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  • 101.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa ; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Lombard, Marlize
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa ; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Still Bay Point-Production Strategies at Hollow Rock Shelter and Umhlatuzana Rock Shelter and Knowledge-Transfer Systems in Southern Africa at about 80-70 Thousand Years Ago2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0168012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that technological variations associated with Still Bay assemblages of southern Africa have not been addressed adequately. Here we present a study developed to explore regional and temporal variations in Still Bay point-production strategies. We applied our approach in a regional context to compare the Still Bay point assemblages from Hollow Rock Shelter (Western Cape) and Umhlatuzana Rock Shelter (KwaZulu-Natal). Our interpretation of the point-production strategies implies inter-regional point-production conventions, but also highlights variability and intra-regional knapping strategies used for the production of Still Bay points. These strategies probably reflect flexibility in the organisation of knowledge-transfer systems at work during the later stages of the Middle Stone Age between about 80 ka and 70 ka in South Africa. 

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  • 102.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa;Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Lombard, Marlize
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa;Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Gärdenfors, Peter
    Lund University, Sweden;Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Cumulative Culture: An Integrated Perspective2019Other (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Nilsson, BjörnSkoglund, Peter
    Gården i landskapet: Tre bebyggelsearkeologiska studier2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 104. Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Olausson, Deborah
    Lund University.
    Scandinavian Flint – an Archaeological Perspective2007Book (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Olausson, Deborah
    Hughes, Richard
    Many Different Types of Scandinavian Flint: Visual Classification and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence2012In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 225-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hogberg, A.; Olausson, D. & Hughes, R., 2012. Many Different Types of Scandinavian Flint - Visual Classification and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence. Fornvannen 107. Stockholm. Proceeding from previously published studies of the provenance of southern Scandinavian flint based on visual classification and chemical sourcing, this paper presents a comprehensive study of flint provenancing. Existing knowledge of the appearance and geological origin of flint types is discussed and reappraised, and new chemical analyses of flint from 25 localities are presented. The results show that although there are certain problems in identifying the provenance of south Scandinavian flint using geochemical and visual criteria, in most cases these problems can be overcome. The study ends with a discussion of how the results of the study can be applied more broadly in future archaeological research.

  • 106.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Persson, Carl
    Fornforskaren, Sweden.
    Small pieces of flint: Mesolithic contact patterns on the Småland highlands in south Sweden2019In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 201-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text discusses a small assemblage of flint from an excavation of a Mesolithic site in the Småland highlands dated to c. 9.200 cal BP. Flint does not occur naturally in the area and the flint assemblage was brought to the site from the coast, about 45 kilometres to the west. The ambition of the study was to analyse a Mesolithic site with few and fragmented artefacts . By means of analyses of distribution patterns and detailed analyses of reduction processes and use-wear analysis it could be established that a variety of tasks had been performed at the site. The distribution of burnt flint together with there mains of a hut demonstrate that the site was spatially organized. Even though the number of flint pieces from the site is small, there are no indications that the find material is the result of short visits on the site. Instead, it is more likely a place that was used for stays of some duration. The use of non-local raw material indicates mobility and contact patterns that links present day west coast of Halland and south-east Scandinavia (Skåne and the Danish islands), with the Småland highland and the Markaryd area at the time of the settlement. The technological analys is indicates that stays in the inland lasted long enough to force the group to use and curate the flint tools in a careful way to make them last. But the visits were not so long that locally available raw materials, as for example quartz, had to be used. A general conclusion to be drawn from the result is that the number of lithic pieces in an assemblage, is not in proportion to the interpretative potential of a site.

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  • 107.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Persson, Eva
    Nya och gamla berättelser: Ett pilotprojekt om att tänka nytt om gestaltning av och berättelser om fornlämningar och kulturmiljöer2012Report (Other academic)
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  • 108.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö museum.
    Puseman, Kathryn
    Paleo Research Institute, Colorado US.
    Yost, Chad
    Paleo Research Institute, Colorado US.
    Integration of use-wear with protein residue analysis – a study of tool use and function in the south Scandinavian Early Neolithic2009In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1725-1737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents research on how an integration of use-wear analysis with protein residue analysis

    can produce new results on prehistoric tool use and function. Thirty flint artefacts from an Early Neolithic

    TRB site in south Sweden were analysed for both use-wear and protein residues. The results show

    a positive correlation between the two methods. The Early Neolithic tools analysed were primarily used

    to process fish.

  • 109.
    Lombard, Marlitze
    et al.
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Caruana, Matthew V.
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    van der Walt, Jaco
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    The Keimoes 3 desert kite site, South Africa: an aerial lidar and micro-topographic exploration2020In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 94, no 373, p. 197-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    So-called desert kites have been found widely in the Middle East and Central Asia. The newly discovered Keimoes 3 site in the Nama Karoo, however, represents one of only three known desert kite sites in southern Africa. The complex comprises 14 funnels arranged in three groups around a small hill. Radiocarbon dates for structures in the region suggest a relative age for the kites of less than 2000 years. The authors demonstrate how strategic use of the site’s micro-topography optimised game harvesting, and argue that Keimoes 3 offers robust evidence of Holocene Stone Age hunters engaging in long-term landscape modification as part of their subsistence strategies.

  • 110.
    Lombard, Marlize
    et al.
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa;Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa;Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    The Still Bay points of Apollo 11 Rock Shelter, Namibia: an inter-regional perspective2018In: Azania, ISSN 0067-270X, E-ISSN 1945-5534, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 312-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dating to roughly 80,000 to 70,000 years ago, components of the Still Bay technocomplex of southern Africa and their potential behavioural implications have been widely discussed. Stone points with invasive retouch, as defined over 90 years ago by Goodwin and van Riet Lowe, serve as markers for Still Bay assemblages, yet many Still Bay sites remain undated and comprehensive, comparable sets of data for their point assemblages remain unpublished. Much of the Middle Stone Age at the site of Apollo 11 in Namibia was undated until 2010, when a potential Still Bay component was announced. Although a Still Bay assemblage at Apollo 11 would represent the most northwesterly and inland expression of this technocomplex, its points have never been fully analysed. This paper presents their morphometric data and an interpretation of point-production strategies. These results are then compared with data obtained for two South African sites: Hollow Rock Shelter in the Western Cape and Umhlatuzana in KwaZulu-Natal. This comparison demonstrates that whereas there are no statistically significant differences in the morphometric data sets between the three sites, there are both similarities and differences in point-production strategies, cross-section shapes and the use of raw materials for knapping. It is suggested that these similarities and variations represent aspects of how knowledge-transfer systems and knapping conventions were followed on both intra-regional and inter-regional scales.

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  • 111.
    Lombard, Marlize
    et al.
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Haidle, Miriam N.
    Senckenberg Research Institute, Germany.
    Cognition: From Capuchin Rock Pounding to Lomekwian Flake Production2019In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 201-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it is sometimes suggested that modern-day chimpanzee nut-cracking behaviour is cognitively similar to early stone-tool-knapping behaviour, few systematic comparative studies have tested this assumption. Recently, two further techno-behaviours were reported that could both represent intermediary phases in hominin cognitive evolution pertaining to our ultimate technological astuteness. These behaviours are that of bearded capuchin monkeys pounding rocks and very early stone-tool knapping from Lomekwi 3. Here we use a multi-model approach to directly compare cognitive aspects required for 11 techno-behaviours, ranging from the simplest capuchin pounding behaviour to the most complex chimpanzee nut-cracking and Lomekwi 3 knapping behaviours. We demonstrate a marked difference in broad-spectrum cognitive requirements between capuchin pounding on the one hand and Lomekwian bipolar knapping on the other. Whereas the contrast is less pronounced between chimpanzee nut-cracking scenarios and basic passive-hammer knapping at Lomekwi 3, the escalation in cognitive requirement between nut cracking and bipolar knapping is a good indication that early hominin flaking techniques are cognitively more taxing than chimpanzee nut-cracking behaviour today.

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  • 112.
    Lombard, Marlize
    et al.
    Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Wadley, Lyn
    Univ Witwatersrand, South Africa.
    Temporal perspectives on Still Bay point production at Sibudu Cave, KwaZulu-Natal, in the context of southern Africa2019In: Azania, ISSN 0067-270X, E-ISSN 1945-5534, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 141-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on optically stimulated luminescence age estimates it has been argued that the Still Bay represents a sudden, short-lived technological innovation dating to about 72–71 kya. Yet, few sites have the stratigraphic integrity and Still Bay point assemblage size to test this assumption. The Wadley deep sounding of Sibudu Cave provides such an opportunity. Here we use fine-grained analyses consisting of technological attributes and morphometric data to explore the retouched point assemblages of Sibudu over a period of more than ten thousand years spanning the Still Bay. Although we found subtle changes through time, we found no evidence of a technological break in retouched point-production strategies since the Wadley early pre-Still Bay at more than 77 kya through to the final Still Bay/early Howiesons Poort dating to 64.7 ± 2.3 kya. We did, however, uncover a potential point-production hiatus at the site and we present testable hypotheses for this phenomenon. We further contextualise the Sibudu assemblages within southern Africa by directly comparing them with those of Hollow Rock Shelter, Umhlatuzana and Apollo 11. Although our results demonstrate both variation and similarities between the different Still Bay assemblages, we could not replicate a previous suggestion regarding technical disconnection between a north-east/south-west axis on the greater landscape.

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  • 113.
    Lundberg, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Ramírez-Pasillas, Marcela
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Towards a Conceptual Model for Heritagepreneurship and Regional Development2016In: Tourism and Culture in the Age of Innovation / [ed] Katsoni, V; Stratigea, A, Springer, 2016, p. 23-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this text, we present a conceptual model for discussing and analysing what happens when culture, in the form of heritage, and regional development, in the form of entrepreneurship, is juxtaposed (=heritagepreneurship). By comparing case studies from Mexican and South West Scandinavian regions our ambition is to elucidate potentials and limits in different ways of working with regional development using heritage as a mean.

    Our case studies showed that heritage becomes staged, enacted, and perceived in very differing ways depending on the ways memories are embraced, constructed or repressed in the heritagepreneurship process. Different meanings thereby give different societal effects, influencing the heritagepreneurship process.

    The strategies used in these case studies tend to be located “in the extremes”, from unconscious ignorance or a conscious effort to forget, to efforts to provide full attention and an active awareness of what has happened. We believe that more nuanced strategies for more long-term sustainable heritagepreneurship and regional development are located in-between these extremes.

  • 114. Magnusson Staaf, Björn
    Staden vid kusten: arkeologiska berättelser i Citytunnelns spår2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 115. Norlin, Ann
    et al.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kolten kliade och soppan smakade vatten: utvärdering av tidsresor med årskurs 5 och 7 i Borgholms kommun2015Report (Other academic)
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  • 116.
    Olausson, Deborah
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Hughes, Richard
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    A NEW LOOK AT BJURSELET: THE NEOLITHIC FLINT AXE CACHES FROM VÄSTERBOTTEN, SWEDEN USING NON-DESTRUCTIVE ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS FOR PROVENANCE DETERMINATION2012In: Acta Archaeologica, ISSN 0065-101X, E-ISSN 1600-0390, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 83-103Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 117.
    Olausson, Deborah
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Hughes, Richard E.
    Geochemical Research Laboratory, USA.
    The Use of Non-Destructive Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Analysis for Sourcing Flint in Northern Europe: Progress to Date and Prospects for the Future2017In: The Exploitation of Raw Materials in Prehistory: Sourcing, Processing and Distribution / [ed] Telmo Pereira, Xavier Terradas, Nuno Bicho, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017, p. 98-112Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article summarizes the results of work since 2010 to develop nondestructive energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDXRF) as a non-destructive method for determining the provenience of flint in northern Europe. Some 40 localities from Sweden, Denmark, Germany,

    Poland, and Ukraine have been sampled and analyzed. Trace elements have not proven particularly effective in drawing distinctions between and among flint and chert because they often occur below, or near, detection limits. However CaO and Fe compositions usually generated the highest count rates and total counts using EDXRF and their concentrations allowed satisfactory partitioning of some of the flints we analyzed. EDXRF can help us to discriminate among various outcrops of flint used for tool production during prehistory. Future work involves investigating correlations between flint chemistry and visual appearance, as well as investigating source-critical aspects of post-depositional effects on tool surfaces.

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  • 118.
    Riede, Felix
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Johannsen, Niels N.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa;Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Nowell, April
    University of Victoria, Canada.
    Lombard, Marlize
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa;Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    The role of play objects and object play in human cognitive evolution and innovation2018In: Evolutionary anthropology (Print), ISSN 1060-1538, E-ISSN 1520-6505, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 46-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this contribution, we address a major puzzle in the evolution of human material culture: If matur-ing individuals just learn their parental generation’s material culture, then what is the origin of keyinnovations as documented in the archeological record? We approach this question by coupling alife-history model of the costs and benefits of experimentation with a niche-construction perspec-tive. Niche-construction theory suggests that the behavior of organisms and their modification ofthe world around them have important evolutionary ramifications by altering developmentalsettings and selection pressures. Part ofHomo sapiens’niche is the active provisioning of childrenwith play objects—sometimes functional miniatures of adult tools—and the encouragement ofobject play, such as playful knapping with stones. Our model suggests that salient material cultureinnovation may occur or be primed in a late childhood or adolescence sweet spot when cognitiveand physical abilities are sufficiently mature but before the full onset of the concerns and costsassociated with reproduction. We evaluate the model against a series of archeological cases andmake suggestions for future research.

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  • 119. Sandén, Ulf
    et al.
    Brink, Kristian
    Sydsvensk Arkeologi AB.
    Högberg, Anders
    Sydsvensk Arkeologi AB.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Skoglund, Peter
    Sydsvensk Arkeologi AB.
    Fester och festande vid Hyllie: nya tolkningar av mellanneolitiska platser och bebyggelsemönster i sydvästra Skåne2010In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 169-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the late Funnel Beaker culture, phase III of the Middle Neolithic A, a period of about two centuries c.3000 cal BC. With regard to the settlement pattern in the Malmö area of south-west Scania, the period has been interpreted as a time when people abandoned small settlements and moved together at larger ones. In 2002 and 2005 a site with substantial remains from the MN A III was investigated in the area. Three sunken features contained large amounts of pottery, knapped flint, animal bones and plant remains. The paper reports on in-depth analyses of the context and the finds. We conclude that the remains are the result of a gathering of many people for a short period of time, interpreted as evidence for feasting. This has clear implications for the interpretation of other sites from the period as well, thus being important for the understanding of the overall settlement pattern of the period. Rather than interpreting the abundant finds from MN A III sites as the result of people living there for a long time, the Hyllie analyses suggest that the sites were used briefly by large groups on a few occasions. These gatherings would have strengthened bonds between smaller groups in the area.

  • 120.
    Schmidt, Patrick
    et al.
    Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Germany.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Heat treatment in the Still Bay: A case study on Hollow Rock Shelter, South Africa2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 21, p. 712-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Still Bay, with its carefully crafted bifacial points, is one of the most enigmatic technocomplexes in the later Middle Stone Age of the southern African subcontinent. Heat treatment of silcrete has been documented in the Still Bay but it has recently been suggested that its application was restricted to the later stages of the production of points. This would confer a special role to heat treatment in the Still Bay if compared to the following Howiesons Poort technocomplex. In this paper, we analyse the silcrete assemblage from Hollow Rock Shelter for heating proxies to provide a first picture of the prevalence of heat treatment in the Still Bay and to investigate whether points were treated differently in terms of heat treatment than other end-products. Our results show no evidence of later-stage heat treatment but, on the contrary, comprehensive data to support heat treatment in an early stage of reduction. Relatively less silcrete was heated in the Still Bay than in later Howiesons Poort, revealing technological differences between both phases. We found a significant number of silcrete pieces that exploded during heat treatment and were still knapped afterwards, indicating a heating process that involved fast heating rates. We also found that points were not treated differently than the other end-products. These findings have implications for our understanding of the fabrication of bifacial points and the Still Bay chaîne opératoire in general.

123 101 - 120 of 120
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