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  • 101.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Forssblad, M
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Capio Artro Clinic, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Comparison of patient-reported outcomes among those who chose ACL reconstruction or non-surgical treatment.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 535-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of our study was to cross-sectionally compare patient-reported knee function outcomes between people who chose non-surgical treatment for ACL injury and those who chose ACL reconstruction. We extracted Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EuroQoL-5D data entered into the Swedish National ACL Registry by patients with a non-surgically treated ACL injury within 180 days of injury (n = 306), 1 (n = 350), 2 (n = 358), and 5 years (n = 114) after injury. These data were compared cross-sectionally to data collected pre-operatively (n = 306) and at 1 (n = 350), 2 (n = 358), and 5 years (n = 114) post-operatively from age- and gender-matched groups of patients with primary ACL reconstruction. At the 1 and 2 year comparisons, patients who chose surgical treatment reported superior quality of life and function in sports (1 year mean difference 12.4 and 13.2 points, respectively; 2 year mean difference 4.5 and 6.9 points, respectively) compared to those who chose non-surgical treatment. Patients who chose ACL reconstruction reported superior outcomes for knee symptoms and function, and in knee-specific and health-related quality of life, compared to patients who chose non-surgical treatment.

  • 102.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Österberg, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Webster, Kate E.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The impact of psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activities after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 22, p. 1613-U50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This cross-sectional study aimed to examine whether appraisal of knee function, psychological and demographic factors were related to returning to the preinjury sport and recreational activity following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Method 164 participants completed a questionnaire battery at 1-7 years after primary ACL reconstruction. The battery included questionnaires evaluating knee self-efficacy, health locus of control, psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, and fear of reinjury; and self-reported knee function in sport-specific tasks, knee-related quality of life and satisfaction with knee function. The primary outcome was returning to the preinjury sport or recreational activity. Results At follow-up, 40% (66/164) had returned to their preinjury activity. Those who returned had more positive psychological responses, reported better knee function in sport and recreational activities, perceived a higher knee-related quality of life and were more satisfied with their current knee function. The main reasons for not returning were not trusting the knee (28%), fear of a new injury (24%) and poor knee function (22%). Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, measured with the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (was most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity). Age, sex and preinjury activity level were not related. Conclusions Less than 50% returned to their preinjury sport or recreational activity after ACL reconstruction. Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreation was the factor most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity. Including interventions aimed at improving this in postoperative rehabilitation programmes could be warranted to improve the rate of return to sport and recreational activities.

  • 103.
    Aremyr, Ann
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Hjärtström, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Sjukgymnastik efter cancerbehandling: Utvärdering av behandling för att minska biverkningar2010Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hand-foot syndrome is a form of perifier sensory neuropathy caused by chemotherapy. The syndrome can cause side effects such as pain, discomfort, numbness, swelling and impaired balance. Evaluated treatment is lacking.

    Purpose: Examine how twelve week physiotherapy treatment short-wave diathermy, interference and balance training affects side effects of the foot/lower leg caused by chemotherapy in seven patients with hand-foot syndrome.

    Method: Study group, quasi-experimental outcome study. Seven patients participated. Variables measured were, pain, discomfort, numbness, and balance. Three measurements were carried out, before, after, and eight weeks after the intervention. Self-reported estimates and the physical measurement were used.

    Results: The group's pain, discomfort and numbness decreased in all measurements. For pain measurement after the intervention and eight weeks after showed significance (p = 0,027),(p = 0,042). Discomfort showed significance after the intervention (p = 0,018). Numbness showed no significance. Balance showed significance in: Sharpened Romberg, left, eyes closed, eight weeks after intervention (p = 0,043). Sharpened Romberg, left, eyes closed, after the intervention (p = 0,027), eight weeks after intervention (p = 0,028). Standing on one leg, the right, eyes closed, after the intervention (p = 0,042), eight weeks after intervention(p = 0,027). No measurements showed deterioration.

    Conclusion: The results showed that treatment with short-wave diathermy, interference and balance training reduced pain, discomfort, numbness and partial improvements in balance in hand-foot syndrome. However, it is not possible to demonstrate which treatment component that affected the most. Further studies are needed to produce results more valid.

  • 104.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Finns kompetensen2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Fysioterapeutens roll för att förbättra sexuell hälsa hos patienten med långvarig smärta2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Förbättringsarbete i Fysioterapi2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 107.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Improving hydrotherapy interventions and physical activity intensity for persons with rheumatological diseases2015In: Evidensbaserad träningsintensitet i bassäng vid reumatisk sjukdom, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Inkludera sexuell hälsa i fysioterapi2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Rehabilitation and sexual health in chronic disease2016In: Conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sexual health in rheumatoid arthritis - The role of the physiotherapist to enhance sexual health2016In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, no Suppl. 2, p. 46-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual health is often negatively affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but rarely discussed between patients and health care professionals. Experienced reasons for decreased sexual health vary among patients, but pain, stiffness, reduced mobility, fatigue and negative feelings towards one’s own body are common factors. In addition to negative effects experienced to be due to RA, there are also negative influences on sexual health by other factors, such as insufficient physical activity, low self-esteem, depression and stressful influences in life. Physiotherapy is a common intervention for patients with RA and patients have reported improved sexual health due to physiotherapy. Regular physiotherapy interventions for patients with RA often include coaching towards increasing physical activity levels, hydrotherapy, pain reductive treatment and mobility exercises, both individually and in groups. The physiotherapy interventions leading to improved sexual health (according to patients with RA) has been regular interventions for patients with RA and not specifically aimed at enhancing sexual health. The patients do seldom describe that the physiotherapist has informed them of how physiotherapy might enhance sexual health, but they have themselves experienced how physiotherapy has improved their sexual life. Patients describe that they experience joy, increased self-esteem and a more positive approach to their body, when participating in physiotherapy and that this positive feeling is affecting their life, including their sexual life. They also describe how increased physical capacity reduces fatigue and increases their capacity to engage in valued life activities, including sexual activities. The way that the physiotherapist can further enhance sexual health, is by informing the patient of how sexual health is linked to experienced symptoms of RA and how physiotherapy interventions, for example increasing physical activity, can enhance also sexual health

  • 111.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sexuell hälsa & rehabilitering2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Samrehab, Värnamo Sjukhus.
    The Role of Physiotherapy to Enhance Sexual Health in Chronic Disease2014In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 11, no Suppl. 1, p. 90-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Using resources and addressing challenges: It is time to include sexual health in therapy2016In: International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-1645, E-ISSN 1759-779X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 156-157Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Using resources and addressing challenges—it is time to include sexual health in therapy2016In: International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-1645, E-ISSN 1759-779X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 106-107Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    The co-constructive processes in physiotherapy2017In: Cogent Medicine, ISSN 2331-205X, Vol. 4, p. 1-8, article id 1290308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To employ a person-centred approach, it is essential to work with the patient in deciding the important issues that the physiotherapy intervention should target, and to develop and adjust the individual treatment accordingly. Those co-constructive processes of physiotherapy consist of several parts, aiming to improve patient involvement and to optimize intervention outcomes. This paper aims to discuss and bring forward the role of the co-constructive processes in physiotherapy, by using perspectives from learning strategies and quality improvement strategies. The conclusion is that co-constructive learning processes are useful theories, which can be used in unison with quality improvement strategies for optimal co-construction between patients and physiotherapists and thus improve results of physiotherapy interventions.

  • 116.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Lunds universitet.
    Bergenzaun, Lill
    Lunds universitet.
    Fahlvik Svensson, Sofia
    Lunds universitet.
    Lundqvist, Sara
    Lunds universitet.
    Peterson, Pernilla
    Lunds universitet.
    Lindberg-Sand, Åsa
    Lunds universitet.
    “Should I stay or should I go?”: Tolvhundra doktoranders syn på avhopp och akademisk karriär2016Report (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Gard, Gunvor
    Lund University.
    Sexual health - a professional challenge for physiotherapists2016In: Conference abstracts: Pre-conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Gerbild, Helle
    Health Sciences Research Centre, University College Lillebaelt, Denmark.
    Sexual health education - experiences, challenges and recommendations for physiotherapists2016In: Conference abstracts: Pre-conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Health Care Students' Attitudes Toward Addressing Sexual Health in Their Future Profession: Validity and reliability of a questionnaire2016In: International Journal of Sexual Health, ISSN 1931-7611, E-ISSN 1931-762X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To test the reliability and validity of the Students' Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health questionnaire (SA-SH), measuring students' attitudes towards addressing sexual health in their future professions.

    Method: A cross-sectional online survey (22 items) were distributed to 186 nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students in Sweden, April 2015. Validity and reliability were tested.

    Results: The construct validity analysis led to three major factors: present feelings of comfortableness, future working environment and fear of negative influence on future patient relations. The construct validity, internal consistency reliability and intrarater reliability showed good results.Conclusion: The SA-SH is valid and reliable.

  • 120.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Samrehab, Värnamo Hospital.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi C.
    Futurum – The Academy of Healthcare, Jönköping.
    Lund-Levander, Martha
    Futurum – The Academy of Healthcare, Jönköping.
    Evidence-based practice in a multiprofessional context2012In: International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, ISSN 1744-1595, E-ISSN 1744-1609, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 117-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  Healthcare today is a complex system with increasing needs of specific knowledge of evaluation of research and implementation into clinical practice. A critical issue is that we all apply evidence-based practice (EBP) with standardised methods and continuing and systematic improvements. EBP includes both scientific and critical assessed experience-based knowledge. For the individual, this means applying evidence-based knowledge to a specific situation, and for the organisation, it means catering for a systematic critical review and evaluation and compiling research into guidelines and programmes. In 2009, the County Council of Jönköping had approximately 335 000 inhabitants and the healthcare organisation had more than 10 000 employees. As the County Council actively promotes clinical improvement, it is interesting to explore how healthcare employees think about and act upon EBP. The aim of this survey was therefore to describe factors that facilitate or hinder the application of EBP in the clinical context.

    Method  A quantitative study was performed with a questionnaire to healthcare staff employed in the County Council of Jönköping in 2009. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning which factors are experienced to affect the development of evidence-based healthcare. There were 59 open and closed questions, divided into the following areas:

    • • Sources of knowledge used in practice
    • • Barriers to finding and evaluating research reports and guidelines
    • • Barriers to changing practice on the basis of best evidence
    • • Facilitating factors for changing practice on the basis of best evidence
    • • Experience in finding, evaluating and using different sources of evidence

    The participants were selected using the county council's staff database and included medical, caring and rehabilitative staff within hospitals, primary care, dentistry and laboratory medicine. The inclusion criteria were permanent employment and clinical work. Invitations were sent to 5787 persons to participate in the study and 1445 persons answered the questionnaire.

    Results  Knowledge used in daily clinical practice was mainly based on information about the patient, personal experience and local guidelines. Twenty per cent answered that they worked ‘in the way they always had’, and 11% responded that they used evidence from research as a basis for change. The participants experienced that EBP was not used enough in clinical healthcare and explained this with practical and structural barriers, which they thought should be better monitored by the organisation and directors.

    Conclusion  Overall, the results indicate that the scientific evidence for healthcare is not used sufficiently as a base for decisions in daily practice as well as for changing practice. This is more prominent among assistant staff. As a consequence, this might affect the care of the patients in a negative way. Increased awareness of EBP and a stronger evidence-based approach are keys in the ongoing improvement work in the county. Local guidelines seem to be a way to implement knowledge. But, as the arena of activities is complex and the employees have diverse education levels, different strategies to facilitate and promote EBP are necessary.

  • 121.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Larsson, Agneta
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Luleå, Sweden.
    Health care students' attitudes towards working with sexual health in their professional roles - survey of students at nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy programmes2016In: Conference abstracts: Pre-conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Rolander, Bo
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Health care students' attitudes towards working with sexual health in their professional roles - survey of students at nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy programmes2016In: Conference abstracts: Pre-conference abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Health Care Students’ Attitudes Towards Working with Sexual Health in Their Professional Roles: Survey of Students at Nursing, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Programmes2016In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 289-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore differences and similarities in health care students’ attitudes towards working with and communicating with patients about sexual health issues in their future professions. The aim was also to explore whether the students’ gender, age and future professions were influencing factors and whether there was a change in attitude depending on educational levels, gender, age and future professions. The study also aimed to explore the potential development of those differences and similarities in attitudes between health care students having achieved different levels of education and training in their future professions. A cross-sectional quantitative study was performed with an online survey distributed to nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. The students believed that they needed increased sexual health education and increased communication skills about sexual health. Gender and future profession are factors that significantly affect the attitudes of the students towards working with sexual health. Nursing and occupational therapy students have a more positive attitude towards addressing sexual health in their future professions than do physiotherapy students. Further research is needed in this field to improve competence in sexual health for all student groups, particularly physiotherapy students. Further research is also needed to explore the significance of gender regarding education in sexual health and attitudes towards working with sexual health.

  • 124.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stenz, Cathrine
    Gerbild, Helle
    Syddansk Unversitet, Danmark.
    Fysioterapi og Seksuel Sundhet2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Värnamo Hospital.
    Öberg, Ulrika
    Futurum - The Academy of Healthcare, County Council, Jönköping.
    A literature review of the sexual health of women with rheumatoid arthritis2009In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 219-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual health problems are common for women with Rheumatoid Arthritis, RA. Sexual health is covered in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by two different fields: sexual function and intimate relationships, which are included in the ICF core sets for RA. Most patients with RA are female, and there are differences concerning sexual health between women and men with RA. The aim of this study was to explore the literature concerning the effects of RA on the sexual health of female patients, and also recommend solutions to improve the sexual health of women with RA. Sexual health problems can occur before, during and after sexual activities, and can affect women's sexual health in different perspectives. The investigated areas concerning female RA-patients and sexual are general sexual problems, sexual satisfaction, sexual desire, sexual performance, and sexual functioning. RA affects sexual health as a result of pain, reduced joint mobility, fatigue, depression and body image alterations. The investigated material provides few solutions to sexual health problems of female RA- patients. The most commonly mentioned solution is increased information and communication between health professionals and patients. Some of the studies recommend physiotherapy. Further research is needed to understand which types of intervention can help women with RA to improve their sexual health

  • 126.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    HBTQ - Fysioterapeutens roll2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 127.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Lund University.
    Ekdahl, Charlotte
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Lund University.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, CRC, Lund University.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Detecting decreased sexual health with MDHAQ-S2013In: Health, ISSN 1949-4998, E-ISSN 1949-5005, Vol. 5, no 6B, p. 38-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are instruments that measure sexual function or sexual health for persons with RA, but since sexual health is a sensitive issue, the hypothesis is that it would be easier to have a standard questionnaire that could indicate the need for communication about sexual health issues instead of an extra questionnaire with more detailed questions on sexual health. The aim of the study is to find out whether sexual health difficulties can be screened by factors included in the MDHAQ-S for persons with RA. This study explores the relation between factors included in the MDHAQ-S and the Sexual Health Questionnaire (QSH) using a mixed methods design combining quantitative and qualitative data. The MDHAQ-S covers sexual health issues, not only by using the question on sexual health, but also on other factors included in the questionnaire such as increased pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, physical capacity, level of physiccal activity and body weight. To explore decreased sexual arousal, decreased sexual satisfaction and decreased sexual well-being, in-depth interviews must be held with persons with RA, either using a sexual health questionnaire or in a clinical interview.

  • 128.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Gard, Gunvor
    Sexual health – A professional challenge for physiotherapists2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Haraldsson, Patrik
    AME, Region Jönköpings län.
    SMAK - Nyttan av ett strukturerat, validerat multidisciplinärt bedömningsinstrument inom företagshälsovården2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Health care students' attitudes toward addressing sexual health in their future profession: Validity and reliability of a questionnaire2016In: International Journal of Sexual Health, ISSN 1931-7611, E-ISSN 1931-762X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To test the reliability and validity of the Students' Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health Questionnaire (SA-SH), measuring students' attitudes toward addressing sexual health in their future professions.

    Method: A cross-sectional online survey (22 items) were distributed to 186 nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students in Sweden, April 2015. Validity and reliability were tested.

    Results: The construct validity analysis led to three major factors: present feelings of comfortableness, future working environment, and fear of negative influence on future patient relations. The construct validity, internal consistency reliability, and intrarater reliability showed good results.

    Conclusion: The SA-SH is valid and reliable.

  • 131.
    Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Larsson, Agneta
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Health care students' attitudes towards working with sexual health in their professional roles: Survey of students at nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy programmes2016In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 289-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore differences and similarities in health care students’ attitudes towards working with and communicating with patients about sexual health issues in their future professions. The aim was also to explore whether the students’ gender, age and future professions were influencing factors and whether there was a change in attitude depending on educational levels, gender, age and future professions. The study also aimed to explore the potential development of those differences and similarities in attitudes between health care students having achieved different levels of education and training in their future professions. A cross-sectional quantitative study was performed with an online survey distributed to nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. The students believed that they needed increased sexual health education and increased communication skills about sexual health. Gender and future profession are factors that significantly affect the attitudes of the students towards working with sexual health. Nursing and occupational therapy students have a more positive attitude towards addressing sexual health in their future professions than do physiotherapy students. Further research is needed in this field to improve competence in sexual health for all student groups, particularly physiotherapy students. Further research is also needed to explore the significance of gender regarding education in sexual health and attitudes towards working with sexual health.

  • 132.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Evaluation of the Otago Exercise Programme with or without motivational interviewing: Feasibility, experiences, effects and adherence among older community-dwelling people2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Falls and injuries related to falls are one of the most common health problems among older people and are becoming increasingly more frequent. Regular exercise has been identified as one of the most effective fall-prevention activities for older people; however, awareness of the impact of exercise programmes and adherence to recommended exercise among the elderly population is generally low. Research examining how an exercise programme is administered to and experienced by elderly community-dwelling people is needed.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the feasibility, experiences and effects of and adherence to the fall-preventive Otago Exercise Programme (OEP) with or without motivational interviewing (MI) among community-dwelling people aged 75 years or older.

    Four studies were performed from October 2012 to May 2016 in a sample of 175 people. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were used. The methods included the feasibility for conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) (I), individual face-to-face interviews (II), an RCT (III) and a prospective cohort study (IV). The intervention was given to two groups. The participants who received OEP with or without MI were compared with a control group that received standard care.

    The feasibility of performing an exercise intervention with or without MI was acceptable from the perspective of the participating physiotherapists. From the perspective of the older participants performing the exercise with behavioural change support, the inclusion of monitored exercises in everyday life and daily routines was important. The participants also expressed experiencing more strength, improved physical functioning and greater hope for an extended active life during old age.

    From the short-term perspective, there were significant improvements within the OEP combined with MI group in terms of physical performance, fall self-efficacy, activity level, and handgrip strength. Improved physical performance and fall self-efficacy were also found within the control group; however, corresponding differences did not occur in the OEP group without MI. There were no significant differences between the study groups after 12 weeks of regular exercise. Adherence to the exercises in the pooled exercise group was 81% at the 12-week follow-up.

    At the 52-week follow-up, the behavioural factors being physically active and obtaining behavioural support in terms of MI had a significant association with adherence to the exercise programme.

    These studies provide some support for the combination of OEP with MI as the addition of MI was valuable for achieving adherence to the exercise programme over time in older community-dwelling people.

     

  • 133. Arkkukangas, Marina
    et al.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    Soderlund, Anne
    Eriksson, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    Older persons' experiences of a home-based exercise program with behavioral change support2017In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 905-913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is a challenge to promote exercise among older persons. Knowledge is needed regarding the maintenance of exercise aiming at preventing falls and promoting health and well-being in older persons.

    Purpose: This descriptive study used a qualitative inductive approach to describe older persons' experiences of a fall-preventive, home-based exercise program with support for behavioral change.

    Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 elderly persons aged 75years or older, and a qualitative content analysis was performed.

    Results: Four categories emerged: facilitators of performing exercise in everyday life, the importance of support, perceived gains from exercise, and the existential aspects of exercise.

    Conclusion: With support from physiotherapists (PTs), home-based exercise can be adapted to individual circumstances in a meaningful way. Including exercises in everyday life and daily routines could support the experience of being stronger, result in better physical functioning, and give hope for an extended active life in old age.

  • 134.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Sundler, Annelie
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, Staffan
    Johansson, Ann Christin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Older persons’ experiences of a home-based exercise programme with behavioural change support2017In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 905-913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is a challenge to promote exercise among older persons. Knowledge is needed regarding the maintenance of exercise aiming at preventing falls and promoting health and wellbeing in older persons.

    Purpose: This descriptive study used a qualitative inductive approach to describe older persons’ experiences of a fall-preventive, home-based exercise programme with support for behavioural change.

    Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve older persons aged 75 years or older, and a qualitative content analysis was performed.

    Results: Four categories emerged: facilitators of performing exercise in everyday life, the importance of support, perceived gains from exercise, and the existential aspects of exercise.

    Conclusion: With support from physiotherapists, home-based exercise can be adapted to individual circumstances in a meaningful way. By including exercises in everyday life and daily routines could support the experience of being stronger, result in better physical functioning and give hope for an extended active life in old age.

  • 135.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, Staffan
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    One- year adherence to the Otago Exercise Programme with or without motivational interviewing in older peopleManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 136. Arkkukangas, Marina
    et al.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Eriksson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    One-Year Adherence to the Otago Exercise Programme with or Without Motivational Interviewing In Community-Dwelling Older People2018In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, E-ISSN 1543-267X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 390-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated if behavioral factors, treatment with behavioral support, readiness to change, fall self-efficacy and activity habits could predict long-term adherence to an exercise program. Included in this study were 114 community-dwelling older people who had participated in one of two home-based exercise interventions. Behavioral factors associated with adherence to the exercise program over 52 weeks were analyzed. The behavioral factors, specifically activity habits at baseline, significant predicted adherence to the exercise program, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.39 and 95% CI = 1.38-8.32 for exercise and an OR of 6.11 and 95% CI = 2.34-15.94 for walks. Being allocated to a specific treatment including motivational interviewing (MI) was also significantly predictive: OR = 2.47 and 95% CI = 1.11-5.49 for exercise adherence. In conclusion, activity habits and exercise in combination with MI had a significant association with adherence to the exercise program at a one-year follow up.

  • 137.
    Arnadottir, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Physical activity, participation and self-rated health among older community-dwelling Icelanders: a population-based study2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The main objective of this study was to investigate older people’s physical activity, their participation in various life situations, and their perceptions of their own health. This included an exploration of potential influences of urban versus rural residency on these outcomes, an evaluation of the measurement properties of a balance confidence scale, and an examination of the proposed usefulness of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a conceptual framework to facilitate analysis and understanding of selected outcomes.

    Methods: The study design was cross-sectional, population-based, with random selection from the national register of one urban and two rural municipalities in Northern Iceland. There were 186 participants, all community-dwelling, aged 65 to 88 years (mean = 73.8), and 48% of the group were women. The participation rate was 79%. Data was collected in 2004, in face-to-face interviews and through various standardized assessments. The main outcomes were total physical activity; leisure-time, household, and work-related physical activity; participation frequency and perceived participation restrictions; and self-rated health. Other assessments represented aspects of the ICF body functions, activities, environmental factors and personal factors. Moreover, Rasch analysis methods were applied to examine and modify the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale and the ICF used as a conceptual framework throughout the study.

    Results: The total physical activity score was the same for urban and rural people and the largest proportion of the total physical activity behavior was derived from the household domain. Rural females received the highest scores of all in household physical activity and rural males were more physically active than the others in the work-related domain. However, leisure-time physical activity was more common in urban than rural communities. A physically active lifestyle, urban living, a higher level of cognition, younger age, and fewer depressive symptoms were all associated with more frequent participation. Rural living and depressive symptoms were associated with perceived participation restrictions. Moreover, perceived participation restrictions were associated with not being employed and limitations in advanced lower extremity capacity. Both fewer depressive symptoms and advanced lower extremity capacity also increased the likelihood of better self-rated health, as did capacity in upper extremities, older age, and household physical activity. Rasch rating scale analysis indicated a need to modify the ABC to improve its psychometric properties. The modified ABC was then used to measure balance confidence which, however, was found not to play a major role in explaining participation or self-rated health. Finally, the ICF was useful as a conceptual framework for mapping various components of functioning and health and to facilitate analyses of their relationships.

    Conclusions: The results highlighted the commonalities and differences in factors associated with participation frequency, perceived participation restrictions, and self-rated health in old age. Some of these factors, such as advanced lower extremity capacity, depressive symptoms, and physical activity pattern should be of particular interest for geriatric physical therapy due to their potential for interventions. While the associations between depressive symptoms, participation, and self-rated health are well known, research is needed on the effects of advanced lower extremity capacity on participation and self-rated health in old age. The environment (urban versus rural) also presented itself as an important contextual variable to be aware of when working with older people’s participation and physically active life-style. Greater emphasis should be placed on using Rasch measurement methods for improving the availability of quality scientific measures to evaluate various aspects of functioning and health among older adults. Finally, a coordinated implementation of a conceptual framework such as ICF may further advance interdisciplinary and international studies on aging, functioning, and health.

  • 138.
    Arnadottir, Solveig A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gunnarsdottir, Elin D
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Are rural older Icelanders less physically active than those living in urban areas?: a population-based study2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 409-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Older people in rural areas have been labelled as physically inactive on the basis of leisure-time physical activity research. However, more research is needed to understand the total physical activity pattern in older adults, considering all domains of physical activity, including leisure, work, and domestic life. AIMS: We hypothesised that: (a) total physical activity would be the same for older people in urban and rural areas; and (b) urban and rural residency, along with gender and age, would be associated with differences in domain-specific physical activities. METHODS: Cross-sectional data were collected in Icelandic rural and urban communities from June through to September 2004. Participants were randomly selected, community-dwelling, 65-88 years old, and comprised 68 rural (40% females) and 118 urban (53% females) adults. The Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) was used to obtain a total physical activity score and subscores in leisure, during domestic life, and at work. RESULTS: The total PASE score was not associated with rural vs. urban residency, but males were, in total, more physically active than females, and the 65-74-year-olds were more active than the 75-88-year-olds. In the leisure domain, rural people had lower physical activity scores than urban people. Rural males were, however, most likely of all to be physically active in the work domain. In both urban and rural areas, the majority of the physical activity behaviour occurred in relation to housework, with the rural females receiving the highest scores. CONCLUSIONS: Older Icelanders in rural areas should not be labelled as less physically active than those who live in urban areas. Urban vs. rural living may, however, influence the physical activity patterns among older people, even within a fairly socioeconomically and culturally homogeneous country such as Iceland. This reinforces the need to pay closer attention to the living environment when studying and developing strategies to promote physical activity.

  • 139.
    Arnadottir, Solveig A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. School of Health Sciences, University of Akureyri, Iceland .
    Gunnarsdottir, Elin D
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Determinants of self-rated health in old age: a population-based, cross-sectional study using the international classification of functioning2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 670-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-rated health (SRH) is a widely used indicator of general health and multiple studies have supported the predictive validity of SRH in older populations concerning future health, functional decline, disability, and mortality. The aim of this study was to use the theoretical framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to create a better understanding of factors associated with SRH among community-dwelling older people in urban and rural areas.

    Methods: The study design was population-based and cross-sectional. Participants were 185 Icelanders, randomly selected from a national registry, community-dwelling, 65-88 years old, 63% urban residents, and 52% men. Participants were asked: "In general, would you say your health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?" Associations with SRH were analyzed with ordinal logistic regression. Explanatory variables represented aspects of body functions, activities, participation, environmental factors and personal factors components of the ICF.

    Results: Univariate analysis revealed that SRH was significantly associated with all analyzed ICF components through 16 out of 18 explanatory variables. Multivariate analysis, however, demonstrated that SRH had an independent association with five variables representing ICF body functions, activities, and personal factors components: The likelihood of a better SRH increased with advanced lower extremity capacity (adjusted odds ratio [adjOR] = 1.05, < 0.001), upper extremity capacity (adjOR = 1.13, = 0.040), household physical activity (adjOR = 1.01, = 0.016), and older age (adjOR = 1.09, = 0.006); but decreased with more depressive symptoms (adjOR = 0.79, < 0.001).

    Conclusions: The results highlight a collection of ICF body functions, activities and personal factors associated with higher SRH among community-dwelling older people. Some of these, such as physical capacity, depressive symptoms, and habitual physical activity are of particular interest due to their potential for change through public health interventions. The use of ICF conceptual framework and widely accepted standardized assessments should make these results comparable and relevant in an international context.

  • 140.
    Arnadottir, Solveig A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gunnarsdottir, Elin D
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Participation frequency and perceived participation restrictions at older age: applying the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 23-24, p. 2208-2216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify variables from different components of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) associated with older people's participation frequency and perceived participation restrictions. Method: Participants (N = 186) were community-living, 65-88 years old and 52% men. The dependent variables, participation frequency (linear regression) and perceived participation restrictions (logistic regression), were measured using The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument. Independent variables were selected from various ICF components. Results: Higher participation frequency was associated with living in urban rather than rural community (beta = 2.8, p < 0.001), physically active lifestyle (beta = 4.6, p < 0.001) and higher cognitive function (beta = 0.3, p = 0.009). Lower participation frequency was associated with being older (beta = -0.2, p = 0.002) and depressive symptoms (beta = -0.2, p = 0.029). Older adults living in urban areas, having more advanced lower extremities capacity, or that were employed had higher odds of less perceived participation restrictions (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 5.5, p = 0.001; OR = 1.09, p < 0.001; OR = 3.7, p = 0.011; respectively). In contrast, the odds of less perceived participation restriction decreased as depressive symptoms increased (OR = 0.8, p = 0.011). Conclusions: Our results highlight the importance of capturing and understanding both frequency and restriction aspects of older persons' participation. ICF may be a helpful reference to map factors associated with participation and to study further potentially modifiable influencing factors such as depressive symptoms and advanced lower extremity capacity.

  • 141.
    Arnadottir, Solveig A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gunnarsdottir, Elin D
    Fisher, Anne G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Application of rasch analysis to examine psychometric aspects of the activities-specific balance confidence scale when used in a new cultural context2010In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arnadottir SA, Lundin-Olsson L, Gunnarsdottir ED, Fisher AG. Application of Rasch analysis to examine psychometric aspects of the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale when used in a new cultural context. OBJECTIVE: To investigate by using Rasch analysis the psychometric properties of the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale when applied in a new Icelandic context. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, population-based, random selection from the Icelandic National Registry. SETTING: Community-based. PARTICIPANTS: Icelanders (N=183), 65 to 88 years old, and 48% women. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: ABC, an instrument used to evaluate how confident older people are in maintaining balance and remaining steady when moving through the environment. An Icelandic translation of the ABC (ABC-ICE) scale was evaluated by implementing Rasch rating scale analysis to transform ordinal ABC-ICE scores into interval measures and evaluating aspects of validity and reliability of the scale. RESULTS: Participants were not able to differentiate reliably between the 11 rating scale categories of the ABC-ICE. Additionally, 3 items failed to show acceptable goodness of fit to the ABC-ICE rating scale model. By collapsing categories and creating a new 5-category scale, only 1 item misfit. Removing that item resulted in a modified version of ABC-ICE with 5 categories and 15 items. Both item goodness-of-fit statistics and principal components analysis supported unidimensionality of the modified ABC-ICE. The ABC-ICE measures reliably separated the sample into at least 4 statistically distinct strata of balance confidence. Finally, the hierarchical order of item difficulties was consistent with theoretic expectations, and the items were reasonably well targeted to the balance confidence of the persons tested. CONCLUSIONS: Rasch analysis indicated a need to modify the ABC-ICE to improve its psychometric properties. Further studies are needed to determine if similar analyses of other versions of the ABC, including the original one, will yield similar results.

  • 142.
    Arnadottir, Solveig
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gunnarsdottir, E
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Self-rated health: a valid outcome in geriatric physical therapy?Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Arumugam, Ashokan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Sacral Osteosarcoma Masquerading as Posterior Thigh Pain2018In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 665-665Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Arumugam, Ashokan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Markström, Jonas L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Häger, Charlotte K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Introducing a novel test with unanticipated medial/lateral diagonal hops that reliably captures hip and knee kinematics in healthy women2019In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 82, p. 70-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a vast literature on one-leg hops and cutting maneuvers assessing knee control pre/post-injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), comprehensive and reliable tests performed under unpredictable conditions are lacking. This study aimed to: (1) assess the feasibility of an innovative, knee-challenging, one-leg double-hop test consisting of a forward hop followed by a diagonal hop (45°) performed medially (UMDH) or laterally (ULDH) in an unanticipated manner; and (2) determine within- and between-session reliability for 3-dimensional hip and knee kinematics and kinetics of these tests. Twenty-two healthy women (22.3 ± 3.3 years) performed three successful UMDH and ULDH, twice 1–4 weeks apart. Hop success rate was 69–84%. Peak hip and knee angles demonstrated moderate to excellent within-session reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.67–0.99, standard error of measurement [SEM] ≤  3°) and poor to excellent between-session reliability (ICC CI: 0.22–0.94, SEM ≤ 3°) for UMDH and ULDH. The smallest real difference (SRD) was low (≤ 5°) for nearly all peak angles. Peak hip and knee moments demonstrated poor to excellent reliability (ICC CI: 0–0.97) and, in general, moments were more reliable within-session (SEM ≤ 0.14 N.m/kg.m, both directions) than between-session (SRD ≤ 0.43 N.m/kg.m). Our novel test was feasible and, in most but not all cases, provided reliable angle estimates (within-session > between-session, both directions) albeit less reliable moments (within-session > between-session, both directions). The relatively large hip and knee movements in the frontal and transverse planes during the unanticipated hops suggest substantial challenge of dynamic knee control. Thus, the test seems appropriate for evaluating knee function during ACL injury rehabilitation.

  • 145.
    Arumugam, Ashokan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Strong, Andrew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Tengman, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Psychometric properties of knee proprioception tests targeting healthy individuals and those with anterior cruciate ligament injury managed with or without reconstruction: a systematic review protocol2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e027241Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury affects knee proprioception and sensorimotor control and might contribute to an increased risk of a second ACL injury and secondary knee osteoarthritis. Therefore, there is a growing need for valid, reliable and responsive knee proprioception tests. No previous study has comprehensively reviewed all the relevant psychometric properties (PMPs) of these tests together. The aim of this review protocol is to narrate the steps involved in synthesising the evidence for the PMPs of specific knee proprioception tests among individuals with an ACL injury and knee-healthy controls.

    Methods and analysis: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses will be followed to report the review. A combination of four conceptual groups of terms-(1) construct (knee proprioception), (2) target population (healthy individuals and those with an ACL injury managed conservatively or with a surgical reconstruction), (3) measurement instrument (specific knee proprioception tests) and (4) PMPs (reliability, validity and responsiveness)-will be used for electronic databases search. PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ProQuest will be searched from their inception to November 2018. Two reviewers will independently screen titles, abstracts and full text articles, extract data and perform risk of bias assessment using the updated COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments risk of bias checklist for the eligible studies. A narrative synthesis of the findings and a meta-analysis will be attempted as appropriate. Each PMP of knee proprioception tests will be classified as 'sufficient', 'indeterminate' or 'insufficient'. The overall level of evidence will be ascertained using an established set of criteria.

    Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval or patient consent is not required for a systematic review. The review findings will be submitted as a series of manuscripts for peer-review and publication in scientific journals.

  • 146.
    Arumugam, Ashokan
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation – Physiotherapy Section, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Strong, Andrew
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation – Physiotherapy Section, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tengman, Eva
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation – Physiotherapy Section, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Häger, Charlotte K
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation – Physiotherapy Section, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of knee proprioception tests targeting healthy individuals and those with anterior cruciate ligament injury managed with or without reconstruction: a systematic review protocol2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e02741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury affects knee proprioception and sensorimotor control and might contribute to an increased risk of a second ACL injury and secondary knee osteoarthritis. Therefore, there is a growing need for valid, reliable and responsive knee proprioception tests. No previous study has comprehensively reviewed all the relevant psychometric properties (PMPs) of these tests together. The aim of this review protocol is to narrate the steps involved in synthesising the evidence for the PMPs of specific knee proprioception tests among individuals with an ACL injury and knee-healthy controls.

  • 147.
    Arundale, Amelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Football Research Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fältström, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Jönköping County, Rehabilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jumping performance based on duration of rehabilitation in female football players after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction2019In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 556-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To determine if female football players who had longer durations of rehabilitation, measured in months, after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction would have lower tuck jump scores (fewer technique flaws) and smaller asymmetries during drop vertical jump landing.

    Methods

    One-hundred-and-seventeen female football players, aged 16ᅵ25 years, after primary unilateral ACL reconstruction (median 16 months, range 6ᅵ39) were included. Athletes reported the duration of rehabilitation they performed after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Athletes also performed the tuck jump and drop vertical jump tests. Outcome variables were: tuck jump score, frontal plane knee motion and probability of peak knee abduction moment during drop vertical jump landing.

    Results

    There was no difference in tuck jump score based on duration of rehabilitation (n.s.). No interaction (n.s.), difference between limbs (n.s.), or duration of rehabilitation (n.s.) was found for peak knee abduction moment during drop vertical jump landing. No interaction (n.s.) or difference between limbs (n.s.) was found for frontal plane knee motion, but there was a difference based on duration of rehabilitation (P?=?0.01). Athletes with >?9 months of rehabilitation had more frontal plane knee motion (medial knee displacement) than athletes with <?6 months (P?=?0.01) or 6ᅵ9 months (P?=?0.03).

    Conclusion

    As there was no difference in tuck jump score or peak knee abduction moment based on duration of rehabilitation, the results of this study press upon clinicians the importance of using objective measures to progress rehabilitation and clear athletes for return to sport, rather than time alone.

  • 148.
    Arvidsson, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Skogs, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Muskuloskeletal skadeprevalens i nedre extremitet hos rekryter efter genomförd grundläggande militär utbildning.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a high injury rate in the lower extremities among military recruits. A correlation has been shown between female gender or a low level of physical activity prior to basic military training and a higher risk of injury.

    AIM: To investigate the self-reported injury rate in the lower extremities among Swedish recruits and the difference in injury rate between men and women. Another aim was to investigate correlation between self-reported injury rate in the lower extremities and self-reported physical activity, and to study this correlation for both men and women.

    METHOD: A quantitative study with a prospective, descriptive, comparative and correlative design. Data from two different questionnaires were answered by 177 recruits.

    RESULTS: 26% of the recruits reported injury in lower extremities after completing the basic training. There was a significant difference (p=0.006) in self-reported injury between female and male recruits. The level of prior physical activity and the injury rate amongst the recruits had a low correlation.

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate a high injury rate among Swedish recruits, especially among the female recruits. No correlation between self-reported physical activity and the injury rate in lower extremities was found. 

  • 149. Arvidsson, Mialinn
    et al.
    Patel, Sonal
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Calner, Tommy
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kroppsmedvetande hos unga indiska kvinnor2005In: Nordisk fysioterapi, ISSN 1402-3024, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 40-47Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Body image is a concept, referring to feelings and attitudes toward: the body. There are many di fervent factors affecting the body image; historical, cultural, social and individual factors. The aim ofthis study was to describe young Indian women's body image. One hundred female university students in India answered the Ben-Tovim Walker Body attitudes questionnaire (BAQ). The result showed that Indian women had a sound body image.

  • 150.
    Arwidson, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Självständighet i dagliga aktiviteter: Äldres upplevelser av möjligheter och hinder2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The world's population is aging faster than ever and the number of elderly people over the age of 80 will triple in Europe over the next 50 years, while the proportion of people working in healthcare will decrease. Reablement is an interprofessional rehabilitation that aims to support the elderly for a more active everyday life. It is important to create conditions for the older person to continue to be as independent as possible. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe how older people experience opportunities and barriers to independence in activities of daily living. Method: The study was designed as a descriptive qualitative interview study. Analysis has been carried out with content analysis. Result: The elderly feel that their ability to be independent in activities of daily living is determined by psychological characteristics, physical discomfort, the influence of the environment and coping of the situation. All in all, it appears that society contains challenges for the elderly with disabilities, that lost independence is a long-term process and that it is important to have control over their own existence. Conclusions: The opportunities for older people to experience independence in activities of daily living are influenced by many factors. In order to provide good opportunities for the elderly to regain or maintain independence in activities of daily living, the healthcare needs to adopt a biopsychosocial perspective.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-01 22:19
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