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  • 151.
    Gandaglia, G.
    et al.
    San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Strittmatter, F.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    La Croce, G.
    San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Benigni, F.
    San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Bettiga, A.
    San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Castiglione, F.
    San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Moschini, M.
    San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Mistretta, F.
    San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Gratzke, C.
    Munich University, Germany.
    Montorsi, F.
    San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Stief, C.
    Munich University, Germany.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor oleoyl ethyl amide counteracts bladder overactivity in female rats2014In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, ISSN 0733-2467, E-ISSN 1520-6777, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 1251-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To study micturition and bladder overactivity in female rats after chronic treatment with the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor oleoyl ethyl amide (OEtA).

    METHODS:

    Sprague-Dawley rats received daily subcutaneous injections of OEtA (0.3 mg/kg), or vehicle for 2 weeks. Cystometries, organ bath studies, Western blot, and immunofluorescence were then used. Expressions of FAAH, cannabinoid 1 and 2 receptors (CB1 and CB2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), vesicular acetyl choline-transporter protein (VAChT), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were evaluated.

    RESULTS:

    At baseline, OEtA-treated rats had higher values (P < 0.05) of micturition intervals (MI) and volumes (MV), bladder capacity (BC), threshold pressure, and flow pressure than vehicle controls. Intravesical PGE2 reduced MI, MV, and BC, and increased basal pressure and the area under the curve in all rats. However, these urodynamic parameters were altered less by intravesical PGE2 in OEtA-treated rats (P < 0.05 vs. vehicle controls). Compared to vehicle controls, detrusor from OEtA-treated rats had larger contractions to carbachol at 10-0.1 µM, but no difference in Emax was recorded. FAAH, CB1, CB2, VAChT, or CGRP was similarly expressed in bladders from all rats. In separate experiments, intravesical OEtA increased mucosal expression of phosphorylated MAPK.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Chronic FAAH inhibition altered sensory urodynamic parameters and reduced bladder overactivity. Even if it cannot be excluded that OEtA may act on central nervous sensory pathways to contribute to these effects, the presence of FAAH and CB receptors in the bladder and activation of intracellular signals for CB receptors by intravesical OEtA suggest a local role for FAAH in micturition control. Neurourol. Urodynam

  • 152.
    Gawel, Danuta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Serra-Musach, Jordi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lilja, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aagesen, Jesper
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Arenas, Alex
    Univ Rovira and Virgili, Spain.
    Asking, Bengt
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Bengner, Malin
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Bjorkander, Janne
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Biggs, Sophie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Köpsén, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jung Lee, Eun Jung
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Li, Xinxiu
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Martinez, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schafer, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Sonmez, Ceylan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Tjärnberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Shalek, Alex K.
    MIT, MA 02139 USA; Broad Inst MIT and Harvard, MA 02142 USA; Ragon Inst MGH MIT and Harvard, MA USA.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden; Inst Clin Sci, Sweden.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    A validated single-cell-based strategy to identify diagnostic and therapeutic targets in complex diseases2019In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 11, article id 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Genomic medicine has paved the way for identifying biomarkers and therapeutically actionable targets for complex diseases, but is complicated by the involvement of thousands of variably expressed genes across multiple cell types. Single-cell RNA-sequencing study (scRNA-seq) allows the characterization of such complex changes in whole organs.

    Methods

    The study is based on applying network tools to organize and analyze scRNA-seq data from a mouse model of arthritis and human rheumatoid arthritis, in order to find diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Diagnostic validation studies were performed using expression profiling data and potential protein biomarkers from prospective clinical studies of 13 diseases. A candidate drug was examined by a treatment study of a mouse model of arthritis, using phenotypic, immunohistochemical, and cellular analyses as read-outs.

    Results

    We performed the first systematic analysis of pathways, potential biomarkers, and drug targets in scRNA-seq data from a complex disease, starting with inflamed joints and lymph nodes from a mouse model of arthritis. We found the involvement of hundreds of pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets that differed greatly between cell types. Analyses of scRNA-seq and GWAS data from human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) supported a similar dispersion of pathogenic mechanisms in different cell types. Thus, systems-level approaches to prioritize biomarkers and drugs are needed. Here, we present a prioritization strategy that is based on constructing network models of disease-associated cell types and interactions using scRNA-seq data from our mouse model of arthritis, as well as human RA, which we term multicellular disease models (MCDMs). We find that the network centrality of MCDM cell types correlates with the enrichment of genes harboring genetic variants associated with RA and thus could potentially be used to prioritize cell types and genes for diagnostics and therapeutics. We validated this hypothesis in a large-scale study of patients with 13 different autoimmune, allergic, infectious, malignant, endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular diseases, as well as a therapeutic study of the mouse arthritis model.

    Conclusions

    Overall, our results support that our strategy has the potential to help prioritize diagnostic and therapeutic targets in human disease.

  • 153.
    Geetha, Duvuru
    et al.
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Hruskova, Zdenka
    Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic .
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Hogan, Jonathan
    Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.
    Morgan, Matthew D
    University of Birmingham, UK .
    Cavero, Teresa
    Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain .
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Seo, Philip
    John Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA.
    Manno, Rebecca L
    John Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA.
    Dale, Jessica
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Harper, Lorraine
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Tesar, Vladimir
    Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic .
    Jayne, David Rw
    Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK .
    Rituximab for treatment of severe renal disease in ANCA associated vasculitis2016In: JN. Journal of Nephrology (Milano. 1992), ISSN 1121-8428, E-ISSN 1724-6059, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 195-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Rituximab (RTX) is approved for remission induction in ANCA associated vasculitis (AAV). However, data on use of RTX in patients with severe renal disease is lacking.

    Methods

    We conducted a retrospective multi-center study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of RTX with glucocorticoids (GC) with and without use of concomitant cyclophosphamide (CYC) for remission induction in patients presenting with e GFR less than 20 ml/min/1.73 m2. We evaluated outcomes of remission at 6 months (6 M), renal recovery after acute dialysis at diagnosis, e-GFR rise at 6 M, patient and renal survival and adverse events.

    Results

    A total 37 patients met the inclusion criteria. The median age was 61 years. (55–73), 62 % were males, 78 % had new diagnosis and 59 % were MPO ANCA positive. The median (IQR) e-GFR at diagnosis was 13 ml/min/1.73 m2 (7–16) and 15 required acute dialysis. Eleven (30 %) had alveolar hemorrhage. Twelve (32 %) received RTX with GC, 25 (68 %) received RTX with GC and CYC and seventeen (46 %) received plasma exchange. The median (IQR) follow up was 973 (200–1656) days. Thirty two of 33 patients (97 %) achieved remission at 6 M and 10 of 15 patients (67 %) requiring dialysis recovered renal function. The median prednisone dose at 6 M was 6 mg/day. The mean (SD) increase in e-GFR at 6 months was 14.5 (22) ml/min/m2. Twelve patients developed ESRD during follow up. There were 3 deaths in the first 6 months. When stratified by use of concomitant CYC, there were no differences in baseline e GFR, use of plasmapheresis, RTX dosing regimen or median follow up days between the groups. No differences in remission, renal recovery ESRD or death were observed.

    Conclusions

    This study of AAV patients with severe renal disease demonstrates that the outcomes appear equivalent when treated with RTX and GC with or without concomitant CYC.

  • 154.
    Gerbek, Tina
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ebbesen, Maria
    Univ Hosp Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nersting, Jacob
    Univ Hosp Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Frandsen, Thomas L.
    Univ Hosp Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lindqvist Appell, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schmiegelow, Kjeld
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Role of TPMT and ITPA variants in mercaptopurine disposition2018In: Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology, ISSN 0344-5704, E-ISSN 1432-0843, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 579-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To explore the levels of thioguanine incorporated into DNA (DNA-TG), and erythrocyte levels of 6-thioguanine nucleotides (Ery-TGN) and methylated metabolites (Ery-MeMP) during 6-mercaptopurine (6MP)/Methotrexate (MTX) therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and the relation to inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) and thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) gene variants. Blood samples were drawn during 6MP/MTX maintenance therapy from 132 children treated for ALL at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. The samples were analysed for thiopurine metabolites and compared to TPMT (rs1800460 and rs1142345) and ITPA (rs1127354) genotypes. Median DNA-TG (mDNA-TG) levels were higher in TPMT and ITPA low-activity patients as compared to wildtype patients (TPMT (LA) 549 vs. 364 fmol/A mu g DNA, p = 0.007, ITPA (LA) 465 vs. 387 fmol/A mu g DNA, p = 0.04). mDNA-TG levels were positively correlated to median Ery-TGN (mEry-TGN)(r (s) = 0.37, p = 0.001), but plateaued at higher mEry-TGN levels. DNA-TG indices (mDNA-TG/mEry-TGN) were 42% higher in TPMT (WT) patients as compared to TPMT (LA) patients but no difference in DNA-TG indices was observed between ITPA (WT) and ITPA (LA) patients (median 1.7 vs. 1.6 fmol/A mu g DNA/ nmol/mmol Hb, p = 0.81). DNA-TG indices increased with median Ery-MeMP (mEry-MeMP) levels (r (s) = 0.25, p = 0.001). TPMT and ITPA genotypes significantly influence the metabolism of 6MP. DNA-TG may prove to be a more relevant pharmacokinetic parameter for monitoring 6MP treatment intensity than cytosolic metabolites. Prospective trials are needed to evaluate the usefulness of DNA-TGN for individual dose adjustments in childhood ALL maintenance therapy.

  • 155.
    Gillies, Michael A.
    et al.
    Royal Infirm Edinburgh NHS Trust, Scotland.
    Pearse, Rupert
    Royal London Hosp, England.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Peri-operative goal-directed therapy A definitive answer remains elusive2018In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 35, no 7, p. 467-468Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 156.
    Gingnell, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Alaie, Iman
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bjorkstrand, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Faria, Vanda
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Reis, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wahlstedt, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Combining escitalopram and cognitive-behavioural therapy for social anxiety disorder: randomised controlled fMRI trial2016In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 209, no 3, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) are often used concomitantly to treat social anxiety disorder (SAD), but few studies have examined the effect of this combination. Aims To evaluate whether adding escitalopram to internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) improves clinical outcome and alters brain reactivity and connectivity in SAD. Method Double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled neuroimaging trial of ICBT combined either with escitalopram (n=24) or placebo (n=24), including a 15-month clinical follow-up (trial registration: ISRCTN24929928). Results Escitalopram+ICBT, relative to placebo+ICBT, resulted in significantly more clinical responders, larger reductions in anticipatory speech state anxiety at post-treatment and larger reductions in social anxiety symptom severity at 15-month follow-up and at a trend-level = 0.09) at post-treatment. Right amygdala reactivity to emotional faces also decreased more in the escitalopram+ICBT combination relative to placebo+ICBT, and in treatment responders relative to non-responders. Conclusions Adding escitalopram improves the outcome of ICBT for SAD and decreased amygdala reactivity is important for anxiolytic treatment response.

  • 157.
    Ginstman, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Frisk, Jessica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Ärlemalm, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Plasma concentrations of etonogestrel in women using oral desogestrel before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: a pharmacokinetic study2019In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 126, no 4, p. 486-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To investigate whether Roux‐en‐Y gastric bypass (RYGB) affects oral desogestrel (etonogestrel) pharmacokinetics.

    Design

    Single centre, open label, phase‐2 pharmacokinetic study.

    Setting

    University hospital of Linköping, Sweden.

    Population

    Fourteen women with planned RYGB surgery were included; nine women aged 18–45 years using 75 micrograms desogestrel completed the study.

    Methods

    Steady‐state etonogestrel pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were measured on three occasions for each individual (at 8 ± 6 weeks before surgery, and at 12 ± 2 and 52 ± 2 weeks after surgery). Each patient served as her own control. On each occasion, serum samples were collected during a 24‐hour period and etonogestrel concentrations were determined with ultra‐performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Main outcome measures

    Area under the plasma concentration time curve of etonogestrel (AUC0–24 hours).

    Results

    All women had significant postoperative weight loss. There were no significant differences in AUC0–24 hours, terminal half‐lives (t½), time to peak serum concentrations (Tmax), or apparent oral clearances of etonogestrel (CLoral) before and after gastric bypass surgery on any occasion. Peak serum concentrations (Cmax) increased after 52 ± 2 weeks compared with preoperative values (0.817 ng/ml versus 0.590 ng/ml, P = 0.024).

    Conclusion

    To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effects on desogestrel pharmacokinetics after RYGB. This study did not reveal any clinically significant changes in etonogestrel pharmacokinetics, suggesting that oral desogestrel may be used by women after RYGB surgery. The sample size was limited, however, and therefore the results should be interpreted cautiously.

  • 158.
    Glasin, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björk Wilhelms, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine.
    Wireless vitals: Proof of concept for wireless patient monitoring in an emergency department setting2019In: Journal of Biophotonics, ISSN 1864-063X, E-ISSN 1864-0648, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e201800275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vital sign assessment is a common task in emergency medicine, but resources for continuous monitoring are restricted, data is often recorded manually, and entangled wires cause frustration. Therefore, we designed a small, wireless photoplethysmographic device capable of continuously assessing pulse, respiratory frequency and oxygen saturation on the sternum and tested the performance and feasibility in an emergency department setting. Fifty (56.3 20.2 years), consenting emergency patients (29 male) were recruited. Heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were recorded simultaneously using the device and standard monitoring equipment. Data was compared using Bland-Altman plotting (heart rate, respiratory rate) and mean difference (oxygen saturation). The bias for heart- and respiratory rate was 0.4 (limits of agreements -11.3, 12.2 and -6.1, 7.0). Mean difference for oxygen saturation was -0.21 +/- 2.35%. This may be the first wireless device to use photoplethysmography on the sternum for vital sign assessment. We noted good agreement with standard monitors, but lack of standardization in data processing between monitoring systems may limit the generalizability of these findings. Although further improvements are needed, the feasibility of this approach provides proof of concept for a new paradigm of large scale, wireless patient monitoring.

  • 159.
    Golster, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Seven years of patient-controlled epidural analgesia in a Swedish hospital A prospective survey2014In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 589-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief needs to be monitored regularly in order to evaluate benefits and avoid potential hazards. OBJECTIVES To evaluate efficacy and safety profile of a ward- based regimen for postoperative epidural analgesia combining patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and continuous epidural infusion (CEI). DESIGN We conducted a prospective survey in all patients who received postoperative epidural analgesia between March 2004 and February 2011. PATIENTS We analysed 4663 patients undergoing elective and acute surgery. SETTING University hospital in Sweden. RESULTS The median level of catheter insertion ranged from T8 in high abdominal surgery to T11 in gynaecological surgery. Mean infusion rate was 5.4 +/- 1.6ml h (-1) and was adjusted for age. Mean duration was 3.3 +/- 2.1 days. Eighty-seven percent of the patients rated satisfaction 8 to 10 out of 10 on a post-treatment scale. Reasons for termination were elective in 77.1%, due to inadequate pain relief in 11.4%, due to suspected infection in 0.7% and due to other causes in 10.9%. Of the latter, dislodgement of the catheter (4.0%) and leakage from the puncture site (1.4%) dominated. Catheter reinsertion was performed in 5.3% of the patients, and in 5.0%, the treatment was converted into an intravenous (i. v.) morphine patientcontrolled analgesia regimen. The incidence of motor blockade was 1.7%, sedation 2.1%, nausea 12.8% and pruritus 18.8%. Bolus doses accounted for 16% of the total infusion volume. No epidural haematoma was seen. One epidural abscess requiring antibiotic treatment occurred. CONCLUSION Our prospective survey indicates that PCEA in combination with CEI is effective and relatively well tolerated. The incidence of side effects is generally low and severe adverse events very rare.

  • 160.
    Grass, Johanna Nordmark
    et al.
    Swedish Poisons Informat Ctr, Sweden.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Steinwall, Johanna
    Stockholm South Gen Hosp, Sweden.
    Forsman, Par
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindeman, Erik
    Swedish Poisons Informat Ctr, Sweden.
    Letter: A case of massive metoprolol and amlodipine overdose with blood concentrations and survival following extracorporeal corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY, vol 57, issue 1, pp 66-682019In: Clinical Toxicology, ISSN 1556-3650, E-ISSN 1556-9519, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 66-68Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 161.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gener visar rätta dosenoch risk för biverkningar2013In: Gynsamposten, no 3, p. 18-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 162.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Gene Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Solna, Sweden/ Royal Institute Technology, Sweden; National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Hasmats, Johanna
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Kupershmidt, Ilya
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden; NextBio, CA USA.
    Edsgard, Daniel
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    de Petris, Luigi
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Blackhall, Fiona
    Christie Hospital, England; University of Manchester, England.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Besse, Benjamin
    University of Paris 11, France.
    Lindgren, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Branden, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Using Whole-Exome Sequencing to Identify Genetic Markers for Carboplatin and Gemcitabine-Induced Toxicities2016In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 366-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Chemotherapies are associated with significant interindividual variability in therapeutic effect and adverse drug reactions. In lung cancer, the use of gemcitabine and carboplatin induces grade 3 or 4 myelosuppression in about a quarter of the patients, while an equal fraction of patients is basically unaffected in terms of myelosuppressive side effects. We therefore set out to identify genetic markers for gemcitabine/carboplatin-induced myelosuppression. Experimental Design: We exome sequenced 32 patients that suffered extremely high neutropenia and thrombocytopenia (grade 3 or 4 after first chemotherapy cycle) or were virtually unaffected (grade 0 or 1). The genetic differences/polymorphism between the groups were compared using six different bioinformatics strategies: (i) whole-exome nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants association analysis, (ii) deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, (iii) analysis of genes selected by a priori biologic knowledge, (iv) analysis of genes selected from gene expression meta-analysis of toxicity datasets, (v) Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and (vi) FunCoup network enrichment analysis. Results: A total of 53 genetic variants that differed among these groups were validated in an additional 291 patients and were correlated to the patients myelosuppression. In the validation, we identified rs1453542 in OR4D6 (P = 0.0008; OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.8-18) as a marker for gemcitabine/carboplatin-induced neutropenia and rs5925720 in DDX53 (P = 0.0015; OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.17-0.71) as a marker for thrombocytopenia. Patients homozygous for the minor allele of rs1453542 had a higher risk of neutropenia, and for rs5925720 the minor allele was associated with a lower risk for thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: We have identified two new genetic markers with the potential to predict myelosuppression induced by gemcitabine/ carboplatin chemotherapy. (C)2015 AACR.

  • 163.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsen Falk, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Paul, E
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hermansson, M
    Uppsala University.
    Rosenquist, R
    Uppsala University.
    Paul, C
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Nahi, H
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Association of ABCB1 polymorphisms with survival and in vitro cytotoxicty in de novo acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype2012In: The Pharmacogenomics Journal, ISSN 1470-269X, E-ISSN 1473-1150, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overexpression of the multi-drug transporter P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ABCB1 gene, is a clinically relevant problem in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Polymorphisms in ABCB1 might contribute to cancer risk and therapeutic response. We therefore investigated the influence of polymorphisms G1199A, C1236T, G2677T/A and C3435T on cancer susceptibility, in vitro cytotoxicity and overall survival in 100 de novo AML patients with normal karyotype. Patients with 1236C/C or 2677G/G genotypes showed poorer survival than patients with other genotypes (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02, respectively). Both these genotypes were significant factors for survival in multivariate analysis, along with age, NPM1 and FLT3 mutation status. In vitro cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that leukemic cells from 1236T/T and 2677T/T patients were significantly more susceptible to mitoxantrone (P 0.02), and tended to be more susceptible to etoposide and daunorubicin (P = 0.07-0.09), but not to cytarabine. No significant difference in allele frequencies was found between patients and healthy volunteers (n = 400).

  • 164.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist Appell, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Genetiska test för optimal dosering på väg att bli klinisk rutin2013In: Onkologi i Sverige, no 3, p. 36-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 165.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoglund, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rommel, Franz
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Haematology UHL.
    Mirghani, Rajaa A
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    CYP3A activity influences imatinib response in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: a pilot study on in vivo CYP3A activity2010In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, ISSN 0031-6970, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 383-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imatinib is currently used for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The main metabolite CGP74588 has similar potency to that of imatinib and is a product of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 metabolism. However, the clinical significance of the metabolism on therapeutic response and pharmacokinetics is still unclear. We designed this study to investigate the role of the CYP3A activity in the response to imatinib therapy. Fourteen CML patients were phenotyped for in vivo CYP3A activity using quinine as a probe drug. The plasma concentration ratio of quinine and its CYP3A metabolite was used for assessing CYP3A activity. The patients were divided into complete molecular responders with undetectable levels of BCR-ABL transcripts after 12 months of therapy and into partial molecular responders who had failed to achieve a complete molecular response. Patients that achieved complete molecular response showed significantly (Mann-Whitney U-test, p = 0.013) higher in vivo CYP3A activity (median quinine metabolic ratio = 10.1) than patients achieving partial molecular response (median = 15.9). These results indicate a clinical significance of the CYP3A activity and its metabolic products in CML patients treated with imatinib.

  • 166.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Artillerigatan 12, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Tillmar, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Artillerigatan 12, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Gisela
    Natl Board Forens Med, Sweden.
    Montelius, Kerstin
    Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Artillerigatan 12, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    The use of FTA cards to acquire DNA profiles from postmortem cases2019In: International journal of legal medicine (Print), ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 133, no 6, p. 1651-1657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Filter papers have been used for many years in different applications of molecular biology and have been proven to be a stable way to store DNA waiting to be analyzed. Sampling of DNA on FTA (Flinders Technology Associates) cards is convenient and cost effective compared to alternative approaches involving DNA extractions and storage of DNA extracts. FTA cards are analyzed at many forensic laboratories, and the way to perform direct genetic profiling on buccal swab cards has developed into an almost industrial process. The possibility to include postmortem (PM) samples into an FTA-based workflow would facilitate and speed up the genetic identification process compared to conventional methods, both on a regular basis and in a mass casualty event. In this study, we investigated if FTA cards may be used to carry tissue DNA from deceased and present a high-quality DNA profile from the individual in order to be useful for the identification process. The study also aimed to investigate if a specific body tissue would be preferable, and if decomposed tissue is suitable at all to put on an FTA card in order to obtain a DNA profile. We have compared the quality of the DNA profiles acquired from postmortem tissue on FTA cards, with the results acquired with conventional methods from reference bone/muscle samples from the same individual. Several types of tissues have been tested from different identification cases and scenarios. We concluded that tissue cells from inner organs are suitable to put on FTA cards, and that the obtained DNA profiles have the potential to serve as PM data for identification purposes. In cases including compromised samples, however, it is recommended to keep the tissue sample as a backup if further DNA has to be extracted.

  • 167.
    Gregers, Jannie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden; National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Christensen, I. J.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Dalhoff, K.
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Schroeder, H.
    University Hospital Skejby, Denmark.
    Carlsen, N.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Rosthoej, S.
    University Hospital Aalborg, Denmark.
    Lausen, B.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schmiegelow, K.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene and effect on outcome and toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia2015In: The Pharmacogenomics Journal, ISSN 1470-269X, E-ISSN 1473-1150, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 372-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The membrane transporter P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ABCB1 gene, influences the pharmacokinetics of anti-cancer drugs. We hypothesized that variants of ABCB1 affect outcome and toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We studied 522 Danish children with ALL, 93% of all those eligible. Risk of relapse was increased 2.9-fold for patients with the 1199GA variant versus 1199GG (P = 0.001), and reduced 61% and 40%, respectively, for patients with the 3435CT or 3435TT variants versus 3435CC (overall P = 0.02). The degree of bone marrow toxicity during doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone induction therapy was more prominent in patients with 3435TT variant versus 3435CT/3435CC (P = 0.01/P less than 0.0001). We observed more liver toxicity after high-dose methotrexate in patients with 3435CC variant versus 3435CT/TT ( P = 0.03). In conclusion, there is a statistically significant association between ABCB1 polymorphisms, efficacy and toxicity in the treatment of ALL, and ABCB1 1199G greater than A may be a new possible predictive marker for outcome in childhood ALL.

  • 168.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assessment of Fever: Physiology, Immunology and Measurement in Clinical Practice2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When we say that someone has a fever, what do we really mean? Most people only take their temperature when they have a fever, and with good reason: fever is part of a larger response in the body.

    Assessment of Fever, a problem-based learning (PBL) textbook, uses inter-professional discussions of scenarios from clinical practice to examine the question of body temperature. The authors start by examining the historical perspective and go on to consider technical measurement accuracy and thermoregulation from a physiological and immunological perspective. They address evaluations of body temperature and inflammatory activity in various conditions. They end by discussing how evidence-based knowledge can inform clinical practice, looking at different scenarios in the shape of case histories and realistic situations from clinical practice. These clinical scenarios are pertinent both in an inter-professional perspective in clinical practice and in the advanced education of health-care professionals, research scientists, and technicians. Each chapter concludes with a number of reflections and additional questions that the reader will be able to answer using the material presented in the book.

  • 169.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Viktorsson, Lisa
    Carlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Olsen Faresjö, Ashild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    More negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among patients diagnosed with IBS compared with patients without IBS - a case-control study in primary care2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, relapsing gastrointestinal disorder,that affects approximately 10% of the general population and the majority are diagnosed  in primary care. IBS has been reported to be associated with altered psychological and cognitive functioning such as mood disturbances, somatization, catastrophizing or altered visceral interoception by negative emotions and stress. The aim was to  investigate the psychosocial constructs of self-esteem and sense of coherence among IBS patients compared to non-IBS patients in primary care.     

    Methods

    A case–control study in primary care setting among IBS patients meeting the ROME III         criteria (n = 140) compared to controls i.e. non-IBS patients (n = 213) without any         present or previous gastrointestinal complaints. The data were collected through self-reportedquestionnaires of psychosocial factors.     

    Results

    IBS-patients reported significantly more negative self-esteem (p < 0.001), lower scores         for positive self-esteem (p < 0.001), and lower sense of coherence (p < 0.001) than the controls. The IBS-cases were also less likely to report ‘good’ health status (p < 0.001) and less likely to report a positive belief in the future (p < 0.001). After controlling for relevant confounding factors in multiple regressions, the elevation  in negative self-esteem among IBS patients remained statistically significant (p =0.02), as did the lower scores for sense of coherence among IBS cases (p = 0.04).     

    Conclusions

    The more frequently reported negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among         IBS patients found in this study suggest the possibility that psychological therapies         might be helpful for these patients. However these data do not indicate the causal         direction of the observed associations. More research is therefore warranted to determine whether these psychosocial constructs are more frequent in IBS patients.

  • 170.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Patient-controlled sedation with propofol for endoscopic procedures: A cost analysis2019In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Patient‐controlled sedation (PCS) with propofol accompanied by a bedside nurse anaesthetist is an alternative sedation method for endoscopic procedures compared with midazolam administered by a nurse or endoscopist. Increasing costs in health care demands an economic perspective when introducing alternative methods. We applied a hospital perspective on a cost analysis comparing different methods of sedation and the resource use that were expected to affect cost differences related to the sedation.

    Methods

    Based on two randomised previous studies, the direct costs were determined for different sedation methods during two advanced endoscopic procedures: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and flexible bronchoscopy including endobronchial ultrasound. ERCP comparisons were made between midazolam sedation by the endoscopic team, PCS with a bedside nurse anaesthetist and propofol sedation administered by a nurse anaesthetist. Bronchoscopy comparisons were made between midazolam sedation by the endoscopic team and PCS with a bedside nurse anaesthetist, categorised by premedication morphine‐scopolamine or glycopyrronium.

    Results

    Propofol PCS with a bedside nurse anaesthetist resulted in lower costs per patient for sedation for both ERCP (233 USD) and bronchoscopy (premedication morphine‐scopolamine 267 USD, premedication glycopyrronium 269 USD) compared with midazolam (ERCP 425 USD, bronchoscopy 337 USD). Aborted procedures that needed to be repeated and prolonged hospital stays significantly increased the cost for the midazolam groups.

    Conclusion

    Propofol PCS with a bedside nurse anaesthetist reduces the direct sedation costs for ERCP and bronchoscopy procedures compared with midazolam sedation.

  • 171.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Patient-controlled Sedation During Flexible Bronchoscopy: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: Journal of Bronchology & Interventional Pulmonology, ISSN 1944-6586, E-ISSN 1948-8270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient-controlled sedation (PCS) is a documented method for endoscopic procedures considered to facilitate early recovery. Limited data have been reported, however, on its use during flexible bronchoscopy (FB).

    Materials and Methods: This study hypothesized that PCS with propofol during FB would facilitate early recovery, with similar bronchoscopist and patient satisfaction compared with nurse-controlled sedation (NCS) with midazolam. A total of 150 patients were randomized 1:1:1 into a control group (premedication with morphine-scopolamine and NCS with midazolam), PCS-MS group (premedication with morphine-scopolamine and PCS with propofol), and PCS-G group (premedication with glycopyrronium and PCS with propofol).

    Results: The procedures included transbronchial biopsy, transbronchial needle aspiration, cryotherapy/biopsy, and/or multistation endobronchial ultrasound. FB duration values in median (range) were 40 (10 to 80), 39 (12 to 68), and 44 (10 to 82) minutes for the groups NCS, PCS-MS, and PCS-G, respectively. An overall 81% of the patients in the combined PCS groups were ready for discharge (modified Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System, score 10) 2 hours after bronchoscopy compared with 40% in the control group (P<0.0001). Between PCS groups, 96% of the PCS-G group patients were ready for discharge compared with 65% in the PCS-MS group (P=0.0002) at 2 hours. Bronchoscopists’ and patients’ satisfaction scores were high in all groups. Postdischarge quality scores showed no differences among the groups.

    Conclusion: PCS with propofol during FB is feasible, as it shortened recovery time without compromising procedure conditions for bronchoscopists or patients. A rapid postsedation stabilization of vital signs facilitates surveillance before the patient leaves the hospital.

  • 172.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1081-1088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Worldwide, ketamine is used during paediatric procedures, but no recommendations are available regarding a suitable dose for rectal administration during procedures involving high levels of pain and/or anxiety such as burn wound dressing change.

    Methods

    We evaluated three different single doses of rectally administered racemic ketamine mixed with a fixed dose of 0.5 mg/kg of midazolam. In total, 90 children – aged 6 months to 4 years – were randomised 1:1:1 to receive 4 mg/kg (K-4 group), 6 mg/kg (K-6 group) or 8 mg/kg (K-8 group) of racemic ketamine for a maximum of three consecutive procedures. Primary outcome measure was procedural pain evaluated by Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) behavioural scale. Secondary outcome included feasibility and recovery time. Patient safety was evaluated using surrogate outcomes.

    Results

    In total, 201 procedures in 90 children aged 19 ± 8 months were completed. The median maximum pain was FLACC 0 in all groups (p = 0.141). The feasibility was better for groups K-6 (p = 0.049) and K-8 (p = 0.027) compared with K-4, and the mean recovery time was the longest for group K-8 (36 ± 22 min) compared with groups K-4 (25 ± 15 min; p = 0.003) and K-6 (27 ± 20 min; p = 0.025). Median maximum sedation measured by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS) was higher in group K-8 compared with group K-4 (p < 0.0001) and K-6 (p = 0.023). One child in group K-8 had a study drug-related serious adverse event — laryngospasm/airway obstruction. No rescue analgosedative medication was administered for group K-6.

    Conclusions

    A rectally administered mixture of racemic ketamine (6 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) during paediatric burn dressing procedures with a duration of approximately 30 min provides optimal conditions regarding pain relief, feasibility, recovery time and patient safety, with no need for rescue analgosedative medication.

  • 173.
    Grundstrom, Gunilla
    et al.
    Gambro Lundia AB, Sweden .
    Christensson, Anders
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Alquist, Maria
    Gambro Lundia AB, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Lars-Goran
    Gambro Lundia AB, Sweden .
    Segelmark, Marten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Replacement of acetate with citrate in dialysis fluid: a randomized clinical trial of short term safety and fluid biocompatibility2013In: BMC Nephrology, ISSN 1471-2369, E-ISSN 1471-2369, Vol. 14, no 216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The majority of bicarbonate based dialysis fluids are acidified with acetate. Citrate, a well known anticoagulant and antioxidant, has been suggested as a biocompatible alternative. The objective of this study was to evaluate short term safety and biocompatibility of a citrate containing acetate-free dialysis fluid.

    Methods

    Twenty four (24) patients on maintenance dialysis three times per week, 13 on on-line hemodiafiltration (HDF) and 11 on hemodialysis (HD), were randomly assigned to start with either citrate dialysis fluid (1 mM citrate, 1.5 mM calcium) or control fluid (3 mM acetate, 1.5 mM calcium) in an open-labeled cross-over trial (6 + 6 weeks with 8 treatments wash-out in between). Twenty (20) patients, 11 on HDF and 9 on HD were included in the analyses. Main objective was short term safety assessed by acid–base status, plasma ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH). In addition, biocompatibility was assessed by markers of inflammation (pentraxin 3 (PTX-3), CRP, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β) and thrombogenicity (activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and visual clotting scores).

    Results

    No differences dependent on randomization order or treatment mode (HD vs. HDF) were detected. Citrate in the dialysis fluid reduced the intra-dialytic shift in pH (+0.04 week 6 vs. +0.06 week 0, p = 0.046) and base excess (+3.9 mM week 6 vs. +5.6 mM week 0, p = 0.006) over the study period. Using the same calcium concentration (1.5 mM), citrate dialysis fluid resulted in lower post-dialysis plasma ionized calcium level (1.10 mM vs. 1.27 mM for control, p < 0.0001) and higher post-dialysis PTH level (28.8 pM vs. 14.7 pM for control, p < 0.0001) while pre-dialysis levels were unaffected. Citrate reduced intra-dialytic induction of PTX-3 (+1.1 ng/ml vs. +1.4 ng/ml for control, p = 0.04) but had no effect on other markers of inflammation or oxidative stress. Citrate reduced visual clotting in the arterial air chamber during HDF (1.0 vs. 1.8 for control, p = 0.03) and caused an intra-dialytic increase in APTT (+6.8 s, p = 0.003) without affecting post-dialysis values compared to control.

    Conclusions

    During this small short term study citrate dialysis fluid was apparently safe to use in HD and on-line HDF treatments. Indications of reduced treatment-induced inflammation and thrombogenicity suggest citrate as a biocompatible alternative to acetate in dialysis fluid. However, the results need to be confirmed in long term studies.

  • 174.
    Gréen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden; Royal Institute Technology, Sweden; Science for Life Laboratory,{ School of Biotechnology, Division of Gene Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rehnberg, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Svensson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Assessment of HaloPlex Amplification for Sequence Capture and Massively Parallel Sequencing of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy-Associated Genes2015In: Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, ISSN 1525-1578, E-ISSN 1943-7811, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic basis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is complex. Mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac desmosomes have been implicated as being causally related to ARVC. Next-generation sequencing allows parallel sequencing and duplication/deletion analysis of many genes simultaneously, which is appropriate for screening of mutations in disorders with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds. We designed and validated a next-generation sequencing test panel for ARVC using HaloPlex. We used SureDesign to prepare a HaloPlex enrichment system for sequencing of DES, DSC2, DSG2, DSP, JUP, PKP2, RYR2, TGFB3, TMEM43, and TIN from patients with ARVC using a MiSeq instrument. Performance characteristics were determined by comparison with Sanger, as the gold standard, and TruSeq Custom Amplicon sequencing of DSC2, DSG2, DSP, JUP, and PKP2. All the samples were successfully sequenced after HaloPlex capture, with greater than99% of targeted nucleotides covered by greater than20x. The sequences were of high quality, although one problematic area due to a presumptive context-specific sequencing error causing motif Located in exon 1 of the DSP gene was detected. The mutations found by Sanger sequencing were also found using the HaloPlex technique. Depending on the bioinformatics pipeline, sensitivity varied from 99.3% to 100%, and specificity varied from 99.90/0 to 100%. Three variant positions found by Sanger and HaloPlex sequencing were missed by TruSeq Custom Amplicon owing to Loss of coverage.

  • 175.
    Guerrieri, Davide
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellqvist, Fanny
    Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Artillerigatan 12, SE-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Artillerigatan 12, SE-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Artillerigatan 12, SE-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Validation and Cross-Reactivity Data for Fentanyl Analogs With the Immunalysis Fentanyl ELISA2019In: Journal of Analytical Toxicology, ISSN 0146-4760, E-ISSN 1945-2403, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 18-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every year new fentanyl analog compounds, or fentanyls, appear on the drug scene. Development of immunoassays dedicated for screening individual molecules is challenging due to the short-lived presence of these compounds on the recreational drug market. Therefore, we investigated the detecting capabilities of the immunalysis fentanyl direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit against fentanyl in whole blood, and determined the cross-reactivity of nine fentanyl analogs (2-fluorofentanyl, acetylfentanyl, acrylfentanyl, carfentanil, cyclopropylfentanyl, tetrahydrofuranylfentanyl, furanylfentanyl, ocfentanil, valerylfentanyl) to confirm its validity for the general screening of fentanyls. Immunalysis ELISA assay was used to test whole blood samples fortified with fentanyl on a TECAN Freedom EVOlyzer platform, according to manufacturer specifications. The kit successfully was validated for fentanyl screening with a cutoff set at 0.5 ng/mL, and all tested analogs, with the exclusion of carfentanil, were detected. The lowest cross-reactivity with the kit was obtained with furanylfentanyl (20% +/- 1, 95% confidence intervals (CI)) and 4-fluoroisobutyrfentanyl (25% +/- 1, 95% CI), while the highest was recorded using acetylfentanyl (99% +/- 11, 95% CI) and acrylfentanyl (94% +/- 10, 95% CI). Post-mortem samples containing fentanyl, acrylfentanyl, cyclopropylfentanyl, THF-fentanyl and 4-fluoroisobutyrfentanyl were screened, and sensitivity and specificity of each analog were calculated. Positive screening results were generated by all post-mortem cases containing fentanyl (n = 14), acrylfentanyl (n = 11), cyclopropylfentanyl (n = 14), tetrahydrofuranylfentanyl (n = 13) and 4-fluoroisobutyrfentanyl (n = 10). Concentration of post-mortem fentanyl samples ranged from 0.5 ng/mL (cutoff) to 230 ng/mL, while the range for analogs was 3.4-36 ng/mL (cyclopentylfentanyl), 0.76-370 ng/mL (4-fluoroisobutyrfentanyl), 0.02-12 ng/mL (acrylfentanyl) and 2-26 ng/mL (tetrahydrofuranylfentanyl). The immunalysis fentanyl direct ELISA kit was successfully validated and showed significant cross-reactivity for all tested fentanyls, except carfentanil, making it a suitable technique for fentanyl and fentanyl analogs screening.

  • 176.
    Guerrieri, Davide
    et al.
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Rapp, Emma
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Roman, Markus
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Druid, Henrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Postmortem and Toxicological Findings in a Series of Furanylfentanyl-Related Deaths2017In: Journal of Analytical Toxicology, ISSN 0146-4760, E-ISSN 1945-2403, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 242-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the course of 4 months in 2015 and 2016, a cluster of seven fatal intoxications involving the opioid-analogue furanylfentanyl occurred in Sweden; toxicological analysis showed presence of furanylfentanyl either as the only drug or in combination with other illicit substances. Previous publications have only reported non-lethal furanylfentanyl intoxications. In the cases presented here, furanylfentanyl intoxication-alone or in combination with other drugs-was determined to be the cause of death by the responsible pathologist. All victims were young (24-37 years old) males, five of which had a well-documented history of drug abuse. Femoral blood concentration of furanylfentanyl ranged from 0.41 ng/g to 2.47 ng/g blood. Five cases presented a complex panel of drugs of abuse and prescription drugs. Moreover, in five cases the concurrent presence of pregabalin corroborates previous observations indicating pregabalin as a possible contributing factor in polydrug intoxications. We conclude that it is difficult to establish a specific lethal concentration of furanylfentanyl, due to incompletely known effects of possible pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions with other drugs, as well as to the unknown degree of tolerance to opioids. We suggest that a full toxicological screening-to assess the possibility of drug interactions-together with segmental hair analysis regarding opioids-to estimate the level of opioid tolerance-be carried out to assist in the interpretation of cases involving synthetic opioids such as furanylfentanyl.

  • 177.
    Guerrieri, Davide
    et al.
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Rapp, Emma
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Roman, Markus
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Thelander, Gunilla
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Acrylfentanyl: Another new psychoactive drug with fatal consequences2017In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 277, p. E21-E29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Nordic Countries are the most exposed to opioid-related deaths. Between April and October 2016, a series of forty lethal intoxications occurred in Sweden, in which the presence of the synthetic opioid acrylfentanyl was determined to be the main - or a contributing - cause of death. In the reported cases, the blood concentration of acrylfentanyl - mostly detected in combination with other drugs - ranged from 0.01 ng/g to 5 ng/g; victims were predominantly males (34 males and 6 females), and their age varied between 18 and 53 years. We further describe five cases, representative of the different drug administration route (nasal spray, tablets) and intentions (accidental or voluntary intoxication). Moreover, we address nine cases of non-lethal intoxication, in single (8 cases) or polydrug scenario (1 case). We discuss the present characteristics of the Swedish drug market for fentanyl-analogs in general and acrylfentanyl in particular, reporting a structural difficulty to effectively counteracting the appearance of unscheduled substances due to the constant turnover of new molecules on the recreational drug market. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  • 178.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    et al.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Carlsten, Anders
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden;Medical Prod Agency, Sweden .
    Petzold, Max
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Rehnberg, Clas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Economic Impact of Adverse Drug Events - A Retrospective Population-Based Cohort Study of 4970 Adults2014In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 0092061-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to estimate the direct costs caused by ADEs, including costs for dispensed drugs, primary care, other outpatient care, and inpatient care, and to relate the direct costs caused by ADEs to the societal COI (direct and indirect costs), for patients with ADEs and for the entire study population. Methods: We conducted a population-based observational retrospective cohort study of ADEs identified from medical records. From a random sample of 5025 adults in a Swedish county council, 4970 were included in the analyses. During a three-month study period in 2008, direct and indirect costs were estimated from resource use identified in the medical records and from register data on costs for resource use. Results: Among 596 patients with ADEs, the average direct costs per patient caused by ADEs were USD 444.9 [95% CI: 264.4 to 625.3], corresponding to USD 21 million per 100 000 adult inhabitants per year. Inpatient care accounted for 53.9% of all direct costs caused by ADEs. For patients with ADEs, the average societal cost of illness was USD 6235.0 [5442.8 to 7027.2], of which direct costs were USD 2830.1 [2260.7 to 3399.4] (45%), and indirect costs USD 3404.9 [2899.3 to 3910.4] (55%). The societal cost of illness was higher for patients with ADEs compared to other patients. ADEs caused 9.5% of all direct healthcare costs in the study population. Conclusions: Healthcare costs for patients with ADEs are substantial across different settings; in primary care, other outpatient care and inpatient care. Hence the economic impact of ADEs will be underestimated in studies focusing on inpatient ADEs alone. Moreover, the high proportion of indirect costs in the societal COI for patients with ADEs suggests that the observed costs caused by ADEs would be even higher if including indirect costs. Additional studies are needed to identify interventions to prevent and manage ADEs.

  • 179.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    et al.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden; EPID Research, Finland.
    Svensson, Staffan
    Narhalsan Hjallbo Medical Centre, Finland.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Jonköping County Council, Sweden.
    Rehnberg, Clas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Comparing Methods for Estimating Direct Costs of Adverse Drug Events2017In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1299-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To estimate how direct health care costs resulting from adverse drug events (ADEs) and cost distribution are affected by methodological decisions regarding identification of ADEs, assigning relevant resource use to ADEs, and estimating costs for the assigned resources. Methods: ADEs were identified from medical records and diagnostic codes for a random sample of 4970 Swedish adults during a 3-month study period in 2008 and were assessed for causality. Results were compared for five cost evaluation methods, including different methods for identifying ADEs, assigning resource use to ADEs, and for estimating costs for the assigned resources (resource use method, proportion of registered cost method, unit cost method, diagnostic code method, and main diagnosis method). Different levels of causality for ADEs and ADEs contribution to health care resource use were considered. Results: Using the five methods, the maximum estimated overall direct health care costs resulting from ADEs ranged from Sk10,000 (Sk = Swedish krona; similar to(sic)1,500 in 2016 values) using the diagnostic code method to more than Sk3,000,000 (similar to(sic)414,000) using the unit cost method in our study population. The most conservative definitions for ADEs contribution to health care resource use and the causality of ADEs resulted in average costs per patient ranging from Sk0 using the diagnostic code method to Sk4066 (similar to(sic)500) using the unit cost method. Conclusions: The estimated costs resulting from ADEs varied considerably depending on the methodological choices. The results indicate that costs for ADEs need to be identified through medical record review and by using detailed unit cost data. Copyright (C) 2017, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 180.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Rehnberg, Clas
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Petzold, Max
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Carlsten, Anders
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Andersson Sundell, Karolina
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Cost of illness of patient-reported adverse drug events: a population-based cross-sectional survey.2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the cost of illness (COI) of individuals with self-reported adverse drug events (ADEs) from a societal perspective and to compare these estimates with the COI for individuals without ADE. Furthermore, to estimate the direct costs resulting from two ADE categories, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and subtherapeutic effects of medication therapy (STE).

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

    SETTING: The adult Swedish general population.

    PARTICIPANTS: The survey was distributed to a random sample of 14 000 Swedish residents aged 18 years and older, of which 7099 responded, 1377 reported at least one ADE and 943 reported an ADR or STE.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Societal COI, including direct and indirect costs, for individuals with at least one self-reported ADE, and the direct costs for prescription drugs and healthcare use resulting from self-reported ADRs and STEs were estimated during 30 days using a bottom-up approach.

    RESULTS: The economic burden for individuals with ADEs were (95% CI) 442.7 to 599.8 international dollars (Int$), of which direct costs were Int$ 279.6 to 420.0 (67.1%) and indirect costs were Int$ 143.0 to 199.8 (32.9%). The average COI was higher among those reporting ADEs compared with other respondents (COI: Int$ 442.7 to 599.8 versus Int$ 185.8 to 231.2). The COI of respondents reporting at least one ADR or STE was Int$ 468.9 to 652.9. Direct costs resulting from ADRs or STEs were Int$ 15.0 to 48.4. The reported resource use occurred both in hospitals and outside in primary care.

    CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported ADRs and STEs cause resource use both in hospitals and in primary care. Moreover, ADEs seem to be associated with high overall COI from a societal perspective when comparing respondents with and without ADEs. There is a need to further examine this relationship and to study the indirect costs resulting from ADEs.

  • 181.
    Haage, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Forensic Toxicological Aspects of Tramadol: Focus on Enantioselective Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most difficult parts in forensic toxicology is to interpret obtained drug concentrations. Was it therapeutic, toxic or even lethal to the particular individual that the blood sample was drawn from? Concentrations of opioid drugs are especially difficult to interpret, because of large interindividual differences in innate and acquired tolerance.

    Tramadol is a complex drug. Not only is it an opioid, it is also a racemic drug with the (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of the parent compound and metabolites showing different pharmacological effects. Further, it is metabolized by polymorphic enzymes, which may affect the amounts of metabolites formed and possibly the enantiomer ratios of the parent compound and its metabolites. It has been speculated that particularly the (+)/(-)-enantiomer ratio of O-desmethyltramadol is related to the risk of adverse effects, and it has been shown that the ratio is affected by CYP2D6 genotype.

    The overall aim of the thesis was to evaluate if forensic interpretations of tramadol, regarding toxicity and time since drug administration, may be improved by the use of genotyping and enantioselective concentration determination of tramadol and its three main metabolites.

    To simultaneously quantify the enantiomer concentrations of tramadol, Odesmethyltramadol, N-desmethyltramadol and N,O-didesmethyltramadol in whole blood, a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS) method was developed and validated. Genetic variation in CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP3A4 (encoding the tramadol metabolizing enzymes), ABCB1 (encoding a transport protein) and OPRM1 (encoding the μ-opioid receptor) was investigated, using pyrosequencing, xTAG, and TaqMan analysis. The methods were applied to the blood samples of two study populations; 19 healthy volunteers administered a therapeutic, single tramadol dose, and 159 tramadol positive autopsy cases.

    The most important finding was the positive correlations between all four enantiomer ratios and time since tramadol administration in the healthy volunteers. All enantiomer ratios except the one of tramadol was also affected by the CYP2D6 genotype, which was apparent among the autopsy cases as well. Genetic variation in CYP2D6 and possibly CYP2B6 was shown to have an impact on tramadol pharmacokinetics, although no association to neither drug related symptoms nor tramadol related causes of death was found. Tramadol intoxications were predominantly characterized by low age (median 26 years) and male sex, often with a history of substance abuse and with other drugs (at fairly low concentrations) detected in blood.

    In conclusion, enantiomer concentration determination combined with genotyping seems promising regarding estimations of time since drug administration, although is of low value concerning interpretations of toxicity in autopsy cases.

  • 182.
    Haage, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping Sweden.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping Sweden.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping Sweden.
    Quantitation of the enantiomers of tramadol and its three main metabolites in human whole blood using LC-MS/MS.2016In: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, ISSN 0731-7085, E-ISSN 1873-264X, Vol. 119, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analgesic drug tramadol and its metabolites are chiral compounds, with the (+)- and (-)-enantiomers showing different pharmacological and toxicological effects. This novel enantioselective method, based on LC-MS/MS in reversed phase mode, enabled measurement of the parent compound and its three main metabolites O-desmethyltramadol, N-desmethyltramadol and N,O-didesmethyltramadol simultaneously. Whole blood samples of 0.5g were fortified with internal standards (tramadol-(13)C-D3 and O-desmethyl-cis-tramadol-D6) and extracted under basic conditions (pH 11) by liquid-liquid extraction. Chromatography was performed on a chiral alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) column preceded by an AGP guard column. The mobile phase consisted of 0.8% acetonitrile and 99.2% ammonium acetate (20mM, pH 7.2). A post-column infusion with 0.05% formic acid in acetonitrile was used to enhance sensitivity. Quantitation as well as enantiomeric ratio measurements were covered by quality controls. Validation parameters for all eight enantiomers included selectivity (high), matrix effects (no ion suppression/enhancement), calibration model (linear, weight 1/X(2), in the range of 0.25-250ng/g), limit of quantitation (0.125-0.50ng/g), repeatability (2-6%) and intermediate precision (2-7%), accuracy (83-114%), dilution integrity (98-115%), carry over (not exceeding 0.07%) and stability (stable in blood and extract). The method was applied to blood samples from a healthy volunteer administrated a single 100mg dose and to a case sample concerning an impaired driver, which confirmed its applicability in human pharmacokinetic studies as well as in toxicological and forensic investigations.

  • 183.
    Haage, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Calistri, Simona
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands / Scuola di Scienze della Salute Umana, Università degli studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.
    van Schaik, Ron H N
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of tramadol and its three main metabolites; impact of CYP2D6, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 genotype2018In: Pharmacology Research & Perspectives, ISSN 2052-1707, Vol. 6, no 4, article id e00419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tramadol is a complex drug, being metabolized by polymorphic enzymes and administered as a racemate with the (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of the parent compound and metabolites showing different pharmacological effects. The study aimed to simultaneously determine the enantiomer concentrations of tramadol, O-desmethyltramadol, N-desmethyltramadol, and N,O-didesmethyltramadol following a single dose, and elucidate if enantioselective pharmacokinetics is associated with the time following drug intake and if interindividual differences may be genetically explained. Nineteen healthy volunteers were orally administered either 50 or 100 mg tramadol, whereupon blood samples were drawn at 17 occasions. Enantiomer concentrations in whole blood were measured by LC-MS/MS and the CYP2D6,CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 genotype were determined, using the xTAG CYP2D6 Kit, pyrosequencing and real-time PCR, respectively. A positive correlation between the (+)/(-)-enantiomer ratio and time following drug administration was shown for all four enantiomer pairs. The largest increase in enantiomer ratio was observed for N-desmethyltramadol in CYP2D6 extensive and intermediate metabolizers, rising from about two to almost seven during 24 hours following drug intake. CYP2D6 poor metabolizers showed metabolic profiles markedly different from the ones of intermediate and extensive metabolizers, with large area under the concentration curves (AUCs) of the N-desmethyltramadol enantiomers and low corresponding values of the O-desmethyltramadol and N,O-didesmethyltramadol enantiomers, especially of the (+)-enantiomers. Homozygosity of CYP2B6 *5 and *6 indicated a reduced enzyme function, although further studies are required to confirm it. In conclusion, the increase in enantiomer ratios over time might possibly be used to distinguish a recent tramadol intake from a past one. It also implies that, even though (+)-O-desmethyltramadol is regarded the enantiomer most potent in causing adverse effects, one should not investigate the (+)/(-)-enantiomer ratio of O-desmethyltramadol in relation to side effects without consideration for the time that has passed since drug intake.

  • 184.
    Haarhaus, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Department of Nephrology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Division of Nephrology, Bone and Mineral Metabolism, University of Kentucky, Albert B. Chandler Medical Center, USA.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Division of Nephrology, Bone and Mineral Metabolism, University of Kentucky, Albert B. Chandler Medical Center, USA.
    A multicenter prospective study of bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms and arterial calcification in chronic kidney disease patients on dialysis2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic kidney disease – mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to frequent cardiovascular (CV) complications. Accelerated arterial stiffening and calcification are associated with serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in advanced CKD. We have previously described three bone ALP (BALP) isoforms in healthy individuals and detected a novel isoform, B1x, exclusively in serum from some CKD patients, in bone and in calcifying vascular smooth muscle cells. We investigated the association of these BALP isoforms, abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) score and carotid – femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), with outcome in a 2-year prospective multicenter study of 68 prevalent dialysis patients participating in the Calcification Outcome in Renal Disease (CORD) study. Twenty-one patients experienced a combined event of all-cause mortality or a first nonfatal CV event during follow-up. PWV (hazard ratio 1.067, P = 0.03) was independently associated with the combined event. B1x was detected in 53 patients and was associated with baseline PWV (Kendall's tau 0.23, P = 0.007) and with variation of PWV over time (estimate 14.14, P = 0.03). Patients with B1x had lower levels of PTH and total ALP, indicating a possible association with low bone turnover. We found no association of BALP isoforms with AAC score. Cox regression revealed B1x as a positive predictor of event free survival (hazard ratio 0.98, P = 0.01). In conclusion, B1x is associated with vascular stiffness in CKD 5D. This finding is contrasted by the ability of B1x to predict longer event free survival in the current study.

  • 185.
    Haglund, Sofie
    et al.
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Almer, Sven
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Combination treatment with 6-mercaptopurine and allopurinol in HepG2 and HEK293 cells - Effects on gene expression levels and thiopurine metabolism2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0173825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combination treatment with low-dose thiopurine and allopurinol (AP) has successfully been used in patients with inflammatory bowel disease with a so called skewed thiopurine metabolite profile. In red blood cells in vivo, it reduces the concentration of methylated metabolites and increases the concentration of the phosphorylated ones, which is associated with improved therapeutic efficacy. This study aimed to investigate the largely unknown mechanism of AP on thiopurine metabolism in cells with an active thiopurine metabolic pathway using HepG2 and HEK293 cells. Cells were treated with 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and AP or its metabolite oxypurinol. The expression of genes known to be associated with thiopurine metabolism, and the concentration of thiopurine metabolites were analyzed. Gene expression levels were only affected by AP in the presence of 6MP. The addition of AP to 6MP affected the expression of in total 19 genes in the two cell lines. In both cell lines the expression of the transporter SLC29A2 was reduced by the combined treatment. Six regulated genes in HepG2 cells and 8 regulated genes in HEK293 cells were connected to networks with 18 and 35 genes, respectively, present at known susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, when analyzed using a protein-protein interaction database. The genes identified as regulated as well as the disease associated interacting genes represent new candidates for further investigation in the context of combination therapy with thiopurines and AP. However, no differences in absolute metabolite concentrations were observed between 6MP+AP or 6MP +oxypurinol vs. 6MP alone in either of the two cell lines. In conclusion; the effect of AP on=gene expression levels requires the presence of 6MP, at least in vitro. Previously described AP-effects on metabolite concentrations observed in red blood cells in vivo could not be reproduced in our cell lines in vitro. APs effects in relation to thiopurine metabolism are complex. The network-identified susceptibility genes represented biological processes mainly associated with purine nucleotide biosynthetic processes, lymphocyte proliferation, NF-KB activation, JAK-STAT signaling, and apoptotic signaling at oxidative stress.

  • 186.
    Haglund, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zimdahl Kahlin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Almér, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderman, Jan
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    P658 Effects of allopurinol on thiopurine metabolism and gene expression levels in HepG2 cells2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Hahn, R G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Letter: Haemodilution made difficult2013In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 679-680Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 188.
    Hahn, R. G.
    et al.
    Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Nephrocheck® results should be corrected for dilution2017In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 261-262Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 189.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Editorial Material: Why are crystalloid and colloid fluid requirements similar during surgery and intensive care?2013In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 515-518Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 190.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fluid absorption and the ethanol monitoring method2015In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 59, no 9, p. 1081-1093Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundFluid absorption is a well-known complication of endoscopic surgeries, such as transurethral prostatic resection and transcervical endometrial resection. Absorption of electrolyte-free fluid in excess of 1L, which occurs in 5% to 10% of the operations, markedly increases the risk of adverse effects from the cardiovascular and neurological systems. Absorption of isotonic saline, which is used with the new bipolar resection technique, will change the scenario of adverse effects in a yet unknown way. Hyponatremia no longer occurs, but marking the saline with ethanol reveals that fluid absorption occurs just as much as with monopolar prostate resections. MethodsEthanol monitoring is a method for non-invasive indication and quantification of fluid absorption that has been well evaluated. By using an irrigating fluid that contains 1% of ethanol, updated information about fluid absorption can be obtained at any time perioperatively by letting the patient breathe into a hand-held alcolmeter. ResultsRegression equations and nomograms with variable complexity are available for estimating how much fluid has been absorbed, both when the alcolmeter is calibrated to show the blood ethanol level and when it is calibrated to show the breath ethanol concentration. Examples of how such estimations should be performed are given in this review article. ConclusionsThe difficulty is that the anesthesiologist must be aware of how the alcolmeter is calibrated (for blood or breath) and be able to distinguish between the intravascular and extravascular absorption routes, which give rise to different patterns and levels of breath ethanol concentrations.

  • 191.
    Hahn, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Glycine 1.5% for Irrigation Should Be Abandoned2013In: Urologia internationalis, ISSN 0042-1138, E-ISSN 1423-0399, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 249-255Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Glycine 1.5% has long maintained a dominating role as an irrigating solution for monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), as well as for certain other transurethral procedures. Materials and Methods: This review summarizes the findings of systematic experimental and clinical studies in which glycine 1.5% for irrigation was infused/absorbed and the outcome compared to at least one other irrigating fluid, including the isotonic saline used for bipolar TURP. Results: There were 11 studies in animals, 3 in volunteers and 6 in patients undergoing TURP. With only one exception, which is probably due to low power, these studies either show a poorer outcome after administration or absorption of glycine solution or else that glycine 2.2% is more toxic than glycine 1.5%. The poorer outcomes consisted of more tissue damage or higher mortality (animals) or more symptoms (volunteers and patients). Conclusion: The safety of monopolar TURP would be improved by replacing glycine 1.5% with some other electrolyte-free fluid. The author argues that glycine 1.5% should be abandoned completely.

  • 192.
    Hahn, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Dehydration and fluid volume kinetics before major open abdominal surgery2014In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 58, no 10, p. 1258-1266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Assessment of dehydration in the preoperative setting is of potential clinical value. The present study uses urine analysis and plasma volume kinetics, which have both been validated against induced changes in body water in volunteers, to study the incidence and severity of dehydration before open abdominal surgery begins. Methods: Thirty patients (mean age 64 years) had their urine analysed before major elective open abdominal surgery for colour, specific weight, osmolality and creatinine. The results were scored and the mean taken to represent a dehydration index. Thereafter, the patients received an infusion of 5ml/kg of Ringers acetate intravenously for over 15min. Blood was sampled for 70min and the blood haemoglobin concentration used to estimate the plasma volume kinetics. Results: Distribution of fluid occurred more slowly (Pless than0.01) and the elimination half-life was twice as long (median 40min, not significant) in the 11 patients (37%) diagnosed to be moderately dehydrated as compared with euhydrated patients. The dehydration index indicated that the fluid deficit in these patients corresponded to 2.5% of the body weight, whereas the deficit in the others was 1%. In contrast, the 11 patients who later developed postoperative nausea and vomiting had a very short elimination half-life, only 9min (median, Pless than0.01). These patients were usually euhydrated but had microalbuminuria (Pless than0.03) and higher natriuresis (Pless than0.01). Conclusions: The degree of dehydration before major surgery was modest as evidenced both by urine sampling and volume kinetic analysis.

  • 193.
    Hahn, Robert G
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Homeopathy: meta-analyses of pooled clinical data.2013In: Forschende Komplementärmedizin, ISSN 1661-4119, E-ISSN 1661-4127, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 376-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the first decade of the evidence-based era, which began in the mid-1990s, meta-analyses were used to scrutinize homeopathy for evidence of beneficial effects in medical conditions. In this review, meta-analyses including pooled data from placebo-controlled clinical trials of homeopathy and the aftermath in the form of debate articles were analyzed. In 1997 Klaus Linde and co-workers identified 89 clinical trials that showed an overall odds ratio of 2.45 in favor of homeopathy over placebo. There was a trend toward smaller benefit from studies of the highest quality, but the 10 trials with the highest Jadad score still showed homeopathy had a statistically significant effect. These results challenged academics to perform alternative analyses that, to demonstrate the lack of effect, relied on extensive exclusion of studies, often to the degree that conclusions were based on only 5-10% of the material, or on virtual data. The ultimate argument against homeopathy is the 'funnel plot' published by Aijing Shang's research group in 2005. However, the funnel plot is flawed when applied to a mixture of diseases, because studies with expected strong treatments effects are, for ethical reasons, powered lower than studies with expected weak or unclear treatment effects. To conclude that homeopathy lacks clinical effect, more than 90% of the available clinical trials had to be disregarded. Alternatively, flawed statistical methods had to be applied. Future meta-analyses should focus on the use of homeopathy in specific diseases or groups of diseases instead of pooling data from all clinical trials. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  • 194.
    Hahn, Robert G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Sweden.
    Should anaesthetists stop infusing isotonic saline?2014In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 4-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Hahn, Robert G.
    et al.
    Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Preoperative fluid retention increases blood loss during major open abdominal surgery2017In: Perioperative Medicine, ISSN 0908-6919, E-ISSN 2047-0525, Vol. 6, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Quantification of renal fluid conservation is possible by urine analysis, and the results can indicate dehydration. The present report sought to determine whether this fluid retention correlates with fluid requirements during major abdominal surgeries that have estimated operating times ≥ 2 h.

    Methods

    Urine colour, specific weight, osmolality and creatinine concentration were used to calculate a composite “fluid retention index” (FRI) in 97 patients prior to major abdominal surgery. Goal-directed fluid volume optimization, with hydroxyethyl starch supplemented with a background administration of crystalloid fluid, was used.

    Results

    The median preoperative FRI was 3.0. Fluid retention, considered as present when FRI ≥ 3.5, was found in 37% of the patients. Fluid retention was followed by a significantly larger blood loss (+ 125%; 450 vs. 200 ml), higher haemorrhage rate (+ 41%; 123 vs. 87 ml/h) and greater need for both colloid (+ 43%; 1.43 vs. 1.00 l) and crystalloid (+ 18%; 1.28 vs. 1.08 l) fluids. Despite the larger blood loss, the total fluid balance was more positive after surgery in the dehydrated patients (+ 26%; 1.91 vs. 1.51 l; P < 0.02).

    Conclusions

    Preoperative fluid retention, as detected in a urine sample, was associated with a greater blood loss and a more positive fluid balance during major abdominal surgery.

  • 196.
    Hahn, Robert G.
    et al.
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst Danderyds Hosp KIDS, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Emma
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjorne, Hakan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Biomarkers of endothelial injury in plasma are dependent on kidney function2019In: Clinical hemorheology and microcirculation, ISSN 1386-0291, E-ISSN 1875-8622, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Injury (shedding) of the endothelial glycocalyx layer, which alters local blood flow and microvascular permeability, is assessed by measuring components of this layer in circulating blood. The influence of renal function on their concentrations is unknown. METHODS: Plasma and urine concentrations of three shedding products (syndecan-1, hyaluronic acid, and heparan sulfate) and creatinine were measured over 5 hours in 15 healthy volunteers and 15 postoperative patients; this guaranteed a spread of kidney functions. Renal clearances were calculated. RESULTS: Low renal clearances of syndecan-1 (mean 3.5 mL/min) and hyaluronic acid (0.8 mL/min) correlated inversely with the 6-fold variability in the plasma concentrations of these substances (r = -0 . 45 and-0.49). Low creatinine clearance correlated inversely (r = -0.60) and plasma creatinine directly (r = 0.52) with the two-fold variability in heparan sulfate, which was the only shedding substance that also correlated with C-reactive protein (r= 0.51) and, therefore, showed higher concentrations after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The present explorative study suggests that a 6-fold variability in the plasma concentrations of three commonly measured endothelial shedding products can be understood by the kidneys ability to excrete them. This finding has implications when interpreting results of studies where shedding is assessed.

  • 197.
    Hahn, Robert G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Research Unit, Södertälje Hospital, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Preoperative insulin resistance reduces complications after hip replacement surgery in non-diabetic patients.2013In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 39-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance negatively affects the outcome of surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes. This association is often believed to be present in other patient populations as well, but studies are lacking on the influence of preoperative insulin resistance on the clinical course of surgery in non-diabetic patients.

    METHODS: Sixty non-diabetic patients with a mean age of 68 years underwent a 75-min intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) one day before and after elective hip replacement surgery. Patients were regarded to be either insulin resistant (< median insulin sensitivity) or not (> median insulin sensitivity). Hypotensive events occurring in the postoperative care unit and complications in the orthopedic ward were recorded. Fatigue and well-being were assessed via questionnaires.

    RESULTS: A total of 52 patients were included in the final analysis. Insulin resistance before surgery was associated with a lower risk of arterial hypotension in the postoperative care unit (systolic pressure < 80 mmHg; P < 0.05) and with fewer complications in the orthopedic ward (mean 1.9 versus 1.2 per operation, P < 0.01), particularly with respect to nausea/vomiting (P < 0.04) and arterial hypotension (P < 0.05). Fewer of these patients had more than one complication (23% versus 58%, P < 0.001), while no statistical link between preoperative insulin resistance and fatigue or well-being was evident. Insulin resistance, when measured one day postoperatively, did not correlate with the number of complications.

    CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative insulin resistance offers some benefit in the postoperative period and early convalescence in non-diabetic patients who undergo hip replacement surgery.

  • 198.
    Hahn, Robert G.
    et al.
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hasselgren, Emma
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Bjoerne, Hakan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Fluid volume kinetics of 20% albumin2019In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0306-5251, E-ISSN 1365-2125, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 1303-1311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims A population kinetic model was developed for the body fluid shifts occurring when 20% albumin is given by intravenous infusion. The aim was to study whether its efficacy to expand the plasma volume is impaired after major surgery. Methods An intravenous infusion of 3 mL/kg 20% albumin over 30 minutes was given to 15 volunteers and to 15 patients on the 1(st) day after major open abdominal surgery. Blood samples and urine were collected during 5 hours. Mixed-effect modelling software was used to develop a fluid volume kinetic model, using blood haemoglobin and urine excretion the estimate body fluid shifts, to which individual-specific covariates were added in sequence. Results The rise in plasma albumin expanded the plasma volume in excess of the infused volume by relocating noncirculating fluid (rate constant k(21)), but it also increased losses of fluid from the kinetic system (k(b)). The balance between k(21) and k(b) maintained the rise in plasma albumin and plasma volume at a virtual steady-state for almost 2 hours. The rate constant for urinary excretion (k(10)) was slightly reduced by the preceding surgery, by a marked rise in plasma albumin, and by a high preinfusion urinary concentration of creatinine. The arterial pressure, body weight, and plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein and shedding products of the endothelial glycocalyx layer (syndecan-1, heparan sulfate, and hyaluronic acid) did not serve as statistically significant covariates. Conclusions There were no clinically relevant differences in the kinetics of 20% albumin between postoperative patients and volunteers.

  • 199.
    Hahn, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Geback, Tobias
    Chalmers, Sweden .
    Fluid volume kinetics of dilutional hyponatremia; a shock syndrome revisited2014In: Clinics, ISSN 1807-5932, E-ISSN 1980-5322, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 120-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the pathophysiology of shock syndromes can be better understood by comparing central hemodynamics with kinetic data on fluid and electrolyte shifts. METHODS: We studied the dilutional hyponatremic shock that developed in response to overhydration with electrolyte-free irrigating fluid - the so-called transurethral resection syndrome - by comparing cardiac output, arterial pressures, and volume kinetic parameters in 17 pigs that were administered 150 ml/kg of either 1.5% glycine or 5% mannitol by intravenous infusion over 90 minutes. RESULTS: Natriuresis appeared to be the key factor promoting hypovolemic hypotension 15-20 minutes after fluid administration ended. Excessive sodium excretion, due to osmotic diuresis caused by the irrigant solutes, was associated with high estimates of the elimination rate constant (k(10)) and low or negative estimates of the rate constant describing re-distribution of fluid to the plasma after translocation to the interstitium (k(21)). These characteristics indicated a high urinary flow rate and the development of peripheral edema at the expense of plasma volume and were correlated with reductions in cardiac output. The same general effects of natriuresis were observed for both irrigating solutions, although the volume of infused 1.5% glycine had a higher tendency to enter the intracellular fluid space. CONCLUSION: Comparisons between hemodynamics and fluid turnover showed a likely sequence of events that led to hypovolemia despite intravenous administration of large amounts of fluid.

  • 200.
    Hahn, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lyons, Gordon
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The half-life of infusion fluids An educational review2016In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 475-482Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An understanding of the half-life (T-1/2) of infused fluids can help prevent iatrogenic problems such as volume overload and postoperative interstitial oedema. Simulations show that a prolongation of the T-1/2 for crystalloid fluid increases the plasma volume and promotes accumulation of fluid in the interstitial fluid space. The T-1/2 for crystalloids is usually 20 to 40 min in conscious humans but might extend to 80 min or longer in the presence of preoperative stress, dehydration, blood loss of amp;lt;1 l or pregnancy. The longest T-1/2 measured amounts to between 3 and 8 h and occurs during surgery and general anaesthesia with mechanical ventilation. This situation lasts as long as the anaesthesia. The mechanisms for the long T-1/2 are only partly understood, but involve adrenergic receptors and increased renin and aldosterone release. In contrast, the T-1/2 during the postoperative period is usually short, about 15 to 20 min, at least in response to new fluid. The commonly used colloid fluids have an intravascular persistence T-1/2 of 2 to 3 h, which is shortened by inflammation. The fact that the elimination T-1/2 of the infused macromolecules is 2 to 6 times longer shows that they also reside outside the bloodstream. With a colloid, fluid volume is eliminated in line with its intravascular persistence, but there is insufficient data to know if this is the same in the clinical setting.

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