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  • 1351.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden:.
    Warm, Daniel
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Institue of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Institue of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Rodrigo, Carmen Pérez
    Community Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health, Bilbao, Spain.
    Nissinen, Aulikki
    Department of Community Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
    Effective promotion of healthy nutrition and physical activity in Europe requires skilled and competent people: European Master's Programme in Public Health Nutrition1999In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 2, no 3A, p. 449-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists in basic research and epidemiology deliver messages to policy makers. Effective population based strategies then require people trained and competent in the discipline of Public Health Nutrition (PHN). Since 1997, a European Master's Programme in PHN has been undergoing planning and implementation with the aid of funding from the European Commission (DGV). PHN is used as a broad term covering Nutrition and Physical Activity as well as Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

    The partners in this project are academic departments from 17 countries. The students will undertake core modules and electives for a year and a half, followed by a research project for six months. In order to set up formalised procedures for the evaluation of the quality assurance of individual modules from across Europe, a quality assurance system has been set up.

    The academic year 1999-2000 will allow an opportunity for Universities and Institutes to start new modules, to develop other modules, assess the movement of students between modules, tackle funding issues and allow further marketing of the programme. Future activities include strengthening of the European Network for Public Health Nutrition (ENPHN), the establishment of a consortium with universities, the co-ordination of programme activities with other European Master's Programmes in Public Health, and the incorporation of new Member States from Eastern Europe.

    We can look forward to a new brand of professionals, who are truly European in their training, but who also have an integrated view of nutrition and physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention and who are prepared for policy making, action planning, implementation and evaluation.

  • 1352.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Physical Education and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden:.
    Warm, Daniel
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Institue of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Margetts, Barrie
    Institue of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Rodrigo, Carmen Pérez
    Community Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health, Bilbao, Spain.
    Nissinen, Aulikki
    Department of Community Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
    Effective promotion of healthy nutrition and physical activity in Europe requires skilled and competent people: European Master's Programme in Public Health Nutrition1999In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 2, no 3A, p. 449-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists in basic research and epidemiology deliver messages to policy makers. Effective population based strategies then require people trained and competent in the discipline of Public Health Nutrition (PHN). Since 1997, a European Master's Programme in PHN has been undergoing planning and implementation with the aid of funding from the European Commission (DGV). PHN is used as a broad term covering Nutrition and Physical Activity as well as Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

    The partners in this project are academic departments from 17 countries. The students will undertake core modules and electives for a year and a half, followed by a research project for six months. In order to set up formalised procedures for the evaluation of the quality assurance of individual modules from across Europe, a quality assurance system has been set up.

    The academic year 1999-2000 will allow an opportunity for Universities and Institutes to start new modules, to develop other modules, assess the movement of students between modules, tackle funding issues and allow further marketing of the programme. Future activities include strengthening of the European Network for Public Health Nutrition (ENPHN), the establishment of a consortium with universities, the co-ordination of programme activities with other European Master's Programmes in Public Health, and the incorporation of new Member States from Eastern Europe.

    We can look forward to a new brand of professionals, who are truly European in their training, but who also have an integrated view of nutrition and physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention and who are prepared for policy making, action planning, implementation and evaluation.

  • 1353.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Strindlund, Åsa
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The development of a European master programme in public health nutrition2003In: Forum of nutrition, ISSN 1660-0347, Vol. 56, p. 135-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1354.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Strindlund, Åsa
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The development of a European master programme in public health nutrition2003In: Forum of nutrition, ISSN 1660-0347, Vol. 56, p. 135-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1355.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thulin, Susanna
    A European network for public health nutrition: The EUNUTNET project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 321-322Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1356.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thulin, Susanna
    A European network for public health nutrition: The EUNUTNET project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 321-322Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1357.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thulin, Susanna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kennedy, Nick
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Margetts, Barrie
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leonhauser, Ingrid-Ute
    Univ Giessen, D-35390 Giessen, Germany.
    Training in public health nutrition in Europe results from the EUNUTNET project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 334-335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1358.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Breastfeeding - still not reaching the target2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 749-750Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1359.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Congress in Porto September 2010 and increased impact factor2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1295-1295Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1360.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Dietary guidelines and goal-setting2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 1149-1150Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1361.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Salt: importance in iodine deficiency and sodium excess2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 599-600Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1362.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    A robust and knowledgeable workforce is essential for public health nutrition policy implementation2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1979-1980Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1363.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Department of Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    A robust and knowledgeable workforce is essential for public health nutrition policy implementation2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1979-1980Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1364.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Bioscience & Nutriton, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    Nutrition of infants and young children2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 1601-1602Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1365.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    The epidemic of obesity publications, award to legend and more2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1366.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    McNeill, Caroline
    Hodge, Allison
    Vitamin D - the big D-bate2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 565-565Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1367.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Haapala, Irja
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Hodge, Allison
    The local touch2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 943-944Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1368.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Novum, Dept Biosci & Nutr, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    Haapala, Irja
    McNeill, Geraldine
    World Nutrition 2012-a global Public Health Nutrition opportunity2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 567-567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1369.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Novum, Dept Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    Haapala, Irja
    McNeill, Geraldine
    World Nutrition 2012-a global Public Health Nutrition opportunity2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 567-567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1370.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Haapala, Irja
    Assessment of diet and physical activity: new tools; old challenges2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 377-378Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1371.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Haapala, Irja
    Cooking in this issue: back to basics!2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1141-1141Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1372.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Haapala, Irja
    The fantastic year of 2010 - and the really hot topic: breast-feeding2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 1945-1945Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1373.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    McNeill, Caroline
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    2012-starting with overweight and obesity2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1374. Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Haapala, Irja
    Hodge, Allison
    The year that passed: 20112011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 12, p. 2081-2082Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1375.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Hodge, Allison
    Haapala, Irja
    Is the emperor nude?: impact factor or health impact factor?2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 753-753Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1376.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Wolf, Alexandra
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franchini, Bela
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Haraldsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krølner, Rikke
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Maes, Lea
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent , Belgium.
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    Community Nutrition Unit, Bilbao, Spain.
    Sjoström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thórsdóttir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    Fruit and vegetable intake in a sample of 11-year-old children in 9 European countries: the pro children cross-sectional survey2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 236-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: An adequate fruit and vegetable intake provides essential nutrients and nutritive compounds and is considered an important part of a healthy lifestyle. No simple instrument has been available for the assessment of fruit and vegetable intake as well as its determinants in school-aged children applicable in different European countries. Within the Pro Children Project, such an instrument has been developed. This paper describes the cross-sectional survey in 11-year-olds in 9 countries.

    METHODS: The cross-sectional survey used nationally, and in 2 countries regionally, representative samples of schools and classes. The questionnaires, including a precoded 24-hour recall component and a food frequency part, were completed in the classroom. Data were treated using common syntax files for portion sizes and for merging of vegetable types into four subgroups.

    RESULTS: The results show that the fruit and vegetable intake in amounts and choice were highly diverse in the 9 participating countries. Vegetable intake was in general lower than fruit intake, boys consumed less fruit and vegetables than girls did. The highest total intake according to the 24-hour recall was found in Austria and Portugal, the lowest in Spain and Iceland.

    CONCLUSION: The fruit and vegetable intake in 11-year-old children was in all countries far from reaching population goals and food-based dietary guidelines on national and international levels.

  • 1377.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Wolf, Alexandra
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franchini, Bela
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Haraldsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krølner, Rikke
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Maes, Lea
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent , Belgium.
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    Community Nutrition Unit, Bilbao, Spain.
    Sjoström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thórsdóttir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    Fruit and vegetable intake in a sample of 11-year-old children in 9 European countries: the pro children cross-sectional survey2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 236-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: An adequate fruit and vegetable intake provides essential nutrients and nutritive compounds and is considered an important part of a healthy lifestyle. No simple instrument has been available for the assessment of fruit and vegetable intake as well as its determinants in school-aged children applicable in different European countries. Within the Pro Children Project, such an instrument has been developed. This paper describes the cross-sectional survey in 11-year-olds in 9 countries.

    METHODS: The cross-sectional survey used nationally, and in 2 countries regionally, representative samples of schools and classes. The questionnaires, including a precoded 24-hour recall component and a food frequency part, were completed in the classroom. Data were treated using common syntax files for portion sizes and for merging of vegetable types into four subgroups.

    RESULTS: The results show that the fruit and vegetable intake in amounts and choice were highly diverse in the 9 participating countries. Vegetable intake was in general lower than fruit intake, boys consumed less fruit and vegetables than girls did. The highest total intake according to the 24-hour recall was found in Austria and Portugal, the lowest in Spain and Iceland.

    CONCLUSION: The fruit and vegetable intake in 11-year-old children was in all countries far from reaching population goals and food-based dietary guidelines on national and international levels.

  • 1378. Yubero-Serrano, Elena M
    et al.
    Delgado-Lista, Javier
    Tierney, Audrey C
    Perez-Martinez, Pablo
    Garcia-Rios, Antonio
    Alcala-Diaz, Juan F
    Castaño, Justo P
    Tinahones, Francisco J
    Drevon, Christian A
    Defoort, Catherine
    Blaak, Ellen E
    Dembinska-Kieć, Aldona
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lovegrove, Julie A
    Perez-Jimenez, Francisco
    Roche, Helen M
    Lopez-Miranda, Jose
    Insulin resistance determines a differential response to changes in dietary fat modification on metabolic syndrome risk factors: the LIPGENE study2015In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 102, no 6, p. 1509-1517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous data support the benefits of reducing dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) on insulin resistance (IR) and other metabolic risk factors. However, whether the IR status of those suffering from metabolic syndrome (MetS) affects this response is not established.

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine whether the degree of IR influences the effect of substituting high-saturated fatty acid (HSFA) diets by isoenergetic alterations in the quality and quantity of dietary fat on MetS risk factors.

    DESIGN: In this single-blind, parallel, controlled, dietary intervention study, MetS subjects (n = 472) from 8 European countries classified by different IR levels according to homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were randomly assigned to 4 diets: an HSFA diet; a high-monounsaturated fatty acid (HMUFA) diet; a low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate (LFHCC) diet supplemented with long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (1.2 g/d); or an LFHCC diet supplemented with placebo for 12 wk (control). Anthropometric, lipid, inflammatory, and IR markers were determined.

    RESULTS: Insulin-resistant MetS subjects with the highest HOMA-IR improved IR, with reduced insulin and HOMA-IR concentrations after consumption of the HMUFA and LFHCC n-3 diets (P < 0.05). In contrast, subjects with lower HOMA-IR showed reduced body mass index and waist circumference after consumption of the LFHCC control and LFHCC n-3 diets and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations after consumption of the HMUFA and HSFA diets (P < 0.05). MetS subjects with a low to medium HOMA-IR exhibited reduced blood pressure, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol levels after the LFHCC n-3 diet and increased apolipoprotein A-I concentrations after consumption of the HMUFA and HSFA diets (all P < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Insulin-resistant MetS subjects with more metabolic complications responded differently to dietary fat modification, being more susceptible to a health effect from the substitution of SFAs in the HMUFA and LFHCC n-3 diets. Conversely, MetS subjects without IR may be more sensitive to the detrimental effects of HSFA intake. The metabolic phenotype of subjects clearly determines response to the quantity and quality of dietary fat on MetS risk factors, which suggests that targeted and personalized dietary therapies may be of value for its different metabolic features. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00429195.

  • 1379.
    Zamaratskaia, Galia
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Johansson, Daniel P.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Junqueira, Matheus Antunes
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Deissler, Linda
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Hohenheim, Inst Biol Chem & Nutr, Garbenstr 28, D-70599 Stuttgart, Germany..
    Langton, Maud
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hellström, Per M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology/Hepatology.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Sci, BioCtr, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Impact of sourdough fermentation on appetite and postprandial metabolic responses - a randomised cross-over trial with whole grain rye crispbread2017In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 118, no 9, p. 686-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sourdough fermentation is considered to have beneficial effects on postprandial satiety and metabolic responses, but studies demonstrating effects at physiological conditions are lacking. The aim of this acute breakfast intervention study was to determine the effect of consumption of sourdough-fermented and unfermented rye crispbread on self-rated appetite, postprandial glucose and insulin response in healthy subjects. In all, twenty-four Swedish adults were included in a single-blinded, randomised cross-over trial. Three crispbreads (sourdough-fermented and unfermented whole grain rye and yeast-fermented refined wheat as control) were consumed as part of a standardised breakfast. Subjective appetite score, assessed using visual analogue scale, and plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at baseline and postprandially until 360 and 240 min, respectively. Structural changes and viscosity during mastication and gastric digestion were investigated using in vitro methods. Hunger and desire to eat were lower (P<005) based on AUC measurements after intake of sourdough-fermented rye crispbread compared with after intake of yeast-fermented refined wheat crispbread. On the basis of AUC (0-230 min), insulin response was lowest after intake of unfermented rye crispbread compared with sourdough-fermented rye and yeast-fermented refined wheat crispbread. Degradation of viscous fibres and faster bolus disintegration for the sourdough-fermented bread may partly explain the less favourable metabolic responses compared with unfermented bread. Our results showed that food processing affects the composition and structural characteristics of rye bread, which has implications for appetite and metabolic responses.

  • 1380. Zamora-Ros, R.
    et al.
    Knaze, V.
    Lujan-Barroso, L.
    Kuhnle, G. G. C.
    Mulligan, A. A.
    Touillaud, M.
    Slimani, N.
    Romieu, I.
    Powell, N.
    Tumino, R.
    Peeters, P. H. M.
    de Magistris, M. S.
    Ricceri, F.
    Sonestedt, E.
    Drake, I.
    Hjartaker, A.
    Skie, G.
    Mouw, T.
    Wark, P. A.
    Romaguera, D.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.
    Ros, M.
    Molina, E.
    Sieri, S.
    Quiros, J. R.
    Huerta, J. M.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Halkjaer, J.
    Masala, G.
    Teucher, B.
    Kaas, R.
    Travis, R. C.
    Dilis, V.
    Benetou, V.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Amiano, P.
    Ardanaz, E.
    Boeing, H.
    Foerster, J.
    Clavel-Chapelon, F.
    Fagherazzi, G.
    Perquier, F.
    Johansson, Gerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Cassidy, A.
    Overvad, K.
    Gonzalez, C. A.
    Dietary intakes and food sources of phytoestrogens in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) 24-hour dietary recall cohort2012In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 932-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Phytoestrogens are estradiol-like natural compounds found in plants that have been associated with protective effects against chronic diseases, including some cancers, cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dietary intake of phytoestrogens, identify their food sources and their association with lifestyle factors in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Single 24-hour dietary recalls were collected from 36 037 individuals from 10 European countries, aged 35-74 years using a standardized computerized interview programe (EPIC-Soft). An ad hoc food composition database on phytoestrogens (isoflavones, lignans, coumestans, enterolignans and equol) was compiled using data from available databases, in order to obtain and describe phytoestrogen intakes and their food sources across 27 redefined EPIC centres. RESULTS: Mean total phytoestrogen intake was the highest in the UK health-conscious group (24.9 mg/day in men and 21.1 mg/day in women) whereas lowest in Greece (1.3 mg/day) in men and Spain-Granada (1.0 mg/day) in women. Northern European countries had higher intakes than southern countries. The main phytoestrogen contributors were isoflavones in both UK centres and lignans in the other EPIC cohorts. Age, body mass index, educational level, smoking status and physical activity were related to increased intakes of lignans, enterolignans and equol, but not to total phytoestrogen, isoflavone or coumestan intakes. In the UK cohorts, the major food sources of phytoestrogens were soy products. In the other EPIC cohorts the dietary sources were more distributed, among fruits, vegetables, soy products, cereal products, non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high variability in the dietary intake of total and phytoestrogen subclasses and their food sources across European regions.

  • 1381. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Agudo, Antonio
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Leenders, Max
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Navarro, Carmen
    Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio
    Slimani, Nadia
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Hjartaker, Anette
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Boeing, Heiner
    Foerster, Jana
    Li, Kuanrong
    Teuchet, Birgit
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Saieva, Calogero
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Luisa Redondo, Maria
    Wallstrom, Peter
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Mulligan, Angela A.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Dilis, Vardis
    Katsoulis, Michael
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Igali, Lazslo
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Touillaud, Marina
    Perquier, Florence
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Amiano, Pilar
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Bredsdorff, Lea
    Overvad, Kim
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and gastric adenocarcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2012In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 1398-1408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several experimental studies have suggested potential anticarcinogenic effects of flavonoids, although epidemiologic evidence for the impact of dietary flavonoids on risk of gastric cancer (GC) is limited. Objective: We investigated the association between intake of dietary flavonoids and lignans and incident GC. Design: The study followed 477,312 subjects (29.8% men) aged 35-70 y from 10 European countries who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Validated dietary questionnaires and lifestyle information were collected at baseline. A food-composition database on flavonoids and lignans was compiled by using data from USDA and Phenol-Explorer databases. Results: During an average follow-up of 11 y, 683 incident GC cases (57.8% men) were mostly validated by a panel of pathologists and used in this analysis. We observed a significant inverse association between total flavonoid intake and GC risk in women (HR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.94; for the continuous variable after log2 transformation) but not in men (HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.85, 1.09). in women, significant inverse associations with GC risk were also observed for intakes of some flavonoid subgroups (anthocyanidins, flavonols, flavones, and flavanols), particularly with intestinal type tumors for total flavonoid and flavanol intakes (P-heterogeneity < 0.1). After stratification by smoking status and sex, there was no significant heterogeneity in these associations between ever- and never-smokers. Conclusion: Total dietary flavonoid intake is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of GC in women. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;96:1398-408.

  • 1382. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Beraud, Virginie
    Franceschi, Silvia
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Eriksen, Anne K.
    Bonnet, Fabrice
    Affret, Aurelie
    Katzke, Verena
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Valanou, Elisavet
    Karakatsani, Anna
    Masala, Giovanna
    Grioni, Sara
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Skeie, Guri
    Parr, Christine L.
    Merino, Susana
    Salamanca-Fernandez, Elena
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Amiano, Pilar
    Almquist, Martin
    Drake, Isabel
    Hennings, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Sandström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as)
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Khaw, Kay-Thee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Schmidt, Julie A.
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Riboli, Elio
    Slimani, Nadia
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Agudo, Antonio
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Consumption of fruits, vegetables and fruit juices and differentiated thyroid carcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2018In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 3, p. 449-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake is considered as probably protective against overall cancer risk, but results in previous studies are not consistent for thyroid cancer (TC). The purpose of this study is to examine the association between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, fruit juices and differentiated thyroid cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The EPIC study is a cohort including over half a million participants, recruited between 1991 and 2000. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 748 incident first primary differentiated TC cases were identified. F&V and fruit juice intakes were assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors. Comparing the highest versus lowest quartile of intake, differentiated TC risk was not associated with intakes of total F&V (HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.68-1.15; p-trend=0.44), vegetables (HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.69-1.14; p-trend=0.56), or fruit (HR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.79-1.26; p-trend=0.64). No significant association was observed with any individual type of vegetable or fruit. However, there was a positive borderline trend with fruit juice intake (HR: 1.23; 95% CI: 0.98-1.53; p-trend=0.06). This study did not find any significant association between F&V intakes and differentiated TC risk; however a positive trend with fruit juice intake was observed, possibly related to its high sugar content.

  • 1383. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Castaneda, Jazmin
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Slimani, Nadia
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Overvad, Kim
    Eriksen, Anne K.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Katzke, Verena
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Kotanidou, Anastasia
    Palli, Domenico
    Grioni, Sara
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sciannameo, Veronica
    Lund, Eiliv
    Merino, Susana
    Salamanca-Fernandez, Elena
    Amiano, Pilar
    Huerta, Jose Maria
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Almquist, Martin
    Hennings, Joakim
    Sandström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Schmidt, Julie A.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Agudo, Antonio
    Franceschi, Silvia
    Consumption of Fish Is Not Associated with Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study2017In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 147, no 7, p. 1366-1373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Differentiated thyroid cancer (TC) is the most common endocrine cancer. Fish can be an important source of iodine and other micronutrients and contaminants that may affect the thyroid gland and TC risk. Objective: We prospectively evaluated the relations between the consumption of total fish and different fish types and shellfish and TC risk in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study. Methods: EPIC is a cohort of >500,000 men and women, mostly aged 35-70 y, who were recruited in 10 European countries. After a mean follow-up of 14 y, 748 primary differentiated TC cases were diagnosed; 666 were in women and 601 were papillary TC. Data on intakes of lean fish, fatty fish, fish products, and shellfish were collected by using country-specific validated dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Multivariable Cox regression was used to calculate HRs and 95% CIs adjusted for many potential confounders, including dietary and nondietary factors. Results: No significant association was observed between total fish consumption and differentiated TC risk for the highest compared with the lowest quartile (HR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.81, 1.32; P-trend = 0.67). Likewise, no significant association was observed with the intake of any specific type of fish, fish product, or shellfish. No significant heterogeneity was found by TC subtype (papillary or follicular tumors), by sex, or between countries with low and high TC incidence. Conclusion: This large study shows that the intake of fish and shellfish was not associated with differentiated TC risk in Europe, a region in which iodine deficiency or excess is rare.

  • 1384. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    Sharp, Stephen J.
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Buijsse, Brian
    Guevara, Marcela
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    Amiano, Pilar
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bredsdorff, Lea
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Feskens, Edith J.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Grioni, Sara
    Katzke, Verena
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Masala, Giovanna
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Overvad, Kim
    Perquier, Florence
    Luisa Redondo, M.
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Roswall, Nina
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Schulze, Matthias
    Slimani, Nadia
    Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Jose Tormo, Maria
    Touillaud, Marina
    Tumino, Rosario
    van der A, Daphne L.
    van Woudenbergh, Geertruida J.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Riboli, Elio
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Dietary intakes of individual flavanols and flavonols are inversely associated with incident type 2 diabetes in european populations2014In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 144, no 3, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary flavanols and flavonols, flavonoid subclasses, have been recently associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Europe. Even within the same subclass, flavonoids may differ considerably in bioavailability and bioactivity. We aimed to examine the association between individual flavanol and flavonol intakes and risk of developing T2D across European countries. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study was conducted in 8 European countries across 26 study centers with 340,234 participants contributing 3.99 million person-years of follow-up, among whom 12,403 incident T2D cases were ascertained and a center-stratified subcohort of 16,154 individuals was defined. We estimated flavonoid intake at baseline from validated dietary questionnaires using a database developed from Phenol-Explorer and USDA databases. We used country-specific Prentice-weighted Cox regression models and random-effects meta-analysis methods to estimate HRs. Among the flavanol subclass, we observed significant inverse trends between intakes of all individual flavan-3-ol monomers and risk of T2D in multivariable models (all P-trend < 0.05). We also observed significant trends for the intakes of proanthocyanidin dimers (HR for the highest vs. the lowest quintile. 0.81; 95% Cl: 0.71, 0.92; P-trend = 0.003) and trimers (HR: 0.91; 95% Cl: 0.80, 1.04; P-trend = 0.07) but not for proanthocyanidins with a greater polymerization degree. Among the flavonol subclass, myricetin (HR: 0.77; 95% Cl: 0.64, 0.93; P-trend = 0.001) was associated with a lower incidence of T2D. This large and heterogeneous European study showed inverse associations between all individual flavan-3-ol monomers, proanthocyanidins with a low polymerization degree, and the flavonol myricetin and incident T2D. These results suggest that individual flavonoids have different roles in the etiology of T2D.

  • 1385. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Slimani, Nadia
    Hjartaker, Anette
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Overvad, Kim
    Bredsdorff, Lea
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Key, Timothy J
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Mulligan, Angela A
    Winkvist, Anna
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Wallström, Peter
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Pala, Valeria
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Dilis, Vardis
    Katsoulis, Michael
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Martinez, Virginia
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Amiano, Pilar
    Teucher, Birgit
    Grote, Verena
    Bendinelli, Benedetta
    Boeing, Heiner
    Foerster, Jana
    Touillaud, Marina
    Perquier, Florence
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Gallo, Valentina
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A
    Differences in dietary intakes, food sources and determinants of total flavonoids between Mediterranean and non-Mediterranean countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2013In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 109, no 8, p. 1498-1507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A greater adherence to the traditional Mediterranean (MED) diet is associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases. This dietary pattern is based on higher consumption of plant products that are rich in flavonoids. We compared the total flavonoid dietary intakes, their food sources and various lifestyle factors between MED and non-MED countries participating in the EPIC study. Flavonoid intakes and their food sources for 35 628 subjects, aged 35-74 years and recruited between 1992 and 2000, in twenty-six study centres were estimated using standardised 24 h dietary recall software (EPIC-Soft (R)). An ad hoc food composition database on flavonoids was compiled using analytical data from the United States Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases. Moreover, it was expanded to include using recipes, estimations of missing values and flavonoid retention factors. No significant differences in total flavonoid mean intake between non-MED countries (373.7 mg/d) and MED countries (370.2 mg/d) were observed. In the non-MED region, the main contributors were proanthocyanidins (48.2 %) and flavan-3-ol monomers (24.9 %) and the principal food sources were tea (25.7 %) and fruits (32.8 %). In the MED region, proanthocyanidins (59.0 %) were by far the most abundant contributor and fruits (55.1 %), wines (16.7 %) and tea (6.8 %) were the main food sources. The present study shows similar results for total dietary flavonoid intakes, but significant differences in flavonoid class intakes, food sources and some characteristics between MED and non-MED countries. These differences should be considered in studies about the relationships between flavonoid intake and chronic diseases.

  • 1386. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Slimani, Nadia
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Fedirko, Veronika
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Ericson, Ulrica
    Amiano, Pilar
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Dilis, Vardis
    Naska, Androniki
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Cassidy, Aedin
    Overvad, Kim
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Johansson, Gerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Drake, Isabel
    Crowe, Francesca L.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Teucher, Birgit
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    van Rossum, Caroline T. M.
    Norat, Teresa
    Romaguera, Dora
    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Touillaud, Marina
    Salvini, Simonetta
    Khaw, Kay-Thee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Boeing, Heiner
    Foerster, Jana
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Estimated dietary intakes of flavonols, flavanones and flavones in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) 24 hour dietary recall cohort2011In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 106, no 12, p. 1915-1925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flavonols, flavanones and flavones (FLAV) are sub-classes of flavonoids that exert cardioprotective and anti-carcinogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. We aimed to estimate the FLAV dietary intake, their food sources and associated lifestyle factors in ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. FLAV intake and their food sources for 36 037 subjects, aged between 35 and 74 years, in twenty-seven study centres were obtained using standardised 24 h dietary recall software (EPIC-SOFT). An ad hoc food composition database on FLAV was compiled using data from US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases and was expanded using recipes, estimations and flavonoid retention factors in order to increase its correspondence with the 24 h dietary recall. Our results showed that the highest FLAV-consuming centre was the UK health-conscious group, with 130.9 and 97.0 mg/d for men and women, respectively. The lowest FLAV intakes were 36.8 mg/d in men from Umea and 37.2 mg/d in women from Malmo (Sweden). The flavanone sub-class was the main contributor to the total FLAV intake ranging from 46.6 to 52.9% depending on the region. Flavonols ranged from 38.5 to 47.3% and flavones from 5.8 to 8.6%. FLAV intake was higher in women, non-smokers, increased with level of education and physical activity. The major food sources were citrus fruits and citrus-based juices (especially for flavanones), tea, wine, other fruits and some vegetables. We concluded that the present study shows heterogeneity in intake of these three sub-classes of flavonoids across European regions and highlights differences by sex and other sociodemographic and lifestyle factors.

  • 1387. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Slimani, Nadia
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Touillaud, Marina
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Teucher, Birgit
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Grioni, Sara
    Crowe, Francesca
    Boeing, Heiner
    Foerster, Jana
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Molina, Esther
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Dilis, Vardis
    Tsiotas, Konstantinos
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Khaw, Kay-Thee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Ocke, Marga C.
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Tumino, Rosario
    Johansson, Gerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Salvini, Simonetta
    Amiano, Pilar
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Estimation of the intake of anthocyanidins and their food sources in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2011In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 106, no 7, p. 1090-1099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthocyanidins are bioactive flavonoids with potential health-promoting effects. These may vary among single anthocyanidins considering differences in their bioavailability and some of the mechanisms involved. The aim of the present study was to estimate the dietary intake of anthocyanidins, their food sources and the lifestyle factors (sex, age, BMI, smoking status, educational level and physisical activity) involved among twenty-seven centres in ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Anthocyanidin intake and their food sources for 36 037 subjects, aged between 35 and 74 years, in twenty-seven redefined centres were obtained using standardised 24 h dietary recall software (EPIC-SOFT). An ad hoc food composition database on anthocyanidins (cyanidin, delphinidin, malvidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, petunidin) was compiled using data from the US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases and was expanded by adding recipes, estimated values and cooking factors. For men, the total anthocyanidin mean intake ranged from 19.83 (SE 1.53) mg/d (Bilthoven, The Netherlands) to 64.88 (SE 1.86) mg/d (Turin, Italy), whereas for women the range was 18.73 (SE 2.80) mg/d (Granada, Spain) to 44.08 (SE 2.45) mg/d (Turin, Italy). A clear south to north gradient intake was observed. Cyanidins and malvidins were the main anthocynidin contributors depending on the region and sex. Anthocyanidin intake was higher in non-obese older females, non-smokers, and increased with educational level and physical activity. The major food sources were fruits, wine, non-alcoholic beverages and some vegetables. The present study shows differences in both total and individual anthocyanidin intakes and various lifestyle factors throughout Europe, with some geographical variability in their food sources.

  • 1388. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Rothwell, Joseph A.
    Hémon, Bertrand
    Moskal, Aurelie
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Touillaud, Marina
    Katzke, Verena
    Kühn, Tilman
    Boeing, Heiner
    Förster, Jana
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Valanou, Elissavet
    Peppa, Eleni
    Palli, Domenico
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Tumino, Rosario
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Hjartåker, Anette
    Menéndez, Virginia
    Agudo, Antonio
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Huerta, José María
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay-Thee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Lu, Yunxia
    Slimani, Nadia
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Riboli, Elio
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Dietary polyphenol intake in Europe: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2016In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1359-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Polyphenols are plant secondary metabolites with a large variability in their chemical structure and dietary occurrence that have been associated with some protective effects against several chronic diseases. To date, limited data exist on intake of polyphenols in populations. The current cross-sectional analysis aimed at estimating dietary intakes of all currently known individual polyphenols and total intake per class and subclass, and to identify their main food sources in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort.

    METHODS: Dietary data at baseline were collected using a standardized 24-h dietary recall software administered to 36,037 adult subjects. Dietary data were linked with Phenol-Explorer, a database with data on 502 individual polyphenols in 452 foods and data on polyphenol losses due to cooking and food processing.

    RESULTS: Mean total polyphenol intake was the highest in Aarhus-Denmark (1786 mg/day in men and 1626 mg/day in women) and the lowest in Greece (744 mg/day in men and 584 mg/day in women). When dividing the subjects into three regions, the highest intake of total polyphenols was observed in the UK health-conscious group, followed by non-Mediterranean (non-MED) and MED countries. The main polyphenol contributors were phenolic acids (52.5-56.9 %), except in men from MED countries and in the UK health-conscious group where they were flavonoids (49.1-61.7 %). Coffee, tea, and fruits were the most important food sources of total polyphenols. A total of 437 different individual polyphenols were consumed, including 94 consumed at a level >1 mg/day. The most abundant ones were the caffeoylquinic acids and the proanthocyanidin oligomers and polymers.

    CONCLUSION: This study describes the large number of dietary individual polyphenols consumed and the high variability of their intakes between European populations, particularly between MED and non-MED countries.

  • 1389. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Luján-Barroso, Leila
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Dik, Vincent K
    Boeing, Heiner
    Steffen, Annika
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Bech, Bodil Hammer
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Racine, Antoine
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kuhn, Tilman
    Katzke, Verena
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Tumino, Rosario
    Panico, Salvatore
    Vineis, Paolo
    Grioni, Sara
    Palli, Domenico
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Huerta, José María
    Sánchez, María-José
    Argüelles, Marcial
    Amiano, Pilar
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Wallner, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lindkvist, Björn
    Wallström, Peter
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Key, Timothy J
    Khaw, Kay-Thee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Freisling, Heinz
    Stepien, Magdalena
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Gunter, Marc J
    Murphy, Neil
    Riboli, Elio
    González, Carlos A
    Tea and coffee consumption and risk of esophageal cancer: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2014In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 135, no 6, p. 1470-1479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological data regarding tea and coffee consumption and risk of esophageal cancer (EC) is still inconclusive. We examined the association of tea and coffee consumption with EC risk among 442,143 men and women without cancer at baseline from 9 countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Tea and coffee intakes were recorded using country-specific validated dietary questionnaires. Cox regression models were used to analyze the relationships between tea and coffee intake and EC risk. During a mean follow-up of 11.1 years, 339 participants developed EC, of which 142 were esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and 174 were esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In the multivariable models, no significant associations between tea (mostly black tea), and coffee intake and risk of EC, EAC and ESCC were observed. In stratified analyses, among men coffee consumption was inversely related to ESCC (HR for comparison of extreme tertiles 0.42, 95% CI 0.20-0.88; P-trend=0.022), but not among women. In current smokers, a significant and inverse association was observed between ESCC risk and tea (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23-0.93; P-trend=0.053) and coffee consumption (HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.19-0.73; P-trend=0.011). However, no statistically significant findings were observed using the continuous variable (per 100mL/d). These data did not show a significant association between tea and coffee consumption and EC, EAC and ESCC, although a decreased risk of ESCC among men and current smokers is suggested, but need to be confirmed in further prospective studies including more cases.

  • 1390. Zamora-Ros, Raul
    et al.
    Rothwell, Joseph A.
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Knaze, Viktoria
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Slimani, Nadia
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Perquier, Florence
    Touillaud, Marina
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Menendez, Virginia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Santucci de Magistris, Maria
    Palli, Domenico
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sieri, Sabina
    Crowe, Francesca L.
    Khaw, Kay-Thee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Grote, Verena
    Li, Kuanrong
    Boeing, Heiner
    Foerster, Jana
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Benetou, Vassiliki
    Tsiotas, Konstantinos
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Ros, Martine
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Overvad, Kim
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Wallstrom, Peter
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Wark, Petra
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Dietary intakes and food sources of phenolic acids in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2013In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 110, no 8, p. 1500-1511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenolic acids are secondary plant metabolites that may have protective effects against oxidative stress, inflammation and cancer in experimental studies. To date, limited data exist on the quantitative intake of phenolic acids. We estimated the intake of phenolic acids and their food sources and associated lifestyle factors in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Phenolic acid intakes were estimated for 36 037 subjects aged 35-74 years and recruited between 1992 and 2000 in ten European countries using a standardised 24 h recall software (EPIC-Soft), and their food sources were identified. Dietary data were linked to the Phenol-Explorer database, which contains data on forty-five aglycones of phenolic acids in 452 foods. The total phenolic acid intake was highest in Aarhus, Denmark (1265.5 and 980.7 mg/d in men and women, respectively), while the intake was lowest in Greece (213.2 and 158.6 mg/d in men and women, respectively). The hydroxycinnamic acid subclass was the main contributor to the total phenolic acid intake, accounting for 84.6-95.3% of intake depending on the region. Hydroxybenzoic acids accounted for 4.6-14.4%, hydroxyphenylacetic acids 0.1-0.8% and hydroxyphenylpropanoic acids <= 0.1% for all regions. An increasing south-north gradient of consumption was also found. Coffee was the main food source of phenolic acids and accounted for 55.3-80.7% of the total phenolic acid intake, followed by fruits, vegetables and nuts. A high heterogeneity in phenolic acid intake was observed across the European countries in the EPIC cohort, which will allow further exploration of the associations with the risk of diseases.

  • 1391. Zarina, Gunita
    et al.
    Sholts, Sabrina B.
    Tichinin, Alina
    Rudovica, Vita
    Viksna, Arturs
    Engizere, Austra
    Muiznieks, Vitolds
    Bartelink, Eric J.
    Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. UCLA/Getty Conservation Programme, UCLA, United States.
    Cribra orbitalia as a potential indicator of childhood stress: Evidence from paleopathology, stable C, N, and O isotopes, and trace element concentrations in children from a 17th-18th century cemetery in Jekabpils, Latvia2016In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0946-672X, E-ISSN 1878-3252, Vol. 38, p. 131-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cribra orbitalia (CO), or porotic hyperostosis (PH) of the orbital roof, is one of the most common pathological conditions found in archaeological subadult skeletal remains. Reaching frequencies higher than 50% in many prehistoric samples, CO has been generally attributed to a variety of factors including malnutrition (e.g., megaloblastic anemia) and parasitism. In this study, we tested the relationship between CO, trace element concentrations, and stable isotope values (delta C-13, delta N-15, delta O-18) in subadult skeletons from a 17th to 18th century cemetery in the historic town of Jekabpils, Latvia. A total of 28 subadults were examined, seven of which (25%) showed evidence of CO. Bioarchaeological evidence indicated high mortality for children in this cemetery: half of the burials were subadults under the age of 14, while a third were under the age of four. Life expectancy at birth was estimated to have been only 21.6 years. Trace element concentrations measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed no relationship between presence or absence of CO and levels of manganese, zinc, strontium, barium, copper, cadmium, or lead in the bones (p>0.05). However, a significant correlation (p<0.05) was found between the presence of CO and decreased levels of iron. The correlations between CO and decreased levels of copper and lead approached significance (p=0.056 for both elements). Individuals with CO furthermore displayed significantly lower delta N-15 isotope values, suggesting greater consumption of lower trophic level food resources than those unaffected by CO; delta C-13 and delta O-18 values, in contrast, showed no significant differences. These results suggest that the prevalence of CO may be related to dietary deficiencies. In this case, low iron levels may also signify a diet low in other key vitamins (e.g., B-g and B-12), which are known to cause megaloblastic anemia.

  • 1392.
    Zeilstra, Dennis
    et al.
    Independent researcher, Nutriz, Enschede, The Netherlands.
    Younes, Jessica A.
    Winclove Probiotics, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Nutrition-Gut-Brain Interactions Research Centre.
    Kleerebezem, Michiel
    Host Microbe Interactomics Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Perspective: Fundamental Limitations of the Randomized Controlled Trial Method in Nutritional Research: The Example of Probiotics2018In: Advances in Nutrition, ISSN 2161-8313, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 561-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on the relation between health and nutrition are often inconclusive. There are concerns about the validity of many research findings, and methods that can deliver high-quality evidence-such as the randomized controlled trial (RCT) method-have been embraced by nutritional researchers. Unfortunately, many nutritional RCTs also yield ambiguous results. It has been argued that RCTs are ill-suited for certain settings, including nutritional research. In this perspective, we investigate whether there are fundamental limitations of the RCT method in nutritional research. To this end, and to limit the scope, we use probiotic studies as an example. We use an epistemological approach and evaluate the presuppositions that underlie the RCT method. Three general presuppositions are identified and discussed. We evaluate whether these presuppositions can be considered true in probiotic RCTs, which appears not always to be the case. This perspective concludes by exploring several alternative study methods that may be considered for future probiotic or nutritional intervention trials.

  • 1393.
    Zheng, Hou-Feng
    et al.
    McGill Univ, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Biostat, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst Med Res, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada..
    Forgetta, Vincenzo
    McGill Univ, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Biostat, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst Med Res, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada..
    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA 02131 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Estrada, Karol
    Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Analyt & Translat Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Rosello-Diez, Alberto
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dev Biol Program, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Leo, Paul J.
    Univ Queensland, Diamantina Inst, Translat Res Inst, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia..
    Dahia, Chitra L.
    Weill Cornell Med Coll, Dept Cell & Dev Biol, New York, NY 10065 USA.;Hosp Special Surg, Tissue Engn Regenerat & Repair Program, New York, NY 10021 USA..
    Park-Min, Kyung Hyun
    Hosp Special Surg, Rheumatol Div, New York, NY 10021 USA..
    Tobias, Jonathan H.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Clin Sci, Bristol BS10 5NB, Avon, England.;Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol BS8 2BN, Avon, England..
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Kleinman, Aaron
    23andMe, Res Dept, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA..
    Styrkarsdottir, Unnur
    deCODE Genet, Dept Populat Genom, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Liu, Ching-Ti
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Uggla, Charlotta
    Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Inst Med,Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Evans, Daniel S.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA 94158 USA..
    Nielson, Carrie M.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Portland, OR 97239 USA.;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Bone Mineral Unit, Portland, OR 97239 USA..
    Walter, Klaudia
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge CB10 1SA, England..
    Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika
    Umea Univ, Dept Pharmacol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    McCarthy, Shane
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge CB10 1SA, England..
    Eriksson, Joel
    Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Inst Med,Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kwan, Tony
    McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada..
    Jhamai, Mila
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Trajanoska, Katerina
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Memari, Yasin
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge CB10 1SA, England..
    Min, Josine
    Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol BS8 2BN, Avon, England..
    Huang, Jie
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge CB10 1SA, England..
    Danecek, Petr
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge CB10 1SA, England..
    Wilmot, Beth
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Oregon Clin & Translat Res Inst, Portland, OR 97239 USA.;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Med & Clin Informat, Portland, OR 97239 USA..
    Li, Rui
    McGill Univ, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Biostat, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst Med Res, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada..
    Chou, Wen-Chi
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA 02131 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Mokry, Lauren E.
    McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst Med Res, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada..
    Moayyeri, Alireza
    UCL, Farr Inst Hlth Informat Res, London NW1 2DA, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London SE1 7EH, England..
    Claussnitzer, Melina
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA 02131 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Cheng, Chia-Ho
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA 02131 USA..
    Cheung, Warren
    McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 1B1, Canada..
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;NCHA, NGI, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Ge, Bing
    McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada..
    Chen, Shu-Huang
    McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada..
    Choi, Kwangbom
    Univ Rochester, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, Rochester, NY 14642 USA..
    Oei, Ling
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;NCHA, NGI, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Fraser, James
    McGill Univ, Dept Biochem, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6, Canada.;McGill Univ, Goodman Canc Res Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6, Canada..
    Kraaij, Robert
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;NCHA, NGI, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Hibbs, Matthew A.
    Univ Rochester, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, Rochester, NY 14642 USA.;Trinity Univ, Dept Comp Sci, San Antonio, TX 78212 USA..
    Gregson, Celia L.
    Univ Bristol, Musculoskeletal Res Unit, Bristol BS10 5NB, Avon, England..
    Paquette, Denis
    McGill Univ, Dept Biochem, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6, Canada.;McGill Univ, Goodman Canc Res Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6, Canada..
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;NCHA, NGI, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Wibom, Carl
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Tranah, Gregory J.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Portland, OR 97239 USA.;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Bone Mineral Unit, Portland, OR 97239 USA..
    Marshall, Mhairi
    Univ Queensland, Diamantina Inst, Translat Res Inst, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia..
    Gardiner, Brooke B.
    Univ Queensland, Diamantina Inst, Translat Res Inst, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia..
    Cremin, Katie
    Univ Queensland, Diamantina Inst, Translat Res Inst, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia..
    Auer, Paul
    Univ Wisconsin, Sch Publ Hlth, Milwaukee, WI 53726 USA..
    Hsu, Li
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Ring, Sue
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol BS8 2BN, Avon, England..
    Tung, Joyce Y.
    23andMe, Res Dept, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA..
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    deCODE Genet, Dept Stat, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Enneman, Anke W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van Schoor, Natasja M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, NL-1007 MB Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1007 MB Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.
    Wageningen Univ, Dept Human Nutr, NL-6700 EV Wageningen, Netherlands..
    van der Velde, Nathalie
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Acad Med Ctr, Sect Geriatr, Dept Internal Med, NL-1105 Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Kemp, John P.
    Univ Queensland, Diamantina Inst, Translat Res Inst, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia.;Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol BS8 2BN, Avon, England..
    Christiansen, Claus
    Nord Biosci, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark..
    Sayers, Adrian
    Univ Bristol, Musculoskeletal Res Unit, Bristol BS10 5NB, Avon, England..
    Zhou, Yanhua
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Calderari, Sophie
    INSERM, UMRS 1138, Cordeliers Res Ctr, F-75006 Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Inst Cardiometab & Nutr, F-75013 Paris, France..
    van Rooij, Jeroen
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;NCHA, NGI, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Carlson, Chris
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Peters, Ulrike
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Berlivet, Soizik
    McGill Univ, Dept Biochem, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6, Canada.;McGill Univ, Goodman Canc Res Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6, Canada..
    Dostie, Josee
    McGill Univ, Dept Biochem, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6, Canada.;McGill Univ, Goodman Canc Res Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3G 1Y6, Canada..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;NCHA, NGI, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Williams, Stephen R.
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Dept Med, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.;Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA..
    Farber, Charles
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Dept Med, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.;Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA..
    Grinberg, Daniel
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Genet, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.;Ctr Biomed Network Res Rare Dis CIBERER, U720, Barcelona 28029, Spain.;Univ Barcelona, Inst Biomed, Dept Human Mol Genet, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain..
    LaCroix, Andrea Z.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Womens Hlth Ctr Excellence Family Med & Publ Hlth, San Diego, CA 92103 USA..
    Haessler, Jeff
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Giulianini, Franco
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Rose, Lynda M.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Eisman, John A.
    Garvan Inst Med Res, Osteoporosis & Bone Biol Program, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.;Univ Notre Dame Australia, Sch Med Sydney, Sydney, NSW 6959, Australia.;NSW Univ, St Vincents Hosp, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.;NSW Univ, Sch Clin, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia..
    Nguyen, Tuan V.
    Garvan Inst Med Res, Osteoporosis & Bone Biol Program, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.;NSW Univ, St Vincents Hosp, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.;NSW Univ, Sch Clin, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia..
    Center, Jacqueline R.
    Garvan Inst Med Res, Osteoporosis & Bone Biol Program, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.;NSW Univ, St Vincents Hosp, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.;NSW Univ, Sch Clin, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia..
    Nogues, Xavier
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Dept Med, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.;Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.;Inst Hosp Mar Invest Med, Musculoskeletal Res Grp, Barcelona 08003, Spain.;Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Hosp Mar, Dept Internal Med, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain..
    Garcia-Giralt, Natalia
    Inst Hosp Mar Invest Med, Musculoskeletal Res Grp, Barcelona 08003, Spain.;Inst Hlth Carlos III, Cooperat Res Network Aging & Fragil RETICEF, Madrid 28029, Spain..
    Launer, Lenore L.
    NIA, Neuroepidemiol Sect, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Gudnason, Vilmunder
    Iceland Heart Assoc, IS-201 Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Inst Med,Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Inst Med,Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Amin, Najaf
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Genet Epidemiol Unit, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Genet Epidemiol Unit, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Hallmans, Goran
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Rousseau, Francois
    Univ Laval, Dept Mol Biol Med Biochem & Pathol, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada.;CHU Quebec, Ctr Rech, Axe Sante Populat & Prat Optimales Sante, Quebec City, PQ G1V 4G2, Canada..
    Giroux, Sylvie
    CHU Quebec, Ctr Rech, Axe Sante Populat & Prat Optimales Sante, Quebec City, PQ G1V 4G2, Canada..
    Bussiere, Johanne
    CHU Quebec, Ctr Rech, Axe Sante Populat & Prat Optimales Sante, Quebec City, PQ G1V 4G2, Canada..
    Arp, Pascal P.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Koromani, Fjorda
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Prince, Richard L.
    Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Diabet, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Dept Med, Perth, WA 6009, Australia..
    Lewis, Joshua R.
    Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Diabet, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Dept Med, Perth, WA 6009, Australia..
    Langdahl, Bente L.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Internal Med, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Hermann, A. Pernille
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark..
    Jensen, Jens-Erik B.
    Hvidovre Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark..
    Kaptoge, Stephen
    UCL, Farr Inst Hlth Informat Res, London NW1 2DA, England..
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Clin Gerontol Unit, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, England..
    Reeve, Jonathan
    Univ Cambridge, Med & Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.;Univ Oxford, Botnar Res Ctr, Inst Musculoskeletal Sci, Oxford OX3 7LD, England..
    Formosa, Melissa M.
    Univ Malta, Dept Appl Biomed Sci, Fac Hlth Sci, MSD-2080 Msida, Malta..
    Xuereb-Anastasi, Angela
    Univ Malta, Dept Appl Biomed Sci, Fac Hlth Sci, MSD-2080 Msida, Malta..
    Akesson, Kristina
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, S-20502 Lund, Sweden..
    McGuigan, Fiona E.
    Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, S-20502 Lund, Sweden..
    Garg, Gaurav
    Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, S-20502 Lund, Sweden..
    Olmos, Jose M.
    Univ Cantabria, Dept Med & Psychiat, Santander 39011, Spain.;Hosp UM Valdecilla IDIVAL, Dept Internal Med, Santander 39008, Spain..
    Zarrabeitia, Maria T.
    Univ Cantabria, Dept Legal Med, Santander 39011, Spain..
    Riancho, Jose A.
    Univ Cantabria, Dept Med & Psychiat, Santander 39011, Spain.;Hosp UM Valdecilla IDIVAL, Dept Internal Med, Santander 39008, Spain..
    Ralston, Stuart H.
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Western Gen Hosp, Ctr Genom & Expt Med, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Alonso, Nerea
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Western Gen Hosp, Ctr Genom & Expt Med, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Jiang, Xi
    Univ Connecticut, Ctr Hlth, Coll Dent Med, Dept Reconstruct Sci, Farmington, CT 06030 USA..
    Goltzman, David
    McGill Univ, Dept Med & Physiol, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada..
    Pastinen, Tomi
    McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 1B1, Canada..
    Grundberg, Elin
    McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 1B1, Canada..
    Gauguier, Dominique
    INSERM, UMRS 1138, Cordeliers Res Ctr, F-75006 Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Inst Cardiometab & Nutr, F-75013 Paris, France..
    Orwoll, Eric S.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Bone Mineral Unit, Portland, OR 97239 USA.;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Med, Portland, OR 97239 USA..
    Karasik, David
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA 02131 USA.;Bar Ilan Univ, Fac Med Galilee, IL-13010 Safed, Israel..
    Davey-Smith, George
    Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol BS8 2BN, Avon, England..
    Smith, Albert V.
    Iceland Heart Assoc, IS-201 Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Siggeirsdottir, Kristin
    Iceland Heart Assoc, IS-201 Kopavogur, Iceland..
    Harris, Tamara B.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van Meurs, Joyce B. J.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    deCODE Genet, Dept Populat Genom, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Maurano, Matthew T.
    Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Timpson, Nicholas J.
    Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol BS8 2BN, Avon, England..
    Soranzo, Nicole
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge CB10 1SA, England..
    Durbin, Richard
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge CB10 1SA, England..
    Wilson, ScottG.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London SE1 7EH, England.;Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Diabet, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Crawley 6009, Australia..
    Ntzani, Evangelia E.
    Univ Ioannina, Sch Med, Dept Hyg & Epidemiol, GR-45110 Ioannina, Greece.;Brown Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Serv Policy & Practice, Providence, RI 02903 USA..
    Brown, Matthew A.
    Univ Queensland, Diamantina Inst, Translat Res Inst, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia..
    Stefansson, Kari
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.;deCODE Genet, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Hinds, David A.
    23andMe, Res Dept, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA..
    Spector, Tim
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London SE1 7EH, England..
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA..
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Inst Med,Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Greenwood, Celia M. T.
    McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst Med Res, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 1B1, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol Biostat & Occupat Hlth, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Gerald Bronfman Ctr, Dept Oncol, Montreal, PQ H2W 1S6, Canada..
    Jackson, Rebecca D.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Metab, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Rowe, David W.
    Univ Connecticut, Ctr Hlth, Coll Dent Med, Dept Reconstruct Sci, Farmington, CT 06030 USA..
    Loomis, Cynthia A.
    NYU, Sch Med, Ronald O Perelman Dept Dermatol, New York, NY 10016 USA.;NYU, Sch Med, Dept Cell Biol, New York, NY 10016 USA..
    Evans, David M.
    Univ Queensland, Diamantina Inst, Translat Res Inst, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia.;Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol BS8 2BN, Avon, England..
    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.
    Univ Rochester, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, Rochester, NY 14642 USA..
    Joyner, Alexandra L.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dev Biol Program, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Duncan, Emma L.
    Univ Queensland, Diamantina Inst, Translat Res Inst, Princess Alexandra Hosp, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia.;Royal Brisbane & Womens Hosp, Dept Diabet & Endocrinol, Brisbane, Qld 4029, Australia..
    Kiel, Douglas P.
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA 02131 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;NCHA, NGI, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Richards, J. Brent
    McGill Univ, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Biostat, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada.;McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst Med Res, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada.;Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London SE1 7EH, England..
    Whole-genome sequencing identifies EN1 as a determinant of bone density and fracture2015In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 526, no 7571, p. 112-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent to which low-frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 1-5%) and rare (MAF <= 1%) variants contribute to complex traits and disease in the general population is mainly unknown. Bone mineral density (BMD) is highly heritable, a major predictor of osteoporotic fractures, and has been previously associated with common genetic variants(1-8), as well as rare, population specific, coding variants(9). Here we identify novel non-coding genetic variants with large effects on BMD (n(total) = 53,236) and fracture (n(total) = 508,253) in individuals of European ancestry from the general population. Associations for BMD were derived from whole-genome sequencing (n = 2,882 from UK10K (ref. 10); a population-based genome sequencing consortium), whole-exome sequencing (n = 3,549), deep imputation of genotyped samples using a combined UK10K/1000 Genomes reference panel (n = 26,534), and de novo replication genotyping (n = 20,271). We identified a low-frequency non-coding variant near a novel locus, EN1, with an effect size fourfold larger than the mean of previously reported common variants for lumbar spine BMD8 (rs11692564(T), MAF51.6%, replication effect size510.20 s.d., P-meta = 2 x 10(-14)), which was also associated with a decreased risk of fracture (odds ratio = 0.85; P = 2 x 10(-11); ncases = 98,742 and ncontrols = 409,511). Using an En1cre/flox mouse model, we observed that conditional loss of En1 results in low bone mass, probably as a consequence of high bone turnover. We also identified a novel low frequency non-coding variant with large effects on BMD near WNT16 (rs148771817(T), MAF = 1.2%, replication effect size +10.41 s.d., P-meta = 1 x 10(-11)). In general, there was an excess of association signals arising from deleterious coding and conserved non-coding variants. These findings provide evidence that low-frequency non-coding variants have large effects on BMD and fracture, thereby providing rationale for whole-genome sequencing and improved imputation reference panels to study the genetic architecture of complex traits and disease in the general population.

  • 1394.
    Ziaei, Shirin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Naved, Ruchira Tabassum
    ICDDR, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Women's exposure to intimate partner violence and child malnutrition: findings from demographic and health surveys in Bangladesh2014In: Maternal and Child Nutrition, ISSN 1740-8695, E-ISSN 1740-8709, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 347-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic violence, in particular intimate partner violence (IPV), has been recognized as a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among women of reproductive age. The effects of IPV against women on their children's health, especially their nutritional status has received less attention but needs to be evaluated to understand the comprehensive public health implications of IPV. The aim of current study was to investigate the association between women's exposure to IPV and their children's nutritional status, using data from the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS). Logistic regression models were used to estimate association between ever-married women's lifetime exposure to physical and sexual violence by their spouses and nutritional status of their children under 5 years. Of 2042 women in the BDHS survey with at least one child under 5 years of age, 49.4% reported lifetime experience of physical partner violence while 18.4% reported experience of sexual partner violence. The prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight in their children under 5 years was 44.3%, 18.4% and 42.0%, respectively. Women were more likely to have a stunted child if they had lifetime experience of physical IPV [odds ratio n = 2027 (OR)adj, 1.48; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.23–1.79] or had been exposed to sexual IPV (n = 2027 ORadj, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.02–1.61). The present findings contribute to growing body of evidence showing that IPV can also compromise children's growth, supporting the need to incorporate efforts to address IPV in child health and nutrition programmes and policies.

  • 1395.
    Ådén, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Carlsson, Maine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Edström, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Håglin, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Dietary intake and olfactory function in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.2011In: Nutritional neuroscience, ISSN 1476-8305, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate energy and nutrient intake in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and association between olfaction and nutrient density of the diet.

    DESIGN: Baseline data from a prospective cohort study.

    SUBJECTS: Eighty-seven patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls participated in the study.

    METHODS: Dietary intake was assessed by using 3-day dietary records and 24-hour dietary recalls. The Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) was used to test olfaction.

    RESULTS: Patients, compared with controls, had lower intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (P = 0.024) and a higher intake of carbohydrates (P = 0.027) in energy percent (E%). Lower intake of protein (E%) (P = 0.045), and a low nutrient density of folate (P = 0.022), magnesium (P = 0.012), and phosphorus (P = 0.029) were associated with lower B-SIT score in both patients and controls. PD patients had a lower B-SIT score than controls (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate a higher relative contribution of energy from carbohydrates in PD patients. An association between low protein, folate, magnesium, and phosphorus density of the diet and olfaction was seen in the whole population.

  • 1396.
    Ödlund Olin, Ann
    et al.
    Nutrition Team, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Österberg, Pernilla
    Nutrition Team, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hådell, Karin
    Nutrition Center, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aremyr, Irene
    Nutrition Center, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Järström, Stina
    Department of Geriatrics, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Nutrition Team, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Energyenriched hospital food to improve energy intake in elderly patients1996In: JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, ISSN 0148-6071, E-ISSN 1941-2444, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 93-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It was hypothesized that energy intake in hospitalized elderly patients could be improved by increasing the density of energy of the food and that the volume of food actually consumed, even with a higher energy content than the normal, would not change with servings of high energy-dense hospital food. Methods: Thirty-six elderly patients (52 to 96 years) of both sexes, long-term treated at two comparable wards, participated in this study. The patients were given 6 weeks of regular hospital food (RHF, 1670 kcal/d, 7.0 MJ) and 6 weeks of high-energy food (HE, 2520 kcal/d, 10.5 MJ). The volume of food was kept constant. A crossover study design was used. Food intake, energy intake, body weight, and modified functional condition (Norton scale) were measured. Results: Regardless of type of food (RHF or HE) and time of day (lunch or dinner), the food portion size (volume of food) intake was the same, approximately 80% of the portions consumed. HE led to a 40% increase in energy intake (from 25 ± 1 during RHF to 35 ± 2 kcal/kg/d, p <.0001), which resulted in a 3.4% increase in body weight (p <.001) after 3 weeks of HE. Only minimal changes in functional condition were found. The cost of HE was substantially lower (-85%) than any other mean available for improvement of energy intake. Conclusions: A significant increase in energy intake can be achieved by higher energy density in regular hospital food and that HE does not cause a decrease in the volume of the food consumed. These findings suggest that it is the volume of food rather than the energy that limits voluntary energy intake of hospital food in elderly hospitalized patients. (Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 20:93–97, 1996)

  • 1397.
    Öhlund, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Studiebesök på the Royal London Hospital2008In: Dietistaktuellt, ISSN 1102-9285, Vol. XIX, no 2, p. 24-25/27Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1398.
    Öhlund, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Lind, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Silfverdal, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Karlsland Åkeson, Pia
    Increased vitamin D intake differentiated according to skin color is needed to meet requirements in young Swedish children during winter: a double-blind randomized clinical trial2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dark skin and low exposure to sunlight increase the risk of vitamin D insufficiency in children. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the amount of vitamin D needed to ascertain that most children >4 y of age attain sufficient serum25-hydroxyvitamin D [S-25(OH) D; i.e., >= 50 nmol/L] during winter regardless of latitude and skin color. Design: In a longitudinal, double-blind, randomized, food-based intervention study, 5- to 7-y-old children from northern (638 degrees N) and southern (558 degrees N) Sweden with fair (n = 108) and dark (n = 98) skin were included. Children, stratified by skin color by using Fitzpa-trick's definition, were randomly assigned to receive milk-based vitamin D-3 supplements that provided 2 (placebo), 10, or 25 mu g/d during 3 winter months. Results: Mean daily vitamin D intake increased from 6 to 17 mu g and 26 mu g in the intervention groups supplemented with 10 and 25 mu g, respectively. In the intention-to-treat analysis, 90.2% (95% CI: 81.1%, 99.3%) of fair-skinned children randomly assigned to supplementation of 10 mu g/d attained sufficient concentrations, whereas 25 mu g/d was needed in dark-skinned children to reach sufficiency in 95.1% (95% CI: 88.5%, 100%). In children adherent to the study product, 97% (95% CI: 91.3%, 100%) and 87.9% (95% CI: 76.8%, 99%) of fair-and dark-skinned children, respectively, achieved sufficient concentrations if supplemented with 10 mu g/d. By using 95% prediction intervals for 30 and 50 nmol S-25(OH) D/L, intakes of 6 and 20 mu g/d are required in fair-skinned children, whereas 14 and 28 mu g/d are required in children with dark skin. Conclusion: Children with fair and dark skin require vitamin D intakes of 20 and 28 mu g/d, respectively, to maintain S-25(OH) D >= 50 nmol/L, whereas intakes of 6 and 14 mu g/d, respectively, are required to maintain concentrations >= 30 nmol/L during winter.

  • 1399.
    Öhlund, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Öhlund, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Dietary shortcomings in children on a gluten-free diet2010In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 294-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Coeliac disease (CD), or permanent gluten intolerance, is one of the most common chronic food-related diseases among children in Europe and the USA. The treatment is lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD) (i.e. the exclusion of wheat, rye and barley from the diet, which are important sources particularly of iron, dietary fibre and vitamin B). The present study aimed to evaluate dietary intakes of energy and nutrients in children and adolescents on GFD and compare these with intake of comparable age groups on a normal diet as well as current recommendations.

    Methods: Thirty children, 4-17 years of age with confirmed CD and on GFD were agreed to participate in this study at the Department of Pediatrics, Umeå University Hospital. Weight and height were used to calculate individual energy requirement according to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2004 (NNR-04). Dietary intake was assessed using 5-day food records and household measures were used for quantities. Twenty-five children completed their dietary record.

    Results: Thirteen of the 25 children did not meet the recommended energy intake and the dietary intakes were inadequate regarding quality of macronutrients and quantity of minerals and vitamins. The mean intakes of sucrose and saturated fatty acids were above and the intakes of dietary fibre, vitamin D, magnesium and selenium below the NNR-04. High intakes of sucrose and saturated fat and a low intake of dietary fibre were also noted in a previous national survey on healthy children on a normal diet. The nutrient density of vitamin D, riboflavin, niacin, thiamine, magnesium and selenium were lower among CD children than healthy children but, for iron and calcium, it was higher in CD children.

    Conclusions: Children on GFD appear to follow the same trends as healthy children on a normal diet, with high intakes of saturated fat and sucrose and low intakes of dietary fibre, vitamin D and magnesium compared to recommendations.

  • 1400.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    et al.
    Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Nutrition Gut Brain Interactions Research Centre, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Nutrition Gut Brain Interactions Research Centre, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Nutrition Gut Brain Interactions Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Probiotic administration among free-living older adults: a double blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial2016In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 15, article id 80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diseases of the digestive system have been found to contribute to a higher symptom burden in older adults. Thus, therapeutic strategies able to treat gastrointestinal discomfort might impact the overall health status and help older adults to increase their overall health status and optimal functionality.

    Objective: The aim of this double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus reuteri on digestive health and wellbeing in older adults.

    Methods: The study enrolled general older adults (>65 years). After eligibility screening qualified subjects (n = 290) participated in a 2-arm study design, with each arm consisting of 12 weeks of intervention of either active or placebo product. Primary outcome measure was set to changes in gastrointestinal symptoms and secondary outcome measures were changes in level of wellbeing, anxiety and stress. Follow up was performed at 8 and 12 weeks.

    Results: No persistent significant effects were observed on the primary or secondary outcome parameters of the study. A modest effect was observed in the probiotic arm, were levels of stress decreased at week 8 and 12. Similarly, we found that subjects suffering from indigestion and abdominal pain, respectively, showed a significant decrease of anxiety at week 8 after probiotic treatment, but not at week 12.

    Conclusion: The RCT failed to show any improvement in digestive health after daily intake of a probiotic supplement containing L. reuteri. Neither was any significant improvement in wellbeing, stress or anxiety observed. Even though the RCT had a negative outcome, the study highlights issues important to take into consideration when designing trials among older adults.

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