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  • 151. Fougner, Stine Lyngvi
    et al.
    Casar-Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Heck, Ansgar
    Berg, Jens Petter
    Bollerslev, Jens
    Adenoma granulation pattern correlates with clinical variables and effect of somatostatin analogue treatment in a large series of patients with acromegaly2012In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 96-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT:

    Somatotroph adenomas have been classified into densely granulated (DG) and sparsely granulated (SG) tumours with a transitional, intermediate group. Gsp oncogenes are activating mutations in the Gsα subunit gene, found in approximately 40% of somatotroph adenomas.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To explore granulation pattern and presence of gsp oncogene in acromegaly with correlations to clinical and biochemical variables and to the effect of treatment with somatostatin analogues (SA), as well as to describe granulation pattern in adenomas with and without SA pretreatment.

    DESIGN/SETTINGS/PATIENTS:

    Seventy-eight patients with active acromegaly were included. Long-term SA efficacy was evaluated in 29 patients treated preoperatively and in ten treated postoperatively. Granulation pattern was examined, as were immunohistochemical analyses for E-cadherin and SSTR2a. Protein levels of E-cadherin and SSTR2a were measured (Western blot). Gsp mutation analysis was available for 74 adenomas.

    RESULTS:

    DG adenomas and the transitional group had higher serum levels of IGF-1 per tumour volume than SG (P = 0·009; P = 0·005). Acute and long-term SA responses were lower in SG (P = 0·001; P = 0·043). No correlation between gsp mutation and granulation was found, and no difference in granulation pattern according to preoperative SA treatment was demonstrated. A significant correlation between granulation and E-cadherin was found, where SG had lowest immunohistochemical expression, substantiated by protein levels, and a highly significant gradient was observed from DG, through the transitional group, to SG.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Densely granulated adenomas were highly responsive to somatostatin analogues in contrast to SG adenomas. The transitional group behaved clinically more like DG adenomas. However, based on E-cadherin, a marker of dedifferentiation, the transitional group seemed to be a true intermediate.

  • 152. Fougner, Stine Lyngvi
    et al.
    Lekva, Tove
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Olivera Casar-Borotas publikationer.
    Hald, John K
    Bollerslev, Jens
    Berg, Jens Petter
    The expression of E-cadherin in somatotroph pituitary adenomas is related to tumor size, invasiveness, and somatostatin analog response2010In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 2334-2342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: Appropriate cell-to-cell adhesion is fundamental for the epithelial phenotype of pituitary cells. Loss of the adhesion protein E-cadherin has been associated with invasiveness, metastasis, and poor prognosis in cancers of epithelial origin. In somatotroph adenomas, a variable and reduced expression of E-cadherin has been demonstrated. In addition, nuclear translocation of E-cadherin was found to correlate with pituitary tumor invasion.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the protein expression of E-cadherin in somatotroph pituitary adenomas in relation to adenoma size, invasiveness, and somatostatin analog (SMS) efficacy.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-three patients were included, and 29 were treated preoperatively with SMS. Adenoma E-cadherin protein expression was analyzed by Western blot (61 patients) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) (80 patients) with antibodies directed against both extracellular and intracellular domains (IHC). The acute (direct surgery group) and long-term (preoperatively treated group) SMS responses were evaluated. Baseline tumor volume and invasiveness were measured on magnetic resonance imaging scans.

    RESULTS: Membranous E-cadherin was lost in several adenomas. Nine of these were nuclear E-cadherin positive. The E-cadherin protein expression correlated negatively to tumor size and positively to acute SMS response. Low E-cadherin levels (preoperatively treated group only) and loss of membranous E-cadherin correlated to tumor invasiveness. The E-cadherin level correlated positively to tumor reduction after SMS treatment, and adenomas with nuclear E-cadherin staining had lower IGF-I reduction and tumor shrinkage. Preoperatively treated adenomas had reduced E-cadherin protein levels, but the IHC expression was unaltered.

    CONCLUSION: Reduced E-cadherin expression may correlate to a dedifferentiated phenotype in the somatotroph pituitary adenomas.

  • 153. Fraenkel, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Melhus, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Enterococcus faecium coisolated with Lactobacillus species can mimic vancomycin-resistant enterococci2011In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 1, p. 7335-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Franklin, Oskar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Jonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Billing, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lundberg, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Öhlund, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nyström, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lundin, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Plasma micro-RNA alterations appear late in pancreatic cancer2018In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 267, no 4, p. 775-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to study whether plasma microRNAs (miRNA) can be used for early detection of pancreatic cancer (PC) by analyzing prediagnostic plasma samples collected before a PC diagnosis. Background: PC has a poor prognosis due to late presenting symptoms and early metastasis. Circulating miRNAs are altered in PC at diagnosis but have not been evaluated in a prediagnostic setting. Methods: We first performed an initial screen using a panel of 372 miRNAs in a retrospective case-control cohort that included early-stage PC patients and healthy controls. Significantly altered miRNAs at diagnosis were then measured in an early detection case-control cohort wherein plasma samples in the cases are collected before a PC diagnosis. Carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (Ca 19–9) levels were measured in all samples for comparison. Results: Our initial screen, including 23 stage I-II PC cases and 22 controls, revealed 15 candidate miRNAs that were differentially expressed in plasma samples at PC diagnosis. We combined all 15 miRNAs into a multivariate statistical model, which outperformed Ca 19–9 in receiver-operating characteristics analysis. However, none of the candidate miRNAs, individually or in combination, were significantly altered in prediagnostic plasma samples from 67 future PC patients compared with 132 matched controls. In comparison, Ca 19–9 levels were significantly higher in the cases at <5 years before diagnosis. Conclusion: Plasma miRNAs are altered in PC patients at diagnosis, but the candidate miRNAs found in this study appear late in the course of the disease and cannot be used for early detection of the disease.

  • 155.
    Frisk, Sofia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Univ Lab, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Taylan, Fulya
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blaszczyk, Izabela
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Hand & Plast Surg, Umea, Sweden.
    Nennesmo, Inger
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Annerén, Göran
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Herm, Bettina
    Ostersunds Hosp, Child & Adolescent Habilitat Ctr, Ostersund, Sweden.
    Stattin, Evalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zachariadis, Vasilios
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindstrand, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Univ Lab, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tesi, Bianca
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Univ Lab, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Tobias
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordgren, Ann
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Univ Lab, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Early activating somatic PIK3CA mutations promote ectopic muscle development and upper limb overgrowth2019In: Clinical Genetics, ISSN 0009-9163, E-ISSN 1399-0004, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 118-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum is a group of rare genetic disorders with asymmetric overgrowth caused by somatic mosaic PIK3CA mutations. Here, we report clinical data and molecular findings from two patients with congenital muscular upper limb overgrowth and aberrant anatomy. During debulking surgery, numerous ectopic muscles were found in the upper limbs of the patients. DNA sequencing, followed by digital polymerase chain reaction, was performed on DNA extracted from biopsies from hypertrophic ectopic muscles and identified the somatic mosaic PIK3CA hotspot mutations c.3140A > G, p.(His1047Arg) and c.1624G > A, p.(Glu542Lys) in a male (patient 1) and a female (patient 2) patient, respectively. Patient 1 had four ectopic muscles and unilateral isolated muscular overgrowth while patient 2 had 13 ectopic muscles and bilateral isolated muscular overgrowth of both upper limbs, indicating that her mutation occurred at early pre-somitic mesoderm state. The finding of PIK3CA mutations in ectopic muscles highlights the importance of PIK3CA in cell fate in early human embryonic development. Moreover, our findings provide evidence that the disease phenotype depends on the timing of PIK3CA mutagenesis during embryogenesis and confirm the diagnostic entity PIK3CA-related muscular overgrowth with ectopic accessory muscles.

  • 156.
    Galant, Natalie J.
    et al.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Med Biophys, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Biochem, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada..
    Bugyei-Twum, Antoinette
    Univ Toronto, Dept Med Biophys, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Biochem, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada..
    Rakhit, Rishi
    Stanford Univ, Dept Chem & Syst Biol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Walsh, Patrick
    Univ Toronto, Dept Biochem, Hosp Sick Children, Mol Struct & Funct Program, 1 Kings Coll Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada..
    Sharpe, Simon
    Univ Toronto, Dept Biochem, Hosp Sick Children, Mol Struct & Funct Program, 1 Kings Coll Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada..
    Arslan, Pharhad Eli
    Univ Toronto, Dept Med Biophys, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Biochem, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada..
    Westermark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Higaki, Jeffrey N.
    Prothena Biosci Inc, Dept Biochem, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA.;Prothena Biosci Inc, Dept Histopathol, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    Torres, Ronald
    Prothena Biosci Inc, Dept Biochem, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA.;Prothena Biosci Inc, Dept Histopathol, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    Tapia, Jose
    Prothena Biosci Inc, Dept Biochem, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA.;Prothena Biosci Inc, Dept Histopathol, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    Chakrabartty, Avijit
    Univ Toronto, Dept Med Biophys, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Biochem, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada..
    Substoichiometric inhibition of transthyretin misfolding by immune-targeting sparsely populated misfolding intermediates: a potential diagnostic and therapeutic for TTR amyloidoses2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 25080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild-type and mutant transthyretin (TTR) can misfold and deposit in the heart, peripheral nerves, and other sites causing amyloid disease. Pharmacological chaperones, Tafamidis (R) and diflunisal, inhibit TTR misfolding by stabilizing native tetrameric TTR; however, their minimal effective concentration is in the micromolar range. By immune-targeting sparsely populated TTR misfolding intermediates (i.e. monomers), we achieved fibril inhibition at substoichiometric concentrations. We developed an antibody (misTTR) that targets TTR residues 89-97, an epitope buried in the tetramer but exposed in the monomer. Nanomolar misTTR inhibits fibrillogenesis of misfolded TTR under micromolar concentrations. Pan-specific TTR antibodies do not possess such fibril inhibiting properties. We show that selective targeting of misfolding intermediates is an alternative to native state stabilization and requires substoichiometric concentrations. MisTTR or its derivative may have both diagnostic and therapeutic potential.

  • 157.
    Galant, Natalie J.
    et al.
    Univ Toronto, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Dept Med Biophys, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada..
    Westermark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Higaki, Jeffrey N.
    Prothena Biosci Inc, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    Chakrabartty, Avijit
    Univ Toronto, Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Dept Med Biophys, TMDT 4-305,101 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada..
    Transthyretin amyloidosis: an under-recognized neuropathy and cardiomyopathy2017In: Clinical Science, ISSN 0143-5221, E-ISSN 1470-8736, Vol. 131, no 5, p. 395-409Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis (ATTR amyloidosis) is an underdiagnosed and important type of cardiomyopathy and/or polyneuropathy that requires increased awareness within the medical community. Raising awareness among clinicians about this type of neuropathy and lethal form of heart disease is critical for improving earlier diagnosis and the identification of patients for treatment. The following review summarizes current criteria used to diagnose both hereditary and wild-type ATTR (ATTRwt) amyloidosis, tools available to clinicians to improve diagnostic accuracy, available and newly developing therapeutics, as well as a brief biochemical and biophysical background of TTR amyloidogenesis.

  • 158. Gantelius, Stefan
    et al.
    Hedström, Yvette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Pontén, Eva
    Higher Expression of Myosin Heavy Chain IIx in Wrist Flexors in Cerebral Palsy2012In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, ISSN 0009-921X, E-ISSN 1528-1132, Vol. 470, no 5, p. 1272-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) use their paretic arm less than normal but have a relative overactivity of wrist flexors, causing an impairing flexed position of the wrist. Voluntary use of a muscle downregulates myosin heavy chain (MyHC) IIx, but it is unclear whether the relative overactivity of wrist flexors and extensors in children with CP affects MyHC expression compared to normal subjects.

    QUESTIONS/PURPOSES:

    We therefore asked whether MyHC expression composition differs in wrist flexors compared to extensors in children with CP and in controls and whether it is related to clinical findings.

    METHODS:

    We took muscle biopsies from wrist flexors and extensors during hand surgery in children with CP (n = 9) and during open reduction of forearm fractures in control children (n = 5). The expression of the MyHC I, IIa, and IIx isoforms were determined on silver-stained 6% SDS-PAGE.

    RESULTS:

    CP flexors showed a higher proportion of MyHC IIx (40%) than control flexors (16%) and CP extensors (20%). MyHC IIa isoform proportion was lower in CP flexors (27%) than in control flexors (46%) and in CP extensors (45%). MyHC I expression was lower in CP (36%) than in controls (46%) for wrist extensors only.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Both the brain injury in CP and the different demands on flexors and extensors affect the expression of MyHCs. The higher amount of MyHC IIx in CP could be caused by a decreased voluntary use of the hemiplegic arm.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

    More information on the structural difference between flexors and extensors in normal and spastic muscle could improve the understanding of strain of wrist extensors and possibly the development of flexion contractures in CP.

  • 159.
    Garwicz, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wadelius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Farmakogenetisk analys kan avslöja risk för statinbiverkningar: [Pharmacogenetic analysis can predict adverse effects of statins]2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 19-20, p. 951-952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mer än var tionde vuxen i Sverige behandlas med statiner. 

    Muskelsvaghet, -trötthet och -värk är kända biverkningar. I sällsynta fall ses rabdomyolys, som kan leda till akut njursvikt och någon gång dödsfall. 

    Statiners kemiska egenskaper och serumkoncentration påverkar risken för allvarliga biverkningar. Serumkoncentrationen beror på dos och på patientens förmåga att omsätta läkemedlet.

    Akademiska sjukhuset har som första svenska sjukhus infört analys av en genetisk variant (SLCO1B1*5) som kan förutsäga ökad risk för sällsynta, allvarliga muskelbiverkningar vid statinbehandling.

  • 160. Geisler, Christian H.
    et al.
    Kolstad, Arne
    Laurell, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Räty, Riikka
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Nordström, Marie
    Kimby, Eva
    Boesen, Anne Marie
    Nilsson-Ehle, Herman
    Kuittinen, Outi
    Lauritzsen, Grete F.
    Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth
    Ehinger, Mats
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Delabie, Jan
    Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa
    Brown, Peter
    Elonen, Erkki
    The Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (MIPI) is superior to the International Prognostic Index (IPI) in predicting survival following intensive first-line immunochemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT)2010In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 115, no 8, p. 1530-1533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) has a heterogeneous clinical course. The recently proposed Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (MIPI) predicted the survival of MCL better than the International Prognostic Index in MCL patients treated with conventional chemotherapy, but its validity in MCL treated with more intensive immunochemotherapy has been questioned. Applied here to 158 patients of the Nordic MCL2 trial of first-line intensive immunochemotherapy followed by high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, the MIPI and the simplified MIPI (s-MIPI) predicted survival significantly better (P < .001) than the International Prognostic Index (P > .004). Both the MIPI and the s-MIPI mainly identified 2 risk groups, low and intermediate versus high risk, with the more easily applied s-MIPI being just as powerful as the MIPI. The MIPI(B) (biological), incorporating Ki-67 expression, identified almost half of the patients as high risk. We suggest that also a simplified MIPI(B) is feasible.

  • 161.
    Gholiha, Alex R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hollander, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Molin, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Smedby, Karin E
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjalgrim, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Glimelius, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    High tumour plasma cell infiltration reflects an important microenvironmental component in classic Hodgkin lymphoma linked to presence of B-symptoms2019In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 184, no 2, p. 192-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasma cells are important prognostic actors in different malignancies. The tumour microenvironmental composition in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is a major prognostic key element; however, clinicopathological studies regarding plasma cells in cHL are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate CD138+ (also termed SDC1+) plasma cell and IgG4 producing (IgG4+) plasma cells infiltration in the microenvironment of cHL. Immunohistochemistry with anti-CD138 and IgG4 antibodies was performed on diagnostic tumour biopsies from 124 patients with cHL, on tissue micro array (TMA). In 120 cases, CD138+ plasma cell-infiltration was associated with the presence of B-symptoms (P = 0·028) and advanced stage, IIB-IVB (P = 0·009). In multivariate analysis, CD138+ plasma cells correlated with eosinophil infiltration (P = 0·013). The subgroup of IgG4+ plasma cells was analysed in 122 cases and only correlated to CD138+ plasma cells (P = 0·004). Patients with high proportion of tumour infiltrating CD138+ plasma cells (defined as ≥10%), had a more inferior event-free survival (P = 0·007) and overall survival (P = 0·004) than patients with a low proportion of infiltrating CD138+ plasma cells (<10%), although significance was not maintained in multivariate analysis. In summary, a high proportion of tumour-associated plasma cells in cHL reflect an important component in the microenvironment of cHL.

  • 162.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Beskow, Anna H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Birgisson, Helgi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Björ, Ove
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hansson, Tony
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Helleday, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Div Translat Med & Chem Biol, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Henriksson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hultdin, Magnus
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Höglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Larsson, Chatarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Mindus, Stephanie
    Akad Sjukhuset, Lung & Allergy Clin, Uppsala.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, RCC Uppsala Örebro, Uppsala.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, Solna.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå.
    Stålberg, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Sundström, Christer Sundström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Thellenberg Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå.
    Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    U-CAN: a prospective longitudinal collection of biomaterials and clinical information from adult cancer patients in Sweden.2018In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Progress in cancer biomarker discovery is dependent on access to high-quality biological materials and high-resolution clinical data from the same cases. To overcome current limitations, a systematic prospective longitudinal sampling of multidisciplinary clinical data, blood and tissue from cancer patients was therefore initiated in 2010 by Uppsala and Umeå Universities and involving their corresponding University Hospitals, which are referral centers for one third of the Swedish population.

    Material and Methods: Patients with cancer of selected types who are treated at one of the participating hospitals are eligible for inclusion. The healthcare-integrated sampling scheme encompasses clinical data, questionnaires, blood, fresh frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens, diagnostic slides and radiology bioimaging data.

    Results: In this ongoing effort, 12,265 patients with brain tumors, breast cancers, colorectal cancers, gynecological cancers, hematological malignancies, lung cancers, neuroendocrine tumors or prostate cancers have been included until the end of 2016. From the 6914 patients included during the first five years, 98% were sampled for blood at diagnosis, 83% had paraffin-embedded and 58% had fresh frozen tissues collected. For Uppsala County, 55% of all cancer patients were included in the cohort.

    Conclusions: Close collaboration between participating hospitals and universities enabled prospective, longitudinal biobanking of blood and tissues and collection of multidisciplinary clinical data from cancer patients in the U-CAN cohort. Here, we summarize the first five years of operations, present U-CAN as a highly valuable cohort that will contribute to enhanced cancer research and describe the procedures to access samples and data.

  • 163.
    Graflund, M.
    et al.
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sorbe, Bengt
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sigurdardóttir, S.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    HPV-DNA, vascular space invasion, and their impact on the clinical outcome in early-stage cervical carcinomas2014In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 896-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was designed to analyze the relationship of human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA, microvessel density, and their impact on clinical outcome in early cervical carcinoma. HPV-DNA was evaluated in 171 cases of cervical carcinoma treated from 1965 to 1990. In 110 cases, the analyses could be performed. A polymerase chain reaction technique was used on paraffin-embedded specimens obtained before the start of therapy. HPV-DNA of any type was detected in 78% (86/110) of all evaluable tumors. HPV16 was the predominant type and was detected in 56% (62/110), HPV18 in 8% (9/110), and HPV35 in 21% (23/110). Patients with tumors containing HPV16 or HPV18 were significantly (P = 0.011) younger than patients with tumors not containing either of these two subtypes. Vascular space invasion and lymph node metastases were observed more frequently in tumors expressing HPV16 and HPV18 (P = 0.002, P = 0.047) than in tumors negative for these HPV strains. Tumors containing HPV16 and HPV18 were significantly (P = 0.012) larger and more frequently (P = 0.005) associated with higher FIGO stages. The cancer-specific survival rate was lower for patients with HPV16- and HPV18-positive tumors, but the difference was not statistically significant. The microvessel density was a non-significant prognostic factor. The overall 5-year survival rate of the complete series was 91%. It was concluded that HPV-DNA was a prognostic factor in early-stage cervical cancer and was associated with the age of the patient, vascular space invasion, lymph node metastases, tumor size, and FIGO stage.

  • 164.
    Graflund, M.
    et al.
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sorbe, Bengt
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sigurdardóttir, S.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Relation between HPV-DNA and expression of p53, bcl-2, p21WAF-1, MIB-1, HER-2/neu and DNA ploidy in early cervical carcinoma: correlation with clinical outcome2004In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 169-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relation between the expression of p53, bcl-2, p21WAF1, MIB-1, HER-2/neu, DNA ploidy and HPV16 or 18 infections with clinical parameters. HPV-DNA was evaluated in 171 early cervical carcinomas treated from 1965 to 1990 and detected by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) on paraffin specimens obtained before therapy was started. HPV-DNA of any type was detected in 78% (86/110) of all tumors, HPV16 was the predominant type and was seen in 56% (62/110), HPV18 in 8% (9/110) and HPV35 in 21% (23/110). Patients with HPV16 or 18 were significantly (P=0.011) younger than patients with tumors not containing these two HPV subtypes. Lymph node metastases were seen more frequently (P=0.047) in tumors expressing HPV16 or 18. Tumor size was associated with the HPV-type. The frequency of DNA aneuploidy was lower in high-risk HPV tumors than in tumors with other HPV subtypes (P=0.014). MIB-1 expression was highly significantly (P=0.00007) associated with presence of HPV16 or 18. The cancer-specific survival rate was lower for patients with HPV16 and 18 positive tumors, but the difference was not statistically significant. The overall 5-year survival rate of the complete series was 91%. In conclusion, the HPV DNA subtype was a prognostic factor in early stage cervical cancer and it was associated with age, positive lymph nodes, tumor size, DNA ploidy and the proliferation marker MIB-1.

  • 165.
    Graflund, Marianne
    et al.
    Departments of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sorbe, Bengt
    Departments of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryne, M.
    Department of Pathology, Institute of Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The prognostic value of a histologic grading system, DNA profile, and MIB-1 expression in early stages of cervical squamous cell carcinomas2002In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 149-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the prognostic importance of a new grading system focusing on the invasive tumor front, DNA profile, and the proliferation marker MIB-1. A complete geographic series of 172 women treated with radical hysterectomy (Wertheim-Meigs) for FIGO stage I-II cervical carcinomas was the target population. The analyses were performed on 141 (82%) squamous cell carcinomas of the complete series. During the period of observation (mean 222 months), 17 recurrences (12.1%) were encountered. Prognostic factors for disease-free survival were lymph node status (P < 0.000001), radical surgical margins (P = 0.00004), and tumor size (P = 0.002). The complete score of the invasive front grading system (IFG), and the individual scores of two variables-pattern of invasion and host response-were all significantly (P = 0.002, P = 0.007, P = 0.0001) associated with pelvic lymph node metastases. Host response was the single most important factor in the IFG system, and it was superior to the complete score in predicting lymph node metastases. The total IFG score was also a significant (P = 0.003) prognostic factor for disease-free survival. DNA ploidy, S-phase fraction, and MIB-1 expression were nonsignificant factors in predicting pelvic lymph node metastases and disease-free survival of the patient. The IFG in the original or modified versions could predict low- and high-risk groups of tumors and therefore be of value in treatment planning for these patients.

  • 166.
    Graflund, Marianne
    et al.
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Sorbe, Bengt
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hussein, A.
    Department of Pathology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryne, M.
    Department of Pathology, Institute of Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Department of Pathology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The prognostic value of histopathologic grading parameters and microvessel density in patients with early squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix2002In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 32-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic importance of clinical and histopathologic factors, including malignancy grading systems (MGS), partial index (PI), invasive front grading (IFG), and microvessel density. A complete geographic series of 172 early stage (FIGO I-II) cervical carcinomas treated by Wertheim-Meigs surgery during the period 1965-1990 was studied. The patients were followed up for at least 10 years. Significant prognostic factors for disease-free survival were lymph node status (P < 0.0000001), radical surgical margins (P = 0.00003), and tumor size (P = 0.008). In a multivariate Cox analysis it was shown that lymph node status was the single most important prognostic factor with regard to disease-free survival. The total MGS and the PI scores were highly significantly (P = 0.0001) associated with pelvic lymph node metastases and disease-free survival rate in squamous cell carcinomas. The MGS and the PI systems were superior to the IFG system in predicting lymph node metastases. The total IFG score was also a statistically highly significant (P = 0.003) prognostic factor with regard to disease-free survival in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Microvessel density was a nonsignificant prognostic factor. There was a highly significant (P = 0.002) association between vascular space invasion of tumor cells and the presence of lymph node metastases. In conclusion, histopathologic malignancy grading systems provide valuable prognostic information in patients with early stage squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix.

  • 167.
    Graflund, Marianne
    et al.
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sorbe, Bengt
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats G
    Department of Pathology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Immunohistochemical expression of p53, bcl-2, and p21(WAF1/CIP1) in early cervical carcinoma: correlation with clinical outcome2002In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of p53, bcl-2, and p21(WAF1/CIP1) immunoreactivity as predictors of pelvic lymph node metastases (LNM), recurrences, and death due to the disease in early stage (FIGO I-II) cervical carcinomas. FIGO stage, type of histopathology, and tumor grade were also evaluated in this series of patients treated by radical hysterectomy (Wertheim-Meigs) between 1965 and 1990. A total of 172 patients were included. A tumor was regarded as positive when more than 30% of the neoplastic cells exhibited immunoreactivity. Positive immunostaining was found in 8.9% for p53, in 43.5% for bcl-2, and in 25.0% for p21(WAF1/CIP1). None of them was able to predict LNM or clinical outcome. Presence of LNM, tumor recurrence, and death from disease were significantly associated with the FIGO stage (P = 0.014, P = 0.009, and P = 0.001, respectively). The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 91.6% and the overall survival rate was 90.5%. It was concluded that immunohistochemically detected p53, bcl-2, and p21(WAF1/CIP1) appeared to be of no predictive value with regard to LNM, tumor recurrences, or long-term survival in early cervical carcinomas.

  • 168.
    Graflund, Marianne
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sorbe, Bengt
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats G
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    MIB-1, p53, bcl-2, and WAF-1 expression in pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumors in early stage cervical carcinomas: correlation with clinical outcome2002In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 1041-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A complete series of 40 cervical carcinomas with pelvic lymph node metastases were analysed immunohistochemically for prognostic markers. The aims of this study were to examine whether the detection of MIB-1, p53, bcl-2, and WAF-1 could be used as a prognostic marker for tumor recurrence and survival rate. During the period of observation (mean 222, range 72-360 months) 22 (55%) recurrences were encountered and 20 patients died of the disease. There were 35 squamous cell carcinomas (87.5%), 2 adenosquamous carcinomas (5.0%), and 3 pure adenocarcinomas (7.5%). One tumor (2.5%) was well differentiated, 12 tumors (30%) were moderately differentiated, and 27 tumors (67.5%) were poorly differentiated. The primary tumor grade (P=0.037) and radicality of the surgical margins (P=0.021) were significant prognostic factors with regard to tumor recurrence. The site and number of lymph nodes with metastases had no prognostic value. P53, bcl-2, and WAF-1 were not predictive factors for recurrences or the cancer-specific survival rate. The concordant expression of WAF-1 in the primary tumor and in lymph node metastases was lower than for p53 and bcl-2. The proliferative activity (MIB-1) seemed to be lower in tumor cells metastasized to the pelvic lymph nodes than in cells of the primary tumor. Expression of MIB-1 in lymph nodes was predictive of disease-free survival in both univariate and multivariate proportional hazard Cox analyses.

  • 169.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Gomez, Ruben
    Nybo, Mads
    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel
    von Meyer, Alexander
    Preanalytical aspects on short- and long-term storage of serum and plasma2019In: Diagnosis, ISSN 2194-8011, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 51-56Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following an ordered clinical chemistry plasma/serum test, ideally the venous blood specimen is adequately collected at a health care facility, then swiftly transported to and readily handled, analyzed and sometimes interpreted at a clinical chemistry laboratory followed by a report of the test result to the ordering physician to finally handle the result. However, often there are practical as well as sample quality reasons for short-or long-term storage of samples before and after analysis. If there are specific storage needs, the preanalytical handling practices are specified in the laboratory's specimen collection instructions for the ordered test analyte. Biobanking of specimens over a very long time prior to analysis includes an often neglected preanalytical challenge for preserved quality of the blood specimen and also involves administrative and additional practical handling aspects (specified in a standard operating procedure SOP) when demands and considerations from academic, industry, research organizations and authorities are included. This short review highlights some preanalytical aspects of plasma/serum short-and long-term storage that must be considered by clinicians, laboratory staff as well as the researchers.

  • 170.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Hammarsten, Ola
    Institutionen för Biomedicin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Berggren Söderlund, Maria
    Klinisk kemi och transfusionsmedicin, Kronoberg.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Linköpings universitet.
    Laboratoriernas verksamhet2018In: Laurells Klinisk kemi i praktisk medicin / [ed] Elvar Theodorsson & Maria Berggren Söderlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 10, p. 13-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    et al.
    Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Umeå universitet.
    Hammarsten, Ola
    Avdelningen för Laboratoriemedicin vid Institutionen för biomedicin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Maria, Berggren Söderlund
    Region Kronoberg, Klinisk kemi och transfusionsmedicin.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Laboratoriernas verksamhet2018In: Laurells klinisk kemi i praktisk medicin / [ed] Elvar Theodorsson, Maria Berggren Söderlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 10, p. 13-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Greaves, Ronda F
    et al.
    School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Australia.
    Smith, Janet M
    Beastall, Graham
    Laboratory Medicine Consulting, Glasgow, UK.
    Florkowski, Chris
    Clinical Biochemistry Unit, Canterbury Health Laboratories, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Langman, Loralie
    Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, United States.
    Sheldon, Joanna
    Protein Reference Unit, St. George’s Hospital, London, UK.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    The IFCC Curriculum - phase 1.2018In: EJIFCC, ISSN 1650-3414, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 55-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 173. Greiser, Anne
    et al.
    Winter, Theresa
    Mahfoud, Hala
    Kallner, Anders
    Ittermann, Till
    Masuch, Annette
    Lubenow, Norbert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Kohlmann, Thomas
    Greinacher, Andreas
    Nauck, Matthias
    Petersmann, Astrid
    The 99th percentile and imprecision of point-of-care cardiac troponin I in comparison to central laboratory tests in a large reference population2017In: Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0009-9120, E-ISSN 1873-2933, Vol. 50, no 18, p. 1198-1202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Determination of cardiac troponin (cTn) is central in the emergency department (ED) for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. In view of adverse effects of long waiting time on patient outcome, implementation of point-of-care-testing (POCT) is suggested if the turn-around-time is longer than 60min. The present study aimed to determine the 99th percentile and imprecision of two POCT in a healthy population measuring cTnI and cTnT and compare these analytical characteristics against three central laboratory test (CLT) for cTnI.

    DESIGN & METHODS: CTnI and cTnT were determined in parallel by means of the AQT90 FLEX analyzer in about 2250 plasma samples from individuals with known health status. Results were compared to previously determined performance data of three CLT.

    RESULTS: The 99th percentile of cTnI in the POCT was determined at 19ng/L, the lowest concentration with an imprecision of 10% was reached at 22ng/L while an imprecision of 20% was reached at 13ng/L. Age, sex, or physical activity did not affect the 99th percentile of cTnI. Compared to CLT the AQT90 cTnI POCT the analytical performance was equivalent. The cTnT POCT could not be assessed due a considerable number of high values and an inadequate imprecision profile.

    CONCLUSION: While the cTnI POCT showed analytical performance comparable to CLT, the results of the cTnT assay on the same device did not suffice to determine a reliable 99th percentile. The present evaluation supports the usage of the cTnI POCT, but application of the cTnT POCT needs further evaluation.

  • 174.
    Gremel, Gabriela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Djureinovic, Dijana
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Niinivirta, Marjut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Laird, Alexander
    Univ Edinburgh, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Edinburgh Urol Canc Grp, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Ljungqvist, Oscar
    Atlas Antibodies AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johannesson, Henrik
    Atlas Antibodies AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergman, Julia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Navani, Sanjay
    Lab Surgpath, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Khan, Naila
    Lab Surgpath, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Patil, Tushar
    Lab Surgpath, Bombay, Maharashtra, India..
    Sivertsson, Asa
    Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Harrison, David J.
    Univ St Andrews, Sch Med, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland..
    Ullenhag, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stewart, Grant D.
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Edinburgh Urol Canc Grp, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hosp, Acad Urol Grp, Box 43,Cambridge Biomed Campus,Hills Rd, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    A systematic search strategy identifies cubilin as independent prognostic marker for renal cell carcinoma2017In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 17, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is an unmet clinical need for better prognostic and diagnostic tools for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Human Protein Atlas data resources, including the transcriptomes and proteomes of normal and malignant human tissues, were searched for RCC-specific proteins and cubilin (CUBN) identified as a candidate. Patient tissue representing various cancer types was constructed into a tissue microarray (n = 940) and immunohistochemistry used to investigate the specificity of CUBN expression in RCC as compared to other cancers. Two independent RCC cohorts (n = 181; n = 114) were analyzed to further establish the sensitivity of CUBN as RCC-specific marker and to explore if the fraction of RCCs lacking CUBN expression could predict differences in patient survival. Results: CUBN was identified as highly RCC-specific protein with 58% of all primary RCCs staining positive for CUBN using immunohistochemistry. In venous tumor thrombi and metastatic lesions, the frequency of CUBN expression was increasingly lost. Clear cell RCC (ccRCC) patients with CUBN positive tumors had a significantly better prognosis compared to patients with CUBN negative tumors, independent of T-stage, Fuhrman grade and nodal status (HR 0.382, CI 0.203-0.719, P = 0.003). Conclusions: CUBN expression is highly specific to RCC and loss of the protein is significantly and independently associated with poor prognosis. CUBN expression in ccRCC provides a promising positive prognostic indicator for patients with ccRCC. The high specificity of CUBN expression in RCC also suggests a role as a new diagnostic marker in clinical cancer differential diagnostics to confirm or rule out RCC.

  • 175. Grinberg, Marianna
    et al.
    Djureinovic, Dijana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Brunnström, Hans R R
    Mattsson, Johanna Sofia Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Edlund, Karolina
    Hengstler, Jan G
    La Fleur, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ekman, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Branden, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jirström, Karin
    Tracy, Derek K
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Botling, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Rahnenführer, Jörg
    Micke, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Reaching the limits of prognostication in non-small cell lung cancer: an optimized biomarker panel fails to outperform clinical parameters.2017In: Modern Pathology, ISSN 0893-3952, E-ISSN 1530-0285, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 964-977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous protein biomarkers have been analyzed to improve prognostication in non-small cell lung cancer, but have not yet demonstrated sufficient value to be introduced into clinical practice. Here, we aimed to develop and validate a prognostic model for surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer. A biomarker panel was selected based on (1) prognostic association in published literature, (2) prognostic association in gene expression data sets, (3) availability of reliable antibodies, and (4) representation of diverse biological processes. The five selected proteins (MKI67, EZH2, SLC2A1, CADM1, and NKX2-1 alias TTF1) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays including tissue from 326 non-small cell lung cancer patients. One score was obtained for each tumor and each protein. The scores were combined, with or without the inclusion of clinical parameters, and the best prognostic model was defined according to the corresponding concordance index (C-index). The best-performing model was subsequently validated in an independent cohort consisting of tissue from 345 non-small cell lung cancer patients. The model based only on protein expression did not perform better compared to clinicopathological parameters, whereas combining protein expression with clinicopathological data resulted in a slightly better prognostic performance (C-index: all non-small cell lung cancer 0.63 vs 0.64; adenocarcinoma: 0.66 vs 0.70, squamous cell carcinoma: 0.57 vs 0.56). However, this modest effect did not translate into a significantly improved accuracy of survival prediction. The combination of a prognostic biomarker panel with clinicopathological parameters did not improve survival prediction in non-small cell lung cancer, questioning the potential of immunohistochemistry-based assessment of protein biomarkers for prognostication in clinical practice.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.14.

  • 176. Gullsby, Karolina
    et al.
    Hallander, Hans O
    Bondeson, Kåre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine.
    Performance of Bordetella pertussis IS481 real-time PCR in a vaccine trial setting2007In: Apmis, Vol. 115, no 12, p. 1370-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 177. Gullsby, Karolina
    et al.
    Storm, Martin
    Bondeson, Kåre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine.
    Simultaneous detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae by use of molecular beacons in a duplex real-time PCR2008In: Journal of clinical microbiology, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 727-731Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 178.
    Gulyas, Miklos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Mattsson, Johanna Sofia Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Lindgren, Andrea
    Ek, Lars
    Lamberg, Kristina
    Behndig, Annelie
    Holmberg, Erik
    Micke, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Bergman, Bengt
    COX-2 expression and effects of celecoxib in addition to standard chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.In: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is proposed as a treatment option in several cancer types. However, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), phase III trials have failed to demonstrate a benefit of adding COX-2 inhibitors to standard chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to analyse COX-2 expression in tumor and stromal cells as predictive biomarker for COX-2 inhibition.

    Methods: In the multicenter phase III trial, 316 patients with advanced NSCLC were randomized to receive celecoxib (400 mg b.i.d.) or placebo up to one year in addition to a two-drug platinum-based chemotherapy combination. In a subset of 122 patients, archived tumor tissue was available for immunohistochemical analysis of COX-2 expression in tumor and stromal cells.

    Results: An updated analysis of all 316 patients included in the original trial, and of the 122 patients with available tumor tissue, showed no survival differences between the celecoxib and placebo arms (HR 1.01; 95%CI 0.81-1.27 and HR 1.12; 95%CI 0.78-1.61, respectively). Similarly, in patients with high COX-2 expression in tumor cells (n=71) or stromal cells (n=55), survival did not differ significantly between patients who received celecoxib or placebo (HR 1.07; 95%CI 0.74-1.54 and HR 0.80; 95%CI 0.56-1.15). No significant interaction effect between COX-2 score in tumor or stromal cells and celecoxib effect on survival was detected (p=0.48 and 0.25, respectively).

    Conclusion: In this subgroup analysis of patients with advanced NSCLC, we could not detect any significant interaction between COX-2 expression in tumor or stromal cells and outcome of celecoxib treatment in addition to standard chemotherapy.

  • 179.
    Gulyas, Miklos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Mattsson, Johanna Sofia Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Lindgren, Andrea
    Linköping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Allergy Ctr, Fac Hlth Sci.
    Ek, Lars
    Skåne Univ Hosp, Pulm Med, Lund.
    Lamberg Lundström, Kristina
    Akad Hosp, Pulm Med, Uppsala.
    Behndig, Annelie
    Norrland Univ Hosp, Pulm Med, Umeå.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg.
    Micke, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Bergman, Bengt
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Resp Med.
    COX-2 expression and effects of celecoxib in addition to standard chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.2018In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 244-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is proposed as a treatment option in several cancer types. However, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), phase III trials have failed to demonstrate a benefit of adding COX-2 inhibitors to standard chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to analyze COX-2 expression in tumor and stromal cells as predictive biomarker for COX-2 inhibition.

    Methods: In a multicenter phase III trial, 316 patients with advanced NSCLC were randomized to receive celecoxib (400 mg b.i.d.) or placebo up to one year in addition to a two-drug platinum-based chemotherapy combination. In a subset of 122 patients, archived tumor tissue was available for immunohistochemical analysis of COX-2 expression in tumor and stromal cells. For each compartment, COX-2 expression was graded as high or low, based on a product score of extension and intensity of positively stained cells.

    Results: An updated analysis of all 316 patients included in the original trial, and of the 122 patients with available tumor tissue, showed no survival differences between the celecoxib and placebo arms (HR 1.01; 95% CI 0.81–1.27 and HR 1.12; 95% CI 0.78–1.61, respectively). High COX-2 scores in tumor (n = 71) or stromal cells (n = 55) was not associated with a superior survival outcome with celecoxib vs. placebo (HR =0.96, 95% CI 0.60–1.54; and HR =1.51; 95% CI 0.86–2.66), and no significant interaction effect between COX-2 score in tumor or stromal cells and celecoxib effect on survival was detected (p = .48 and .25, respectively).

    Conclusions: In this subgroup analysis of patients with advanced NSCLC treated within the context of a randomized trial, we could not detect any interaction effect of COX-2 expression in tumor or stromal cells and the outcome of celecoxib treatment in addition to standard chemotherapy.

  • 180.
    Gustafsson, Dan
    et al.
    Departments of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Breimer, Lars H.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden;.
    Isaksson, Helena S.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Medicine and Biomedicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Medicine and Biomedicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tissue zinc levels in a child with hypercalprotectinaemia and hyperzincaemia: a case report and a review of the literature2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 34-38Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A girl suffering from a rare syndrome of unknown aetiology, termed hypercalprotectinaemia, was evaluated for tissue zinc status, because calprotectin is a protein which chelates Zn at multiple binding-sites, which might have affected the distribution of Zn in her body.

    Methods: Measurement of serum, urine, hair and nail zinc (Zn) concentration, complemented with measurement of total Zn in ultrafiltrates of plasma.

    Results: Her serum Zn concentration was 105-133 mu mol/L. Zn levels in her hair (102 mu g/g), nail (90 mu g/g) and urine (3-12 mu mol/L; 20-80 mu g/dL) were all at the lower end of the reference intervals described in the sparse literature. Zn concentrations in ultrafiltrates of plasma were below the detection limit (<100 nmol/L). Thus, the elevated serum Zn did not translate into a similarly increased level of Zn in any of the tissues tested, nor in free Zn concentrations. Instead it appeared to be a result of Zn being chelated to binder proteins, most probably calprotectin.

    Conclusion: Her grossly elevated serum calprotectin concentration is probably able to raise circulating total Zn concentrations without raising ionized concentrations, but this Zn remains confined to the circulating blood as well as to excreted body fluids, particularly faeces.

  • 181.
    Gylling, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ulvik, Arve
    Bevital AS, Laboratory building, Bergen, Norway.
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen and Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Midttun, Øivind
    Bevital AS, Laboratory building, Bergen, Norway.
    Schneede, Jørn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    One-carbon metabolite ratios as functional B-vitamin markers and in relation to colorectal cancer risk2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 5, p. 68p. 947-956Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One-carbon metabolism biomarker are easily measured in plasma, but analyzing them one at a time in relation to disease does not take into account the interdependence of the many factors involved. The relative dynamics of major one-carbon metabolism branches can be assessed by relating the functional B-vitamin marker total homocysteine (tHcy) to transsulfuration (total cysteine) and methylation (creatinine) outputs.

    Objective: We validated the ratios of tHcy to total cysteine (Hcy:Cys), tHcy to creatinine (Hcy:Cre), and tHcy to cysteine to creatinine (Hcy:Cys:Cre) as functional markers of B-vitamin status. We also calculated the associations of these ratios to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.

    Design: The relative contribution of potential confounders to the variance of the ratio-based B-vitamin markers was calculated by linear regression in a nested case-control study of 613 CRC cases and 1211 matched controls. Total B-vitamin status was represented by a summary score comprising Z-standardized plasma concentrations of folate, cobalamin, betaine, pyridoxal 5´-phosphate, and riboflavin. Associations with CRC risk were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

    Results: The ratio-based B-vitamin markers all outperformed tHcy as markers of total B-vitamin status, in both CRC cases and controls. Associations with CRC risk were similar for the ratio-based B-vitamin markers and total B-vitamin status (approximately 25% lower risk for high versus low B-vitamin status).

    Conclusions: Ratio-based B-vitamin markers were good predictors of total B-vitamin status, and displayed similar associations with CRC risk. Since tHcy and creatinine are routinely clinically analyzed, Hcy:Cre could be easily implemented in clinical practice to aid interpretation of tHcy results.

  • 182.
    Göransson, Lizette
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Fredlund, Filippa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    En jämförelse mellan mättekniker för högerkammarbedömning vid ekokardiografi: Överensstämmelse mellan s´ och TAPSE2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The assessment of right ventricular systolic function is done by echocardiography, with techniques as twodimensional echocardiography, motion-mode (M-mode) and Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI). Measurements ​​obtained from these techniques are Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion (TAPSE) and s`. TAPSE describes the longitudinal movement of annulus tricuspidalis. s´ describes annulus tricuspidalis maximal systolic velocity. The purpose of this essay was to explore the relationship between TAPSE and s´. The study consists of 99 participants between the ages of 18 and 90. The population was consisted of individuals with or without cardiovascular disease, but not individuals with atrial fibrillation. Participants were investigated with transthorakal echocardiography (TTE) at Länssjukhuset Ryhov in Jönköping. At the examination both TAPSE and s´ was measured. McNemar's test was performed and a Kappa value was calculated. The result showed a significant difference and the Kappa value was low which indicates a low relationship between the variables. The outcome of the study shows that several participants are classified with normal right ventricular function measured with TAPSE, but the same individuals are classified with right ventricular dysfunction measured by s'. The reason for the poor relationship between the parameters is unknown and should be studied further in future studies.

  • 183.
    Haglund, Felix
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Garvin, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ihre-Lundgren, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Inga-Lena
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hall, Evelina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Carling, Tobias
    Yale School Med, CT USA.
    Hoog, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Christofer Juhlin, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Detailed Lymph Node Sectioning of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Specimen Increases the Number of pN1a Patients2016In: Endocrine pathology, ISSN 1046-3976, E-ISSN 1559-0097, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 346-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is a common endocrine malignancy, frequently presenting with lymph node metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Lymph node staging (N) partly determines treatment, follow-up, and prognosis. Since 2011, our institution has employed a more comprehensive histopathological work-up of lymph nodes in patients with PTC. We sought to retrospectively determine the value of serial lymph node level sectioning in PTCs with negative preoperative lymph node status (pN0) as a method to increase the sensitivity of detecting metastatic disease. We included all patients that underwent thyroidectomy and central neck dissection and subsequent comprehensive lymph node level sectioning due to PTC with an initial pN0 status between the years 2011 and 2015 at our institution. Sixty-seven cases of PTC with a median of 10 metastatic free lymph nodes identified per case were included. After serial lymph node sectioning of the central compartment, 11 cases (16 %) revealed lymph node metastasis, six of which (55 %) presented with a small primary tumor (amp;lt; 20 mm, T1). Of all T1 tumors with initial pN0 status, 18 % (T1a) and 9 % (T1b) reached a pN1 stage after comprehensive lymph node sectioning. Cases with altered lymph node status had a median of 15 identified lymph nodes as compared to ten in cases that remained negative. We conclude that comprehensive lymph node sectioning increased the sensitivity of detecting metastases in PTC and altered the pathological TNM staging (pTNM) for a significant number of patients. Although of limited prognostic significance, the method should be considered as an adjunct tool when assessing lymph node status of PTC as a part of the routine histological work-up to ensure an accurate cancer staging.

  • 184.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Collin, Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Wadelius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Preventivt arbete kan minska läkemedelsbiverkningar2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, article id ERYWArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Hamberg, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Wadelius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing in children2014In: Pharmacogenomics (London), ISSN 1462-2416, E-ISSN 1744-8042, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 361-374Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical factors, demographic variables and variations in two genes, CYP2C9 and VKORC1, have been shown to contribute to the variability in warfarin dose requirements among adult patients. Less is known about their relative importance for dose variability in children. A few small studies have been reported, but the results have been conflicting, especially regarding the impact of genotypes. In this article, we critically review published pharmacogenetic-based prediction models for warfarin dosing in children, and present results from a head-to-head comparison of predictive performance in a distinct cohort of warfarin-treated children. Finally we discuss what properties a prediction model should have, and what knowledge gaps need to be filled, to improve warfarin therapy in children of all ages.

  • 186.
    Hamberg, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Wadelius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Friberg, Lena E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Biss, Tina T
    Kamali, Farhad
    Jonsson, E Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Characterising variability in warfarin dose requirements in children using modelling and simulation2013In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0306-5251, E-ISSN 1365-2125, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 158-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Although genetic, clinical and demographic factors have been shown to explain approximately half of the inter-individual variability in warfarin dose requirement in adults, less is known about causes of dose variability in children. This study aimed to identify and quantify major genetic, clinical and demographic sources of warfarin dose variability in children using modelling and simulation.

    METHODS: Clinical, demographic and genetic data from 163 children with a median age of 6.3 years (range 0.06-18.9 years), covering over 183 years of warfarin therapy and 6445 INR observations were used to update and optimise a published adult pharmacometric warfarin model for use in children.

    RESULTS: Genotype effects in children were found to be comparable to what has been reported for adults, with CYP2C9 explaining up to a 4-fold difference in dose (CYP2C9 *1/*1 vs. *3/*3) and VKORC1 explaining up to a 2-fold difference in dose (VKORC1 G/G vs. A/A), respectively. The relationship between bodyweight and warfarin dose was non-linear, with a 3-fold difference in dose for a 4-fold difference in bodyweight. In addition, age, baseline and target INR, and time since initiation of therapy, but not CYP4F2 genotype, had a significant impact on typical warfarin dose requirements in children.

    CONCLUSIONS: The updated model provides quantitative estimates of major clinical, demographic and genetic factors impacting warfarin dose variability in children. With this new knowledge more individualised dosing regimens can be developed and prospectively evaluated in the pursuit of improving both efficacy and safety of warfarin therapy in children.

  • 187.
    Hammarsten, Ola
    et al.
    Avdelningen för Laboratoriemedicin vid Institutionen för biomedicin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Umeå universitet.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Tolkning av analysresultat2018In: Laurells klinisk kemi i praktisk medicin / [ed] Elvar Theodorsson, Maria Berggren Söderlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 10, p. 31-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Hammarsten, Ola
    et al.
    Institutionen för Biomedicin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Linköpings universitet.
    Tolkning av analysresultat2018In: Laurells Klinisk kemi i praktisk medicin / [ed] Elvar Theodorsson & Maria Berggren Söderlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 10, p. 31-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Muller, Jasmin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Promoting health of Swedish workers by complementary methods: example of a study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled intervention study2017In: Medical Research Archives, ISSN 2375-1916, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When designing, implementing, and evaluating a work site health promotion program, it is necessary to ensure that the program is evidence based. The present article aims to present in-depth information on the design of a longitudinal randomized controlled complementary intervention pilot study that follows the Consort recommendations to evaluate possible effects of a health promotive intervention in healthy workers.

    Methods: Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to mental training programs, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to mental training programs only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to mental training programs, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Immediately before the randomization, after four weeks and after eight weeks the participants responded to statements from the Swedish Scale of Personality and had their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature measured.

    Results: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ own evaluation of their health, as well as their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. However, the intervention need to be evaluated further.

    Conclusion: The approach described makes it possible to design, implement and evaluate a work site health promotion program, also on pilot-study level and these results should be seen as a first step towards larger randomized studies. This types of studies need to focus on healthy participants and special care should be taken to guarantee adequately powered study groups and their homogeneity.

  • 190.
    Hansson, Lars-Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Flodin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Althaus, Harald
    Blirup-Jensen, Sören
    Grubb, Anders
    The first harmonization step on cystatin C, with the aim to introduce the first ERM-DA471/IFCC cystatin C calibrator and one worldwide company-independent EGFR equation2011In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 49, no s1, p. s557-s557Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 191. Hansson Petersen, Camilla A
    et al.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    Behbahani, Homira
    Wiehager, Birgitta
    Pavlov, Pavel F
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Kuopio Finland .
    Leinonen, Ville
    Ito, Akira
    Winblad, Bengt
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Ankarcrona, Maria
    The amyloid beta-peptide is imported into mitochondria via the TOM import machinery and localized to mitochondrial cristae.2008In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 105, no 35, p. 13145-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) has been suggested to exert its toxicity intracellularly. Mitochondrial functions can be negatively affected by Abeta and accumulation of Abeta has been detected in mitochondria. Because Abeta is not likely to be produced locally in mitochondria, we decided to investigate the mechanisms for mitochondrial Abeta uptake. Our results from rat mitochondria show that Abeta is transported into mitochondria via the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) machinery. The import was insensitive to valinomycin, indicating that it is independent of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Subfractionation studies following the import experiments revealed Abeta association with the inner membrane fraction, and immunoelectron microscopy after import showed localization of Abeta to mitochondrial cristae. A similar distribution pattern of Abeta in mitochondria was shown by immunoelectron microscopy in human cortical brain biopsies obtained from living subjects with normal pressure hydrocephalus. Thus, we present a unique import mechanism for Abeta in mitochondria and demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that Abeta is located to the mitochondrial cristae. Importantly, we also show that extracellulary applied Abeta can be internalized by human neuroblastoma cells and can colocalize with mitochondrial markers. Together, these results provide further insight into the mitochondrial uptake of Abeta, a peptide considered to be of major significance in Alzheimer's disease.

  • 192.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Jenssen, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Haghdoost, Siamak
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Tomato juice intake suppressed serum concentration of 8-oxodG after extensive physical activity2012In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 11, p. 29-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: DNA is constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS), spontaneously arising during the normal oxygen metabolism. ROS may result in temporary as well as permanent modifications in various cellular components such as lipids, proteins and DNA, which may have deleterious consequences. Demonstrating that a dietary supplementation of antioxidants can reduce oxidative DNA damage may provide evidence for the value of such supplementation in prevention of cancer and age related diseases. Findings: The present study was conducted to address whether tomato juice protects against ROS induced by extensive physical exercise in untrained individuals. As a marker of oxidative stress, serum levels of 8-oxodG were monitored using a modified ELISA. An intervention was performed involving 15 untrained healthy subjects who performed a 20 min physical exercise at 80% of maximum pulse using an ergometer bicycle. Blood samples were taken before and one hour after the exercise. The procedure was repeated after 5 weeks with a daily intake of 150 ml tomato juice and followed by a 5 weeks wash-out period and another 5 weeks with a daily intake of tomato juice. The results indicated that a daily intake of tomato juice, equal to 15 mg lycopene per day, for 5 weeks significantly reduced the serum levels of 8-oxodG after an extensive physical exercise. Conclusion: These data strongly suggest that tomato juice has a potential antioxidant effect and may reduce the elevated level of ROS induced by oxidative stress.

  • 193.
    Hasni, Muhammad Sharif
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Berglund, Mattias
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Yakimchuk, Konstantin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Guan, Jiyu
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Linderoth, Johan
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Div Oncol & Pathol, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Okret, Sam
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Estrogen receptor beta 1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma growth and as a prognostic biomarker2017In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 418-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) shows a higher incidence in males versus females. Epidemiological studies have shown that female gender is a favorable prognostic factor, which may be explained by estrogens. Here we show that when grafting human DLBCL cells to immunocompromised mice, tumor growth in males is faster. When treating mice grafted with either germinal center or activated B-cell like DLBCL cells with the selective estrogen receptor beta (ER beta) agonist diarylpropionitrile, tumor growth was significantly inhibited. Furthermore, nuclear ER beta 1 expression analysis in primary DLBCL's by immunohistochemistry revealed expression in 89% of the cases. Nuclear ERb1 expression was in a univariate and multivariate analysis, an independent prognostic factor for adverse progression-free survival in Rituximab-chemotherapy treated DLBCL (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively). These results suggest that estrogen signaling through ERb1 is an interesting future therapeutic target for treatment of DLBCL, and that ERb1 expression can be used as a prognostic marker.

  • 194.
    Hauser, Janosch
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Roxhed, Niclas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.
    A BLOOD HEMATOCRIT TEST STRIP2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports a self-propelled microfluidichematocrit (HCT) test that uses the correlation betweenblood hematocrit and wicking distance of blood in a specialpaper matrix. The enabling feature is a novel blood volumemetering method that allows sampling from the fingertipand reliably generates a highly precise blood volume of47.7 ± 1.9 μl (CV 4%) that is transferred into a porouspaper matrix. A dissolvable valve ensures a relaxed timewindow for blood sampling, making it highly user-friendlyand resilient to overfilling. The presented hematocrit teststrip poses a simple, cheap, equipment-free solution forpatient-centric hematocrit measurements.

  • 195.
    Hauser, Janosch
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Roxhed, Niclas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Micro and Nanosystems.
    AN AUTONOMOUS BLOOD MICROSAMPLING DEVICE ENABLING METERED LARGE-VOLUME DRIED PLASMA SPOTS (DPS)2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work introduces a novel principle for volume metering of passively separated blood plasma, empowered by an air pinch-off structure and the high capillary force of a paper matrix. The presented microfluidic device enables the autonomous generation of large-volume dried plasma spots (DPS) with 16 μl of plasma from 50-100 μl of human whole blood within less than 10 minutes. Providing large-volume DPS increases the confidence level of detecting low concentration analytes and constitutes a step towards using blood microsampling in the everyday blood analysis routine.

  • 196.
    Hedbrant, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    [Common sense against rolls of fat--should we reduce our intake of carbohydrates?].: Folkvett mot fettvalk – bör vi minska vårt kolhydratintag?2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 100, no 47, p. 3889-3890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Västvärldens kostexperter har utifrån ett primitivt energibalanstänkande lanserat budskapet att äta kolhydrater, som är mindre energitäta än fett och borde ge lägre energiintag. Istället har man råkat öka aptiten eftersom kosten innehållit mindre andel protein, samt ökat kroppsfettmassan då ökat kolhydratintag medfört ökade insulinhalter och fettinlagring samt blockerad fettförbränning.

  • 197. Hedin, G
    et al.
    Widerström, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Endocarditis due to Staphylococcus sciuri.1998In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 673-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Hellquist, H. B.
    et al.
    Departments of Pathology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Pathology II, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahl, F.
    Departments of Pathology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Departments of Pathology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, C.
    Departments of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the palate1994In: Histopathology, ISSN 0309-0167, E-ISSN 1365-2559, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 178-180Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Hellquist, H. B.
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nasal memory T lymphocytes capable of producing IL-4 in the allergic reaction1992In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 47, no 4 Pt 1, p. 334-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the presence of memory T cells in the nasal mucosa of allergic patients. The demonstration of CD4+/CD29+ (CD4+/CD45RO+) T lymphocytes, which are capable of interleukin-4 production, can indicate a complementary cell-mediated regulatory mechanism for mast cell proliferation and IgE synthesis in human nasal allergy. No substantial IgE production can be obtained in the absence of IL-4. Therefore, the existence of IL-4 producing cells on site in the nasal mucosa of allergic subjects probably implies a complementary interaction between cytokines and different immunocompetent nasal cells in the regulation of B cells and IgE synthesis.

  • 200.
    Hellquist, H. B.
    et al.
    Department of Pathology II, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Department of Pathology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Christina
    Department of Pathology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Viale, G.
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
    Dell'Orto, P.
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
    Davidsson, Åke
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Olofsson, J.
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway .
    Bcl-2 immunoreactivity in salivary gland neoplasms is unrelated to the expression of mRNA for natural killer cell stimulatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-121996In: Virchows Archiv, ISSN 0945-6317, E-ISSN 1432-2307, Vol. 429, no 2-3, p. 149-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Certain cytokines are involved in the generation of natural killer (NK) cells and participate in the regulation of the proto-oncogene bcl-2. We aimed to study the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-5, the composition of the tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), and the expression of bcl-2 in 14 benign and malignant human parotid tumours. T IL were predominantly composed of T lymphocytes and NK cells. We found evidence for the homing of T cells, and for generation of NK cells in the vicinity of the tumours. mRNA for IL-2 and IL-12, were identified but IL-4 mRNA was not found. The cytokine profiles and the composition of TIL of the two tumour categories were indistinguishable, suggesting that these host-response variables do not explain the differences in biological behaviour of these particular tumours. The results support a shift towards Th 1 (T helper 1) cells and interferon-gamma production, and that IL-12 also in vivo may play an important role in the regulatory interaction between innate resistance and adaptive immunity in tumour diseases. Most infiltrating lymphocytes showed strong expression of bcl-2; an interesting observation with regard to lymphocytic apoptosis in neoplastic diseases. The immunoreactivity for the bcl-2 protein varied considerably between and within tumours, and almost all benign tumours showed strong bcl-2 positively whereas several of the malignant tumours showed weak or absent staining. The variable expression of bcl-2 protein suggests a different susceptibility of tumour cells to apoptosis. The results also indicate that bcl-2 cannot pla a major role as protective agent in the specific apoptotic pathway induced by NK cells.

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