Change search
Refine search result
1234567 101 - 150 of 833
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Bjurlid, Filip
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans: from source of emission to human exposure2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), which are ubiquitous in modern life and the environment, are the major source for polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PBDD/Fs). The knowledge about PBDD/Fs is lim-ited compared to other environmental pollutants, even though PBDD/Fs show similar toxicity as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) which are considered to be among the most toxic man-made substances. The aim of the thesis was to provide a better understanding of PBDD/Fs by investigating the occurrence and distribution of PBDD/Fs in the following matrices: soot and gas from an accidental fire site which is a typical source of emission, blubber from marine mammals living in both far remote areas as well as areas close to anthropogenic sources, and finally in human milk from ten nursing mothers.

    PBDD/Fs was detected in blubber from pilot whales sampled around Faroe Islands, which proved the occurrence in marine mammals in a far remote area. The findings of PBDD/Fs in blubber from Baltic ringed seals showed slightly higher concentrations compared to the pilot whales, which is expected since the Baltic Sea in among the world’s most contam-inated water areas. In the pilot whales and the ringed seals, the average contribution from PBDD/Fs to the total (PCDD/F+PBDD/F) Total Equiv-alent Quantity (TEQ) was low, (1-8%). In gas and soot samples from the accidental fire site, PBDD/Fs were detected in all samples and the contri-bution of PBDD/Fs to the total TEQ was close to 100%. In the human milk samples, PBDD/Fs were detected in all samples and the average con-tribution of PBDD/Fs to the total TEQ was 40%. The results indicate that PBDD/Fs are of concern for human exposure, and should be monitored together with PCDD/Fs in future studies. Moreover, the occurrence at ac-cidental fire sites indicate that PBDD/Fs are a source for occupational ex-posure for firefighters and other professionals. The impact from PBDD/Fs on marine mammalians seems to be of less concern.

  • 102.
    Bjurlid, Filip
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Dam, Maria
    Faroe Islands' Environment Agency, Argir, Denmark.
    Hoydal, Katrin
    Faroe Islands' Environment Agency, Argir, Denmark.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Occurrence of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in pilot whales (Globicephala melas) caught around the Faroe Islands2018In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 195, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blubber from Faroese pilot whales (Globicephala melas) was analysed for brominated dioxins PBDD/Fs, with a subset also analysed for chlorinated dioxins, PCDD/Fs. The studied individuals were restricted to juvenile male whales sampled in the Faroe Islands during the period 1997–2013. Among the PBDD/Fs, the furans were predominant, although the relative abundance of various congeners differed between samples. Furans accounted for, on average, 79% of the ∑PBDD/Fs in the samples, with 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpBDF the most abundant congener, found in half of the analysed pilot whales. The concentration range for ∑PBDD/Fs among the samples was 0.080–71 pg/g l.w. (lipid weight), and the sum of toxic equivalents ranged from 0.0039 to 4.7 pg TEQ/g l.w. No relationship was found between PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs. In addition, 20 pilot whale samples from the period 2010–2013 were analysed for PBDEs. Several PBDE congeners were found in all of the sampled pilot whales, and at noticeably higher levels than PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs. The ∑PBDEs ranged from 140 to 1900 ng/g l.w., with BDE #47 the most abundant congener detected in the samples. Results from the present study were then compared with data from previous studies on pilot wales to investigate temporal trends between 1986 and 2013. The comparison indicated that PBDE concentrations in juvenile males have decreased from 1996 to the latest observations in 2013. No relationship between the concentration levels of PBDD/Fs and PBDEs in the sampled pilot whales could be identified, which indicates possible differences in the metabolism of, or exposure to, PBDEs and PBDD/Fs.

  • 103.
    Bjurlid, Filip
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and Stockholm Convention POPs in human milk: evaluation of the effects of breastfeeding durationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Bjurlid, Filip
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Roos, Anna
    Department of Environmental Research and Monitoring, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Temporal trends of PBDD/Fs, PCDD/Fs, PBDEs and PCBs in ringed seals from the Baltic Sea (Pusa hispida botnica) between 1974 and 20152018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 616-617, p. 1374-1383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporal trends in exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were assessed in 22 pooled samples gathered from 69 individuals of Baltic ringed seal (Pusa hispida botnica) from 1974 to 2015. Samples were analysed for polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PBDD/Fs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). No previous study has reported on the occurrence of PBDD/Fs in marine mammals in the Baltic Sea. Concentrations of pollutants in Baltic ringed seal, a marine mammal and top predator, can be used as an indicator of pollutants concentrations in the Baltic region.

    Visual inspection of data did not show any temporal trends for PBDD/Fs, while the PCDD/Fs and PCBs showed decreasing concentrations between 1974 and 2015. PBDEs increased until the end of the 1990s and then decreased until the end of the period. ∑ PBDD/Fs ranged from 0.5–52.3 pg/g lipid weight (l.w.) (0.08–4.8 pg TEQ/g l.w.), with 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpBDF contributing on average 61% to ∑ PBDD/Fs. ∑ PCDD/Fs ranged from 103 to 1480 pg/g l.w. (39–784 pg TEQ/g l.w.), with 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD, 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF showing the highest average concentrations. PBDD/F toxic equivalents (TEQ) contributed on average 1.1% to the total (PBDD/F + PCDD/F) TEQ. The ∑ PBDEs concentration range was 18.7–503 ng/g l.w., with BDE #47 the predominant congener. The concentration range for ∑ PCBs was 2.8–40.1 μg/g l.w., with #138 and #153 the most abundant congeners. Visual inspection of the data showed decreasing concentrations for all compound groups except PBDD/Fs. A slight increase in the PBDD/Fs concentrations was observed from 2004 onwards. This observation needs to be investigated further.

  • 105.
    Björkbacka, Åsa
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Radiation induced corrosion of copper2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish concept for storage of highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel is called the KBS-3 program. The proposed procedure is that the waste will be stored in a deep repository, 500 meters down in the Swedish bedrock, for 100 000 years. The fuel will be sealed inside cast iron cylinders surrounded by copper. The iron-copper canisters will then be placed one by one in holes and embedded in bentonite clay. The environment in the deep repository will be that of an underground rock cave, there will be groundwater and low amounts of oxygen present.

    Substances which are likely to react with the copper canister and cause corrosion are oxygen, sulphides and reactive water radiolysis products. Gamma radiation from the spent nuclear fuel will penetrate through the canister and further into the bentonite clay. When the gamma radiation comes in contact with the water in the bentonite clay, water radiolysis will occur. Corrosive radiolysis products are for example hydroxyl radicals, solvated electrons and hydrogen peroxide.

    The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation on copper pieces, in an aqueous environment, both under oxic and anoxic conditions. The surfaces of the copper pieces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). The dissolution of copper was measured using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP).

    A second study was also performed where the reactions of three different oxidants; hydrogen peroxide, permanganate and iridium hexachloride, were studied in the presence of copper in an inert environment. All of the reactions were studied spectrophotometrically and the dissolution of copper was measured using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP).

    The SEM measurements showed corrosion products on the irradiated copper pieces both under oxic and anoxic conditions. Under anoxic conditions the corrosion products had a center of a small cavity which was surrounded by a larger, flat, circular area. From that area, wider cavities were spreading out in apparently random directions. SEM-EDS measurements detected oxygen on the surface of the corrosion products. ICP measurements of the water phase showed that the water from irradiated samples contained higher levels of copper than unirradiated samples. ICP measurements from the reactions of copper in the presence of oxidants showed that copper was only dissolved in the presence of iridium hexachloride.

    These results show that gamma radiation causes corrosion of copper in an aqueous environment, both under oxic and anoxic conditions. It can also be concluded that hydrogen peroxide is not the radiolysis product that causes the dissolution of copper when copper is irradiated in an aqueous and inert environment.

  • 106.
    Björklund, Sam
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Characterization of Inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase, an important protein involved in purine metabolism2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The enzyme inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPase) is responsible for controlling the levels of the by-products guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) through their precursor inosine monophosphate (IMP). ). Human ITPase consists of a 194-amino acid homodimer which relies upon either an Mg2+ ion or a Mn2+ ion for catalytic activity, and orthologs of this protein have been found in many different organisms.

    The purpose of this project was to try out methods learned throughout the education and to use this knowledge to gather new data about the human protein inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPase). The protein was expressed in BL21/DE3 cells from a pre-made vector. Experiments performed during this project include secondary- and tertiary stability measurements, tryptophan fluorescence spectra, binding curve and thermic stability to ITPase with ANS and methotrexate.

    The Tm-value of human ITPase was examined with Trp-Fluorescence, ANS-fluorescence and Near-UV and Far-UV circular dichroism (CD). The stability of ITPase monitored by Near-UV as well as Far-UV coincides, indicating that secondary- and tertiary-unfolding occur simultaneously without any intermediates.

    The results of Trp-fluorescence showed that the tryptophans were already exposed and thus it did not yield a reliable result. The binding properties of ANS and MTX to ITPase were also examined.

  • 107. Björlenius, Berndt
    et al.
    Ripszám, Mátyás
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lindberg, Richard H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tysklind, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Pharmaceutical residues are widespread in Baltic Sea coastal and offshore waters: Screening for pharmaceuticals and modelling of environmental concentrations of carbamazepine2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 633, p. 1496-1509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consumption of pharmaceuticals worldwide coupled with modest removal efficiencies of sewage treatment plants have resulted in the presence of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems globally. In this study, we investigated the environmental concentrations of a selection of 93 pharmaceuticals in 43 locations in the Baltic Sea and Skagerrak. The Baltic Sea is vulnerable to anthropogenic activities due to a long turnover time and a sensitive ecosystem in the brackish water. Thirty-nine of 93 pharmaceuticals were detected in at least one sample, with concentrations ranging between 0.01 and 80 ng/L. One of the pharmaceuticals investigated, the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine, was widespread in coastal and offshore seawaters (present in 37 of 43 samples). In order to predict concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the sub-basins of the Baltic Sea, a mass balance-based grey box model was set up and the persistent, widely used carbamazepine was selected as the model substance. The model was based on hydrological and meteorological sub-basin characteristics, removal data from smaller watersheds and wastewater treatment plants, and statistics relating to population, consumption and excretion rate of carbamazepine in humans. The grey box model predicted average environmental concentrations of carbamazepine in sub-basins with no significant difference from the measured concentrations, amounting to 0.57–3.2 ng/L depending on sub-basin location. In the Baltic Sea, the removal rate of carbamazepine in seawater was estimated to be 6.2 10−9 s−1 based on a calculated half-life time of 3.5 years at 10 °C, which demonstrates the long response time of the environment to measures phasing out persistent or slowly degradable substances such as carbamazepine. Sampling, analysis and grey box modelling were all valuable in describing the presence and removal of carbamazepine in the Baltic Sea.

  • 108.
    Björneholm, Olle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics.
    Hansen, Martin H.
    Tech Univ Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Chem, Univ Pk 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Hodgson, Andrew
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Chem, Liverpool L69 7ZD, Merseyside, England..
    Liu, Li-Min
    UCL, London Ctr Nanotechnol, Thomas Young Ctr, Dept Phys & Astron, London WC1E 6BT, England.;UCL, Dept Chem, London WC1E 6BT, England.;Beijing Computat Sci Res Ctr, Beijing 100193, Peoples R China..
    Limmer, David T.
    Princeton Univ, Princeton Ctr Theoret Sci, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA..
    Michaelides, Angelos
    UCL, London Ctr Nanotechnol, Thomas Young Ctr, Dept Phys & Astron, London WC1E 6BT, England.;UCL, Dept Chem, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Pedevilla, Philipp
    UCL, London Ctr Nanotechnol, Thomas Young Ctr, Dept Phys & Astron, London WC1E 6BT, England.;UCL, Dept Chem, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Rossmeisl, Jan
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Chem, Univ Pk 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Shen, Huaze
    Peking Univ, Int Ctr Quantum Mat, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China.;Peking Univ, Sch Phys, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Tocci, Gabriele
    UCL, London Ctr Nanotechnol, Thomas Young Ctr, Dept Phys & Astron, London WC1E 6BT, England.;UCL, Dept Chem, London WC1E 6BT, England.;Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Sch Engn, Inst Bioengn & Mat Sci & Engn, Lab Fundamental BioPhoton,Lab Computat Sci & Mode, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.;Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne Ctr Ultrafast Sci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Tyrode, Eric
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Chem, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Walz, Marie-Madeleine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Werner, Josephina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Chem & Biotechnol, Box 7015, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bluhm, Hendrik
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Div Chem Sci, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Water at Interfaces2016In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 116, no 13, p. 7698-7726Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives many electrochemical reactions, and the liquid/vapor interface, which governs the uptake and release of trace gases by the oceans and cloud droplets. In this article we review some of the recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge of the properties of aqueous interfaces and discuss open questions and gaps in our understanding.

  • 109. Blachnio, Magdalena
    et al.
    Budnyak, Tetyana M.
    KTH.
    Derylo-Marczewska, Anna
    Marczewski, Adam W.
    Tertykh, Valentin A.
    Chitosan-Silica Hybrid Composites for Removal of Sulfonated Azo Dyes from Aqueous Solutions2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 2258-2273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study,. the influence of the chitosan immobilization method on the properties of final hybrid materials was performed. Chitosan was immobilized on the surface of mesoporous (ChS2) and fumed silica (ChS3) by physical adsorption and the sol gel method (ChS1). It was found that physical immobilization of chitosan allows to obtain hybrid composites (ChS) with a homogeneous distribution of polymer on the surface, relatively wide pores, and specific surface area of about 170 m(2)/g, PHpzc = 5.7 for ChS3 and 356 m(2)/g and pH(pzc) = 6.0 for ChS2. The microporous chitosan silica material with a specific surface area of 600 m(2)/g and a more negatively charged surface (pH(pzc) = 4.2) was obtained by the sol gel reaction. The mechanisms of azo dye adsorption were studied, and the correlation with the composite structure was distinguished. The generalized Langmuir equation and its special cases, that is, Langmuir-Freundlich and Langmuir equations, were applied for the analysis of adsorption isotherm data. The adsorption study showed that physically adsorbed chitosan (ChS1 and ChS2) on a silica surface has a higher sorption capacity, for example, 0.48 mmol/g for the acid red 88 (AR88) dye (ChS2) and 0.23 mmol/g for the acid orange 8 (AO8) dye (ChS1), compared to the composite obtained by the sol-gel method [ChS1, 0.05 mmol/g for the A08 dye]. For a deeper understanding of the behavior of immobilized chitosan in the adsorption processes, various kinetic equations were applied: first-order, second-order, mixed 1,2-order (MOE), multiexponential, and fractal-like MOE as well as intraparticle and pore diffusion model equations. In the case of AO8 dye, the adsorption rates were differentiated for three composites: for ChS3, 50% of the dye was removed from the solution after merely 5 min and almost 90% after 80 min. The slowest adsorption process controlled by the diffusion rate of dye molecules into the internal space of the pore structure was found for ChS1 (225 min halftime). In the case of ChS2, the rates for various dyes change in the following order: acid orange (AO7) > orange G (OG) > acid red 1 (AR1) > AR88 > AO8 (halftimes: 10.5 < 15.7 < 23.7 < 34.9 < 42.9 min).

  • 110.
    Blikstad, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Dahlström, Käthe
    Salminen, Tiina
    Widersten, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Substrate scope and selectivity in offspring to an enzyme subjected to directed evolution2014In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 281, no 10, p. 2387-2398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have analyzed the effects of mutations inserted during directed evolution of a specialized enzyme, Escherichia coli S-1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO). The kinetic properties of evolved variants have been determined and the observed differences have been rationalized by modeling the tertiary structures of isolated variants and the wild-type enzyme. The native substrate, S-1,2-propanediol, as well as phenylacetaldehyde and 2S-3-phenylpropane-1,2-diol, which are new substrates accepted by isolated variants, were docked into the active sites. The study provides a comprehensive picture of how acquired catalytic properties have arisen via an intermediate generalist enzyme, which had acquired a single mutation (L259V) in the active site. Further mutagenesis of this generalist resulted in a new specialist catalyst. We have also been able to relate the native enzyme activities to the evolved ones and linked the differences to individual amino acid residues important for activity and selectivity. F254 plays a dual role in the enzyme function. First, mutation of F254 into an isoleucine weakens the interactions with the coenzyme thereby increasing its dissociation rate from the active site and resulting in a four-fold increase in turnover number with S-1,2-propanediol. Second, F254 is directly involved in binding of aryl-substituted substrates via π–π interactions. On the other hand, N151 is critical in determining the substrate scope since the side chain amide group stabilizes binding of 1,2-substituted diols and is apparently necessary for enzymatic activity with these substrates. Moreover, the side chain of N151 introduces steric hindrance, which prevents high activity with phenylacetaldehyde. Additionally, the hydroxyl group of T149 is required to maintain the catalytically important hydrogen bonding network.

  • 111.
    Bogdanska, Jasna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sundström, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Ulrika
    Institutionen för miljötoxikologi, Uppsala universitet.
    Borg, Daniel
    Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet.
    Abedi-Valugerdi, Mauchehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nelson, Buck
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    DePierre, Joseph
    Institutionen för biokemi och biofysik, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nobel, Stefan
    Department of molecular medicin and surgery, Karolinska institutet.
    Tissue distribution of 35S-labelled perfluorobutane sulfonic acid in adult mice following dietary exposure for 1-5 daysManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 112. Boge, Lucas
    et al.
    Bysell, Helena
    Ringstad, Lovisa
    Wennman, David
    Umerska, Anita
    Cassisa, Viviane
    Eriksson, Jonny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Andersson, Martin
    Lipid-Based Liquid Crystals As Carriers for Antimicrobial Peptides: Phase Behavior and Antimicrobial Effect2016In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 32, no 17, p. 4217-4228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is increasing worldwide, and the demand for novel antimicrobials is constantly growing. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could be an important part of future treatment strategies of various bacterial infection diseases. However, AMPs have relatively low stability, because of proteolytic and chemical degradation. As a consequence, carrier systems protecting the AMPs are greatly needed, to achieve efficient treatments. In addition, the carrier system also must administrate the peptide in a controlled manner to match the therapeutic dose window. In this work, lyotropic liquid crystalline (LC) structures consisting of cubic glycerol monooleate/water and hexagonal glycerol monooleate/oleic acid/water have been examined as carriers for AMPs. These LC structures have the capability of solubilizing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, as well as being biocompatible and biodegradable. Both bulk gels and discrete dispersed structures (i.e., cubosomes and hexosomes) have been studied. Three AMPs have been investigated with respect to phase stability of the LC structures and antimicrobial effect: AP114, DPK-060, and LL-37. Characterization of the LC structures was performed using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering, zeta-potential, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and peptide loading efficacy by ultra performance liquid chromatography. The antimicrobial effect of the LCNPs was investigated in vitro using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and time-kill assay. The most hydrophobic peptide (AP114) was shown to induce an increase in negative curvature of the cubic LC system. The most polar peptide (DPK-060) induced a decrease in negative curvature while LL-37 did not change the LC phase at all. The hexagonal LC phase was not affected by any of the AMPs. Moreover, cubosomes loaded with peptides AP114 and DPK-060 showed preserved antimicrobial activity, whereas particles loaded with peptide LL-37 displayed a loss in its broad-spectrum bactericidal properties. AMP-loaded hexosomes showed a reduction in antimicrobial activity.

  • 113. Bogren, S.
    et al.
    Fornara, Andrea
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Ludwig, F.
    Morales, M. P.
    Steinhoff, U.
    Hansen, M. F.
    Kazakova, O.
    Johansson, C.
    Classification of magnetic nanoparticle systems—synthesis, standardization and analysis methods in the nanomag project2015In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 20308-20325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes. The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using these methods, we also show that the nanocrystal size and particle morphology determines the dynamic magnetic properties for both single- and multi-core particles. The presented results are obtained from the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles.

  • 114.
    Bohn Lima, Raquel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Jiebing
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Khan, Mohammed A.
    Core-shell ceria-carbonates nanocomposite electrolyte for Lignin based fuel cell2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 66-ENFL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Borgenstierna, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Påverkar språket i frågorna resultaten på de nationella proven i kemi för årskurs 9?: Om ja, - Vad kan man göra åt det?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Många lärare och elever uppfattar de nationella proven i kemi för årskurs 9 som de svåraste och resultaten är inte så bra som man skulle kunna önska. Undersökningens syfte är att försöka förstå varför resultaten ser ut som de gör ur en språklig synvinkel, vad är det som är så svårt med kemi? Undersökning utgår från en sociokulturell teoriram där språket står i fokus som det viktigaste verktyget för att förstå uppgifterna i de nationella proven. Några egentliga slutsatser går inte att dra då underlaget i rapporten är för litet för att dragenerella slutsatser om språket i frågorna i de nationella proven i kemi. Den slutsats som kan dras är att frågor som är oprecisa och kan uppfattas som orimliga och svårtolkade är de har svårast med. För att komma åt problemet med att eleverna uppfattar kemiämnet som abstrakt bör man lägga mer tid på att tillsammans med eleverna gå igenom vetenskapliga texter för att på så sätt lära dem det naturvetenskapliga skolspråket. Att förenkla dessa texterär att göra eleverna en björntjänst.

  • 116. Bosmans, Toon J.
    et al.
    Stepan, Agnes M.
    Toriz, Guillermo
    Renneckar, Scott
    Karabulut, Erdem
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Gatenholm, Paul
    Nanoparticles based on linear xylans and their assembly onto cellulose surfaces2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 207-CELL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Boström, Fanny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Lundström, Johanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Biokols struktur och dess förmåga att adsorbera näringsämnen2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to create a deeper understanding of biochar’s ability to adsorbnutrients. In the long run the aim is to find a way to use the most suitable structures of biocharfor a maximum adsorption of different kinds of nutrients. The objective of this project is tofind, through case studies and practical experiments, an effective method to examine andanalyze the structure of biochars and their ability to adsorb nitrates and phosphates.

    The conclusion of the project was that analysis of the biochar’s ability to adsorb is a complexmatter. The BET-analysis is a good method to find the structure of the biochar. However, iodinenumber analysis could be a better alternative to directly find a value on the biochar’s ability toadsorb. The ICP-analysis of the solutions only works for phosphor, therefore spectroscopywould be a better alternative since it also can detect nitrogen and the different compounds.

  • 118.
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Sanchez, Carmen Cobo
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Engström, Joakim
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bruce, Carl
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. RISE Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Polycaprolactone Nanocomposites Reinforced with Cellulose Nanocrystals Surface-Modified via Covalent Grafting or Physisorption: A Comparative Study2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 40, p. 35305-35318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) have been surface-modified either via covalent grafting or through physisorption of poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) and employed as reinforcement in PCL. Covalent grafting was achieved by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Two approaches were utilized for the physisorption: using either micelles of poly(dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA-b-PBMA) or latex nanoparticles of poly(dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid)-block-poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (P(DMAEMA-co-MAA)-b-PBMA). Block copolymers (PDMAEMA-b-PBMA)s were obtained by ATRP and subsequently micellized. Latex nanoparticles were produced via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) mediated surfactant-free emulsion polymerization, employing polymer-induced self-assembly (PISA) for the particle formation. For a reliable comparison, the amounts of micelles/latex particles adsorbed and the amount of polymer grafted onto the CNCs were kept similar. Two different chain lengths of PBMA were targeted, below and above the critical molecular weight for chain entanglement of PBMA (M-n,M-c similar to 56 000 g mo1(-1)). Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites reinforced with unmodified and modified CNCs in different weight percentages (0.5, 1, and 3 wt %) were prepared via melt extrusion. The resulting composites were evaluated by UV-vis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and tensile testing. All materials resulted in higher transparency, greater thermal stability, and stronger mechanical properties than unfilled PCL and nanocomposites containing unmodified CNCs. The degradation temperature of PCL reinforced with grafted CNCs was higher than that of micelle-modified CNCs, and the latter was higher than that of latex-adsorbed CNCs with a long PBMA chain length. The results clearly indicate that covalent grafting is superior to physisorption with regard to thermal and mechanical properties of the final nanocomposite. This unique study is of great value for the future design of CNC-based nanocomposites with tailored properties.

  • 119. Bouveresse, D. Jouan-Rimbaud
    et al.
    Pinto, Rui Climaco
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Schmidtke, L. M.
    Locquet, N.
    Rutledge, D. N.
    Identification of significant factors by an extension of ANOVA-PCA based on multi-block analysis2011In: Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, ISSN 0169-7439, E-ISSN 1873-3239, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modification of the ANOVA-PCA method, proposed by Harrington et al. to identify significant factors and interactions in an experimental design, is presented in this article. The modified method uses the idea of multiple table analysis, and looks for the common dimensions underlying the different data tables, or data blocks, generated by the "ANOVA-step" of the ANOVA-PCA method, in order to identify the significant factors. In this paper, the "Common Component and Specific Weights Analysis" method is used to analyse the calculated multi-block data set. This new method, called AComDim, was compared to the standard ANOVA-PCA method, by analysing four real data sets. Parameters computed during the AComDim procedure enable the computation of F-values to check whether the variability of each original data block is significantly greater than that of the noise.

  • 120.
    Bouwman, Henk
    et al.
    Nort-West University, South Africa.
    Krátká, M
    Masaryk University, Czech Republic.
    Choong Kwet Yive, Nee Sun
    University of Mauritius, Mauritius.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Klanova, Jana
    Masaryk University, Czech Republic.
    Do POPs Transfer from Plastic Marine Debris to Coral on Tropical Islands?2014In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 76, p. 1352-1355Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Bouwman, Hindrik
    et al.
    North-West Uniersity, South AFrica.
    Evans, Steven
    University of Venda, South Africa.
    Cole, Nik
    Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, Channel Isles, UK.
    Choong Kwer Yive, Nee Sun
    University of Mauritius, Mauritius.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The flip-or-flop boutique: Marine debris on the shores of St Brandon’s Rock, an isolated tropical atoll in the Indian Ocean2016In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 114, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isolated coral atolls are not immune from marine debris accumulation. We identified Southeast Asia, the Indian sub-continent, and the countries on the Arabian Sea as most probable source areas of 50 000 items on the shores of St. Brandon’s Rock (SBR), Indian Ocean. 79% of the debris was plastics. Flip-flops, energy drink bottles, and compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) were notable item types. The density of debris (0.74 m-1 shore length) is comparable to similar islands but less than mainland sites. Intact CFLs suggests product-facilitated long-range transport of mercury. We suspect that aggregated marine debris, scavenged by the islands from currents and gyres, could re-concentrate pollutants. SBR islets accumulated debris types in different proportions suggesting that many factors act variably on different debris types. Regular cleaning of selected islets will take care of most of the accumulated debris and may improve the ecology and tourism potential. However, arrangements and logistics require more study.

  • 122.
    Boyd, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pilch, Iris
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Complex 3D nanocoral like structures formed by copper nanoparticle aggregation on nanostructured zinc oxide rods2016In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 184, p. 127-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports a new strategy for nanoparticle surface assembly so that they form anisotropic fibril like features, consisting of particles directly attached to each other, which can extend 500 nm from the surface. The particles are both formed and deposited in a single step process enabled via the use of a pulsed plasma based technique. Using this approach, we have successfully modified zinc oxide rods, up to several hundred nanometers in diameter, with 25 nm diameter copper nanoparticles for catalytic applications. The resulting structure could be modelled using a diffusion limited aggregation based approach. This gives the material the appearance of marine coral, hence the term nanocoral. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 123.
    Bozaghian, Marjan
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology.
    Rebbling, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Larsson, Sylvia H.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology.
    Xiong, Shaojun
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Combustion characteristics of barley straw stored with CaCO3 using olivine and quartz as bed materials in fluidized bed combustion2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Breivik, Knut
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Kjeller, Norway.
    Alcock, Ruth
    Environmental Research Solutions, Witherslack, Cumbria, UK.
    Li, Yi-Fan
    Meteorological Service of Canada, Downsview, ON, Canada.
    Bailey, Robert E.
    Bailey Associates, Midland, USA.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    UNEP Chemicals, Châtelaine (GE), Switzerland.
    Pacyna, Jozef M.
    Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Kjeller, Norway.
    Primary sources of selected POPs: regional and global scale emission inventories2004In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 128, no 1-2, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, a number of studies have been devoted to the sources and emissions of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) at regional and global scales. While significant improvements in knowledge have been achieved for some pesticides, the quantitative understanding of the emission processes and emission patterns for "non-pesticide" POPs are still considered limited. The key issues remaining for the non-pesticide POPs are in part determined by their general source classification. For industrial chemicals, such as the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), there is considerable uncertainty with respect to the relative importance of atmospheric emissions from various source categories. For PCBs, temperature is discussed as a potential key factor influencing atmospheric emission levels and patterns. When it comes to the unintentional by-products of combustion and industrial processes (PCDD/Fs), there is still a large uncertainty with respect to the relative contribution of emissions from unregulated sources such as backyard barrel burning that requires further consideration and characterisation. For hexachlorobenzene (HCB), the relative importance of primary and secondary atmospheric emissions in controlling current atmospheric concentrations remains one of the key uncertainties. While these and other issues may remain unresolved, knowledge concerning the emissions of POPs is a prerequisite for any attempt to understand and predict the distribution and fate of these chemicals on a regional and global scale as well as to efficiently minimise future environmental burdens.

  • 125.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Students' application of chemical concepts when solving chemistry problems in different contexts2014In: Chemistry Education Research and Practice, ISSN 1756-1108, E-ISSN 1756-1108, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 516-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning approaches have been implemented in school science over the last 40 years as a way to enhance students' interest in, as well as learning outcomes from, science. Contexts are used to connect science with the students' lives and to provide a frame in which concepts can be learned and applied on a ‘need-to-know’-principle. While effects on interest are coherently reported as positive, they are more diverse regarding cognitive learning outcomes. Hence, the demand for further research on criteria of context-based problems and problem-solving processes has been stated. In this paper, a study is presented investigating students' application of chemical concepts when solving context-based chemistry problems. Tasks for context-based problem solving have been designed systematically, using different combinations of contexts, topics and chemistry concepts in relation to the syllabus. Empirical data were collected using think-aloud interviews where 20 upper secondary students used their chemical content knowledge to solve the problems. The 15 context-based problems raised challenges within organic chemistry where concepts like electronegativity, polarity and solubility had to be applied. The difficulty to differentiate between intra- and intermolecular bonding emphasised in earlier research has also been apparent in this study. Besides the structural formula, which was an important part for the students when solving the tasks, the contextualisation of the problems was often used in the responses; students related their answers to the personal, societal or professional context in different ways. The paper explores the results and gives implications for context-based teaching, learning and assessment.

  • 126.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Javakhishvili, Irakli
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Hvilsted, Søren
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Well-defined ABA- and BAB-type block copolymers of PDMAEMA and PCL2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 49, p. 25809-25818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triblock copolymers of ABA- and BAB-type consisting of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA, A) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL, B) have successfully been prepared. PDMAEMA-b-PCL-b-PDMAEMA (ABA) and PCL-b-PDMAEMA-b-PCL (BAB) were synthesised by a combination of ring-opening polymerisation of epsilon-CL, atom transfer radical polymerisation of DMAEMA and end-group conversion, performed through either acylation or azide-alkyne "click" chemistry. All samples were analysed by size exclusion chromatography where it was found that the evaluation of PDMAEMA-containing polymers was difficult due to the thermoresponsivity of PDMAEMA, affecting the solubility of the polymer in the temperature range at which the SEC was operated. From differential scanning calorimetry measurements it was shown that the crystallinity could be altered by changing the order of the blocks; with PDMAEMA as the outer block (ABA), the inherent crystallinity of PCL was destroyed while with PCL as the outer block (BAB), the degree of crystallinity was in the same proximity as for a PCL homopolymer.

  • 127.
    Brömstrup, Torben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Theoretical & Computational Biophysics.
    Murail, Samuel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Theoretical & Computational Biophysics. Inst Pasteur, Grp Recepteurs Canaux, France.
    Lindahl, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Theoretical & Computational Biophysics.
    Single-site mutation changes the location of the most favored Desflurane binding site in the GLIC ligand-gated ion channel2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    SEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database. Inter-linking multiproxy environmental data with archaeological investigations and ecology.2013In: CAA2012, Proceedings of the 40th Annual Conference of Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Southampton, England. / [ed] Graeme Earl, Tim Sly, Angeliki Chrysanthi, Patricia Murrieta-Flores, Constantinos Papadopoulos, Iza Romanowska & David Wheatley, Amsterdam, 2013, p. 320-331Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume of data on past environmental and climate changes, as well as human interactions with these, has long since passed the level where it is manageable outside of large scale database systems. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database project aims to not only store and disseminate such data, but also provide tools for querying and analysing them, whilst maintaining a close connection with the archaeological and ecological data that are essential for their comprehensive interpretation. Large scale, geographically and chronologically unrestricted databases provide us with essentially unlimited scope for putting individual sites into a broader context and applying locally collated data to the investigation of earth system level changes. By providing integrated access to data from a variety of proxies, including plant macrofossils, pollen, insects and geochemistry, along with dating evidence, more complex questions can be answered where any single proxy would not be able to provide comprehensive answers.

  • 129.
    Buckland, Philip I
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Archaeology and Sami Studies.
    Johan, Olofsson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Archaeology and Sami Studies.
    Engelmark, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Archaeology and Sami Studies.
    SEAD: Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database, planning report2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document lays out a strategy for the development of SEAD – A Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database, which will facilitate the digitisation and accessibility augmentation of MAL’s existing data from nearly thirty years of work in the fields of archaeology and environmental science. SEAD will also provide a framework for the entry of data from all future research and consultancy work at MAL, and allow guest researchers and external partners to contribute to, and work with the same data. The planned system will be implemented at both local and internet levels, and be designed with an aim towards broadening its scope with external partners in the future. SEAD will be made available online in order to increase the ease of access to environmental archaeology data and encourage an expansion of both the discipline and Sweden’s role in it. This is inline with current EU strategies on enhancing research infrastructure, and providing a greater insight into human-environment interactions for long term planning.

  • 130.
    Burks, Terrance
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Avila, Marta
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Akhtar, F.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Götelid, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Lansåker, P. C.
    Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Studies on the adsorption of chromium(VI) onto 3-Mercaptopropionic acid coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles2014In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 425, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromium (Cr) in the form of Cr(VI) is deemed toxic in water due to its mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. For the successful removal of Cr(VI), we demonstrate a novel adsorbent consisting of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) functionalized with 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the functionalization of nanoparticles and presence of sulfonate groups. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the functionalized adsorbent recovered 45 mg of Cr(VI)/g of 3-MPA coated SPION at initial concentration of 50 mg/L aqueous solution at pH 1 with less than 1% of Fe dissolution from SPION. The results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that Cr(VI) chemisorbed onto the adsorbent. Hence, the XPS spectra did not indicate any reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) upon adsorption. The adsorption data were better fitted for the Freundlich model. Moreover, the Cr(VI) adsorption kinetics on functionalized SPION followed a pseudo-second order rate, revealing chemisorption as the dominant mechanism. The high Cr(VI) removal, rapid adsorption kinetics and stability of adsorbent indicate that 3-MPA coated SPION could be an efficient adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI).

  • 131. Butchosa, Nria
    et al.
    Brown, Christian
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Antimicrobial activity of biocomposites based on bacterial cellulose and chitin nanoparticles2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Brown, Christian
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanocomposites of bacterial cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals: fabrication, characterization and bactericidal activity2013In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 3404-3413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An environmentally friendly approach was implemented for the production of nanocomposites with bactericidal activity, using bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals (ChNCs). The antibacterial activity of ChNCs prepared by acid hydrolysis, TEMPO-mediated oxidation or partial deacetylation of a-chitin powder was assessed and the structure of the ChNC nanoparticles was characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and solid-state C-13-NMR. The partially deacetylated ChNCs (D-ChNC) showed the strongest antibacterial activity, with 99 +/- 1% inhibition of bacterial growth compared to control samples. Nanocomposites were prepared from BC nanofibers and D-ChNC by (i) in situ biosynthesis with the addition of D-ChNC nanoparticles in the culture medium of Acetobacter aceti, and (ii) post-modification by mixing D-ChNC with disintegrated BC in an aqueous suspension. The structure and mechanical properties of the BC/D-ChNC nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and an Instron universal testing machine. The bactericidal activity of the nanocomposites increased with the D-ChNC content, with a reduction in bacterial growth by 3.0 log units when the D-ChNC content was 50%. D-ChNC nanoparticles have great potential as substitutes for unfriendly antimicrobial compounds such as heavy metal nanoparticles and synthetic polymers to introduce antibacterial properties to cellulosic materials.

  • 133.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Leijon, Felicia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Enhancing toughness of cellulose nanofibrils through the expression of cellulose-binding modules in plantManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Water redispersible nanofibrillated cellulose adsorbed with carboxymethyl cellulose2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 130-CELL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Cai, Wanzhu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bao, Qinye
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.
    Zaifei, Zaifei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tang, Zheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-doped conjugated polyelectrolyte with tuneable work function for effective hole transport in polymer solar cells2016In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 4, no 40, p. 15670-15675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE), PEDOT-S (poly(4-(2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-2-yl-methoxy)-1-butanesulfonic acid)), is demonstrated to be an excellent hole transport material in several polymer solar cells with different donor's HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital). With a P3TI:PC71BM (poly[6,6′-bis(5′-bromo-3,4′-dioctyl-[2,2′-bithiophen]-5-yl)-1,1′-bis(2-hexyldecyl)-[3,3′-biindolinylidene]-2,2′-dione]:[6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester) active layer, the device using PEDOT-S as a hole transport layer (HTL) outperforms the PEDOT:PSS-based devices due to an increased FF (fill factor). The devices' current density–voltage characteristics (JV) show that a PEDOT-S layer can operate well with a wide range of thicknesses as well, helped by its high conductivity and decent transparency. With UV-ozone treatment, the work function of the PEDOT-S can increase from 4.9 eV to 5.2 eV. In TQ1:PC71BM (poly[[2,3-bis(3-octyloxyphenyl)-5,8-quinoxalinediyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl]:PC71BM) devices, which have a deeper donor HOMO than P3TI, Voc is improved from 0.81 V to 0.92 V by 7 min UV-ozone treatment, along with a suppressed reverse injection current and increased Jsc (short-circuit current density) and FF. Topography study shows the excellent coating ability of PEDOT-S. Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) shows the out-of-plane current in PEDOT-S film is one thousand times higher than that in PEDOT:PSS PH 4083 film under the same electric field and has much more uniformly distributed current pathways.

  • 136.
    Cao, Xinrui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Fu, Qiang
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Luo, Yi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Catalytic activity of Pd-doped Cu nanoparticles for hydrogenation as a single-atom-alloy catalyst2014In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 16, no 18, p. 8367-8375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The single atom alloy of extended surfaces is known to provide remarkably enhanced catalytic performance toward heterogeneous hydrogenation. Here we demonstrate from first principles calculations that this approach can be extended to nanostructures, such as bimetallic nanoparticles. The catalytic properties of the single-Pd-doped Cu-55 nanoparticles have been systemically examined for H-2 dissociation as well as H atom adsorption and diffusion, following the concept of single atom alloy. It is found that doping a single Pd atom at the edge site of the Cu-55 shell can considerably reduce the activation energy of H-2 dissociation, while the single Pd atom doped at the top site or in the inner layers is much less effective. The H atom adsorption on Cu-55 is slightly stronger than that on the Cu(111) surface; however, a larger nanoparticle that contains 147 atoms could effectively recover the weak binding of the H atoms. We have also investigated the H atom diffusion on the 55-atom nanoparticle and found that spillover of the produced H atoms could be a feasible process due to the low diffusion barriers. Our results have demonstrated that facile H-2 dissociation and weak H atom adsorption could be combined at the nanoscale. Moreover, the effects of doping one more Pd atom on the H-2 dissociation and H atom adsorption have also been investigated. We have found that both the doping Pd atoms in the most stable configuration could independently exhibit their catalytic activity, behaving as two single-atom-alloy catalysts.

  • 137.
    Cao, Zhiguo
    et al.
    POPs Research Center, School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    Chemicals Branch, UNEP/DTIE, Châtelaine (GE), Switzerland.
    Wang, Bin
    POPs Research Center, School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Tingting
    POPs Research Center, School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Yu, Gang
    POPs Research Center, School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Huang, Jun
    POPs Research Center, School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Deng, Shubo
    POPs Research Center, School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Economic status as a determinant of national PCDD/PCDF releases and implications for PCDD/PCDF reduction2013In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 328-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The annual releases of polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) from 68 countries/regions were investigated by correlating quantitative emissions with economic status of the nations. The national dioxin/furan inventories were developed using the PCDD/PCDF Standardized Toolldt, which presents the quantitative releases from ten major source groups to five release vectors. The correlation between intensity of PCDDIPCDF release and economic status was discussed and the influence of economic status on composition of five release vectors and ten source groups was studied. As PCDD/PCDF are mainly released from human activities to environmental matrices, release per person (RpP) and release per unit area (RpA) are defined to reflect release burden (Donor) and contamination burden (Receptor), respectively. Based on these two concepts, International PCDD/PCDF Reduction Burden is characterized by burden quotient (BQ) and a calculation model is established. The numbers of countries/regions with high, moderate and low International PCDD/PCDF Reduction Burden were 19,31 and 18, respectively. The information in this paper can be used for politicians to develop legislations to improve International PCDD/PCDF Reduction.

  • 138.
    Carlsson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Stockholms Universitet, MMK.
    Development of an adductomic approach to identify electrophiles in vivo through their hemoglobin adducts2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans are exposed to electrophilically reactive compounds, both formed endogenously and from exogenous exposure. Such compounds could react and form stable reaction products, adducts, at nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA. The formation of adducts constitutes a risk for effects, such as cancer and contact allergy, and plays a role in ageing processes. Adducts to proteins offer a possibility to measure electrophilic compounds in vivo.

    Adductomic approaches aim to study the totality of adducts, to specific biomolecules, by mass spectrometric screening. This thesis describes the development and application of an adductomic approach for the screening of unknown adducts to N-terminal valine (Val) in hemoglobin (Hb) by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS).

    The adductomic approach is based on the FIRE procedure, a modified Edman procedure for the analysis of adducts to N-terminal Val in Hb by LC/MS/MS. The adduct screening was performed by stepwise scanning of precursor ions in small mass increments and monitoring four fragments common for derivatives of detached Val adducts, in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Samples from 12 smokers/nonsmokers were screened with the adductomic approach, and seven previously identified adducts and 19 unknown adducts were detected. A semiquantitative approach was applied for approximate quantification of adduct levels.

    A strategy for identifying unknown Hb adducts using adductome LC/MS/MS data was formulated and applied for the identification of unknown adducts. Identifications were based on the observed m/z of precursor ions and retention times combined with databases and Log P calculations. Hypothesized adducts were generated in vitro for comparison and matching with the corresponding unknown adducts. Five identified adducts correspond to the precursor electrophiles ethyl vinyl ketone (EVK), glyoxal, methylglyoxal, acrylic acid, and 1-octen-3-one. These adducts, except the adducts corresponding to glyoxal and methylglyoxal, have not been observed as protein adducts before.  Probable exposure sources to these electrophiles are diet and/or endogenous formation. The observation of these adducts motivate further studies to evaluate possible contributions to health risks, as well as their potential as biomarkers of exposure.

    The adduct from EVK was quantitatively assessed through different experiments to estimate the daily internal dose (area under the concentration-time-curve, AUC). EVK is about 2 × 103 more reactive than the reference compound acrylamide. The EVK adduct was shown to be unstable, with a relatively short half-life. The daily AUC in humans of EVK was estimated to be about 20 times lower than the corresponding AUC of acrylamide from intake via food.

    To confirm the observation of the detected unknown adducts and obtain a statistical foundation, analysis of unknown adducts were performed in large sets of blood samples (n = 50–120) from human cohorts. The majority of the previously detected unknown adducts were found in all analyzed samples, and the levels of many adducts showed large variations between individuals. The cause and significance of these observed variations are not yet clarified, but are of importance for the directions of future studies.

    In conclusion, a new approach for identification of unknown human exposure to electrophiles was developed and successfully applied. 

  • 139.
    Carlsson, Linn K.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lachini, Mohammad
    Malmström Jonsson, Eva E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Synthesis and characterization of biocomposites from cellulose nano- and filter papers prepared by ring-opening polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone with titanium based catalyst2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 140. Carrick, C.
    et al.
    Lindström, S.B.
    Larsson, P.T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wågberg, L.
    Lightweight, highly compressible, noncrystalline cellulose capsules2014In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 30, no 26, p. 7635-6744Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Aidun, Cyrus
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Native and functionalized micrometre-sized cellulose capsules prepared by microfluidic flow focusing2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 37, p. 19061-19067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose capsules with average outer and inner radii of approximately 44 mu m and 29 mm respectively were prepared from cellulose dissolved in a mixture of lithium chloride and dimethylacetamide using a microfluidic flow focusing device (MFFD). The MFFD had three inlets where octane oil in a cellulose solution in silicone oil was used to produce a double emulsion containing a cellulose capsule. This technique enables the formation of capsules with a narrow size distribution which can be beneficial for drug delivery or controlled release capsules. In this respect, cellulose is a highly interesting material since it is known to cause no autoimmune reactions when used in contact with human tissue. Furthermore, by controlling the chemical properties of the cellulose, it is possible to trigger a swelling of the capsules and consequentially the release of an encapsulated substance, e. g. a model drug, when the capsule becomes exposed to an external stimulus. To demonstrate this, capsules were functionalized by carboxymethylation to be pH- responsive and to expand approximately 10% when subjected to a change in pH from 3 to 10. The diffusion constant of a model drug, a 4 kDa fluorescently labelled dextran, through the native capsule wall was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-14) m(2) s(-1) by fitting fluorescence intensity data to Fick's second law.

  • 142.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lightweight, Highly Compressible, Noncrystalline Cellulose Capsules2014In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 30, no 26, p. 7635-7644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate how to prepare extraordinarily deformable, gas-filled, spherical capsules from nonmodified cellulose. These capsules have a low nominal density, ranging from 7.6 to 14.2 kg/m(3), and can be deformed elastically to 70% deformation at 50% relative humidity. No compressive strain-at-break could be detected for these dry cellulose capsules, since they did not rupture even when compressed into a disk with pockets of highly compressed air. A quantitative constitutive model for the large deformation compression of these capsules is derived, including their high-frequency mechanical response and their low-frequency force relaxation, where the latter is governed by the gas barrier properties of the dry capsule. Mechanical testing corroborated these models with good accuracy. Force relaxation measurements at a constant compression rendered an estimate for the gas permeability of air through the capsule wall, calculated to 0.4 mL mu m/m(2) days kPa at 50% relative humidity. These properties taken together open up a large application area for the capsules, and they could most likely be used for applications in compressible, lightweight materials and also constitute excellent model materials for adsorption and adhesion studies.

  • 143.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ruda, Marcus
    Pettersson, Bert
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hollow cellulose capsules from CO2 saturated cellulose solutions - Their preparation and characterization2013In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 3, no 7, p. 2462-2469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new material consisting of mm-sized hollow cellulose spheres, for biomedical applications or for the preparation of low weight porous materials has been prepared by a unique solution precipitation (SP) method. The technique is based on three separate steps. In the first step, high molecular mass, non-modified cellulose is dissolved in a suitable solvent. This cellulose solution is then saturated with a suitable gas (CO2 or N2 in the present work) and finally this gas-saturated solution is drop-wise added to a water reservoir. In this step, the cellulose is precipitated and a gas bubble is nucleated in the center of the cellulose sphere. When stored in water, the hollow center is filled with water, indicating that the capsule wall is porous in nature. This was also supported by BET-area measurements as well as by high resolution SEM-images of broken capsule walls. The internal void volume of a capsule was about 5 μl and the wall volume was about 8 μl. It was also established that the properties of the cellulose capsules, i.e. wall and void volume, the specific surface area, the average pore size of the capsule wall, the wall density, and the compressive load capacity could be tuned by the choice of cellulose concentration in the solution before precipitation. The capsule wall volume and void volume were also affected by the choice of gas, the gas pressure and the gas dissolution time during the gas saturation step. The response of the cellulose wall of the prepared capsules to changes in pH and ion concentration in the surrounding solution was also investigated. The swelling-shrinking behavior was further investigated by introducing more charges to the capsule wall, via carboxymethylation of the cellulose. This was achieved by using carboxymethylated cellulose which increased the swelling-shrinking effect. The results show a typical polyelectrolyte gel behavior of the capsule wall and the wet modulus of the cellulose wall was determined to be between 0.09-0.2 MPa depending on the charge of the cellulose in the capsule wall. Furthermore, the freeze dried cellulose spheres had a modulus of 1.9-7.4 MPa, depending on the cellulose concentration during the preparation of the spheres. These cellulose capsules are suitable both for the preparation of porous materials, where these larger spheres are joined together in 3D-shaped materials, and for controlled release where the interior of the capsules is filled with active substances and these substances are released by controlling the pores in the capsule walls.

  • 144.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Aidun, Cyrus
    Preparation of cellulose capsule: New renewable material based on regenerated cellulose from the LiCl/DMAc solvent system2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Immunoselective cellulose nanospheres by antibody conjugation2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 727-COLL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 146. Charlène, Reverdy
    et al.
    Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Sundin, Mikael
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Swerin, Agne
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Superhydrophobic surfaces manufacturing with nanocellulose2016In: N.I.C.E. 2016, The 3rd International Conference on Bioinspired and Biobased Chemistry & Materials, Nice, France, October 16-19, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers in natural fibers see opportunities in superhydrophobicity for fabrics or paper. The first challenge with natural fiber is their high hydrophilicity when the second is the perpetual search for water born coating  in papermaking. These challenges were overcome by a one pot formulation comprising a latex binder, precipitated calcium carbonate and  fatty acids to give their hydrophobicity to pigments 1.  In this study, we want to go further by replacing the petro-sourced latex with a new kind of fibers that are cellulose nanofibers (CNF).

    Inspired by the Lotus leaf, superhydrophobic surfaces have been a center of interest in the last decade because of their high potential in industry for a variety of applications.  It is seen as the next generation of surface for anti-fouling and corrosive retardant in navy industry but also  in general  anti corrosive materials industry.  Now widely studied , mechanisms for manufacturing superhydrophobicity are well understood. Born from the alliance of low surface energy chemistry and physical structuration of surface, superhydrophobic materials give a water contact angle above 150° and a slidding angle below 10°.

  • 147.
    Chatterjee, S
    et al.
    Swiss Federal Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Empa.
    Wang, J.W.
    National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan.
    Kuo, W.S.
    Feng Chia University, Taiwan.
    Tai, N.H.
    National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan.
    Salzmann, C.
    University College London, London, UK.
    Li, W.L.
    Hollertz, Rebecca
    Swiss Fed Labs Mat Sci & Technol Empa, Lab Funct Polymers, Switzerland.
    Nüesch, F.
    Chu, B.T.T.
    Mechanical reinforcement and thermal conductivity in expanded graphene nanoplatelets reinforced epoxy composites2012In: Chemical Physics Letters, ISSN 0009-2614, E-ISSN 1873-4448, Vol. 531, p. 6-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Influence of reinforcements on mechanical and thermal properties of graphene nanoplatelets/epoxy composites is investigated. Amine functionalized expanded graphene nanoplatelets (EGNPs) were dispersed within epoxy resins using high-pressure processor followed by three roll milling. Functionality on the EGNPs was confirmed with FTIR and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Bending and nano-mechanical testing was performed on the composites. Incorporation of EGNPs improved the flexural modulus and hardness of the composite and increased fracture toughness by up to 60%. Marked improvement was observed in thermal conductivity of the composites reaching 36% at 2 wt.% loading. Functionalized EGNPs exhibited significant improvements indicating favorable interaction at EGNPs/polymer interface.

  • 148.
    Chatzidaki, Maria D.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Formulation and characterization of W/O nano-dispersions for bioactive delivery applications2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this study was the formulation of food-grade water-in-oil (W/O) nano-dispersions based mainly on medium or long-chain triglycerides. Two types of dispersions were formulated and structurally compared, namely emulsions and microemulsions. The systems were used as matrices for encapsulating targeted bioactive molecules with specific characteristics such as antioxidants or peptides.

    The structural characterization of the formulated systems was investigated using techniques such as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Small Angle Xray Scattering (SAXS). The existence of swollen inverse micelles was revealed for the case of microemulsions whereas larger droplets still at the nano-scale were observed for the case of emulsions. Structural differences in the presence of the bioactive molecules or induced by the alteration of components were also observed.

    In order to study the efficacy of the formulations, the proposed loaded systems were assessed either using EPR spectroscopy or Well Diffusion Assay (WDA) depending on the bioactive molecule. It was found that the encapsulated molecules retained their claimed characteristics when encapsulated to the proposed matrices.

    Finally, some of the formulated dispersions were investigated for their behavior under gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. A two-step digestion model using recombinant Dog Gastric Lipase (rDGL) and Porcine Pancreatic Lipase (PPL) was proposed to simulate lipid hydrolysis in humans. The studies revealed significant decrease of the rDGL specific activity in the presence of the microemulsion while in the presence of lower percent of surfactants (case of emulsion) no alterations were observed.

  • 149.
    Chatzidaki, Maria D.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Inst Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Natl Hellen Res Fdn, Athens, Greece.
    Arik, Nehir
    Inst Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Natl Hellen Res Fdn, Athens, Greece.
    Monteil, Julien
    Institut de Chimie & Biologie des Membranes & des Nano-objets (CBMN), Univ Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
    Papadimitriou, Vassiliki
    Inst Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Natl Hellen Res Fdn, Athens, Greece.
    Leal-Calderon, Fernando
    Institut de Chimie & Biologie des Membranes & des Nano-objets (CBMN), Univ Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
    Xenakis, Aristotelis
    Inst Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Natl Hellen Res Fdn, Athens, Greece.; Sch Sci & Technol, MTM Res Ctr, Univ Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Microemulsion versus emulsion as effective carrier of hydroxytyrosol2016In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 146-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two edible Water-in-Oil (W/O) dispersions, an emulsion that remains kinetically stable and a microemulsion which is spontaneously formed, transparent and thermodynamically stable, were developed for potential use as functional foods, due to their ability to be considered as matrices to encapsulate biologically active hydrophilic molecules. Both systems contained Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) as the continuous phase and were used as carriers of Hydroxytyrosol (HT), a hydrophilic antioxidant of olive oil. A low energy input fabrication process of the emulsion was implemented. The obtained emulsion contained 1.3% (w/w) of surfactants and 5% (w/w) aqueous phase. The spontaneously formed microemulsion contained 4.9% (w/w) of surfactants and 2% (w/w) aqueous phase. A comparative study in terms of structural characterization of the systems in the absence and presence of HT was carried out. Particle size distribution obtained by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) technique and interfacial properties of the surfactants' layer, examined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy indicated the involvement of HT in the surfactant membrane. Finally, the proposed systems were studied for the scavenging activity of the encapsulated antioxidant toward galvinoxyl stable free radical showing a high scavenging activity of HT in both systems.

  • 150.
    Chatzidaki, Maria D.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. National Hellenic Research Foundation Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry and Biotechnology.
    Eduardo, Mateos-Diaz
    CNRS, UMR7282 Enzymologie Interfaciale et Physiologie de la Lipolyse.
    Leal-Calderon, Fernando
    Polytechnic Institute of Bourdeaux, CBMN.
    Xenakis, Aristotelis
    National Hellenic Research Foundation Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry and Biotechnology.
    Carrière, Frédéric
    CNRS, UMR7282 Enzymology at Interfaces and Physiology of Lipolysis.
    Water-in-Oil microemulsions versus emulsions as carriers of hydroxytyrosol: an in vitro gastrointestinal lipolysis study using the pHstat techniqueManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1234567 101 - 150 of 833
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf