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  • 1157751.
    Woolfson, Charles
    University of Glasgow.
    New Modes of Regulation for Health and Safety: Post-enlargement policy perspectives for the European Union2006In: NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy, ISSN 1048-2911, E-ISSN 1541-3772, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 155-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent joining of ten new member states to the European Union, eight of which are former communist countries, has reopened inherent tensions in current European Union (EU) policy-making on safety and health in the workplace. These spring from seemingly incompatible objectives; the need to ensure broad EU member state compliance with regulation, around agreed minimum standards through active regulatory enforcement, and the promotion of “softer” voluntary initiatives in the management of workplace risks and hazards in order to create “a culture of prevention.” The present EU strategy which ends in 2006, seeks to secure a balance between both sets of objectives. However, with respect to the post-communist new member states of Central and Eastern Europe, the appropriateness of the current strategy is doubtful. This article therefore focuses on the implications of the expansion of the European Union in May 2004 in the context of the elaboration of the new “soft law” modes of regulatory governance at the EU level. In turn, this provokes the question: will the “new” European policy for occupational health and safety from 2007 onwards, be “new,” or simply more of the same? If the latter, it is suggested that the future for working environment standards in Europe as a whole may be significantly compromised.

  • 1157752.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Precarious work in times of crisis: regulatory discourses and labour standards2011In: Vulnerable Workers: health, safety and well-being / [ed] M. Sargeant and M. Giovanone, Farnham: Gower Publishing Ltd., 2011, 1, p. 75-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increase in labour precarity which has accompanied the global economic and financial crisis is itself part of a longer term historical trend towards the increasing vulnerability of labour. This has two elements that are relevant: 1. The impacts of crisis on regulated labour standards in general 2. The role crisis-induced migration flows in accelerating labour precarity on a European and transnational scale. Both these tendencies need to be seen against fundamental changes in the architecture of European labour rights and labour law as it seeks to accommodate the competitiveness agenda of the European Commission in promoting greater labour flexibility and adaptability within a context of free movement of labour.

  • 1157753.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Precarious Work, Regulation and Labour Standards in Times of Crisis2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    The increase in labour precarity which has accompanied the global economic and financial crisis is itself part of a longer term historical trend towards the increasing vulnerability of labour through the growth of precarious and contingent forms of employment (Frade and Darmon, 2005). This has two elements that are especially relevant in the current economic downturn and its aftermath: 1. The immediate impact of crisis on regulated labour standards in general, that is, on employment protection, regulation and enforcement 2. The longer-term role crisis-induced migration flows in accelerating labour precarity on a European and transnational scale. Both these issues need to be seen against fundamental changes in the architecture of European labour rights and the diminishing regulatory reach of labour law as it seeks to accommodate the competitiveness agenda of the European Commission in promoting greater labour “flexibility” and an “individualisation” of employment rights. Yet the contemporary political economy of capitalism, not least, its spectacular regulatory failure, has placed the issue of the renewal of regulation back on the agenda of governments and supranational agencies. If capital needs regulation to control its financial excesses, an inescapable conclusion that the European Union and its member state governments appear to recognise, the need is at least equal for regulation to control the harms which capital directly perpetrates on labour at both a national and supra-national level. In this context, claims for effective labour standards pose a public policy imperative of devising protective regulatory strategies to counter precarity, not least those aspects of precarity heightened by the crisis. The challenge is to address the socially imperative task of “re-protecting” the “un-protected” in an increasingly globalised and insecure labour market.

  • 1157754.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    PREVENTABLE DISASTERS IN THE OFFSHORE OIL INDUSTRY: FROM PIPER ALPHA TO DEEPWATER HORIZON2012In: NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy, ISSN 1048-2911, E-ISSN 1541-3772, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 497-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares two industrial disasters in the offshore oil industry, the explosion and fire on Piper Alpha off the coast of Scotland in 1988, the world’s worst offshore disaster, and the blowout and explosions on Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. It attempts to answer a simple question: Given the enormity of the first tragedy and the careful analysis of its circumstances and causes, why were the lessons of previous failure not learned by this globally organized industry, in the very heartland in the United States? The answer tells us much about the ability of corporate capital to configure regulatory regimes in its own interests and to do so in a manner that continues to threaten the safety and well-being of its employees and the wider environment.

  • 1157755.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Glasgow University.
    ‘Pushing the envelope': The ‘informalisation’ of labour in post-communist new EU Member States2007In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 551-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution to debate explores one aspect of the reconfiguration of power in the workplaces of post-communist Eastern Europe in which relations between employer and employee are informalized to the detriment of employees’ rights and decent labour standards. It focuses on the new EU member state of Lithuania, one of the poorest of the new entrants in the 2004 enlargement which embraced eight former communist countries. In choosing a ‘worst-case’ example, a central argument is explored: that of informalization as a pervasive feature of employment relations in the new market economies of post-communism.

  • 1157756.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Safety failures the offshore oil industry: From Piper Alpha to Deepwater Horizon2013In: Safety or Profit? : International Studies in Governance, Change and the Work Environment / [ed] Theo Nichols and David Walters, Amytyville, New York: Baywood Publishing Company, Inc., 2013, 1, p. 181-203Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the title Safety or Profit? suggests, health and safety at work needs to be understood in the context of the wider political economy. This book brings together contributions informed by this view from internationally recognized scholars. It reviews the governance of health and safety at work, with special reference to Australia, Canada, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Three main aspects are discussed. The restructuring of the labor market: this is considered with respect to precarious work and to gender issues and their implications for the health and safety of workers. The neoliberal agenda: this is examined with respect to the diminished power of organized labor, decriminalization, and new governance theory, including an examination of how well the health-and-safety-at-work regimes put in place in many industrial societies about forty years ago have fared and how distinctive the recent emphasis on self-regulation in several countries really is. The role of evidence: there is a dearth of evidence-based policy. The book examines how policy on health and safety at work is formulated at both company and state levels. Cases considered include the scant regard paid to evidence by an official inquiry into future strategy in Canada; the lack of evidence-based policy and the reluctance to observe the precautionary principle with respect to work-related cancer in the United Kingdom; and the failure to learn from past mistakes in the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.  Intended Audience: Researchers; policymakers, trade union representatives, and officials interested in OHS; postgraduate students of OHS; OHS professionals; regulatory and socio-legal scholars.

  • 1157757.
    Woolfson, Charles
    University of Glasgow.
    Social Dialogue and Life-long learning in the new EU member states: “reform fit” in Latvia2008In: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, E-ISSN 1461-7269, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Vocational education and training (VET) is regarded by EU policymakers as crucial to creating a high-skill workforce capable of adapting to European and global demands in an intensified competitive environment. It is part of the so-called Copenhagen Process, in which social dialogue between employers and employees is seen as an important means of realizing policy. However, many of the new member states from the Eastern European countries which joined the European Union in 2004 have only weak forms of social dialogue. Moreover, the prevailing neo-liberal environment in many post-communist new member states undermines ‘reform fit’ between broad European social policy goals and narrower domestic agendas. This article explores the resulting problems in social dialogue with regard to VET in the new member states, using Latvia as a case-study.

     

  • 1157758.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Continuing Price of Britain’s Oil: Business Organisation, Precarious Employment and Risk Transfer Mechanisms in the North Sea Petroleum Industry2007In: Governance and Regulation in Social Life: Essays in Honour of W. G. Carson / [ed] in A. Brannigan and G. Pavlich, London: Routledge , 2007, 1, p. 55-74Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comprising fourteen articles by leading international contributors, including some of the most prominent socio-legal and criminological scholars working in the field, this volume is currently the only work available that critically examines W.G. Carson and his crucial influence in the turn towards sociological approaches to criminology and a criminological interest in governance and social control.

    The 1970s witnessed an epiphany in the sociological understanding of crime in Britain. The correctional perspective, which assumed crimes had inherent or essential qualities that distinguished them from other acts, was superseded by the analysis of how social events came to be defined as so harmful and repugnant as to require criminalization. This shift in perspectives was exemplified in W.G. Carson’s work, which combines a Marxist acknowledgement of the imperative for profit with a symbolic interactionist attention to the restraining effect of prestige and status among producers and regulators.

    This key work is an essential read for postgraduates and researchers studying and researching in the areas of criminology and law.

  • 1157759.
    Woolfson, Charles
    University of Latvia and University of Glasgow.
    The 'Conventionalization' of Safety Crimes in the Post-Communist New Member States of the European Union2006In: Critical Criminology, ISSN 1205-8629, E-ISSN 1572-9877, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 339-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article begins by presenting a brief overview of the neglected area of ‘safety crime’ in the post-communist states of Central and Eastern Europe. Quantitative and qualitative evidence is reviewed, suggesting both the widespread nature of safety crimes, and a deteriorating work environment, in which safety crimes are routinely tolerated. Evidence of the ‘institutionalized tolerance of non-compliance’ is provided through a case study of labor inspection in the new member states, focusing on Latvia, currently the worst performer in health and safety in Europe. Against a background of general violations of labor rights, current innovations in European-level regulatory strategies are critiqued, in particular, the shift towards soft law’ and compliance-based strategies, relying on appeals to corporate social responsibility, together with the encouragement of various forms of voluntary initiatives. It is suggested that such (self)-regulatory strategies may be inappropriate as forms of crime control in the new member states of the European Union. In effect, a convergence domestic and European Union policies may open the door to the further ‘conventionalization’ of safety crimes in the new EU member states.

  • 1157760.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Economic Crisis, Austerity, and Migration: Exploring the Failed Trajectory of Neoliberal Post-Communism2012In: Socioeconomic Outcomes of the Global Financial Crisis: Theoretical Discussion and Empirical Case Studies / [ed] Ulrike Schuerkens, Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 38-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter ethnographically explores popular responses to the impacts of the global economic and financial crisis in Lithuania. It analyzes emergent “discourses of discontent” resulting from the collapse of mass living standards and expectations with its onset. It suggests that the failure of “voice,” as manifested in expressions of popular discontent and social dialogue, will result in the migratory “exit” of many of the disillusioned and increasingly desperate population. The impact of the crisis is all the more severe given previously burgeoning economic growth and rising expectations. Post-communist states such as Lithuania, having embraced a neo-liberal path of rapid economic transition to the free market, with minimal regard to considerations of social justice, now face gathering popular discontent and social turbulence.

  • 1157761.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The future of the construction industry: A Baltic view2012In: Construction Labour Research News, ISSN 1997-1745, no 4, p. 30-33Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a short contribution (an essay, a scenario, a vision paper) about the future of the building industry in Europe. It suggests that by the year 2020 there will have been a radical recalibrating of labour rights across the European space, in the name of restoring flexibility in the labour market and competitive dynamism to the European economy, and is a ‘warning parable’.

  • 1157762.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    The Labour Theory of Culture: A Re-examination of Engels' Theory of Human Origins2009 (ed. 2)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its importance in understanding the social relations of labour little attention has been paid by Western Marxists to evolutionary theory. Taking as a starting point an unfinished essay by Engels, the author argues that the human species must be seen as discontinuous with its nearest biological ancestors – that a qualitative distinction was brought about by social labour. It is argued that the most likely forms of human organization were co-operative and field studies are discussed which apparently provide evidence for tool use and linguistic ability among the higher primates. The relationship between hand and brain in terms of Marxist psychology is also elaborated.

  • 1157763.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Politics of Brexit: European Free Movement of Labour and Labour Standards2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper attempts to reassess the Brexit debate in the UK over immigration and free movement of labour in terms of the politics of austerity. It advances a progressive case for Brexit based on regaining national sovereignty to enable the effective defence of national labour standards outside of the neoliberal European project. The issue of labour standards is a cause that paradoxically the current Conservative administration has sought to champion, although on a highly contestable basis. In the UK general election of 2017, the Labour Party has significantly advanced its position on the basis of an anti-austerity program while the Conservative government has entered into a likely terminal crisis. It is argued that rejecting membership of the supranational European Union has the potential to advance labour rights further in an inclusive and non-xenophobic way.

  • 1157764.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    The Race Equality Directive: ‘differentiated’ or ‘differential’ Europeanisation in the new EU member states?2010In: European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, ISSN 1461-6696, E-ISSN 1469-8307, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the Race Equality Directive (RED) and its transposition in the context of a new European Union (EU) member state, Baltic Lithuania. Taking this post-communist society as a case study, it is suggested that while formal legislative compliance with the RED has been broadly attained, transposed anti-discrimination legislation and national policy implementation initiatives may not adequately take into account societal attitudes and norms. The historical legacy of Soviet times, the contemporary post-communist experience, and the current economic crisis have resulted in a fragile national identity and a propensity towards populist and even xenophobic responses to uncertainty. These factors are explored in terms of their potential for undermining the objectives of EU-derived legislation designed to promote racial and ethnic tolerance. The article concludes that while a ‘differentiated’ Europeanisation has not occurred in formal terms, the possibility exists of ‘differential’ Europeanisation emerging in post-communist new EU member states such as Lithuania.

  • 1157765.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The semiotics of working class speech2007In: CCCS Selected Working Papers: Volume 1 / [ed] A. Gray, J. Campbell, M. Erickson, S. Hanson, S. and H. Wood, London: Routledge , 2007, 1, p. 504-535Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of classic essays focuses on the theoretical frameworks that informed the work of the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at the University of Birmingham, the methodologies and working practices that the Centre developed for conducting academic research and examples of the studies carried out under the auspices of the Centre.

    This volume is split into seven thematic sections that are introduced by key academics working in the field of cultural studies, and includes a preface by eminent scholar, Stuart Hall. The thematic sections are:

    • Literature and Society
    • Popular Culture and Youth Subculture
    • Media
    • Women's Studies and Feminism
    • Race
    • History
    • Education and Work.
  • 1157766.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The ‘Singapore scenario’: The uncertain prospects for labour standards in post-Brexit Britain2017In: Industrial relations journal, ISSN 0019-8692, E-ISSN 1468-2338, Vol. 48, no 5-6, p. 384-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Conservative government of Theresa May asserted that labour standards would be preserved post-Brexit. The Labour Party also privileged labour standards in its anti-austerity programme. The threat remains however that Brexit will provide an incentive to erode labour standards in a global ‘race to the bottom’ in a ‘Singapore scenario’.   

  • 1157767.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Where state power and opposition collide: Discourses of labor protest in a new market economy2009In: Oppositional Discourses and Democracies / [ed] Michael Huspek, London: Routledge , 2009, 1, p. 60-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the emergent discourses of labour protest which have accompanied the transition process from communism to the market economy. Building on the ground-breaking theoretical paradigm of V. N. Voloshinov and contemporary attempts by Marxist scholars to develop a materialist socio-linguistics, the gradual emergence of class-based labour discourses in the new market economies of Central and Eastern Europe is examined. A number of recent labour protests in ex-soviet Lithuania are examined. The complex articulation of labour identities is charted. Their legitimization, as social actors with “independent” demands, in the context of transitional Lithuanian society, is analyzed through the discourses of protest. Discourses of labour protest have emerged in contestation and tension with seemingly contradictory attempts to impose a “supra class” ideology. The imposition of both neo-liberal ideology which seeks to excludes organized labour from an independent role in civil society, and at the same time, the cultivation of the language of social partnership, which seeks to incorporate labour in national tripartite structures, are complementary attempts to forestall the emergence of more radical class-based discourses. The emergence of dialogic discourses between labour and capital, and the forms of their social resonance, reveal much about the current limits of labour protest in the new market economies. Such discourses also reveal much about possible future forms of labour contestation, as the new market economies of Central and Eastern Europe are incorporated into the newly enlarged European Union.

  • 1157768.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Department of Law.
    Working Environment and ‘Soft Law’ in thePost-Communist New Member States2006In: Journal of Common Market Studies, ISSN 0021-9886, E-ISSN 1468-5965, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 195-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current, admittedly incomplete evidence, suggests a deteriorating working environment in the new Member States of central and eastern Europe. Moreover, support for occupational health and safety regulation concerning the working environment appears to be limited among business and political elites in the new Member States. This has created a lack of policy ‘reform fit’ between the ‘social dimension’ of a European social model and domestic agendas dominated by more ‘business-friendly’ free market considerations. The European Commission has also currently adopted ‘deregulationary’ assumptions concerning the need to ‘simplify’ the acquis, as well as advocating ‘soft law’ as an alternative to traditional regulatory instruments such as directives. However, the lack of contextual industrial relations supports, in particular, the power imbalance in industrial relations due to the weakness of trade unions and social dialogue at workplace level, make uncertain prospects for ‘soft law’ as a strategy for working environment improvements in the new Member States.

  • 1157769.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    School of Law, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
    Calite, Dace
    Department of Sociology, University of Latvia, Latvia.
    New European Community strategy for health and safety: The elephant in the room2007In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 342-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Lithuania has comprehensive health and safety legislation in line with EU requirements, on a range of general health and occupational health and safety (OHS) indicators, it is a poor performer. Survey data suggest that the norm for work in Lithuania is based on a regime of intensification without a participative working environment in which employees have a voice in safety management. Although European-style legislative reforms appear to be having no measurable effects on CHS performance in post-communist New Member States, the EU OHS strategy for 2007–2012 fails to take account of the deteriorated working environments in these states, suggesting that prospects for harmonization of working environment standards in the enlarged Europe may recede with eastward expansion.

  • 1157770.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    University of Glasgow.
    Calite, Dace
    University of Latvia.
    Working Environment in the new EU Member State of Lithuania: Examining a ‘worst case’ example2008In: Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, ISSN 1477-3996, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 3-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Using recent survey data from Lithuania, it is suggested that post-communist countries such as Lithuania, admittedly a 'worst case' example, have specific legacies of serious health and safety problems. On a range of general health and occupational safety and health indicators, some three years after joining the European Union, Lithuania is currently a poor performer, and on key indicators the poorest in the European Union. Yet, formally, Lithuania has comprehensive health and safety legislation in line with EU requirements. Survey data suggest, however, a work regime of intensification and an absence of a participative working environment in which employees have a 'voice' in the safety management process. European-style legislative reforms appear to be having only limited positive measurable effects on health and safety performance. Moreover, the new EU occupational safety and health strategy for 2007 to 2012 fails to take account of the deteriorated working environments in the workplaces of post-communist new member states such as Lithuania.

     

  • 1157771.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Calite, Dace
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Kallaste, Epp
    Estonian Center for Social Research, Estonia.
    Employee “voice” and working environment in the New Member States: Translating policy into practice in the Baltic States2009In: Workplace Health and Safety : International Perspectives on Worker Representation / [ed] David Walters and Theo Nichols, London: Palgrave/Macmillan , 2009, 1, p. 134-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines employee ‘voice’ in workplace health and safety in three Baltic New Member States by means of a cross-national survey. The data point to unresolved problems of voice in the context of rather poor working environments. These present opportunities for collective renewal by trade unions, but paradoxically are more likely to be addressed by employers in the context of significant labour shortages created by a post-European Union accession labour ‘exit’.

  • 1157772.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fudge, Judy
    University of Kent, UK.
    Thörnqvist, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Migrant precarity and future challenges to labour standards in Sweden2014In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 695-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fears of a ‘race to the bottom’ in labour standards may have been overstated. Nevertheless, using Sweden as a case study, it is argued that the diminished capacity of trade unions to defend labour standards following the Laval judgement of the European Court of Justice, together with a decline in trade union density, a limited remit of enforcement authorities and recent changes to the Swedish labour migration regime, may have detrimental impacts on labour standards, particularly in low-skill low-wage occupations. In combination, these developments are creating new spaces for migrant precariousness within the context of a formerly well-regulated Swedish labour market model.

  • 1157773.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Fudge, Judy
    University of Kent, UK.
    Thörnqvist, Christer
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Migrant precarity and future challenges to labour standards in Sweden2014In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 695-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fears of a ‘race to the bottom’ in labour standards may have been overstated. Nevertheless, using Sweden as a case study, it is argued that the diminished capacity of trade unions to defend labour standards following the Laval judgement of the European Court of Justice, together with a decline in trade union density, a limited remit of enforcement authorities and recent changes to the Swedish labour migration regime, may have detrimental impacts on labour standards, particularly in low-skill low-wage occupations. In combination, these developments are creating new spaces for migrant precariousness within the context of a formerly well-regulated Swedish labour market model.

  • 1157774.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Herzfeld Olsson, Petra
    Department of Law, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thörnqvist, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forced Labour and Migrant BerryPickers in Sweden2012In: International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, ISSN 0952-617X, E-ISSN 1875-838X, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 147-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groups of migrant berry pickers arriving annually in Sweden from both Asia and the newer European Union Member States have been subject to exploitation over the years. The problem appears to persist in spite of public and international concern and successive regulatory reforms. An examination of this problem from a forced labour perspective suggests inadequate implementation and application of international norms in Swedish law, as well as deficiencies in the application of criminal-law and in regulatory oversight. Policy recommendations regarding the labour conditions for seasonal migrant workers in Sweden are put forward.

  • 1157775.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Juska, Arunas
    University of East Carolina, USA.
    Austerity era policing, protest and passivity in Lithuania2014In: Urban (In)Security: Policing the Neoliberal Crisis / [ed] Volker Eik and Kendra Briken, Ottowa: Red Quill Publications , 2014, 1, p. 294-322Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the global crisis, in Lithuania the centralization of the police force accelerated as locally accountable and more community-oriented municipal police units came under the direct control and supervision of the national police headquarters. Centralization of command and control went hand in hand with policies strengthening the military ethos of police, manifested in military-style deployments resulting in the supression of popular 'voice' in mass demonstrations and increasing propensities to 'exit' among the discontented population.

  • 1157776.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Juska, Arunas
    East Carolina University, USA.
    Neoliberal Austerity and Corporate Crime: The collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia2014In: NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy, ISSN 1048-2911, E-ISSN 1541-3772, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 129-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The roof collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia on November 21, 2013 left 54 dead. This analysis identifies the disaster as a “safety crime.” Neoliberal deregulatory measures, intensified by the global economic and financial crisis and a programme of radical austerity, together with corporate and state disregard of public safety and well-being, combined to produce the disaster. The wider context and underlying causes of catastrophic safety failure exemplify the inherently contradictory character of the neoliberal “Baltic model” of austerity, recently much in vogue with international policymakers in both Europe and the United States. The authors conclude that the current renewed drive by the European Commission towards reducing regulation for business, especially in the aftermath of the crisis, further justifies longstanding anti-regulatory preferences of neoliberal domestic elites, with the result that the costs of disregard for public safety are externalized onto the general populace.

  • 1157777.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Juska, Arunas
    University of East Carolina, NC, USA.
    Postscript: a very Baltic tragedy - the collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia2014In: The contraditions of austerity: the socio-economic costs of the neoliberal Baltic model / [ed] Jeffrey Sommers and Charles Woolfson, London and New York: Routledge, 2014, p. 149-173Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The roof collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia on November 21, 2013 left 54 dead. This analysis identifies the disaster as a “safety crime.” Neoliberal deregulatory measures, intensified by the global economic and financial crisis and a programme of radical austerity, together with corporate and state disregard of public safety and well-being, combined to produce the disaster. The wider context and underlying causes of catastrophic safety failure exemplify the inherently contradictory character of the neoliberal “Baltic model” of austerity, recently much in vogue with international policymakers in both Europe and the United States. The authors conclude that the current renewed drive by the European Commission towards reducing regulation for business, especially in the aftermath of the crisis, further justifies longstanding anti-regulatory preferences of neoliberal domestic elites, with the result that the costs of disregard for public safety are externalized onto the general populace.

  • 1157778.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kallaste, Epp
    Illusory Corporatism “Mark 2”’ in the Baltic States2011In: Warsaw Forum of Economic Sociology, ISSN 2081-9633, Vol. 2, no 1 (3), p. 51-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In their paper the authors employ the notion of ‘illusory corporatism’ coined over a decade ago. In the Baltic states, despite introduction of neo-corporatist institutional arrangements, neo-liberal policies have prevailed, thus the term appears appropriate to describe the actual status of tripartite social dialogue in the area for many years. Following the onset of the global economic crisis, which deeply aff ected the Baltic region, neo-corporatist type arrangements seem to have been re-embraced by trade unions and received support of the state. However, this renewed interest in neo-corporatism is mostly a tactical move on the part of the state, aiming to facilitate social peace in the times of recession and the implementation of stern austerity measures, with trade unions largely failing to infl uence the shape of anti-crisis policies of governments. Th us this new chapter in the history of social dialogue in the Baltic states is labelled ‘illusory corporatism Mark 2’.

  • 1157779.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Kallaste, Epp
    Estonian Center for Applied Research CentAR.
    Berzins, Janis
    Department of Political Science, Riga Stradins University, Latvia.
    Industrial relations and social dialogue in the Baltic states: crisis, conflict and compromise2011In: Globalising Employment Relations?: Multinational Corporations and Central and Eastern European transitions / [ed] S. Contrepois, V. Delteil, P. Dieuaide and S. Jefferys, London: Palgrave Macmillan , 2011, 1, p. 179-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes first, the economic contours of the crisis in the Baltic States , taking into account the differences between each country. Second, the various governmental crisis-response measures are outlined, and the key question is posed: how is it possible to sustain an accord between capital and labour, given the scale of sacrifices imposed on the latter? To answer this, the third part of the chapter, overviews existing arrangements for social dialogue and the structure and density of trade union organisation in the post-communist era. Fourth, the responses of organised labour to governmental policy are discussed. It is suggested that after initial potentially destabilising opposition, the trade unions have increasingly come to accept a revival of previous neo-corporatist compromise arrangements.

  • 1157780.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Likic-Brboric, Branka
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Migrants and the unequal burdening of “toxic” risk:: Towards a new global governance regime2008In: Debatte, ISSN 0965-156X, E-ISSN 1469-3712, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 291-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article addresses the changing discourse that frames the neo-liberal regulatory agenda, in the context of the current financial crisis and related, system-threatening ‘toxic’ risk. In this, the authors claim that a flexible mix of regulation/deregulation and self-regulation is reflected in an asymmetric architecture of multilevel governance that is based on an unequal burden-sharing of risk, involving the commodification of risk and an imposition of this burden on the socially weakest groups. Migrant workers are identified as being most vulnerable to the condition of precariousness due to ‘double asymmetry of hyperprecarity’. The article identifies class-biased practices of regulatory failure and the counter-movements that they have generated around the demand for “decent work”. It is claimed that the present systemic failure has created only a ‘window of opportunity’ for the working class and civil society actors to promote de-commodification of labour and equalization of risk-burdening in the inception of a new regulatory contest on both national and transnational level.

  • 1157781.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mesic, Nedzad
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Roma berry pickers in Sweden: Economic crisis and new contingents of the austeriat2015In: Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research, ISSN 1024-2589, E-ISSN 1996-7284, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 37-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current era of austerity free movement of labour has produced an ongoing but also contingent flow of migrant labour, an austeriat, moving from poorer crisis-hit regions of Europe to those countries such as Sweden where the crisis has been less severe. This article describes the working and living experiences of Bulgarian Roma berry pickers in Sweden. It argues that, in the context of a previously well-regulated labour market, an erosion of labour standards based on the exploitation of seasonal unskilled labour migrants from Bulgaria is occurring in the Swedish berry industry, in turn posing challenges for labour market actors and regulatory authorities. The article concludes with a discussion of what might be appropriate European and national trade union responses to the issues of labour precariousness which have emerged.

  • 1157782.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Petrylaite, Daiva
    University of Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Missing in action: The Right to Strike in the Post-Communist new Member States - An Absent EU competence2006In: International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, ISSN 0952-617X, E-ISSN 1875-838X, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 439-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores a neglected aspect of legislative reform, the right to strike, in the post-communist new EU Member States of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. It suggests a tension, on the one hand, between the endorsement of free collective bargaining as integral to post-communist democratic transformation, and on the other hand, domestic exigencies, as perceived by business and political elites, for social peace and the necessary disempowerment of labour as an independent actor. During the past decade and a half of capitalist transformation there has been ambivalence about the desirable scope of the exercise of the right to strike. It is paradoxical in this area of collective labour relations, reflecting most precisely the balance of power between labour and capital, that the European Union lacks legislative competence, despite the declared endorsement of the fundamental right to withdraw labour.

  • 1157783.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA.
    Austerity and the Demise of Social Europe: The Baltic Model versus the European Social Model2016In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 78-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws on the experience of the imposition of radical austerity measures in the Baltic states. It challenges the myth that austerity can be achieved in a socially and economically ‘costless’ manner. Baltic-style austerity has now become a template of ‘successful adjustment’ and a recipe for recovery of the Eurozone. The authors argue contra such ‘myth-making’ that austerity is compromising the longer run sustainability of societies that follow this path, while simultaneously ending prospects of the adhesion of a European ‘Social Model’ in the post-communist periphery. The article is a contribution to an emerging debate in academic and policy circles concerning the viability and future of Europe’s ‘Social Model’ in an age of austerity.

  • 1157784.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA.
    Conclusion: The neoliberal Baltic austerity model against Social Europe2014In: The Contradictions of Austerity : The Socio-Economic Costs of the Neoliberal Baltic Model / [ed] Jeffrey Sommers and Charles Woolfson, London and New York: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 103-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1157785.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    Stockholm School of Economics, Riga, Latvia.
    Die Gestaltung des neuen Europas nach der EU-Erweiterung: Rechtliche und politische Implikationen des „Laval un Partneri- Streits“ um Sozialstandards’ zwischen Lettland und Schweden2006In: Arbeit. Zeitschrift für Arbeitsforschung, Arbeitsgestaltung und Arbeitspolitik, ISSN 0941-5025, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 85-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Der Beitritt der neuen Mitgliedstaaten aus Zentral- und Osteuropa zur Europäischen Union (EU) könnte durch die schwach ausgeprägten Gewerkschaftsstrukturen und den wenig entwickelten sozialen Dialog dieser Staaten die vorgeschriebenen Arbeitsstandards der Länder mit starken Gewerkschaftsbewegungen, wie Schweden, bedrohen. Dieser Artikel betrachtet die politischen, wirtschaftlichen und legalen Implikationen eines Arbeitsstreiks in der Bauindustrie, verursacht durch die Beschäftigung lettischer Arbeiter in Schweden durch die lettische Baufirma Laval un Partneri. Der Streit zeigt im Kleinen beispielhaft die wahrgenommenen Gefahren für die Arbeitsstandards, die sich durch die Osterweiterung der EU ergeben. The accession to the European Union of Central and East European new member states with weak trade union movements and poorly developed social dialogue may pose a threat to regulated labour standards in advanced social democracies with strong trade union movements such as Sweden. This article examines the political, economic and legal implications of a labour dispute in the construction industry arising from the presence of Latvian contract labour in Sweden employed by Laval un Partneri. The dispute exemplifies in microcosm the perceived challenges to labour standards posed by the recent Eastward enlargement of the EU.

  • 1157786.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    Univesity of Wisconsin-MIlwaukee, USA.
    Introduction: The Baltics and the political economy of austerity2014In: The Contradictions of Austerity: The Socio-Economic Costs of the Neoliberal Baltic Model / [ed] Jeffrey Sommers and Charles Woolfson, London and New York: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1157787.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    University of Latvia.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    Stockholm School of Economics, Riga.
    Labour Mobility in Construction: European Implications of the Lavalun Partneri Dispute with Swedish Labour2006In: European journal of industrial relations, ISSN 0959-6801, E-ISSN 1461-7129, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 49-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accession to the European Union of new member states from central and eastern Europe, with weak trade union movements, poorly developed social dialogue and inferior working conditions, has been viewed as a threat to regulated labour standards in the EU-15. This article examines a high-profile labour dispute arising from the conditions of Latvian construction contract labour in Sweden. The dispute exposes weaknesses in the protective floor of minimum standards offered by the posted workers Directive. It also goes to the core of the debate about the preservation of a ‘European social model’ and the proposed Services Directive.

  • 1157788.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    University of Glasgow.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    University of Wisconsin.
    Trajectories of Entropy and "the Labour Question": The Political Economy of Post-communist Migration in the New Europe2008In: Debatte, ISSN 0965-156X, E-ISSN 1469-3712, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 53-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    This article begins by outlining the global historical context of contingent neoliberalism which has emerged in the late twentieth century as the dominant alternative economic trajectory to that of corporatist liberal welfare capitalism. Our analysis connects contemporary dimensions of labour migration and the challenges of economic development. It is relevant to the understanding of contemporary developments in Central and Eastern Europe in that we locate a case study of labour migration from the Baltic State of Latvia as an outcome of the application of the trajectory of neoliberalism that more widely now threatens to dismantle Jacques Delors’ “Social Europe” model. We argue that in the new post-communist EU member states such as Latvia, such socioeconomic prescriptions based on a “low road” of poor labour standards fail to deliver sustainable development for those who have adopted this path.

     

  • 1157789.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    Raritan College, USA and SSE, Riga.
    Thörnqvist, Christer
    University of Gothenburg and Yale University.
    Where next for European trade union rights?2008In: CLR News (Construction Labour Research News), ISSN 1997-1745, no 3, p. 5-10Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Court of Justice, since the end of 2007, has delivered a series of rulings in the Viking, Laval, Rüffert and the Luxemburg cases, which directly address issues of the right to defend existing standards against erosion by workers prepared to work for lower wages and under inferior conditions. The series of hostile judgments has come as a shock to many in the European labour movement. The Court has clearly privileged the economic priorities of the European project, in particular, European treaty provisions on freedom of provision of services and the freedom of establishment of undertakings over the ‘social dimension’ of the European project.

  • 1157790.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thörnqvist, Christer
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Herzfeld Olsson, Petra
    Department of Law, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Forced Labour in Sweden? Case of Migrant Berry Pickers: A Report to the Council of Baltic Sea States Task Force on Trafficking in Human Beings: Forced Labour Exploitation and Counter Trafficking in the Baltic Sea Region2011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The legal transposition in Sweden of international law on forced labour is analysed and important weaknesses in the implementation and application of such law are identified. These deficiencies are illustrated by the treatment and means of redress available to foreign berry pickers who annually gather wild berries in the forests of Sweden. A case study of the recruitment and employment of Thai berry pickers is presented, exemplifying serious deficiencies in labour protection both in terms of legal recourse and regulation through the labour market. As a result groups of berry pickers have been subject to various illegal forms of detriment amounting to evidence of forced labour. A number of policy recommendations are made for strengthening the legal and labour market regulatory framework to enable effective control of forced labour in this sector of work in Sweden.

  • 1157791.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thörnqvist, Christer
    University of Gothenburg.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    Department of Africology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
    The Swedish model and the future of labour standards after Laval2010In: Industrial relations journal, ISSN 0019-8692, E-ISSN 1468-2338, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 333-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reflects on the European Court of Justice ruling in the case of Laval, involving Latvian posted workers in Sweden. It analyses the implications of the ruling and ensuing debate over the Laval case for the future of the ‘Swedish model’ and labour standards. It suggests that profound dilemmas now face trade unions both at Swedish national and European level as to appropriate strategies to adopt to defend national pay and working conditions in the light of the European Court decision and especially in the Swedish context due to the subsequent ruling by the Swedish Labour Court. Nevertheless, a human rights discourse is emerging in which the European Court of Human Rights may act as a counterbalance to the European Court of Justice, especially in the context of the Lisbon Treaty.

  • 1157792.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vanadzins, I.
    Institute of Occupational Safety and Environmental Health, Latvia.
    Historical and contemporary challenges to occupational safety and health in Latvia2014In: Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, ISSN 1477-3996, E-ISSN 1477-4003, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 47-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the historical and contemporary challenges created for occupational safety and health in the EU member state of Latvia, which joined the European Union in 20It examines the historical background for the determinants of workplace health and safety in Latvia as a former Soviet republic, and thereafter, following independence from the USSR in 1991, as an open-market neoliberal economy. These divergent contexts have set a problematic trajectory of reactive path dependency with respect to the regulation of occupational safety and health.With the onset of the economic and financial crisis of 2008 onwards, Latvia suffered a particularly sharp economic downturn. We suggest that previous limited advances made in the management of occupational safety and health at the workplace level since accession to the European Union may have been undermined. Ever since the crisis, business and policy actors have sought to promote rapid economic recovery as the overall priority, at the expense of protective occupational safety and health regulation. This approach was brought into sharp relief with the collapse of the Maxima supermarket roof in Riga in November 2013, resulting in 54 fatalities. The event has raised debates on the enforcement of safety regulation in the new era of neoliberal austerity to a greater level of public salience, although with, as yet, uncertain policy outcomes.

  • 1157793.
    Woolgar, Chris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Planning and Media Design.
    European Union Dairy Policy and the Least Developed Countries: Case Study - Africa2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural policy within the European Union (EU) is but one of the founding pillars upon which unification was developed. Negotiated out of a post-war Europe, the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) emphasized the protection of the domestic market, through government subsidies and payment programmes, artificially raising the price of domestic products while restricting access for the foreign agricultural producers. The objective of this paper is to explore the link between the agricultural decisions made by the EU and the effects on citizens in the Least Developed Countries (LDC). To develop a comprehensive understanding of the issue at hand a review of the existing literature will be necessary, as well as an analysis of the available quantitative data. The findings revealed that the CAP is but one factor that impacts development of agriculture in LDC’s, many other factors, such as international and bi-lateral trade agreements, government institutions, and political lobbying also influence the outcome.

  • 1157794.
    Woolgar, Stephen William
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Ontological child consumption2012In: Situating Child Consumption: Rethinking values and notions of children, childhood and consumption / [ed] Anna Sparrman, Bengt Sandin & Johanna Sjöberg, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2012, p. 33-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1157795.
    Woolgar, Stephen William
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Struggles with representation: Can it be otherwise?2013In: Representation in Scientific Practice Revisited / [ed] Woolgar, Stephen William;Vertesi, Janet;Coopmans, Catelijne & Lynch, Michael, Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2013, p. 329-332Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new series of essays that sets the bar for the study of representation in science in the twenty-first century. Chapters span a range of topics, including molecular modelling, nano-imaging, mathematical formalisms, and digital imagery in neuroscience, planetary science, and biology - as well as business data visualisation, economics diagrams and technology-mediated surgery.

  • 1157796.
    Woolgar, Stephen William
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Use of Discovery Accounts2011In: SAGE qualitative research methods / [ed] Sara Delamont, Paul Atkinson, London: Sage Publications, 2011, 4, p. 253-278Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1157797.
    Woolgar, Stephen William
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lezaun, JavierUniversity of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    A turn to ontology in STS?: Special issue of Social Studies of Science2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 1157798.
    Woolgar, Stephen William
    et al.
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Lynch, Michael
    Boston University, USA.
    Preface2013In: Representation in Scientific Practice Revisited / [ed] Catelijne Coopmans, Janet Vertesi, Michael Lynch, and Steve Woolgar, Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2013, p. 366-Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       A new series of essays that sets the bar for the study of representation in science in the twenty-first century. Chapters span a range of topics, including molecular modelling, nano-imaging, mathematical formalisms, and digital imagery in neuroscience, planetary science, and biology - as well as business data visualisation, economics diagrams and technology-mediated surgery.

  • 1157799.
    Woolgar, Stephen William
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neyland, Daniel
    Goldsmiths College, London, United Kingdom.
    Mundane Governance: Ontology and Accountability2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The book aims to explore how governance and accountability are mediated through material relations involving ordinary everyday objects and technologies. It draws on empirical materials in three main areas: waste management and recycling; the regulation and control of traffic; and security and passenger movement in airports

  • 1157800.
    Woolgar, Stephen William
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thrift, Nigel
    University of Warwick, United Kingdom.
    Tickell, Adam
    University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Globalisation in Practice2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of globalization has become ubiquitous in social science and in the public consciousness and is often invoked as an explanation for a diverse range of changes to economies, societies, politics and cultures - both as a positive liberating force and as a wholly negative one. While our understanding of the politics, economics, and social resonance of the phenomenon has become increasingly sophisticated at the macro-level, this book argues that globalization too often continues to be depicted as a set of extra-terrestrial forces with no real physical manifestation, except as effects.

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