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  • 1401.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Hughes, Roger
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Editorial on the occasion of the International Congress of Nutrition. World hunger: A good fight or a losing cause?2009In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 1685-1686Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1402.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Hughes, Roger
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Editorial on the occasion of the International Congress of Nutrition. World hunger: A good fight or a losing cause?2009In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 1685-1686Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1403.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Hughes, Roger
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Food insecurity: not just about rural communities in Africa and Asia2009In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 1971-1972Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1404.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Hughes, Roger
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Public health: someone must have been doing something right!2009In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 2253-2254Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1405.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci Novum, Unit Prevent Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Sachdev, H. P. S.
    Sitaram Bhartia Inst Sci & Res, New Delhi, India.
    Guidance on publishing results and how we operate evidence-based policy2008In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 655-656Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1406.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hughes, Roger
    Cannon, Geoffrey
    Climate change: time to redefine our profession2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 301-302Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1407.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Oshaug, Arne
    Margetts, Barrie
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hughes, Roger
    Cannon, Geoffrey
    World Food Summits: what for, and what value?2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 151-152Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1408.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden .
    Breastfeeding determinants and a suggested framework for action in Europe2001In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 4, no 2B, p. 729-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a background paper for the EURODIET initiative. A number of international initiatives and documents were identified, such as the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes and a number of consensus reports from professional groups, that propose ways forward for breastfeeding promotion. These point at a range of initiatives on different levels. The determinants for successful breastfeeding have to be identified. They can be categorised into five groups; socio-demographic, psycho-social, health care related, community- and policy attributes. A framework for future breastfeeding promoting efforts on European level is suggested, within which these determinants are considered. A common surveillance system needs to be built in Europe, where determinants of breastfeeding are included. There is also a need for a surveillance system which makes it possible to use the collected data on local level, not only on national and supranational level. Combined with a thorough review of the effectiveness of already existing breastfeeding promotion programmes, a co-ordinated EU-EFTA action plan on breastfeeding should be formulated and implemented within a few years. Urgent action could take place in parallel, especially targeting young, low-income, less educated mothers.

  • 1409.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden .
    Breastfeeding determinants and a suggested framework for action in Europe2001In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 4, no 2B, p. 729-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a background paper for the EURODIET initiative. A number of international initiatives and documents were identified, such as the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes and a number of consensus reports from professional groups, that propose ways forward for breastfeeding promotion. These point at a range of initiatives on different levels. The determinants for successful breastfeeding have to be identified. They can be categorised into five groups; socio-demographic, psycho-social, health care related, community- and policy attributes. A framework for future breastfeeding promoting efforts on European level is suggested, within which these determinants are considered. A common surveillance system needs to be built in Europe, where determinants of breastfeeding are included. There is also a need for a surveillance system which makes it possible to use the collected data on local level, not only on national and supranational level. Combined with a thorough review of the effectiveness of already existing breastfeeding promotion programmes, a co-ordinated EU-EFTA action plan on breastfeeding should be formulated and implemented within a few years. Urgent action could take place in parallel, especially targeting young, low-income, less educated mothers.

  • 1410.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Breastfeeding in countries of the European Union and EFTA: current and proposed recommendations, rationale, prevalence, duration and trends2001In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 4, no 2B, p. 631-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recommendations suggest exclusive breast feeding for at least the first 4 to 6 months after birth. Paradoxically, an overwhelming proportion of breast feeding (BF) data in Europe refers to all BF, i.e. not only exclusive but also partial BF (including formula, juices, water, sweetened water etc). This makes it difficult to estimate to what extent the recommendations are met. There is currently strong evidence for recommending exclusive breast feeding for at least 6 months. Exclusive BF has progressively gained scientific support. Prevention of infections, allergies and chronic diseases and a favourable cognitive development are highlighted in the recent scientific literature. Further long-term studies on the effects of BF on prevention of chronic disease in the adult are needed. Great differences exist in BF prevalence and duration both within and between European countries. Trends point towards higher prevalence and duration, with some exceptions. Young mothers breast feed less than older mothers; single and/or less educated mothers breast feed less than married mothers with more education. However, inefficient and unreliable monitoring systems prevail, and the data are scarce, not only on exclusive BF but also on demographic, socio-economic, psychosocial and medical determinants of BF patterns. National BF coordinators have not been appointed in many countries, and only every second country has promotion of BF incorporated into their national plan of action for nutrition.

    Conclusions: Efficient surveillance systems, comparable across Europe and using common definitions and methodology, need to be developed. These should include determinants of breast feeding. A European consensus conference should urgently be organised, in which strategies for successful promotion of exclusive BF should be particularly considered. There is now strong evidence for a recommendation to breast feed exclusively for about 6 months, which is more than the duration recommended previously.

  • 1411.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Breastfeeding in countries of the European Union and EFTA: current and proposed recommendations, rationale, prevalence, duration and trends2001In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 4, no 2B, p. 631-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recommendations suggest exclusive breast feeding for at least the first 4 to 6 months after birth. Paradoxically, an overwhelming proportion of breast feeding (BF) data in Europe refers to all BF, i.e. not only exclusive but also partial BF (including formula, juices, water, sweetened water etc). This makes it difficult to estimate to what extent the recommendations are met. There is currently strong evidence for recommending exclusive breast feeding for at least 6 months. Exclusive BF has progressively gained scientific support. Prevention of infections, allergies and chronic diseases and a favourable cognitive development are highlighted in the recent scientific literature. Further long-term studies on the effects of BF on prevention of chronic disease in the adult are needed. Great differences exist in BF prevalence and duration both within and between European countries. Trends point towards higher prevalence and duration, with some exceptions. Young mothers breast feed less than older mothers; single and/or less educated mothers breast feed less than married mothers with more education. However, inefficient and unreliable monitoring systems prevail, and the data are scarce, not only on exclusive BF but also on demographic, socio-economic, psychosocial and medical determinants of BF patterns. National BF coordinators have not been appointed in many countries, and only every second country has promotion of BF incorporated into their national plan of action for nutrition.

    Conclusions: Efficient surveillance systems, comparable across Europe and using common definitions and methodology, need to be developed. These should include determinants of breast feeding. A European consensus conference should urgently be organised, in which strategies for successful promotion of exclusive BF should be particularly considered. There is now strong evidence for a recommendation to breast feed exclusively for about 6 months, which is more than the duration recommended previously.

  • 1412.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden:.
    Warm, Daniel
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Institue of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Institue of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Rodrigo, Carmen Pérez
    Community Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health, Bilbao, Spain.
    Nissinen, Aulikki
    Department of Community Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
    Effective promotion of healthy nutrition and physical activity in Europe requires skilled and competent people: European Master's Programme in Public Health Nutrition1999In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 2, no 3A, p. 449-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists in basic research and epidemiology deliver messages to policy makers. Effective population based strategies then require people trained and competent in the discipline of Public Health Nutrition (PHN). Since 1997, a European Master's Programme in PHN has been undergoing planning and implementation with the aid of funding from the European Commission (DGV). PHN is used as a broad term covering Nutrition and Physical Activity as well as Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

    The partners in this project are academic departments from 17 countries. The students will undertake core modules and electives for a year and a half, followed by a research project for six months. In order to set up formalised procedures for the evaluation of the quality assurance of individual modules from across Europe, a quality assurance system has been set up.

    The academic year 1999-2000 will allow an opportunity for Universities and Institutes to start new modules, to develop other modules, assess the movement of students between modules, tackle funding issues and allow further marketing of the programme. Future activities include strengthening of the European Network for Public Health Nutrition (ENPHN), the establishment of a consortium with universities, the co-ordination of programme activities with other European Master's Programmes in Public Health, and the incorporation of new Member States from Eastern Europe.

    We can look forward to a new brand of professionals, who are truly European in their training, but who also have an integrated view of nutrition and physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention and who are prepared for policy making, action planning, implementation and evaluation.

  • 1413.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden:.
    Warm, Daniel
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Institue of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Institue of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Rodrigo, Carmen Pérez
    Community Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health, Bilbao, Spain.
    Nissinen, Aulikki
    Department of Community Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
    Effective promotion of healthy nutrition and physical activity in Europe requires skilled and competent people: European Master's Programme in Public Health Nutrition1999In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 2, no 3A, p. 449-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists in basic research and epidemiology deliver messages to policy makers. Effective population based strategies then require people trained and competent in the discipline of Public Health Nutrition (PHN). Since 1997, a European Master's Programme in PHN has been undergoing planning and implementation with the aid of funding from the European Commission (DGV). PHN is used as a broad term covering Nutrition and Physical Activity as well as Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

    The partners in this project are academic departments from 17 countries. The students will undertake core modules and electives for a year and a half, followed by a research project for six months. In order to set up formalised procedures for the evaluation of the quality assurance of individual modules from across Europe, a quality assurance system has been set up.

    The academic year 1999-2000 will allow an opportunity for Universities and Institutes to start new modules, to develop other modules, assess the movement of students between modules, tackle funding issues and allow further marketing of the programme. Future activities include strengthening of the European Network for Public Health Nutrition (ENPHN), the establishment of a consortium with universities, the co-ordination of programme activities with other European Master's Programmes in Public Health, and the incorporation of new Member States from Eastern Europe.

    We can look forward to a new brand of professionals, who are truly European in their training, but who also have an integrated view of nutrition and physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention and who are prepared for policy making, action planning, implementation and evaluation.

  • 1414.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Strindlund, Åsa
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The development of a European master programme in public health nutrition2003In: Forum of nutrition, ISSN 1660-0347, Vol. 56, p. 135-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1415.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Strindlund, Åsa
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The development of a European master programme in public health nutrition2003In: Forum of nutrition, ISSN 1660-0347, Vol. 56, p. 135-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1416.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thulin, Susanna
    A European network for public health nutrition: The EUNUTNET project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 321-322Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1417.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thulin, Susanna
    A European network for public health nutrition: The EUNUTNET project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 321-322Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1418.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thulin, Susanna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kennedy, Nick
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Margetts, Barrie
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leonhauser, Ingrid-Ute
    Univ Giessen, D-35390 Giessen, Germany.
    Training in public health nutrition in Europe results from the EUNUTNET project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 334-335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1419.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Breastfeeding - still not reaching the target2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 749-750Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1420.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Congress in Porto September 2010 and increased impact factor2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1295-1295Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1421.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Dietary guidelines and goal-setting2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 1149-1150Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1422.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Salt: importance in iodine deficiency and sodium excess2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 599-600Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1423.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    A robust and knowledgeable workforce is essential for public health nutrition policy implementation2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1979-1980Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1424.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Department of Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    A robust and knowledgeable workforce is essential for public health nutrition policy implementation2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1979-1980Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1425.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Bioscience & Nutriton, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    Nutrition of infants and young children2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 1601-1602Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1426.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    The epidemic of obesity publications, award to legend and more2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1427.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    McNeill, Caroline
    Hodge, Allison
    Vitamin D - the big D-bate2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 565-565Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1428.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Hodge, Allison
    The local touch2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 943-944Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1429.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Novum, Dept Biosci & Nutr, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    Haapala, Irja
    McNeill, Geraldine
    World Nutrition 2012-a global Public Health Nutrition opportunity2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 567-567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1430.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Novum, Dept Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    Haapala, Irja
    McNeill, Geraldine
    World Nutrition 2012-a global Public Health Nutrition opportunity2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 567-567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1431.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Haapala, Irja
    Assessment of diet and physical activity: new tools; old challenges2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 377-378Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1432.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Haapala, Irja
    Cooking in this issue: back to basics!2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1141-1141Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1433.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Haapala, Irja
    The fantastic year of 2010 - and the really hot topic: breast-feeding2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 1945-1945Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1434.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    McNeill, Caroline
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    2012-starting with overweight and obesity2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1435. Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    The year that passed: 20112011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 12, p. 2081-2082Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1436.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Hodge, Allison
    Haapala, Irja
    Is the emperor nude?: impact factor or health impact factor?2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 753-753Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1437.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Wolf, Alexandra
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franchini, Bela
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Haraldsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krølner, Rikke
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Maes, Lea
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent , Belgium.
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    Community Nutrition Unit, Bilbao, Spain.
    Sjoström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thórsdóttir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    Fruit and vegetable intake in a sample of 11-year-old children in 9 European countries: the pro children cross-sectional survey2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 236-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: An adequate fruit and vegetable intake provides essential nutrients and nutritive compounds and is considered an important part of a healthy lifestyle. No simple instrument has been available for the assessment of fruit and vegetable intake as well as its determinants in school-aged children applicable in different European countries. Within the Pro Children Project, such an instrument has been developed. This paper describes the cross-sectional survey in 11-year-olds in 9 countries.

    METHODS: The cross-sectional survey used nationally, and in 2 countries regionally, representative samples of schools and classes. The questionnaires, including a precoded 24-hour recall component and a food frequency part, were completed in the classroom. Data were treated using common syntax files for portion sizes and for merging of vegetable types into four subgroups.

    RESULTS: The results show that the fruit and vegetable intake in amounts and choice were highly diverse in the 9 participating countries. Vegetable intake was in general lower than fruit intake, boys consumed less fruit and vegetables than girls did. The highest total intake according to the 24-hour recall was found in Austria and Portugal, the lowest in Spain and Iceland.

    CONCLUSION: The fruit and vegetable intake in 11-year-old children was in all countries far from reaching population goals and food-based dietary guidelines on national and international levels.

  • 1438.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Wolf, Alexandra
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franchini, Bela
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Haraldsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krølner, Rikke
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Maes, Lea
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent , Belgium.
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    Community Nutrition Unit, Bilbao, Spain.
    Sjoström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thórsdóttir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    Fruit and vegetable intake in a sample of 11-year-old children in 9 European countries: the pro children cross-sectional survey2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 236-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: An adequate fruit and vegetable intake provides essential nutrients and nutritive compounds and is considered an important part of a healthy lifestyle. No simple instrument has been available for the assessment of fruit and vegetable intake as well as its determinants in school-aged children applicable in different European countries. Within the Pro Children Project, such an instrument has been developed. This paper describes the cross-sectional survey in 11-year-olds in 9 countries.

    METHODS: The cross-sectional survey used nationally, and in 2 countries regionally, representative samples of schools and classes. The questionnaires, including a precoded 24-hour recall component and a food frequency part, were completed in the classroom. Data were treated using common syntax files for portion sizes and for merging of vegetable types into four subgroups.

    RESULTS: The results show that the fruit and vegetable intake in amounts and choice were highly diverse in the 9 participating countries. Vegetable intake was in general lower than fruit intake, boys consumed less fruit and vegetables than girls did. The highest total intake according to the 24-hour recall was found in Austria and Portugal, the lowest in Spain and Iceland.

    CONCLUSION: The fruit and vegetable intake in 11-year-old children was in all countries far from reaching population goals and food-based dietary guidelines on national and international levels.

  • 1439.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Introduction to community based actions in public health nutrition2014In: International Journal of Community Nutrition: Abstracts of the III World Congress of Public Health Nutrition / [ed] Serra-Majem, L, Aalborg University , 2014, p. 23-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Access to good food and possibilities to physical activity in the local com-munity is essential to population health. Efforts exist to influence city planning and change obesogenic environments in residential areas. lne-quity in health is very visible in most countries in relation to residential areas and local community setup. This presentation briefly introduces the symposium and tracks the roots and origins of community based envi-ronmental monitoring and interventions including the Change approach to community based assessment of health environments.

  • 1440. Yubero-Serrano, Elena M
    et al.
    Delgado-Lista, Javier
    Tierney, Audrey C
    Perez-Martinez, Pablo
    Garcia-Rios, Antonio
    Alcala-Diaz, Juan F
    Castaño, Justo P
    Tinahones, Francisco J
    Drevon, Christian A
    Defoort, Catherine
    Blaak, Ellen E
    Dembinska-Kieć, Aldona
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lovegrove, Julie A
    Perez-Jimenez, Francisco
    Roche, Helen M
    Lopez-Miranda, Jose
    Insulin resistance determines a differential response to changes in dietary fat modification on metabolic syndrome risk factors: the LIPGENE study2015In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 102, no 6, p. 1509-1517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous data support the benefits of reducing dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) on insulin resistance (IR) and other metabolic risk factors. However, whether the IR status of those suffering from metabolic syndrome (MetS) affects this response is not established.

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine whether the degree of IR influences the effect of substituting high-saturated fatty acid (HSFA) diets by isoenergetic alterations in the quality and quantity of dietary fat on MetS risk factors.

    DESIGN: In this single-blind, parallel, controlled, dietary intervention study, MetS subjects (n = 472) from 8 European countries classified by different IR levels according to homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were randomly assigned to 4 diets: an HSFA diet; a high-monounsaturated fatty acid (HMUFA) diet; a low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate (LFHCC) diet supplemented with long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (1.2 g/d); or an LFHCC diet supplemented with placebo for 12 wk (control). Anthropometric, lipid, inflammatory, and IR markers were determined.

    RESULTS: Insulin-resistant MetS subjects with the highest HOMA-IR improved IR, with reduced insulin and HOMA-IR concentrations after consumption of the HMUFA and LFHCC n-3 diets (P < 0.05). In contrast, subjects with lower HOMA-IR showed reduced body mass index and waist circumference after consumption of the LFHCC control and LFHCC n-3 diets and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations after consumption of the HMUFA and HSFA diets (P < 0.05). MetS subjects with a low to medium HOMA-IR exhibited reduced blood pressure, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol levels after the LFHCC n-3 diet and increased apolipoprotein A-I concentrations after consumption of the HMUFA and HSFA diets (all P < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Insulin-resistant MetS subjects with more metabolic complications responded differently to dietary fat modification, being more susceptible to a health effect from the substitution of SFAs in the HMUFA and LFHCC n-3 diets. Conversely, MetS subjects without IR may be more sensitive to the detrimental effects of HSFA intake. The metabolic phenotype of subjects clearly determines response to the quantity and quality of dietary fat on MetS risk factors, which suggests that targeted and personalized dietary therapies may be of value for its different metabolic features. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00429195.

  • 1441.
    Zamaratskaia, Galia
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Johansson, Daniel P.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Junqueira, Matheus Antunes
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Deissler, Linda
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Hohenheim, Inst Biol Chem & Nutr, Garbenstr 28, D-70599 Stuttgart, Germany..
    Langton, Maud
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hellström, Per M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology/Hepatology.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Impact of sourdough fermentation on appetite and postprandial metabolic responses - a randomised cross-over trial with whole grain rye crispbread2017In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 118, no 9, p. 686-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sourdough fermentation is considered to have beneficial effects on postprandial satiety and metabolic responses, but studies demonstrating effects at physiological conditions are lacking. The aim of this acute breakfast intervention study was to determine the effect of consumption of sourdough-fermented and unfermented rye crispbread on self-rated appetite, postprandial glucose and insulin response in healthy subjects. In all, twenty-four Swedish adults were included in a single-blinded, randomised cross-over trial. Three crispbreads (sourdough-fermented and unfermented whole grain rye and yeast-fermented refined wheat as control) were consumed as part of a standardised breakfast. Subjective appetite score, assessed using visual analogue scale, and plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at baseline and postprandially until 360 and 240 min, respectively. Structural changes and viscosity during mastication and gastric digestion were investigated using in vitro methods. Hunger and desire to eat were lower (P<005) based on AUC measurements after intake of sourdough-fermented rye crispbread compared with after intake of yeast-fermented refined wheat crispbread. On the basis of AUC (0-230 min), insulin response was lowest after intake of unfermented rye crispbread compared with sourdough-fermented rye and yeast-fermented refined wheat crispbread. Degradation of viscous fibres and faster bolus disintegration for the sourdough-fermented bread may partly explain the less favourable metabolic responses compared with unfermented bread. Our results showed that food processing affects the composition and structural characteristics of rye bread, which has implications for appetite and metabolic responses.

  • 1442.
    Zamaratskaia, Galia
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Box, 7015, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mhd Omar, Nor Adila
    Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. .
    Brunius, Carl
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Box, 7015, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Food and Nutrition Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Hallmans, Göran
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden..
    Andersson, Sven-Olof
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Åman, Per
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Box, 7015, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Landberg, Rikard
    Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Food and Nutrition Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Consumption of whole grain/bran rye instead of refined wheat decrease concentrations of TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin in an exploratory study in men with prostate cancer.2019In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, article id S0261-5614(19)30009-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Rye consumption has shown beneficial effects on prostate cancer tumors, as indicated by slower initial tumor growth in animal models and lowering of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in humans. This study evaluated the effects of whole grain/bran rye consumption on low-grade inflammation and endothelial function biomarkers in men with prostate cancer.

    METHODS: Seventeen men with untreated, low-grade prostate cancer consumed 485 g rye whole grain and bran products (RP) per day or refined wheat products with added cellulose (WP) in a randomized crossover design. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of treatment.

    RESULTS: Concentrations of tumor nuclear factor-receptor 2 (TNF-R2), e-selectin, and endostatin were significantly lower after consumption of the RP diet compared with WP (p < 0.05). Cathepsin S concentration was positively correlated to TNF-R2 and endostatin concentrations across all occasions. Strong correlations were consistently found between intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and between interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). No effect of intervention was found in 92 inflammation-related protein biomarkers measured in a proximity extension assay.

    CONCLUSIONS: RP diet lowered TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin, compared with WP in men with prostate cancer. These effects were accompanied by a reduction in PSA.

  • 1443. Zamaratskaia, Galia
    et al.
    Mhd Omar, Nor Adila
    Brunius, Carl
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Andersson, Sven-Olof
    Larsson, Anders
    Åman, Per
    Landberg, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Food and Nutrition Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Consumption of whole grain/bran rye instead of refined wheat decrease concentrations of TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin in an exploratory study in men with prostate cancer2019In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, article id S0261-5614(19)30009-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Rye consumption has shown beneficial effects on prostate cancer tumors, as indicated by slower initial tumor growth in animal models and lowering of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in humans. This study evaluated the effects of whole grain/bran rye consumption on low-grade inflammation and endothelial function biomarkers in men with prostate cancer.

    METHODS: Seventeen men with untreated, low-grade prostate cancer consumed 485 g rye whole grain and bran products (RP) per day or refined wheat products with added cellulose (WP) in a randomized crossover design. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of treatment.

    RESULTS: Concentrations of tumor nuclear factor-receptor 2 (TNF-R2), e-selectin, and endostatin were significantly lower after consumption of the RP diet compared with WP (p < 0.05). Cathepsin S concentration was positively correlated to TNF-R2 and endostatin concentrations across all occasions. Strong correlations were consistently found between intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and between interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). No effect of intervention was found in 92 inflammation-related protein biomarkers measured in a proximity extension assay.

    CONCLUSIONS: RP diet lowered TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin, compared with WP in men with prostate cancer. These effects were accompanied by a reduction in PSA.

  • 1444. Zamora-Ros, R.
    et al.
    Knaze, V.
    Lujan-Barroso, L.
    Kuhnle, G. G. C.
    Mulligan, A. A.
    Touillaud, M.
    Slimani, N.
    Romieu, I.
    Powell, N.
    Tumino, R.
    Peeters, P. H. M.
    de Magistris, M. S.
    Ricceri, F.
    Sonestedt, E.
    Drake, I.
    Hjartaker, A.
    Skie, G.
    Mouw, T.
    Wark, P. A.
    Romaguera, D.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.
    Ros, M.
    Molina, E.
    Sieri, S.
    Quiros, J. R.
    Huerta, J. M.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Halkjaer, J.
    Masala, G.
    Teucher, B.
    Kaas, R.
    Travis, R. C.
    Dilis, V.
    Benetou, V.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Amiano, P.
    Ardanaz, E.
    Boeing, H.
    Foerster, J.
    Clavel-Chapelon, F.
    Fagherazzi, G.
    Perquier, F.
    Johansson, Gerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Cassidy, A.
    Overvad, K.
    Gonzalez, C. A.
    Dietary intakes and food sources of phytoestrogens in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) 24-hour dietary recall cohort2012In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 932-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Phytoestrogens are estradiol-like natural compounds found in plants that have been associated with protective effects against chronic diseases, including some cancers, cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dietary intake of phytoestrogens, identify their food sources and their association with lifestyle factors in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Single 24-hour dietary recalls were collected from 36 037 individuals from 10 European countries, aged 35-74 years using a standardized computerized interview programe (EPIC-Soft). An ad hoc food composition database on phytoestrogens (isoflavones, lignans, coumestans, enterolignans and equol) was compiled using data from available databases, in order to obtain and describe phytoestrogen intakes and their food sources across 27 redefined EPIC centres. RESULTS: Mean total phytoestrogen intake was the highest in the UK health-conscious group (24.9 mg/day in men and 21.1 mg/day in women) whereas lowest in Greece (1.3 mg/day) in men and Spain-Granada (1.0 mg/day) in women. Northern European countries had higher intakes than southern countries. The main phytoestrogen contributors were isoflavones in both UK centres and lignans in the other EPIC cohorts. Age, body mass index, educational level, smoking status and physical activity were related to increased intakes of lignans, enterolignans and equol, but not to total phytoestrogen, isoflavone or coumestan intakes. In the UK cohorts, the major food sources of phytoestrogens were soy products. In the other EPIC cohorts the dietary sources were more distributed, among fruits, vegetables, soy products, cereal products, non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high variability in the dietary intake of total and phytoestrogen subclasses and their food sources across European regions.

  • 1445. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Agudo, Antonio
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Leenders, Max
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Navarro, Carmen
    Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio
    Slimani, Nadia
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Hjartaker, Anette
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Boeing, Heiner
    Foerster, Jana
    Li, Kuanrong
    Teuchet, Birgit
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Saieva, Calogero
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Luisa Redondo, Maria
    Wallstrom, Peter
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Mulligan, Angela A.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Dilis, Vardis
    Katsoulis, Michael
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Igali, Lazslo
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Touillaud, Marina
    Perquier, Florence
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Amiano, Pilar
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Bredsdorff, Lea
    Overvad, Kim
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and gastric adenocarcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2012In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 1398-1408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several experimental studies have suggested potential anticarcinogenic effects of flavonoids, although epidemiologic evidence for the impact of dietary flavonoids on risk of gastric cancer (GC) is limited. Objective: We investigated the association between intake of dietary flavonoids and lignans and incident GC. Design: The study followed 477,312 subjects (29.8% men) aged 35-70 y from 10 European countries who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Validated dietary questionnaires and lifestyle information were collected at baseline. A food-composition database on flavonoids and lignans was compiled by using data from USDA and Phenol-Explorer databases. Results: During an average follow-up of 11 y, 683 incident GC cases (57.8% men) were mostly validated by a panel of pathologists and used in this analysis. We observed a significant inverse association between total flavonoid intake and GC risk in women (HR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.94; for the continuous variable after log2 transformation) but not in men (HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.85, 1.09). in women, significant inverse associations with GC risk were also observed for intakes of some flavonoid subgroups (anthocyanidins, flavonols, flavones, and flavanols), particularly with intestinal type tumors for total flavonoid and flavanol intakes (P-heterogeneity < 0.1). After stratification by smoking status and sex, there was no significant heterogeneity in these associations between ever- and never-smokers. Conclusion: Total dietary flavonoid intake is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of GC in women. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;96:1398-408.

  • 1446. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Beraud, Virginie
    Franceschi, Silvia
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Eriksen, Anne K.
    Bonnet, Fabrice
    Affret, Aurelie
    Katzke, Verena
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Valanou, Elisavet
    Karakatsani, Anna
    Masala, Giovanna
    Grioni, Sara
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Skeie, Guri
    Parr, Christine L.
    Merino, Susana
    Salamanca-Fernandez, Elena
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Amiano, Pilar
    Almquist, Martin
    Drake, Isabel
    Hennings, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Sandström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as)
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Khaw, Kay-Thee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Schmidt, Julie A.
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Riboli, Elio
    Slimani, Nadia
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Agudo, Antonio
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Consumption of fruits, vegetables and fruit juices and differentiated thyroid carcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2018In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 3, p. 449-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake is considered as probably protective against overall cancer risk, but results in previous studies are not consistent for thyroid cancer (TC). The purpose of this study is to examine the association between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, fruit juices and differentiated thyroid cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The EPIC study is a cohort including over half a million participants, recruited between 1991 and 2000. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 748 incident first primary differentiated TC cases were identified. F&V and fruit juice intakes were assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors. Comparing the highest versus lowest quartile of intake, differentiated TC risk was not associated with intakes of total F&V (HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.68-1.15; p-trend=0.44), vegetables (HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.69-1.14; p-trend=0.56), or fruit (HR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.79-1.26; p-trend=0.64). No significant association was observed with any individual type of vegetable or fruit. However, there was a positive borderline trend with fruit juice intake (HR: 1.23; 95% CI: 0.98-1.53; p-trend=0.06). This study did not find any significant association between F&V intakes and differentiated TC risk; however a positive trend with fruit juice intake was observed, possibly related to its high sugar content.

  • 1447. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Castaneda, Jazmin
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Slimani, Nadia
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Overvad, Kim
    Eriksen, Anne K.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Katzke, Verena
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Kotanidou, Anastasia
    Palli, Domenico
    Grioni, Sara
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sciannameo, Veronica
    Lund, Eiliv
    Merino, Susana
    Salamanca-Fernandez, Elena
    Amiano, Pilar
    Huerta, Jose Maria
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Almquist, Martin
    Hennings, Joakim
    Sandström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Schmidt, Julie A.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Agudo, Antonio
    Franceschi, Silvia
    Consumption of Fish Is Not Associated with Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study2017In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 147, no 7, p. 1366-1373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Differentiated thyroid cancer (TC) is the most common endocrine cancer. Fish can be an important source of iodine and other micronutrients and contaminants that may affect the thyroid gland and TC risk. Objective: We prospectively evaluated the relations between the consumption of total fish and different fish types and shellfish and TC risk in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study. Methods: EPIC is a cohort of >500,000 men and women, mostly aged 35-70 y, who were recruited in 10 European countries. After a mean follow-up of 14 y, 748 primary differentiated TC cases were diagnosed; 666 were in women and 601 were papillary TC. Data on intakes of lean fish, fatty fish, fish products, and shellfish were collected by using country-specific validated dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Multivariable Cox regression was used to calculate HRs and 95% CIs adjusted for many potential confounders, including dietary and nondietary factors. Results: No significant association was observed between total fish consumption and differentiated TC risk for the highest compared with the lowest quartile (HR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.81, 1.32; P-trend = 0.67). Likewise, no significant association was observed with the intake of any specific type of fish, fish product, or shellfish. No significant heterogeneity was found by TC subtype (papillary or follicular tumors), by sex, or between countries with low and high TC incidence. Conclusion: This large study shows that the intake of fish and shellfish was not associated with differentiated TC risk in Europe, a region in which iodine deficiency or excess is rare.

  • 1448. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    Sharp, Stephen J.
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Buijsse, Brian
    Guevara, Marcela
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    Amiano, Pilar
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bredsdorff, Lea
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Feskens, Edith J.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Grioni, Sara
    Katzke, Verena
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Masala, Giovanna
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Overvad, Kim
    Perquier, Florence
    Luisa Redondo, M.
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Roswall, Nina
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Schulze, Matthias
    Slimani, Nadia
    Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Jose Tormo, Maria
    Touillaud, Marina
    Tumino, Rosario
    van der A, Daphne L.
    van Woudenbergh, Geertruida J.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Riboli, Elio
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Dietary intakes of individual flavanols and flavonols are inversely associated with incident type 2 diabetes in european populations2014In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 144, no 3, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary flavanols and flavonols, flavonoid subclasses, have been recently associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Europe. Even within the same subclass, flavonoids may differ considerably in bioavailability and bioactivity. We aimed to examine the association between individual flavanol and flavonol intakes and risk of developing T2D across European countries. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study was conducted in 8 European countries across 26 study centers with 340,234 participants contributing 3.99 million person-years of follow-up, among whom 12,403 incident T2D cases were ascertained and a center-stratified subcohort of 16,154 individuals was defined. We estimated flavonoid intake at baseline from validated dietary questionnaires using a database developed from Phenol-Explorer and USDA databases. We used country-specific Prentice-weighted Cox regression models and random-effects meta-analysis methods to estimate HRs. Among the flavanol subclass, we observed significant inverse trends between intakes of all individual flavan-3-ol monomers and risk of T2D in multivariable models (all P-trend < 0.05). We also observed significant trends for the intakes of proanthocyanidin dimers (HR for the highest vs. the lowest quintile. 0.81; 95% Cl: 0.71, 0.92; P-trend = 0.003) and trimers (HR: 0.91; 95% Cl: 0.80, 1.04; P-trend = 0.07) but not for proanthocyanidins with a greater polymerization degree. Among the flavonol subclass, myricetin (HR: 0.77; 95% Cl: 0.64, 0.93; P-trend = 0.001) was associated with a lower incidence of T2D. This large and heterogeneous European study showed inverse associations between all individual flavan-3-ol monomers, proanthocyanidins with a low polymerization degree, and the flavonol myricetin and incident T2D. These results suggest that individual flavonoids have different roles in the etiology of T2D.

  • 1449. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Slimani, Nadia
    Hjartaker, Anette
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Overvad, Kim
    Bredsdorff, Lea
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Key, Timothy J
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Mulligan, Angela A
    Winkvist, Anna
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Wallström, Peter
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Pala, Valeria
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Dilis, Vardis
    Katsoulis, Michael
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Martinez, Virginia
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Amiano, Pilar
    Teucher, Birgit
    Grote, Verena
    Bendinelli, Benedetta
    Boeing, Heiner
    Foerster, Jana
    Touillaud, Marina
    Perquier, Florence
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Gallo, Valentina
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A
    Differences in dietary intakes, food sources and determinants of total flavonoids between Mediterranean and non-Mediterranean countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2013In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 109, no 8, p. 1498-1507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A greater adherence to the traditional Mediterranean (MED) diet is associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases. This dietary pattern is based on higher consumption of plant products that are rich in flavonoids. We compared the total flavonoid dietary intakes, their food sources and various lifestyle factors between MED and non-MED countries participating in the EPIC study. Flavonoid intakes and their food sources for 35 628 subjects, aged 35-74 years and recruited between 1992 and 2000, in twenty-six study centres were estimated using standardised 24 h dietary recall software (EPIC-Soft (R)). An ad hoc food composition database on flavonoids was compiled using analytical data from the United States Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases. Moreover, it was expanded to include using recipes, estimations of missing values and flavonoid retention factors. No significant differences in total flavonoid mean intake between non-MED countries (373.7 mg/d) and MED countries (370.2 mg/d) were observed. In the non-MED region, the main contributors were proanthocyanidins (48.2 %) and flavan-3-ol monomers (24.9 %) and the principal food sources were tea (25.7 %) and fruits (32.8 %). In the MED region, proanthocyanidins (59.0 %) were by far the most abundant contributor and fruits (55.1 %), wines (16.7 %) and tea (6.8 %) were the main food sources. The present study shows similar results for total dietary flavonoid intakes, but significant differences in flavonoid class intakes, food sources and some characteristics between MED and non-MED countries. These differences should be considered in studies about the relationships between flavonoid intake and chronic diseases.

  • 1450. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Slimani, Nadia
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Fedirko, Veronika
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Ericson, Ulrica
    Amiano, Pilar
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Dilis, Vardis
    Naska, Androniki
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Cassidy, Aedin
    Overvad, Kim
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Johansson, Gerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Drake, Isabel
    Crowe, Francesca L.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Teucher, Birgit
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    van Rossum, Caroline T. M.
    Norat, Teresa
    Romaguera, Dora
    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Touillaud, Marina
    Salvini, Simonetta
    Khaw, Kay-Thee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Boeing, Heiner
    Foerster, Jana
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Estimated dietary intakes of flavonols, flavanones and flavones in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) 24 hour dietary recall cohort2011In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 106, no 12, p. 1915-1925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flavonols, flavanones and flavones (FLAV) are sub-classes of flavonoids that exert cardioprotective and anti-carcinogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. We aimed to estimate the FLAV dietary intake, their food sources and associated lifestyle factors in ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. FLAV intake and their food sources for 36 037 subjects, aged between 35 and 74 years, in twenty-seven study centres were obtained using standardised 24 h dietary recall software (EPIC-SOFT). An ad hoc food composition database on FLAV was compiled using data from US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases and was expanded using recipes, estimations and flavonoid retention factors in order to increase its correspondence with the 24 h dietary recall. Our results showed that the highest FLAV-consuming centre was the UK health-conscious group, with 130.9 and 97.0 mg/d for men and women, respectively. The lowest FLAV intakes were 36.8 mg/d in men from Umea and 37.2 mg/d in women from Malmo (Sweden). The flavanone sub-class was the main contributor to the total FLAV intake ranging from 46.6 to 52.9% depending on the region. Flavonols ranged from 38.5 to 47.3% and flavones from 5.8 to 8.6%. FLAV intake was higher in women, non-smokers, increased with level of education and physical activity. The major food sources were citrus fruits and citrus-based juices (especially for flavanones), tea, wine, other fruits and some vegetables. We concluded that the present study shows heterogeneity in intake of these three sub-classes of flavonoids across European regions and highlights differences by sex and other sociodemographic and lifestyle factors.

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