takai, Masanaru
    Computed tomography examination of the face of Macaca anderssoni (Early Pleistocene, Henan, northern China): Implications for the biogeographic history of Asian macaques2014In: Journal of Human Evolution, ISSN 0047-2484, E-ISSN 1095-8606, Vol. 72, p. 64-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macaca anderssoni, a fossil macaque from the Early Pleistocene of northern China, has attracted much attention from researchers in terms of reconstructing the biogeographic history of Asian macaques, while its phylogenetic position remains debatable. In the present study, we evaluated patterns of variation in external and internal craniofacial morphologies among four phylogenetic groups of extant macaques (the fascicularis, sinica, silenus, and sylvanus groups), using computed tomography and multivariate analyses. We also reassessed the holotype of M. anderssoni, a partial cranium preserving the face and palate, to evaluate the phylogenetic group to which M. anderssoni is most closely related. Facial elongation was found to be significantly influenced by size. The particular combination of some allometric and non-allometric shape components was found to reflect phylogenetic relationships; however, these features of M. anderssoni fall intermediate among the four phylogenetic groups, with no typical similarities to any one group. The variations in nasal cavity shape were found to reflect phylogenetic relationships but those of the maxillary sinus did not. Macaca anderssoni has a nasal cavity that is laterally expanded anteriorly and constricted posteriorly, a unique morphology among macaques and shared only with larger members of the sinica group. This unique feature is considered to be a derived condition among macaques, suggesting that M. anderssoni is phylogenetically related to the sinica group (especially M. assamensis, M. thibetana, and M. arctoides) and that the populations of the sinica group were distributed in northern China during the Early Pleistocene. Currently, the populations of the sinica group are not distributed in northern East Asia, while those of the fascicularis group are. Thus, probably due to climatic deterioration in the Late Pleistocene, the former lineage has retreated southward or has become extinct in this region, being replaced by the latter lineage. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 186.
    Jaenson, TGT
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Tälleklint, L
    Lundqvist, L
    Olsen, B
    Chirico, J
    Mejlon, H
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Geographical distribution, host associations, and vector roles of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae, Argasidae) in Sweden.1994In: J Med Entomol, ISSN 0022-2585, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 240-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review covers the geographic distribution and host relationships of the tick species in Sweden. Ixodes uriae White, I. caledonicus Nuttall, I. unicavatus Neumann, I. arboricola Schulze & Schlottke, and I. lividus Koch are ornithophagous species. I. trianguliceps Birula, I. canisuga Johnston, I. hexagonus Leach, and Argas vespertilionis (Latreille) are mammalophagous. I. ricinus (L.) and Haemaphysalis punctata Canestrini & Fanzago feed on both birds and mammals. All these tick species may be considered to be permanently present in Sweden. I. persulcatus Schulze, Hyalomma marginatum Koch, and the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille), may be regarded as not indigenous to Sweden although they may be regularly introduced by spring-migrating birds or imported dogs, respectively. The first European record of the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Say), is reported. There are several records of Hyalomma aegyptium (L.) from imported tortoises in Sweden. Excluding other ticks imported on exotic pets and zoo animals, another 13 tick species are listed that may occur, at least occasionally, in Sweden. Because of its wide geographic distribution, great abundance, and wide host range, I. ricinus is medically the most important arthropod in northern Europe. I. ricinus is common in southern and south-central Sweden and along the coast of northern Sweden and has been recorded from 29 mammal species, 56 bird species, and two species of lizards in Sweden alone. The potential introduction to Sweden of exotic pathogens with infected ticks (e.g., I. persulcatus and H. marginatum on birds or Dermacentor spp. and R. sanguineus on mammals) is evident.

  • 187.
    Jaklitsch, Walter M.
    et al.
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci, Inst Forest Entomol Forest Pathol & Forest Protec, Dept Forest & Soil Sci, BOKU, Hasenauerstr 38, A-1190 Vienna, Austria.;Univ Vienna, Dept Bot & Biodivers Res, Div Systemat & Evolutionary Bot, Rennweg 14, A-1030 Vienna, Austria..
    Olariaga, Ibai
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Voglmayr, Hermann
    Univ Vienna, Dept Bot & Biodivers Res, Div Systemat & Evolutionary Bot, Rennweg 14, A-1030 Vienna, Austria..
    Teichospora and the Teichosporaceae2016In: Mycological progress, ISSN 1617-416X, E-ISSN 1861-8952, Vol. 15, no 3, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multigene analysis of a combined ITS, LSU, SSU, rpb2 and tef1 sequence data matrix was applied to infer the phylogenetic position of the genus Teichospora in the Pleosporales, based on isolates from freshly collected material of the generic type T. trabicola and several additional species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Misturatosphaeria and Floricola are synonyms of Teichospora. All species of these genera and several species recently described in the genus Curreya belong to Teichospora and are thus combined in this genus. Also, Melanomma radicans and Ramusculicola thailandica are combined in Teichospora. The new name Teichospora parva is established for Misturatosphaeria minima. Three new species, T. melanommoides, T. pusilla and T. rubriostiolata, are described, and an expanded description of T. mariae is given. The family Teichosporaceae is currently confined to Teichospora, which can be phylogenetically clearly separated from Lophiostoma, the type genus of the Lophiostomataceae. The family name Floricolaceae is a synonym of Teichosporaceae. All species described here form apically free paraphyses among immature asci. This finding contradicts the current general dogma that apically free paraphyses are absent in the Pleosporales and questions the wide use of the term pseudoparaphysis.

  • 188.
    Jensen, Soren
    et al.
    Univ Extremadura, Fac Ciencias, Area Paleontol, Ave Fis, Badajoz 06006, Spain.
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso Univ Museum, Nat Sci, N-9037 Tromso, Norway.
    Almond, John
    Nat Viva Cc, POB 12410,Mill St, ZA-8010 Cape Town, South Africa.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Geol Sci, Private Bag X3, ZA-7700 Rondebosch, South Africa.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Univ Goettingen, Geosci Ctr Goettingen, Dept Sedimentol & Environm Geol, Goldschmidtstr 3, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany;Keele Univ, Sch Geog Geol & Environm, Keele ST5 5BG, Staffs, England.
    Hoyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Agić, Heda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Dept Earth Sci, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Palacios, Teodoro
    Univ Extremadura, Fac Ciencias, Area Paleontol, Ave Fis, Badajoz 06006, Spain.
    Scratch circles from the Ediacaran and Cambrian of Arctic Norway and southern Africa, with a review of scratch circle occurrences2018In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 287-304Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scratch circles - bedding plane parallel sedimentary structures formed by the passive rotation of a tethered organism into the surrounding sediment - are relatively rare in the geological record. Here new occurrences of scratch circles are described from the Ediacaran-Cambrian Stahpogieddi Formation, Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway, and from the Ediacaran Nudaus and Urusis formations, Nama Group, of southern Africa. A literature survey confirms a previously noted concentration of scratch circles reported from shallow marine upper Ediacaran-lower Cambrian and paralic Carboniferous rocks. Scratch circle identification and nomenclature are discussed. The stratigraphical range of the trace fossils Treptichnus pedum and Gyrolithes isp. in the Stahpogieddi Formation are extended downward. Combined with earlier reports of Harlaniella podolica this adds new precision to the placement of the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary on the Digermulen Peninsula.

  • 189.
    Jensen, Soren
    et al.
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Tromso Univ Museum, N-9037 Tromso, Norway.
    Hoyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Univ Gottingen, Geosci Ctr, Goldschmidtstr 3, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany;Keele Univ, Sch Geog Geol & Environm, Keele ST5 5BG, Staffs, England.
    McIlroy, Duncan
    Mem Univ Newfoundland, Dept Earth Sci, St John, NF A1B 3X5, Canada.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Geol Sci, ZA-7701 Cape Town, South Africa.
    Agic, Heda
    Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Dept Earth Sci, 1006 Webb Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Palacios, Teodoro
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    New occurrences of Palaeopascichnus from the Stahpogieddi Formation, Arctic Norway, and their bearing on the age of the Varanger Ice Age2018In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 1253-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on new occurrences of the late Ediacaran problematicum Palaeopascichnus (Protista?) from the Stahpogieddi Formation, Arctic Norway. The stratigraphically lowest occurrences are in beds transitional between the Lillevannet and Indreelva members: the highest in the second cycle of the Manndrapselva Member, stratigraphically close to the lowest occurrences of Cambrian-type trace fossils. This establishes a long stratigraphical range of Palaeopascichnus on the Digermulen Peninsula, as has been previously documented from Newfoundland, South Australia, and elsewhere in Baltica. The age range of Palaeopascichnus in Avalonia and Baltica is from similar to 565 to 541 Ma. Since the transition from the Mortensnes Formation to the Stahpogieddi Formation is without a major break in sedimentation, this supports the inference that the underlying glacigenic Mortensnes Formation is ca. 580 Ma, and therefore Gaskiers-equivalent, or younger.

  • 190.
    Jensen, Sören
    et al.
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Agic, Heda
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Trace fossils across the Ediacaran–Cambrian boundary on the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2017In: ISECT 2017, Memorial University, St. Johns , 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway, contains one of the most complete Ediacaran–Cambrian sedimentary rock successions on Baltica. The boundary interval spans the Manndrapselva Mbr of the Stáhpogieddi Fm. and the Lower Mbr of the Breidvika Fm., consisting of several coarsening upward cycles, each less than 100 meters thick, dominated by mudstone and sandstone, and terminated by shallow-marine sandstone. Nigel Banks established the general succession of trace fossils in the 1970's, with additional information added more recently by Duncan McIlroy and members of the Digermulen Early Life Research Group.

                          The second cycle of the Manndrapselva Mbr is late Ediacaran on the presence of the problematicum Harlaniella podolica. Trace fossils in this cycle include Planolites, Torrowangea rosei and, uniquely for the Digermulen succession, the horizontal cork-screw shaped Helicolithus. A report of treptichnids is here revised as vertically meandering trace fossils. The greatest trace fossil width in this sequence is 8 mm, although most are a few mm wide; recorded depth less than 10 mm. Close to the base of the third cycle of the Manndrapselva Mbr Treptichnus pedum and Gyrolithes appear. Harlaniella and the lowest occurrences of T. pedum and Gyrolithes are separated by some 30 metres of a sandstone-dominated interval from which trace fossils have not been recovered to date. Higher in the third cycle three-lobed trace fossils of the “Bure ichnocomplex” are found. Treptichnus pedum, Gyrolithes and trace fossils of the Bure ichnocomplex continue into the Lower Mbr of the Breidvika Fm., with T. pedum and Gyrolithes of larger size than found in the Manndrapselva Mbr. In addition there are Rusophycus and rare Teichichnus. The Treptichnus pedum Zone on the Digermulen Peninsula spans about 100 metres of section.

                          The general validity of global Ediacaran–Cambrian trace fossil-based correlation has stood the test of time. The succession of trace fossils and problematica on the Digermulen Peninsula allows for particularly close comparison with that of the GSSP section on the Burin Peninsula, Newfoundland, as well as Podolia, Ukraine. Important future challenges include better control on the age of the base of the T. pedum Zone, as well as that of the base of the Rusophycus avalonensis Zone, and the identification of possible diachroneities of these zones, where this is not obviously the result of facies unsuited for trace fossil preservation.

  • 191.
    Ji, Xue-Ping
    et al.
    Yunnan Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology & Research Center for Southeast Asian Archeology Kunming 650118, China.
    Jablonski, Nina G.
    Department of Anthropology, the Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA 16802, USA.
    Tong, Hao-Wen
    Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100044, China.
    Su, Denise F.
    Department of Paleobotany and Paleoecology, Cleveland Museum of Natural History Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Liu, Cheng-Wu
    Qujing Institute of Cultural Relics Qujing 655000, Yunnan, China.
    Yu, Teng-Song
    Zhaotong Institute of Cultural Relics Zhaotong, 657000, Yunnan, China.
    Tapirus yunnanensis from Shuitangba, a terminal Miocenehominoid site in Zhaotong, Yunnan Province of China2015In: Vertebrata Palasiatica, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 177-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fossil tapirid records of Late Miocene and Early Pliocene were quite poor in Chinaas before known. The recent excavations of the terminal Miocene hominoid site (between 6 and6.5 Ma) at Shuitangba site, Zhaotong in Yunnan Province resulted in the discovery of rich tapirfossils, which include left maxilla with P2-M2 and mandibles with complete lower dentitions.The new fossil materials can be referred to Tapirus yunnanensis, which represents a quite small species of the genus Tapirus. But T. yunnanensis is slightly larger than another Late Miocenespecies T. hezhengensis from Gansu, northwest China, both of which are remarkably smallerthan the Plio-Pleistocene Tapirus species in China. The new fossils provided more information todefine the species T. yunnanensis more precisely. Yunnan can be regarded as one of the centers oftapir evolution during the Mid-Late Miocene period, as quite a number of Mid-Late Miocene tapirfossils have been recovered in several localities of Yunnan, which include Xiaolongtan, Yuanmou,Lufeng, Zhaotong and others. Based on the measurements of tooth size, the late Cenozoic tapirswere generally getting larger gradually through time in China, which means the tooth sizescoincide well with their geological ages, the later the larger, and all the Mid-Late Miocene tapirsare exclusively small-sized; thus, the tooth size of fossil tapirs in China is likely to have somesignificance in age estimation. By contrary, both the dwarf and the normal-sized or larger-sizedtapirs were discovered from Mid-Late Miocene strata in Europe and North America.

  • 192.
    Jirak, Daniel
    et al.
    Inst Clin & Expt Med, Dept Diagnost & Intervent Radiol, MR Unit, Prague 14021, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Med Fac 1, Inst Biophys & Informat, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Janacek, Jiri
    Acad Sci Czech Republic, Inst Physiol, Dept Biomath, CR-14220 Prague, Czech Republic..
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A combined MR and CT study for precise quantitative analysis of the avian brain2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 16002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain size is widely used as a measure of behavioural complexity and sensory-locomotive capacity in avians but has largely relied upon laborious dissections, endoneurocranial tissue displacement, and physical measurement to derive comparative volumes. As an alternative, we present a new precise calculation method based upon coupled magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT). Our approach utilizes a novel interactive Fakir probe cross-referenced with an automated CT protocol to efficiently generate total volumes and surface areas of the brain tissue and endoneurocranial space, as well as the discrete cephalic compartments. We also complemented our procedures by using sodium polytungstate (SPT) as a contrast agent. This greatly enhanced CT applications but did not degrade MR quality and is therefore practical for virtual brain tissue reconstructions employing multiple imaging modalities. To demonstrate our technique, we visualized sex-based brain size differentiation in a sample set of Ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). This revealed no significant variance in relative volume or surface areas of the primary brain regions. Rather, a trend towards isometric enlargement of the total brain and endoneurocranial space was evidenced in males versus females, thus advocating a non-differential sexually dimorphic pattern of brain size increase amongst these facultatively flying birds.

  • 193. Jorgensen, Per M.
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Wedin, Mats
    (2143) Proposal to conserve the name Fuscopannaria against Moelleropsis (lichenized Ascomycota)2013In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 629-629Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Juhlin, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Sturkell, E.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lehnert, O.
    Högström, A. E. S.
    Meinhold, G.
    A new interpretation of the sedimentary cover in the western Siljan Ring area, central Sweden, based on seismic data2012In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 580, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new reflection seismic profiles over the Paleozoic successions of the western part of the Siljan Ring impact structure show a contrasting seismic signature. The more southerly c. 10. km long Mora profile reveals a highly disturbed structure, with only a few kilometers of relatively horizontally layered structures observed. However, interpretations of refracted arrivals in the data, that can be correlated to reflections, indicate the Silurian clastic rocks to be about 200. m thick in the central part of the profile. Weak reflections from about 600. m depth suggest a 400. m thick Ordovician limestone sequence to be present. Cores from the area show a mainly shale lithology for the Silurian and only a thin sequence of Ordovician strata, suggesting a rapid thickening of the Ordovician towards the north. On the more northern c. 12. km Orsa profile clear reflections from the Paleozoic successions are seen along the entire profile, except on the southernmost few kilometers. Based on interpretations of refracted arrivals, the Silurian succession appears to be considerably thinner here, and possibly absent at some locations. The Ordovician is also interpreted to be thinner in this area, with a maximum thickness of about 200-300. m along most of the profile. A deeper reflection from about 2. km within the crystalline basement may represent a dolerite sill. The lack of clear basement reflections on the Mora profile can be attributed to near-surface conditions and the acquisition geometry. The seismic data and recent coring in the area suggest the presence of a deeper paleo-basin towards the southwest with significantly more shales being deposited and the Paleozoic successions being severely disturbed. The shallow coring and seismic data will help form the basis for locating future boreholes for deeper drilling to study impact processes and the Paleozoic evolution of central Sweden.

  • 195. Jørgensen, Per Magnus
    et al.
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Proposal to reject the name Lecidea epiploica (lichenized Ascomycota)2009In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 108, p. 1003-1004Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Kear, Benjamin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Larsson, Dennis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Lindgren, Johan
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden..
    Kundrat, Martin
    Univ Pavol Jozef Safarik, Fac Sci, Ctr Interdisciplinary Biosci, Jesenna 5, Sk Kosice, Slovakia..
    Exceptionally prolonged tooth formation in elasmosaurid plesiosaurians2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0172759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elasmosaurid plesiosaurians were globally prolific marine reptiles that dominated the Mesozoic seas for over 70 million years. Their iconic body-plan incorporated an exceedingly long neck and small skull equipped with prominent intermeshing 'fangs'. How this bizarre dental apparatus was employed in feeding is uncertain, but fossilized gut contents indicate a diverse diet of small pelagic vertebrates, cephalopods and epifaunal benthos. Here we report the first plesiosaurian tooth formation rates as a mechanism for servicing the functional dentition. Multiple dentine thin sections were taken through isolated elasmosaurid teeth from the Upper Cretaceous of Sweden. These specimens revealed an average of 950 daily incremental lines of von Ebner, and infer a remarkably protracted tooth formation cycle of about 2-3 years-other polyphyodont amniotes normally take similar to 1-2 years to form their teeth. Such delayed odontogenesis might reflect differences in crown length and function within an originally uneven tooth array. Indeed, slower replacement periodicity has been found to distinguish larger caniniform teeth in macrophagous pliosaurid plesiosaurians. However, the archetypal sauropterygian dental replacement system likely also imposed constraints via segregation of the developing tooth germs within discrete bony crypts; these partly resorbed to allow maturation of the replacement teeth within the primary alveoli after displacement of the functional crowns. Prolonged dental formation has otherwise been linked to tooth robustness and adaption for vigorous food processing. Conversely, elasmosaurids possessed narrow crowns with an elongate profile that denotes structural fragility. Their apparent predilection for easily subdued prey could thus have minimized this potential for damage, and was perhaps coupled with selective feeding strategies that ecologically optimized elasmosaurids towards more delicate middle trophic level aquatic predation.

  • 197.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Editorial2018In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 155-156Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Aplin, Ken P.
    Smithsonian Inst, Div Mammals, Natl Museum Nat Hist, POB 37012, Washington, DC 20013 USA..
    Westerman, Michael
    La Trobe Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Evolut, Melbourne, Vic 3086, Australia..
    Bandicoot fossils and DNA elucidate lineage antiquity amongst xeric-adapted Australasian marsupials2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 37537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bandicoots (Peramelemorphia) are a unique order of Australasian marsupials whose sparse fossil record has been used as prima facie evidence for climate change coincident faunal turnover. In particular, the hypothesized replacement of ancient rainforest-dwelling extinct lineages by antecedents of xeric-tolerant extant taxa during the late Miocene (-10 Ma) has been advocated as a broader pattern evident amongst other marsupial clades. Problematically, however, this is in persistent conflict with DNA phylogenies. We therefore determine the pattern and timing of bandicoot evolution using the first combined morphological + DNA sequence dataset of Peramelemorphia. In addition, we document a remarkably archaic new fossil peramelemorphian taxon that inhabited a latest Quaternary mosaic savannah-riparian forest ecosystem on the Aru Islands of Eastern Indonesia. Our phylogenetic analyses reveal that unsuspected dental homoplasy and the detrimental effects of missing data collectively obscure stem bandicoot relationships. Nevertheless, recalibrated molecular clocks and multiple ancestral area optimizations unanimously infer an early diversification of modern xeric-adapted forms. These probably originated during the late Palaeogene (30-40 Ma) alongside progenitors of other desert marsupials, and thus occupied seasonally dry heterogenous habitats long before the onset of late Neogene aridity.

  • 199.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fordyce, R. Ewan
    Univ Otago, Dept Geol, Post Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand.
    Hiller, Norton
    Canterbury Museum, Rolleston Ave, Christchurch 8013, New Zealand.
    Siversson, Mikael
    Western Australian Museum, 49 Kew St, Welshpool, WA 6106, Australia.
    A palaeobiogeographical synthesis of Australasian Mesozoic marine tetrapods2018In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 461-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kear, B.P., Fordyce, R.E., Hiller, N. & Siversson, M., December 2017. A palaeobiogeographical synthesis of Australasian Mesozoic marine tetrapods. Alcheringa 42, 461-486. ISSN 0311-5518.THE LAST 15years has witnessed a blossoming of research on Australasian Mesozoic marine tetrapod fossils. Much of this work has focused on amniotes, particularly those from the prolific Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) Lagerstatten of the Eromanga Basin in central and eastern Australia, and Upper Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) sequences of the North and South islands of New Zealand. However, rare and less popularized remains have also been found in Lower Triassic-mid-Cretaceous rocks from Australia, New Zealand and the Chatham Islands, and on the tectonically proximal landmasses of New Caledonia and Timor. Currently identified taxa include estuarine-paralic rhytidostean, brachyopid, capitosaurian and trematosaurian temnospondyls from the earliest Triassic (Induan-Olenekian), Middle-Late Triassic (Anisian-Norian) eosauropterygians, and mixosaurian, shastasaurian and euichthyosaurian ichthyosaurians, Early-Middle Jurassic (Sinemurian-Bajocian) ichthyosaurians, together with plesiosauroid and rhomaleosaurid-like plesiosaurians, and diverse Early (Aptian-Albian) through to Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) elasmosaurid, leptocleidid, polycotylid, probable cryptoclidid and pliosaurid plesiosaurians, as well as ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurians, sea turtles incorporating protostegids, and mosasaurid squamates. This faunal succession evidences almost continuous occupation of southern high-palaeolatitude seas, and repeated endemic diversifications (including nascent members of some key lineages) amongst emigrant cosmopolitan clades. The primary dispersal routes are likely to have been peri-Gondwanan, with coastal migrations along the western Tethys and polar margins of the Panthalassan Ocean. However, augmentation by increasing continental fragmentation and seaway corridor connectivity probably occurred from the Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. Latest Cretaceous mosasaurid and elasmosaurid taxa also reveal regional affinities with the emergent western Pacific and Weddellian austral bioprovinces. The extreme rarity, or complete absence, of many major groups prevalent elsewhere in Gondwana (e.g., tanystropheids, Triassic sauropterygians, bothremydid marine turtles, thalattosuchians and dyrosaurid crocodylomorphs) is conspicuous, and might be related to stratigraphical/collecting biases, or the predominantly higher-palaeolatitude, cooler-water Mesozoic palaeogeography of the Australasian region. Although the burgeoning record is substantial, much still awaits discovery and adequate documentation; thus Australasia is still one of the most exciting prospects for future insights into the global history of Mesozoic marine tetrapods.

  • 200.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lindgren, Johan
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Solvegatan 12, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Hurum, Jorn H.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Postboks 1172, N-0318 Oslo, Norway.;UNIS, Univ Ctr Svalbard, Postboks 156, N-9171 Longyearbyen, Norway..
    Milan, Jesper
    Ostsjaellands Museum, Geomuseum Faxe, Ostervej 2, DK-3640 Faxe, Denmark.;Nat Hist Museum Denmark, Oster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark..
    Vajda, Vivi
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Solvegatan 12, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.;Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Palaeobiol, Postboks 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    An introduction to the Mesozoic biotas of Scandinavia and its Arctic territories2016In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mesozoic biotas of Scandinavia have been studied for nearly two centuries. However, the last 15 years have witnessed an explosive advance in research, most notably on the richly fossiliferous Triassic (Olenekian-Carnian) and Jurassic (Tithonian) Lagerstatten of the Norwegian Arctic Svalbard archipelago, Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Kristianstad Basin and Vomb Trough of Skane in southern Sweden, and the UNESCO heritage site at Stevns Klint in Denmark - the latter constituting one of the most complete Cretaceous-Palaeogene (Maastrichtian-Danian) boundary sections known globally. Other internationally significant deposits include earliest (Induan) and latest Triassic (Norian-Rhaetian) strata from the Danish autonomous territory of Greenland, and the Early Jurassic (Sinemurian-Pliensbachian) to Early Cretaceous (Berriasian) rocks of southern Sweden and the Danish Baltic island of Bornholm, respectively. Marine palaeocommunities are especially well documented, and comprise prolific benthic macroinvertebrates, together with pelagic cephalopods, chondrichthyans, actinopterygians and aquatic amniotes (ichthyopterygians, sauropterygians and mosasauroids). Terrestrial plant remains (lycophytes, sphenophytes, ferns, pteridosperms, cycadophytes, bennettitaleans and ginkgoes), including exceptionally well-preserved carbonized flowers, are also world famous, and are occasionally associated with faunal traces such as temnospondyl amphibian bones and dinosaurian footprints. While this collective documented record is substantial, much still awaits discovery. Thus, Scandinavia and its Arctic territories represent some of the most exciting

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