Change search
Refine search result
1234 151 - 160 of 160
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    West, Christina E
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Renz, Harald
    Jenmalm, Maria C
    Kozyrskyj, Anita L
    Allen, Katrina J
    Vuillermin, Peter
    Prescott, Susan L
    The gut microbiota and inflammatory noncommunicable diseases: associations and potentials for gut microbiota therapies.2015In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid environmental transition and modern lifestyles are likely driving changes in the biodiversity of the human gut microbiota. With clear effects on physiologic, immunologic, and metabolic processes in human health, aberrations in the gut microbiome and intestinal homeostasis have the capacity for multisystem effects. Changes in microbial composition are implicated in the increasing propensity for a broad range of inflammatory diseases, such as allergic disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), obesity, and associated noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). There are also suggestive implications for neurodevelopment and mental health. These diverse multisystem influences have sparked interest in strategies that might favorably modulate the gut microbiota to reduce the risk of many NCDs. For example, specific prebiotics promote favorable intestinal colonization, and their fermented products have anti-inflammatory properties. Specific probiotics also have immunomodulatory and metabolic effects. However, when evaluated in clinical trials, the effects are variable, preliminary, or limited in magnitude. Fecal microbiota transplantation is another emerging therapy that regulates inflammation in experimental models. In human subjects it has been successfully used in cases of Clostridium difficile infection and IBD, although controlled trials are lacking for IBD. Here we discuss relationships between gut colonization and inflammatory NCDs and gut microbiota modulation strategies for their treatment and prevention.

  • 152.
    West, Christina E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Renz, Harald
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kozyrskyj, Anita L.
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Allen, Katrina J.
    University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Vuillermin, Peter
    Barwon Heatlh, Australia.
    Prescott, Susan L.
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    MacKay, Charles
    Monash University, Australia.
    Salminen, Seppo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Wong, Gary
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China; Chinese University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Sinn, John
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Stokholm, Jakob
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bisgaard, Hans
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pawankar, Ruby
    Nippon Medical Sch, Japan.
    Noakes, Paul
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Kesper, Doerthe
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Tulic, Meri
    University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, France.
    The gut microbiota and inflammatory noncommunicable diseases: Associations and potentials for gut microbiota therapies2015In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 135, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid environmental transition and modern lifestyles are likely driving changes in the biodiversity of the human gut microbiota. With clear effects on physiologic, immunologic, and metabolic processes in human health, aberrations in the gut microbiome and intestinal homeostasis have the capacity for multisystem effects. Changes in microbial composition are implicated in the increasing propensity for a broad range of inflammatory diseases, such as allergic disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), obesity, and associated noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). There are also suggestive implications for neurodevelopment and mental health. These diverse multisystem influences have sparked interest in strategies that might favorably modulate the gut microbiota to reduce the risk of many NCDs. For example, specific prebiotics promote favorable intestinal colonization, and their fermented products have anti-inflammatory properties. Specific probiotics also have immunomodulatory and metabolic effects. However, when evaluated in clinical trials, the effects are variable, preliminary, or limited in magnitude. Fecal microbiota transplantation is another emerging therapy that regulates inflammation in experimental models. In human subjects it has been successfully used in cases of Clostridium difficile infection and IBD, although controlled trials are lacking for IBD. Here we discuss relationships between gut colonization and inflammatory NCDs and gut microbiota modulation strategies for their treatment and prevention.

  • 153.
    Wheatley, Lisa M.
    et al.
    NIAID, Div Allergy Immunol & Transplantat, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.
    Wood, Robert
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Nadeau, Kari
    Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Liu, Andrew
    Childrens Hosp Colorado, Aurora, CO USA;Univ Colorado, Sch Med, Aurora, CO USA.
    Zoratti, Edward
    Henry Ford Hosp, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.
    Bacharier, Leonard
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, St Louis, MO 63130 USA.
    Brittain, Erica
    NIAID, Biostat Res Branch, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.
    Calderon, Moises
    Imperial Coll London, London, England.
    Casale, Thomas
    Univ S Florida, Tampa, FL USA.
    Chipps, Bradley
    Capital Allergy & Resp Dis Ctr, Sacramento, CA USA.
    Cox, Linda
    Nova Southeastern Univ, Ft Lauderdale, FL 33314 USA.
    Creticos, Peter S.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Desai, Manisha
    Stanford Univ, Quantitat Sci Unit, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Dreborg, Sten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Durham, Stephen
    Imperial Coll London, London, England.
    Gergen, Peter J.
    NIAID, Div Allergy Immunol & Transplantat, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.
    Gruchalla, Rebecca
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Nelson, Harold
    Natl Jewish Hlth, Denver, CO USA.
    O'Hehir, Robyn E.
    Alfred Hosp, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Sch Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Plaut, Marshall
    NIAID, Div Allergy Immunol & Transplantat, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.
    Schwaninger, Julie M.
    NIAID, Div Allergy Immunol & Transplantat, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.
    Tilles, Stephen
    Univ Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Vickery, Brian
    Univ N Carolina, North Carolina Childrens Hosp, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA.
    Wittenberg, Kim M.
    Agcy Healthcare Res & Qual, Ctr Evidence & Practice Improvement, Rockville, MD USA.
    Togias, Alkis
    NIAID, Div Allergy Immunol & Transplantat, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.
    Mind the gaps: Clinical trial concepts to address unanswered questions in aeroallergen immunotherapy-An NIAID/AHRQ Workshop2019In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 143, no 5, p. 1711-1726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases organized a workshop to develop trial concepts that could improve the use and effectiveness of aeroallergen immunotherapy (AAIT). Expert groups were formed to accomplish the following tasks: (1) propose a study design to compare the effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous versus sublingual AAIT; (2) propose a study design to compare the effectiveness and safety of AAIT by using 1 or a few allergens versus all or most allergens to which a patient is sensitized; (3) propose a study design to determine whether AAIT can alter the progression of childhood allergic airways disease; and (4) propose a study design to determine the optimal dose and duration of AAIT to achieve maximal effectiveness with acceptable safety. Study designs were presented by the workgroups, extensively discussed at the workshop, and revised for this report. The proposed trials would be of long duration and require large highly characterized patient populations. Scientific caveats and feasibility matters are discussed. These concepts are intended to help the development of clinical trials that can address some of the major questions related to the practice of AAIT for the management and prevention of allergic airways disease.

  • 154. Williams, H
    et al.
    Robertson, C
    Stewart, A
    Ait-Khaled, N
    Anabwani, G
    Andersson, R
    Asher, I
    Beasley, R
    Björkstén, B
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Burr, M
    Clayton, T
    Crane, J
    Ellwood, P
    Keil, U
    Lai, C
    Javier, M
    Martinez, F
    Mitchell, E
    Montefort, S
    Pearce, N
    Jayant, S
    Sibbald, B
    Strachan, D
    von Mutius, E
    Weiland, SK
    Worldwide variations in the prevalence of symptoms of atopic eczema in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood.  1999In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 103, p. 125-138Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Winkler, Carla
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Hochdoerfer, Thomas
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Elisabeth
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Hasselberg, Annemarie
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Cavallin, Anders
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Thoern, Kristofer
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Muthas, Daniel
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Shojaee, Shervin
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Lueer, Katrin
    Fraunhofer Inst Toxicol and Expt Med, Germany.
    Mueller, Meike
    Fraunhofer Inst Toxicol and Expt Med, Germany.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vaarala, Outi
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Hohlfeld, Jens
    Fraunhofer Inst Toxicol and Expt Med, Germany; German Ctr Lung Res BREATH, Germany; Hannover Med Sch, Germany.
    Pardali, Katerina
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Activation of group 2 innate lymphoid cells after allergen challenge in asthmatic patients2019In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 61-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are effective producers of IL-5 and IL-13 during allergic inflammation and bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses. ILC2 numbers are increased in asthmatic patients compared with healthy control subjects. Thus far, human data describing their phenotype during acute allergic inflammation in the lung are incomplete. Objectives: This study aims to characterize and compare blood and lung-derived ILC2s before and after segmental allergen challenge in patients with mild-to-moderate asthma with high blood eosinophil counts (amp;gt;= 300 cells/mu L). Methods: ILC2s were isolated from blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid before and after segmental allergen challenge. Cells were sorted by means of flow cytometry, cultured and analyzed for cytokine release or migration, and sequenced for RNA expression. Results: ILC2s were nearly absent in the alveolar space under baseline conditions, but numbers increased significantly after allergen challenge (P amp;lt; .05), whereas at the same time, ILC2 numbers in blood were reduced (P amp;lt; .05). Prostaglandin D2 and CXCL12 levels in BAL fluid correlated with decreased ILC2 numbers in blood (P = .004, respective P = .024). After allergen challenge, several genes promoting type 2 inflammation were expressed at greater levels in BAL fluid compared with blood ILC2s, whereas blood ILC2s remain unactivated. Conclusion: ILC2s accumulate at the site of allergic inflammation and are recruited from the blood. Their transcriptional and functional activation pattern promotes type 2 inflammation.

  • 156. Wopereis, Harm
    et al.
    Van Ampting, Marleen
    Candy, David C. A.
    Peroni, Diego
    Vandenplas, Yvan
    Fox, Adam
    Nijhuis, Manon M. Oude
    Harthoorn, Lucien
    Michaelis, Louise J.
    Knol, Jan
    West, Christina E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Gut Microbiota Composition of Non-IgE Mediated Cow's Milk Allergic Infants before and after Dietary Management with a Synbiotics-Supplemented Amino Acid-Based Formula2017In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 139, no 2, p. AB53-AB53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Zhang, Huan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhao, Shuli
    Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bohle, Barbara
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wang, Hui
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Profiling of human CD4+ T-cell subsets identifies the TH2-specific noncoding RNA GATA3-AS12013In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 132, no 4, p. 1005-1008Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 158. Zock, Jan-Paul
    et al.
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Verlato, Giuseppe
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Plana, Estel
    Sunyer, Jordi
    Chinn, Susan
    Olivieri, Mario
    Soon, Argo
    Villani, Simona
    Ponzio, Michela
    Dahlman-Höglund, Anna
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Luczynska, Christina
    Distribution and determinants of house dust mite allergens in Europe: the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II2006In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 682-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies in European homes have described allergen levels from the house dust mite species Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and to a lesser extent Dermatophagoides farinae, but geographic comparisons of exposure levels and risk factors have been hampered by a lack of standardized methods.

    Objective: To study the distribution and determinants of the major house dust mite allergens Der p 1 and Der f 1 in 10 European countries using a common protocol.

    Methods: During home visits with 3580 participants of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II from 22 study centers, mattress dust was sampled and analyzed for Der p 1, Der f 1, and Der 2 allergen. Information on housing characteristics was obtained by both observations and interview.

    Results: Der 1 and Der 2 allergens were detectable (>= 0.1 mu g/g) in 68% and 53% of the samples, respectively. Large differences in allergen levels between study centers were observed, and geographic patterns for Der p 1 and Der f 1 were different. Low winter temperatures reduced Der p 1 rather than Der f 1. Important risk factors for high allergen levels included an older mattress, a lower floor level of the bedroom, limited ventilation of the bedroom, and dampness for Der p 1 but not for Der f 1.

    Conclusion: There are large qualitative and quantitative differences of house dust mite allergen levels in Europe, which can partly be explained by geographic and housing characteristics.

    Clinical implications: Mite allergen exposure may be reduced by replacing the mattress regularly and increasing ventilation of the bedroom, particularly in winter.

  • 159. Zock, Jan-Paul
    et al.
    Plana, Estel
    Antó, Josep M
    Benke, Geza
    Blanc, Paul D
    Carosso, Aurelia
    Dahlman-Höglund, Anna
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Kromhout, Hans
    Lillienberg, Linnéa
    Mirabelli, Maria C
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olivieri, Mario
    Ponzio, Michela
    Radon, Katja
    Soon, Argo
    van Sprundel, Marc
    Sunyer, Jordi
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Torén, Kjell
    Verlato, Giuseppe
    Villani, Simona
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Domestic use of hypochlorite bleach, atopic sensitization, and respiratory symptoms in adults2009In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 731-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Professional use of hypochlorite (bleach) has been associated with respiratory symptoms. Bleach is capable of inactivating allergens, and there are indications that its domestic use may reduce the risk of allergies in children. OBJECTIVE: To study the associations between household use of bleach and atopic sensitization, allergic diseases, and respiratory health status in adults. METHODS: We identified 3626 participants of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II in 10 countries who did the cleaning in their homes and for whom data on specific serum IgE to 4 environmental allergens were available. Frequency of bleach use and information on respiratory symptoms were obtained in face-to-face interviews. House dust mite and cat allergens in mattress dust were measured in a subsample. Associations between the frequency of bleach use and health outcomes were evaluated by using multivariable mixed logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The use of bleach was associated with less atopic sensitization (odds ratio [OR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.63-0.89). This association was apparent for specific IgE to both indoor (cat) and outdoor (grass) allergens, and was consistent in various subgroups, including those without any history of respiratory problems (OR, 0.85). Dose-response relationships (P < .05) were apparent for the frequency of bleach use and sensitization rates. Lower respiratory tract symptoms, but not allergic symptoms, were more prevalent among those using bleach 4 or more days per week (OR, 1.24-1.49). The use of bleach was not associated with indoor allergen concentrations. CONCLUSION: People who clean their homes with hypochlorite bleach are less likely to be atopic but more likely to have respiratory symptoms.

  • 160. Ädelroth, E
    et al.
    Rak, S
    Haahtela, T
    Aasand, G
    Rosenhall, L
    Zetterström, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Allergy Centre UHL.
    Byrne, A
    Champain, K
    Thirlwell, J
    Cioppa, GD
    Sandström, T
    Recombinant humanized mAb-E25, an anti-IgE mAb, in birch pollen-induced seasonal allergic rhinitis2000In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Allergic rhinitis is a common condition often requiring treatment. Objective: We evaluated whether recombinant humanized (rhu)mAb-E25, a recombinant humanized construct of a murine antibody that binds to circulating IgE, could control symptoms and reduce intake of concomitant medication in seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) induced by birch pollen if given subcutaneously in a dose schedule predicted to reduce serum free IgE levels below 25 ng/mL. Methods: We randomly assigned 251 adult subjects with a history of SAR and a positive skin test response to birch pollen to receive 300 mg of rhumAb-E25 or placebo given 2 or 3 times during the season, depending on baseline IgE levels. The primary efficacy variable was the subject's average daily nasal symptom severity score (sneezing, itching, runny, and stuffy nose) from diary data collected over the double-blind treatment period. Secondary efficacy variables included the average number of rescue antihistamine tablets per day, the proportion of days with any SAR medication use, and rhinoconjunctivitis-specific quality of life (QOL). Results: Significant between-treatment differences in favor of rhumAb-E25 were observed in average daily nasal symptom severity scores, the average number of tablets of rescue antihistamines per day, the proportion of days with any SAR medication use, and all domains of QOL. Serum-free IgE levels were markedly lower in rhumAb-E25-treated subjects and were associated with clinical effectiveness. Recombinant humanized mAb-E25 was well tolerated. No anti-rhumAb-E25 antibodies were detected. Conclusion: Compared with placebo, rhumAb-E25 was safe and effective in controlling birch pollen-induced SAR symptoms, with less concomitant medication use and improved QOL. This study shows the therapeutic potential of anti-IgE antibody in SAR.

1234 151 - 160 of 160
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf