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  • 101.
    Lundin, Evelyn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A prospective randomized assessment of quality of life between open and robotic hysterectomy in early endometrial cancer2019In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 721-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective There are limited prospective data on the evaluation of quality of life in patients undergoing robotic hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Our objective was to determine whether post-operative recovery differs between robotic and abdominal hysterectomy.

    Methods At a Swedish tertiary referral university hospital, 50 women with low-risk endometrial cancer scheduled for surgery between February 2012 and May 2016 were included in a randomized trial. Surgery was performed according to principles for minimal invasive surgery. Anesthesia and peri-operative care followed a standardized enhanced recovery after surgery program in both groups. The EuroQol Group form EQ-5D and the Short Form-36 were used to evaluate patients' health-related quality of life. The Swedish Postoperative Symptoms Questionnaire assessed symptoms pre-operatively, daily for 7 days from the day of surgery, and then weekly until 6 weeks post-operatively. Data were analyzed by means of non-parametric tests and repeated measures ANOVA. To evaluate the time-dependent occurrence of complications, Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional-hazard models were used.

    Results A total of 50 women were enrolled in the study (25 robotic and 25 abdominal hysterectomy). Median age (68 years vs 67 years), estimated blood loss (50 mL vs 50 mL), length of hospital stay de facto (53 hours vs 51 hours), and time to meet discharge criteria (36 hours vs 36 hours) in the robotic and abdominal groups, respectively, did not differ significantly (p>0.05) Women in the robotic hysterectomy group recovered significantly faster (p=0.01) in the EQ-5D health index, and reached their pre-operative level after approximately 3 weeks, nearly 2 weeks earlier than the abdominal group. Differences regarding improvement in health-related quality of life (Short Form-36) were statistically significant in general health and social functioning only, and were in favor of robotic hysterectomy. Consumption of analgesics, pain intensity, and symptom sum score post-operatively were equal. Occurrence of complications was an independent risk factor and influenced significantly the EQ-5D health index, length of hospital stay, pain intensity, opioid consumption, and symptom sum score adversely.

    Conclusion Robotic hysterectomy in the setting of an enhanced recovery after surgery program led to faster recovery in health-related quality of life compared with abdominal hysterectomy.

  • 102.
    Malmborg, Agota
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hormonal contraception and sexual desire: A questionnaire-based study of young Swedish women2016In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 158-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The aim of the study was to determine whether a decrease in sexual desire is more prevalent among women using hormonal contraception than among women using hormone-free contraception, and whether a decrease increases the risk of changing to another contraceptive method. Methods A validated questionnaire was posted to 3740 women (aged 22, 25 or 28 years) living in Sweden. Descriptive statistics were used to present the results; differences between groups were tested using χ(2) analyses. A multiple logistic regression model was used for analysis of possible confounders. Results The response rate was 50%. The majority (81%) of respondents used some kind of contraception, and 88% were generally satisfied with the method used. Regardless of the type of method, 27% of hormonal contraceptive users reported a decrease in sexual desire that they attributed to their use of hormonal contraception, whereas only 12% of women using hormone-free contraception reported a decrease in sexual desire (p<0.01). This twofold risk of a decrease in sexual desire was shown in the multiple regression analysis to be independent of age group, depression, BMI, educational level and parity. However, having a partner was found to be a factor of equal importance: women with partners experienced reduced desire twice as often as women without partners. The observed odds ratio for planning to stop hormonal contraception or to change to a different type due to reduced desire was 8.16 (95% confidence interval 6.65-10.1) among women who had had the same experience during a previous period of hormonal contraceptive use. Conclusions Women using hormonal contraception were more likely to experience reduced sexual desire compared with women using hormone-free contraception. Experiencing reduced desire was a strong predictive factor for women to change contraceptive method.

  • 103.
    Morad, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Adipokines and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Normal Human Breast Tissue in Vivo - Correlations and Attenuation by Dietary Flaxseed2016In: Journal of mammary gland biology and neoplasia, ISSN 1083-3021, E-ISSN 1573-7039, Vol. 21, no 1-2, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to sex steroids increases the risk of breast cancer but the exact mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Events in the microenvironment are important for carcinogenesis. Diet containing phytoestrogens can affect the breast microenvironment and alter the risk of breast cancer. It has previously been shown that estrogen regulates extracellular levels of leptin, adiponectin, and VEGF in normal breast tissue in vivo. Whether these proteins correlate in breast tissue in vivo or if diet addition of flaxseed, a major source of phytoestrogens in Western diets, alters adipokine levels in breast tissue are unknown. We used microdialysis to sample proteins of normal human breast tissue and abdominal subcutaneous fat in situ in 34 pre-and postmenopausal women. In vitro, co-culture of breast cancer cells and primary human adipocytes was used. In vivo, in normal breast tissue, a significant positive correlation between VEGF and leptin was detected. No correlations were found in fat tissue. Co-culture of adipocytes and breast cancer cells per se increased the secretion of VEGF and leptin and enhanced the effects of estradiol compared to culture of either cell type alone. In vitro, inhibition of VEGF diminished the release of leptin while inhibition of leptin had no influence on VEGF secretion. The levels of leptin decreased and adiponectin increased after a dietary addition of 25 g of flaxseed/day for one menstrual cycle. We conclude that VEGF and leptin correlate significantly in normal human breast tissue in vivo and that dietary addition of flaxseed affect adipokine levels in the breast.

  • 104.
    Morad, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor and leptin in normal human breast tissue in vivo2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Events in the microenvironment are important for carcinogenesis of the breast. Adipocytes, which produce adipokines with paracrine effects, are the most abundant cell type in breast tissue. Exposure to sex steroids affects the risk of breast cancer. It has previously been shown that estrogen regulates the extracellular levels of leptin, adiponectin, IL-1β, and VEGF in normal human breast tissue in vivo.

    Objective: We aimed to determine if there were any relationships between leptin, adiponectin, IL-1β, and/or VEGF in normal human breast tissue in vivo and to elucidate the role of adipocytes in the regulation of these factors.

    Design and methods: Microdialysis was used to sample proteins of normal human breast tissue and abdominal subcutaneous (s.c.) fat in situ in pre-and postmenopausal women. An in vitro co-culture model of breast cancer cells and primary mature human adipocytes was used.

    Results: In vivo, in normal breast tissue, significant positive correlations between VEGF and leptin, and VEGF and leptin/adiponectin ratio were detected. No correlations were found in s.c. abdominal fat tissue. Co-culture of adipocytes and breast cancer cells per se increased the secretion of VEGF and leptin and enhanced the effects of estradiol compared to culture of either cell type alone. In vitro, inhibition of VEGF diminished the release of leptin while inhibition of leptin had no influence on VEGF secretion. In breast tissue, significant correlations between IL-1β and leptin and VEGF were revealed.

    Conclusions: Our results suggest that VEGF regulates leptin in normal human breast tissue. Moreover, physical contact between adipocytes and breast cancer cells, induces phenotypic changes and enhances the effects of estradiol. These mechanisms may be involved in breast cancer progression.

  • 105.
    Möller, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Andolf, Ellika
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mental health after first childbirth in women requesting a caesarean section; a retrospective register-based study2017In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 17, article id 326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychiatric illness before delivery increases the risk of giving birth by caesarean section on maternal request (CSMR) but little is known about these womens mental health after childbirth. In this study we aimed to compare the prevalence of psychiatric disorders five years before and after delivery in primiparae giving birth by CS on maternal request to all other primiparae giving birth, indifferent on their mode of delivery. Methods: The study population comprised all women born in Sweden 1973-1983 giving birth for the first time in 2002-2004. Psychiatric diagnoses, in- and outpatient care were retrieved from the National Patient Register in Sweden. The risk of psychiatric care after childbirth was estimated using CSMR, previous mental health and sociodemographic variables as covariates. Results: Psychiatric disorders after childbirth were more common in women giving birth by CSMR compared to the other women (11.2% vs 5.5%, p amp;lt; 0.001). CSMR increased the risk of psychiatric disorders after childbirth (aOR 1. 5, 95% CI 1.2-1.9). The prevalence of psychiatric disorders had increased after compared to before childbirth (mean difference 0.02 +/- 0.25, 95% CI 0.018-0.022, p amp;lt; 0.001). Women giving birth by CSMR tended to be diagnosed in the inpatient care more often (54.9% vs. 45.8%, p = 0.056) and were more likely to have been diagnosed before childbirth as well (39.8% vs. 24.2%, p amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusions: Women giving birth by CSMR more often suffer from psychiatric disorders both before and after delivery. This indicates that these women are a vulnerable group requiring special attention from obstetric-and general health-care providers. This vulnerability should be taken into account when deciding on mode of delivery.

  • 106.
    Möller, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gunnervik, Christina
    Värnamo Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproduction, fear of childbirth and obstetric outcomes in women treated for fear of childbirth in their first pregnancy: A historical cohort2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 374-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction About 8% of the pregnant women in Sweden receive counseling for fear of childbirth (FOC) during pregnancy. Little is known about the long-term reproductive and obstetric outcomes after counseling for FOC: Therefore, the objective of this historical cohort study was to compare the long-term reproductive and obstetric outcomes in women treated for FOC in their first pregnancy to women without FOC. Material and methods All nulliparas consecutively referred for treatment of severe FOC between 2001 and 2007 (n = 608) were compared with all other nulliparas giving birth on the same day (n = 431). Women who were not fluent in Swedish, missing a postal address, had moved out of the area, given birth at another hospital or had a late spontaneous abortion were excluded (n = 555). A total of 235 women agreed to participate in the study, 63 (39%) women in the index group and 172 (53%) in the reference group. The women were contacted by letter in 2015, ie 7-14 years after first childbirth, and asked to permit access to their medical charts from pregnancies and childbirths and to fill out a study specific questionnaire. Based on data from the medical charts and questionnaire, the mode of delivery, birth experience, obstetric complications, FOC, counseling for FOC and number of childbirths were compared in the two groups. Results Women in the index group less often gave birth more than twice compared with the reference group (8.2% vs 22.0%, P = 0.012). We found no significant differences in complications during subsequent pregnancies and deliveries. Women in the index group more often gave birth by CS in their first (P = 0.002) and second childbirth (P = 0.001), more often had a less positive birth experience (index group NRS: median 6.0, interquartile range 6 vs reference group NRS: 7.0, interquartile range 5, P = 0.004) in their first delivery and more often received counseling for FOC (58.7% vs 12.5%, P amp;lt; 0.001) in subsequent pregnancies. Women in the index group more often experienced FOC (18% vs 5.3%, P = 0.001) 7-14 years after first childbirth. Conclusions FOC is not easily treated. Despite treatment and exposure to childbirth many women received treatment in their next pregnancy and still suffered from FOC 7-14 years after the first childbirth.

  • 107.
    Möller, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gunnervik, Christina
    Värnamo Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproduction, fear of childbirth and obstetric outcomes in women treated for fear of childbirth in their first pregnancy: A historical cohort2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 374-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction About 8% of the pregnant women in Sweden receive counseling for fear of childbirth (FOC) during pregnancy. Little is known about the long-term reproductive and obstetric outcomes after counseling for FOC: Therefore, the objective of this historical cohort study was to compare the long-term reproductive and obstetric outcomes in women treated for FOC in their first pregnancy to women without FOC. Material and methods All nulliparas consecutively referred for treatment of severe FOC between 2001 and 2007 (n = 608) were compared with all other nulliparas giving birth on the same day (n = 431). Women who were not fluent in Swedish, missing a postal address, had moved out of the area, given birth at another hospital or had a late spontaneous abortion were excluded (n = 555). A total of 235 women agreed to participate in the study, 63 (39%) women in the index group and 172 (53%) in the reference group. The women were contacted by letter in 2015, ie 7-14 years after first childbirth, and asked to permit access to their medical charts from pregnancies and childbirths and to fill out a study specific questionnaire. Based on data from the medical charts and questionnaire, the mode of delivery, birth experience, obstetric complications, FOC, counseling for FOC and number of childbirths were compared in the two groups. Results Women in the index group less often gave birth more than twice compared with the reference group (8.2% vs 22.0%, P = 0.012). We found no significant differences in complications during subsequent pregnancies and deliveries. Women in the index group more often gave birth by CS in their first (P = 0.002) and second childbirth (P = 0.001), more often had a less positive birth experience (index group NRS: median 6.0, interquartile range 6 vs reference group NRS: 7.0, interquartile range 5, P = 0.004) in their first delivery and more often received counseling for FOC (58.7% vs 12.5%, P amp;lt; 0.001) in subsequent pregnancies. Women in the index group more often experienced FOC (18% vs 5.3%, P = 0.001) 7-14 years after first childbirth. Conclusions FOC is not easily treated. Despite treatment and exposure to childbirth many women received treatment in their next pregnancy and still suffered from FOC 7-14 years after the first childbirth.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-11-15 15:39
  • 108.
    Nieminen, Katri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutetet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ryding, Elsa-Lena
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Treatment of nulliparous women with severe fear of childbirth via the Internet: a feasibility study2016In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 37-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of Internet interventions among nulliparous women suffering from severe fear of childbirth (FOC) by means of an Internet-delivered therapist-supported self-help program based on cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT).

    Design: Prospective, longitudinal cohort study.Setting: A feasibility study of an ICBT program for the treatment of severe FOC in pregnant women.Sample: Twenty-eight Swedish-speaking nulliparous women with severe FOC recruited via a project home page from January 2012 to December 2013.

    Methods: The main components of the ICBT program for the treatment of severe FOC comprised psycho-education, breathing retraining, cognitive restructuring, imaginary exposure, in vivo exposure and relapse prevention. The study participants were anonymously self-recruited over the Internet, interviewed by telephone and then enrolled. All participants were offered 8 weeks of treatment via the Internet. Participants reported their homework weekly, submitted measurements of their fear and received feedback from a therapist via a secure online contact management system.

    Main outcome measures: Level of FOC measured with the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ A) during screening at enrollment and weekly during the treatment (W-DEQ version A), and after the delivery (W-DEQ version B).

    Results: A statistically significant (p < 0.0005) decrease of FOC [W-DEQ sum score decreased pre to post-therapy, with a large effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.95)].Conclusions: The results of this feasibility study suggest that ICBT has potential in the treatment of severe FOC during pregnancy in motivated nulliparous women. The results need to be confirmed by randomized controlled studies.

  • 109.
    Nieminen, Katri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Malmquist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ryding, E-L
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nulliparous pregnant womens narratives of imminent childbirth before and after internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for severe fear of childbirth: a qualitative study2015In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 122, no 9, p. 1259-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo describe the expectations concerning imminent childbirth before and after 8weeks of internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) among nulliparous pregnant women with severe fear of childbirth. DesignQualitative study of nulliparous pregnant womens narratives before and after CBT. SettingThe first ICBT programme for treating severe fear of childbirth. SampleFifteen nulliparous pregnant Swedish women with severe fear of childbirth participating in an ICBT self-help programme. MethodsSemi-structured open-ended questions over the internet before and after 8weeks of ICBT. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Main outcome measuresThe participants narratives pertaining to five different situations during labour and delivery before and after ICBT. ResultsAfter therapy, participants described a more realistic attitude towards imminent childbirth, more self-confidence and more active coping strategies. They perceived their partners and the staff as more supportive. They were more aware of the approaching meeting with their baby when giving birth. ConclusionsFollowing the ICBT programme, participants changed their attitude towards imminent childbirth from negative to more positive. This was manifested in positive and more realistic expectations regarding themselves, their partner and the staff that would look after them.

  • 110.
    Nieminen, Katri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Sanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health.
    Kinberger, Emelie K
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health.
    Ryding, Elsa-Lena
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Severe fear of childbirth indicates high perinatal costs for Swedish women giving birth to their first child.2017In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 438-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to calculate costs associated with severe fear of childbirth (FOC) during pregnancy and peripartum by comparing two groups of women expecting their first child and attending an ordinary antenatal program; one with low FOC and one with severe FOC.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a prospective case-control cohort study one group with low FOC [Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ) sum score ≤60, n = 107] and one with severe FOC (W-DEQ ≥85, n = 43) were followed up till 3 months postpartum and included in the analysis. Medical records were assessed and medical parameters were mapped. Mean costs for healthcare consumption and sick leave during pregnancy were calculated and compared.

    RESULTS: When means were compared between the groups, the group with severe FOC had more visits for psychosocial reasons (p = 0.001) and more hours on sick leave (p = 0.03) during pregnancy, and stayed longer at the maternity ward (p = 0.04). They also more seldom had normal spontaneous deliveries (p = 0.03), and more often had an elective cesarean section on maternal request (p = 0.02). Postpartum, they more often than the group with low FOC paid visits to the maternity clinic because of complications (p = 0.001) and to the antenatal unit because of adverse childbirth experiences (p = 0.001). The costs for handling women with severe FOC was 38% higher than those for women with low FOC.

    CONCLUSION: Women with severe FOC generate considerably higher perinatal costs than women with low FOC when handled in care as usual.

  • 111.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Schnider, Thomas
    Institute of Anaesthesiology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Uustal, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Should Propofol and Alfentanil Be Combined in Patient-Controlled Sedation? A Randomised Controlled Trial Using Pharmacokinetic Simulation2015In: Open Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 2164-5558, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 122-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient-controlled sedation (PCS) is increasingly used for moderate sedation. Detailed understanding is essential for maintaining safety and giving the most benefit. We wanted to explore the associations between patients’ characteristics, perioperative pain and anxiety, the procedure, and the calculated concentrations at the effect site (Ce) of propofol. We also wanted to analyse the pharmacokinetic profiles of propofol and alfentanil during PCS, and their association with respiratory complications.

    Methods: 155 patients were double-blinded and randomised to have propofol or propofol and alfentanil for PCS during gynaecological surgery. Pharmacokinetic simulation of Ce and multiple regressions aided the search for correlations between explanatory variables and concentrations of drugs.

    Results: In group propofol, treatment for incontinence, anterior repair, and the patient’s weight correlated the best (B-coef = 0.20, 0.20 and 0.01; r = 0.69; r² = 0.48). When alfentanil was added, alfentanil and the patient’s weight were associated with Ce of propofol (B-coef = -0.40 and 0.01; r = 0.70; r² = 0.43). Logistic regression indicated that age and Ce of drugs were related to ten cases of respiratory complications.

    Conclusions: Patients’ weights and the type of surgery performed were associated with the Ce of propofol; this knowledge could be used for refinement of the doses given during PCS. Because the pharmacokinetic profiles of propofol and alfentanil are different, the alfentanil effect becomes predominant during the time course of sedation. In order to reduce the risk of early and late respiratory depression, alfentanil should not be added to propofol in the same syringe.

  • 112.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Gottvall, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    When fetal hydronephrosis is suspected antenatally: A qualitative study2015In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, no 349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The information about fetal malformation findings during the ultrasound examination often comes unexpectedly, and the women and their partners may not necessarily receive any conclusive statement on the prognosis. A finding such as fetal hydronephrosis range from being a soft markers or mild anomaly, to a serious condition associated with neonatal morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to explore womens reactions to the discovery of fetal hydronephrosis in the context of uncertainty regarding the prognosis. Methods: Ten women were interviewed and the interviews were conducted six to twelve months after the women gave birth. They had experience of suspected fetal hydronephrosis in gestational week 18-20. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using constant comparative analysis. Results: The core category, Going through crisis by knowing that you are doing the right thing illustrates the meaning of womens reactions and feelings. It illuminates the four categories: When the unexpected happens-on the one hand, women had positive views that the suspicious malformation could be discovered; however, on the other hand, women questioned the screening. To live in suspense during pregnancy - the suspicious malformation caused anxiety and was a stressful situation. Difficulties in understanding information - the women thought they had limited knowledge and had difficulties in understanding the information. Suppress feelings and hope for the best - the women tried to postpone the problem and thought they should deal with it after delivery. Conclusions: Women are worried irrespective of suspicious or severe malformations, and in need of information and counselling tailored to their individual needs. Other sources of support could be: written information, links to reliable sources on the Internet and possibilities for ongoing follow-ups.

  • 113.
    Palmquist, Moa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Falk, Gabriella
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Organisation of contraceptive care and attitudes among healthcare providers in two Swedish cities with different socio-demographic profiles2015In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 170-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To compare contraceptive services provided by family planning clinics in Linkoping and Norrkoping in Ostergotland County, Sweden. The two cities are of similar size but have different socio-demographic profiles. The abortion rate in Link ping (15.3 per 1000) is substantially lower than in Norrkoping (21.1 per 1000). Methods The study was performed in two steps. First, the clinics providing contraceptive services in the two cities were studied using ten pre-defined quality indicators. Thereafter, 11 healthcare providers were interviewed: six in Linkoping and five in Norrkoping. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results No differences were found in the organisation of contraceptive care in the two cities. Neither city met the criteria for five of the ten quality indicators. The analysis of the interviews generated four themes: Guidelines and electronic record template, Criteria for good contraceptive counselling, Availability of contraception, and Sexual health. The interviews revealed that the clinical leadership in Norrkoping was insuffincient. Conclusion Clinics in the two cities are organised in the same way so that differences in abortion rates cannot be related to differences in organisation. The reasons for the differences in abortion rates in the two cities have yet to be determined.

  • 114.
    Pelters, Britta
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Neither a sinner nor a saint: Health as a present-day religion in the age of healthism2016In: Social Theory & Health, ISSN 1477-8211, E-ISSN 1477-822X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Western societies, religious imagery is often used in conjunction with the topic health in this biomedicalized, healthistic time, but is that enough to qualify the structural characteristics of the presentations and practices of health as a present-day health religion? And what may be gained by adopting such a perspective? This article explores these questions by a hermeneutical rereading, using a comprehensive list of 10 religious features derived from the sociology of religion on texts describing (a) religiously charged health phenomena, (b) the interconnection between health and society and (c) health theories. The results show that health can rightfully be called a religion, with characteristics resembling Webets protestant work ethic, which may accelerate the formation of a new economic and health-related underclass. Viewing health from a religious angle has the potential of introducing new concepts and ideas of religious origin into the sphere of health. We believe that this introduction will facilitate and inspire new ways of thinking about health which add a religious edge to the seeming rationality of health, that is, an emotionalized commitment to health as a dignified authority, which an understanding of health as a moral obligation hardly captures.

  • 115.
    Pihl, Sofia
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Uustal, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hjertberg, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Interobserver agreement in perineal ultrasound measurement of the anovaginal distance: a methodological study2018In: International Urogynecology Journal, ISSN 0937-3462, E-ISSN 1433-3023, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 697-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective outcome measures of the extent of laceration at delivery are needed. In this study we evaluated and describe here a method for learning perineal ultrasound measurement of the anovaginal distance (AVD). The learning period needed for examiners proficient in vaginal ultrasound examination and the interobserver agreement after reaching proficiency in AVD measurement were determined. The hypothesis was that the method is feasible to learn and reproducible for use in further research. The method was taught by an examiner experienced in perineal ultrasonography. The distance between the mucosal margin of the internal anal sphincter was measured with a vaginal probe. The studied examiners measured the AVD until similar results (+/- 5 mm) were achieved. The AVD in 40 women was then measured and documented by two examiners who were blinded to each others results. Interobserver agreement was calculated using the kappa score. Examiners with previous experience in vaginal ultrasonography had learned the method after performing five sets of comeasurements. The AVD measurements after the learning period showed almost perfect agreement (kappa = 0.87) between the examiners. The method for perineal ultrasound measurement of AVD was learned quickly with high interobserver agreement. The method is feasible to learn and reproducible for use in further research.

  • 116.
    Pihl, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Uustal Fornell, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Anovaginal distance and obstetric anal sphincter injury: a prospective observational study2019In: International Urogynecology Journal, ISSN 0937-3462, E-ISSN 1433-3023, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 939-944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and Hypothesis

    No measurements are available for diagnosing the extent of obstetric lacerations. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between the anovaginal distance (AVD) measured with transperineal ultrasound immediately after delivery and external anal sphincter injury. A secondary aim was to assess whether the palpated perineal thickness was associated with the AVD.

    Methods

    A prospective observational study of 150 primiparous women at the University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. After vaginal delivery, initial inspection and palpation of the perineal thickness were performed by the midwife. The women were then divided into subgroups depending on the degree of the suspected perineal laceration. Transperineal ultrasound of the AVD was performed by a physician. Diagnostics of the perineal laceration were done according to standard care.

    Results

    Women with an external sphincter injury had a shorter AVD and shorter palpatory perineal thickness compared with women without anal sphincter injury. No external sphincter injuries were diagnosed when the AVD and/or palpation height was &gt; 20 mm. The mean AVD in the group with probable second-degree laceration (n = 85) was 18.8 mm (95% CI 17.8–19.8), in suspected third-degree laceration (n = 33) 15.7 mm (95% CI 13.7–17.7) and in probable third-degree laceration (n = 32) 11.8 mm (95% CI 9.7–13.9) (p &lt; 0.001).

    Conclusions

    A short AVD could be a warning sign postpartum and should increase the awareness of possible external sphincter injury before suturing. An AVD of 20 mm seems to indicate a cutoff level of the occurrence of external sphincter injury, but this needs further evaluation.

  • 117.
    Rajan, Meenu Rohini
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyman, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Innovative Medicines, and Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, AstraZeneca Research and Development, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Systems-wide Experimental and Modeling Analysis of Insulin Signaling through Forkhead Box Protein O1 (FOXO1) in Human Adipocytes, Normally and in Type 2 Diabetes2016In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 291, no 30, p. 15806-15819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin resistance is a major aspect of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which results from impaired insulin signaling in target cells. Signaling to regulate forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) may be the most important mechanism for insulin to control transcription. Despite this, little is known about how insulin regulates FOXO1 and how FOXO1 may contribute to insulin resistance in adipocytes, which are the most critical cell type in the development of insulin resistance. We report a detailed mechanistic analysis of insulin control of FOXO1 in human adipocytes obtained from non-diabetic subjects and from patients with T2D. We show that FOXO1 is mainly phosphorylated through mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B at Ser(473) and that this mechanism is unperturbed in T2D. We also demonstrate a cross-talk from the MAPK branch of insulin signaling to stimulate phosphorylation of FOXO1. The cellular abundance and consequently activity of FOXO1 are halved in T2D. Interestingly, inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin reduces the abundance of FOXO1 to the levels in T2D. This suggests that the reduction of the concentration of FOXO1 is a consequence of attenuation of mTORC1, which defines much of the diabetic state in human adipocytes. We integrate insulin control of FOXO1 in a network-wide mathematical model of insulin signaling dynamics based on compatible data from human adipocytes. The diabetic state is network-wide explained by attenuation of an mTORC1-to-insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) feedback and reduced abundances of insulin receptor, GLUT4, AS160, ribosomal protein S6, and FOXO1. The model demonstrates that attenuation of the mTORC1-to-IRS1 feedback is a major mechanism of insulin resistance in the diabetic state.

  • 118.
    Ramö Isgren, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Adverse Neonatal Outcomes in Overweight and Obese Adolescents Compared with Normal Weight Adolescents and Low Risk Adults2019In: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, ISSN 1083-3188, E-ISSN 1873-4332, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Objective: To evaluate the association between maternal body mass index and neonatal outcomes in adolescents and to compare neonatal outcomes between overweight and obese adolescents and obstetric low-risk adult women. Design: Retrospective cohort study using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Setting: Sweden. Participants: All 31,386 primiparous adolescents younger than 20 years of age and 178,844 "standard" women, defined as normal weight, obstetric low-risk adult women who delivered between 1992 and 2013. The adolescents were categorized according to weight and height in early pregnancy into body mass index groups according to the World Health Organization classification. Logistic regression models were used. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: Neonatal outcomes in relation to maternal body mass index groups. Results: In the adolescents, 6109/31,386 (19.5%) and 2287/31,386 (7.3%) were overweight and obese, respectively. Compared with normal weight adolescents, overweight adolescents had a lower risk of having small for gestational age neonates, and higher risks for having neonates with macrosomia, and being large for gestational age and with Apgar score less than 7 at 5 minutes. The obese adolescents had increased risk for having neonates being large for gestational age (3.8% vs 1.3%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.97 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.30-3.84]), with macrosomia ( amp;gt;4500 g) (4.6% vs 1.4%; aOR, 2.95 [95% CI, 2.33-3.73]), and with Apgar score less than 7 at 5 minutes (2.2% vs 1.1%; aOR, 1.98 [95% CI, 1.43-2.76]) than normal weight adolescents. Compared with the standard women, overweight and obese adolescents had overall more adverse neonatal outcomes. Conclusion: Overweight and obese adolescents had predominantly increased risks for adverse neonatal outcomes compared with normal weight adolescents and standard women.

  • 119.
    Ramö Isgren, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Obstetric Outcomes in Adolescents Related to Body Mass Index and Compared with Low-Risk Adult Women2017In: Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1540-9996, E-ISSN 1931-843X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 426-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate in adolescents the association between body mass index (BMI) and obstetric outcomes and to determine whether the outcomes in the BMI groups of adolescents differ from those of a low-risk population of adult women. Materials and Methods: This is a nationwide population-based register study. Obstetric outcomes of 31,386 singleton primiparous adolescents were evaluated in relation to BMI classes. Furthermore, the outcomes of the adolescents and 178,844 normal weight, nonsmoking, singleton primiparous women, 25-29 years old with no known comorbidity, defined as standard women, were compared. Multiple logistic regression models were used. Results are presented as crude odds ratios (ORs) or adjusted ORs and with a 95% confidence interval. Results: Compared with normal weight adolescents, obese adolescents had a lower chance of a normal vaginal delivery (VD)76% versus 85% [adjusted OR 0.61 (0.55-0.68)], a higher risk for acute cesarean section (CS)8.9% versus 4.5% [adjusted OR 2.45 (2.08-2.88)], and stillbirth0.7% versus 0.2% [adjusted OR 3.17 (1.74-5.77)]. Compared with standard women, overweight adolescents had a higher chance of a normal VD82% versus 75% [crude OR 1.53 (1.44-1.64)] and a lower risk for acute CS6.3% versus 7.1% [crude OR 0.85 (0.76-0.95)]. Obese adolescents had a lower risk for instrumental VD8% versus 13% [crude OR 0.61 (0.53-0.71)] and obstetric anal sphincter injury1% versus 3% [crude OR 0.38 (0.26-0.57)]. Conclusion: Several adverse obstetric outcomes were obesity related among adolescents. Overweight adolescents seemed to have better obstetric outcomes than standard women, something to consider when optimizing resources for women during pregnancy and delivery.

  • 120.
    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A.
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Tanbo, Tom
    Department of Gynecology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Tinkanen, Helena
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Thurin-Kjellberg, Ann
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Laczna Kitlinski, Margareta
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Macklon, Kirsten T.
    Rigshosp University Hospital, Denmark.
    Ernst, Erik
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Fedder, Jens
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Tiitinen, Aila
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Morin-Papunen, Laure
    Oulu University Hospital, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Einarsson, Snorri
    ART Medica, Iceland.
    Jokimaa, Varpu
    Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Hippelainen, Maritta
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
    Lood, Mikael
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Johannes
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Jan I.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yding Andersen, Claus
    Rigshosp University Hospital, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation among alternatives for fertility preservation in the Nordic countries - compilation of 20 years of multicenter experience2016In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 95, no 9, p. 1015-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. The aim of this study is to report the current status of ovarian tissue cryopreservation among alternatives for fertility preservation in the Nordic countries. Material and methods. A questionnaire was sent to 14 Nordic academic reproductive centers with established fertility preservation programs. It covered fertility preservation cases performed up to December 2014, standard procedures for ovarian tissue cryopreservation and oocyte cryopreservation and reproductive outcomes following ovarian tissue transplantation. Results. Among the Nordic countries, Denmark and Norway practice ovarian tissue cryopreservation as a clinical treatment (822 and 164 cases, respectively) and their programs are centralized. In Sweden (457 cases), ovarian tissue cryopreservation is practiced at five of six centers and in Finland at all five centers (145 cases). Nearly all considered ovarian tissue cryopreservation to be experimental. In Iceland, embryo cryopreservation is the only option for fertility preservation. Most centers use slow-freezing methods for ovarian tissue cryopreservation. Most patients selected for ovarian tissue cryopreservation were newly diagnosed with cancer and the tissue was predominantly retrieved laparoscopically by unilateral oophorectomy. Only minor complications were reported. In total, 46 women have undergone ovarian tissue transplantation aiming at recovering fertility, 17 healthy children have been born and several additional pregnancies are currently ongoing. Whenever patients clinical condition is permissive, oocyte cryopreservation after hormonal stimulation is preferred for fertility preservation. Between 2012 and 2014, a smaller proportion of females have undergone fertility preservation in the Nordic centers, in comparison to males (1: 3). Conclusions. Overall, ovarian tissue cryopreservation was reported to be safe. Slow freezing methods are still preferred. Promising results of recovery of fertility have been reported in Nordic countries that have initiated ovarian tissue transplantation procedures.

  • 121.
    Roepke, E. Rasmark
    et al.
    Malmo and Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bruno, Valentina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy; Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Boij, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strid, C. Petersson
    Kalmar Hosp, Sweden.
    Piccione, E.
    Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Low-molecular-weight-heparin increases Th1-and Th17-associated chemokine levels during pregnancy in women with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss: a randomised controlled trial2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 12314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is widely used to treat recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) because of its anti-coagulant effects. Although in vitro studies have suggested additional immunological effects, these are debated. We therefore investigated whether LMWH could modulate immune responses in vivo during pregnancy of women with unexplained RPL. A Swedish open multi-centre randomised controlled trial included 45 women treated with tinzaparin and 42 untreated women. Longitudinally collected plasma samples were obtained at gestational weeks (gw) 6, 18, 28 and 34 and analysed by multiplex bead technology for levels of 11 cytokines and chemokines, chosen to represent inflammation and T-helper subset-associated immunity. Mixed linear models test on LMWH-treated and untreated women showed differences during pregnancy of the Th1-associated chemokines CXCL10 (p = 0.01), CXCL11 (p amp;lt; 0.001) and the Th17-associated chemokine CCL20 (p = 0.04), while CCL2, CCL17, CCL22, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL12, CXCL13 and IL-6 did not differ. Subsequent Students t-test showed significantly higher plasma levels of CXCL10 and CXCL11 in treated than untreated women at gw 28 and 34. The consistent increase in the two Th1-associated chemokines suggests a potential proinflammatory and unfavourable effect of LMWH treatment during later stages of pregnancy, when Th1 immunity is known to disrupt immunological tolerance.

  • 122.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    The effect of flip-angle on body composition using calibrated water-fat MRI.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study tested how the flip angle affects body composition analysis by MRI, if adipose tissue is used as an internal intensity reference. Whole-body water-fat images with flip angle 5° and 10° were collected from 29 women in an ongoing study. The images were calibrated based on the adipose tissue signal and whole-body total adipose, lean and soft tissue volumes were measured. A mean difference of 0.29 L, or 0.90 % of the average volume, and a coefficient of variation of 0.40 % was observed for adipose tissue.

  • 123.
    Ronnberg, A. K.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ostlund, I.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Fadl, H.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gottvall, Tomas
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, K.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Intervention during pregnancy to reduce excessive gestational weight gain-a randomised controlled trial2015In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 537-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo evaluate if a feasible, low-cost intervention could decrease the percentage of women gaining weight above the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations on gestational weight gain (GWG) compared with standard maternity care. DesignA randomised controlled interventional design. SettingAntenatal clinics (n=14) in orebro county, Sweden, participated. PopulationHealthy women with a body mass index (BMI) 19kg/m(2), age 18years and adequate knowledge of Swedish language who signed in for maternity care at 16weeks of gestation. MethodsStandard care was compared with a composite intervention consisting of education on recommended GWG according to IOM, application of personalised weight graph, formalised prescription of exercise and regular monitoring of GWG at every antenatal visit. OutcomeThe proportion of women gaining weight above IOM guidelines (1990) and mean GWG (kg) was compared between groups. ResultsIn all, 445 women were randomised and 374 women remained for analysis after delivery. A majority of the women analysed were normal weight (72%). The intervention reduced the proportion of women who exceeded the IOM guidelines (41.1% versus 50.0%). The reduction was, however, not statistically significant (P=0.086). Mean GWG was significantly lower among women receiving the intervention, 14.2kg (SD 4.4) versus 15.3kg (SD 5.4) in the standard care group (P=0.029). ConclusionsThe low-cost intervention programme tested did significantly reduce the mean GWG but the proportion of women who exceeded the IOM recommendations for GWG was not significantly lower. ClinicalTrials.gov Id NCT00451425

  • 124.
    Rosenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Staf, Christian
    Reg Canc Ctr, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Dahm-Kahler, Pernilla
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellman, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Reg Canc Ctr, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stalberg, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tholander, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Hogberg, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Data quality in the Swedish Quality Register of Gynecologic Cancer - a Swedish Gynecologic Cancer Group (SweGCG) study2018In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 346-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of data on endometrial (EC) and ovarian, fallopian tube, peritoneal, abdominal or pelvic cancers (OC) registered in the Swedish Quality Register of Gynecologic Cancer (SQRGC).Method: A random sample of 500 patients was identified in the SQRGC and their medical charts were reviewed for re-abstraction of 31 selected core variables by an independent validator. The data in the SQRGC and the re-abstracted data were compared. The data were collected from 25 hospitals evenly distributed throughout Sweden. The main outcomes were comparability, timeliness, completeness and validity. Coverage was compared with the National Cancer Register (NCR). Timeliness was defined as the speed of registration i.e. when patients were registered in the SQRGC relative to date of diagnosis. Internationally accepted coding systems for stage, grading and histologic type were used ensuring a high degree of comparability. Correlations were estimated using Pearsons correlation coefficient and Cohens kappa coefficient.Results: The completeness was 95%. The timeliness was 88-91% within 12 months of diagnosis. The median degree of agreement between re-abstracted data and data in the SQRGC was 82.1%, with a median kappa value of 0.73 for ordinate variables and a median Pearsons correlation coefficient of 0.96. The agreements for the type of surgery were 76% (95% CI 70-81%; kappa 0.49) and type of primary treatment 90% (95% CI 87-94%; kappa 0.85) in OC and in EC 88% (95% CI 84-93%; kappa 0.84). The agreements for the FIGO stage were in OC and EC 74% (95% CI 68-80%; kappa 0.69) and 87% (95% CI 82-91%; kappa 0.79), respectively.Conclusions: The data in the Swedish Quality Register for Gynecologic Cancer are of adequate quality in order to be used as a basis for research and to evaluate possible differences in treatment, lead times and treatment results.

  • 125.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pallant, Julie F.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Haines, Helen M.
    University of Melbourne, Australia; Northeast Health Wangaratta, Australia.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Maternal depressive symptoms have a negative impact on prenatal attachment - findings from a Swedish community sample2015In: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, ISSN 0264-6838, E-ISSN 1469-672X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 153-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate attachment and its association to obstetric and demographic factors as well as emotional well-being using a standard measure of prenatal attachment during pregnancy. Background: The strength of the mothers relationship with her baby has important implications in the postnatal period, influencing the relationship she develops with her child, and the quality of the care she provides. Methods: This was a population-based longitudinal survey comprising a consecutive sample from a one-year cohort in a Swedish county. In this study the three subscales of PAI-R (Prenatal Attachment Inventory - Revised) were used for evaluation of attachment. In total, 718 pregnant women participated in this study. Results: Women with elevated levels of depression (HADS-D greater than8) recorded lower attachment scores across all three PAI-R subscales. Lack of perceived support from partner was associated with lower scores on Interaction. Lack of support from own mother and own father were also associated with lower scores on all subscales. Attachment was also associated with feelings about the approaching birth and about the first weeks with the newborn, with women who reported less than positive feelings recording lower scores on each of the PAI-R subscales. Conclusion: A focus on attachment during antenatal care and the use of PAI-R during pregnancy provides a means of identifying those women who show lower levels of attachment and possible emotional problems that may impact on emotional health and the birth process.

  • 126.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Lindell, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Akesson, Karin
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Futurum Academic Health and Care, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Caesarean section per se does not increase the risk of offspring developing type 1 diabetes: a Swedish population-based study2015In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 58, no 11, p. 2517-2524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis Some studies have revealed a relationship between Caesarean section (CS) and type 1 diabetes, while other studies have not. By using the Swedish paediatric quality register we investigated whether birth by CS is related to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes during childhood. Methods All children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes from 2000 to 2012 and included in the register (n= 9,376) were matched with four controls by year, day of birth, sex and county of birth from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results Overall, 13.5% of deliveries were by CS. By group, 14.7% of children who developed type 1 diabetes were delivered by CS compared with 13.3% of control children (p less than 0.001). Mothers with diabetes more often gave birth by CS than mothers without diabetes (78.8% vs 12.7%, p less than 0.001). In a logistic regression model adjusting for maternal age, maternal diabetes and BMI in early pregnancy, the OR for CS was 1.0. A child who developed type 1 diabetes and had a mother with type 1 diabetes at the time of delivery had the highest OR to have been born by CS. Children of mothers without diabetes, delivered by CS, had no increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Maternal diabetes was the strongest predictor of childhood diabetes (OR 3.4), especially if the mother had type 1 diabetes (OR 7.54). Conclusions/interpretation CS had no influence on the risk of type 1 diabetes during childhood or adolescence. However, maternal diabetes itself strongly increased the risk of offspring developing type 1 diabetes.

  • 127.
    Sarberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sleep disorders during pregnancy2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Sleep disorders are known to increase in prevalence during pregnancy, and associations between disturbed sleep during pregnancy and adverse outcomes for mother and child have been reported in a number of studies. However, most of these studies were retrospective and too small to satisfactorily demonstrate the association.

    Aims

    • To prospectively investigate the development of snoring during pregnancy and assess if there is an association between snoring and sleepiness or adverse pregnancy outcomes.
    • To study the development of restless legs syndrome during and after pregnancy, and whether it is associated with snoring or other pregnancy-related symptoms.
    • To investigate the possible association between depressive symptoms in the postpartum period and sleep related problems during pregnancy, using screening instruments.
    • To objectively evaluate sleep disordered breathing in pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls and to evaluate differences in Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores between the two groups.

    Methods

    Questionnaires containing subjective rating of snoring, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and symptoms of restless legs were used in all studies. Information from the medical records of the pregnant women was also utilized. For objective evaluation of sleep disordered breathing, nocturnal respiratory recordings were used. In the research for the first three papers the same cohort of 500 pregnant women was followed on three occasions during pregnancy and also after delivery, and for the last paper, 100 other pregnant women were compared to 80 nonpregnant controls.

    Results and conclusions

    Both snoring and restless legs syndrome increase during pregnancy, but this had no convincing impact on obstetric outcome. Sleep recordings could not verify an increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among pregnant women. Restless legs syndrome was associated with snoring and could persist after delivery. Women who had high scores on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in the last trimester of pregnancy showed more depressive symptoms in the postpartum period. No difference in item scoring of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale was found between pregnant women and controls.

  • 128.
    Sarberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing during pregnancy2016In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1231-1237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objectives: To investigate if sleep recordings show differences in prevalence of sleep-disturbed breathing among pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls. To compare the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) scores between the two groups. To evaluate obstetric outcomes.

    Setting: At one antenatal care center at an outpatient unit in Linköping, Sweden.

    Participants: One hundred pregnant women (gestational week 24-34) and 80 non-pregnant women age- and body mass index-matched as controls.

    Interventions: Whole-night respiratory recordings were performed in the homes of all participants, who also answered the same questionnaire, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.

    Measurements and results: Objectively recorded snoring was more common among the pregnant women (median value 10% of total estimated sleep time) than among the non-pregnant controls (2.5% of total sleep time, p<0.001). The prevalence of obstructive events was low and similar in pregnant and non-pregnant women (1% vs. 3% had obstructive apnea-hypopnea index ≥5). The total ESS score was higher among pregnant women than controls (median 9 vs. 7, p<0.001) but no significant differences were found between the two groups in the scores for the separate items of the ESS. Sleep-disturbed breathing and snoring showed no impact on obstetric outcome. There were no significant associations between either subjectively reported or objectively recorded snoring and ESS scores.

    Conclusion: Snoring increases during pregnancy, but sleep recordings could not verify an increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among pregnant women. Development of obstructive sleep apnea is not a likely explanation for the increased daytime sleepiness seen in pregnant women.

  • 129.
    Sarberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Postpartum depressive symptoms and its association to daytime sleepiness and restless legs during pregnancy2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, article id 137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the possible association between depressive symptoms in the postpartum period and sleep related problems during pregnancy, using screening instruments.

    Methods: In a prospective study 293 women in the last trimester of pregnancy answered a questionnaire about sleep related problems in terms of symptoms of restless legs, snoring and daytime sleepiness. They also completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The same women were screened for depressive symptoms using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) four to ten weeks after giving birth. Additional information about social data, pregnancy and delivery was received from the medical charts.

    Results: Women with postpartum depressive symptoms had higher prevalence of sleep related problems including excessive daytime sleepiness defined as ESS score ≥10 (OR 3.84, CI 1.57-9.39), and restless legs syndrome (OR 2.837 CI 1.18-6.84) in last trimester of pregnancy, when adjusted for sociodemographic factors and obstetric risk factors.

    Conclusions: Depressive symptoms after childbirth are preceded by disturbed sleep already during pregnancy. The results from Epworth Sleepiness Scale completed during pregnancy might be used for detecting women at risk, enabling preventive interventions.

  • 130.
    Sharma, Surendra
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Women and Infants Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Obituary: Leif Matthiesen, MD, PhD (1954‐2017)2017In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 78, no 4, article id e12740Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Leif Matthiesen, an evergreen member and supporter of the American Society for Reproductive Immunology (ASRI), died on April 29, 2017, following a hard fought battle with glioblastoma. We all hoped that Leif being a fearless person and a fun‐loving physician scientist would beat all the odds against this dreaded disease and come out of it with flying colors. Alas, our hopes were given a serious thought by the Almighty. We as a community of friends and scientific colleagues are saddened by the loss of such a wonderful human being and a noteworthy member of the ASRI.

  • 131.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Validation of the Fear of Pelvic Examination Scale (F-PEXS) - measuring students fear of performing a pelvic examination2015In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Medical students of both genders often show signs of fear before they perform their first pelvic examination. This situation puts a novice in a special setting of intimacy never experienced before and where different emotions may emerge. A specially designed questionnaire, the Fear of Pelvic Examination Scale (F-PEXS) has been developed to assess fear in this context. The aim of this paper is to describe the validation of the F-PEXS. Methods: Undergraduate medical students (N = 100) answered the F-PEXS one week before, prior to and after a learning session with professional patients to assess levels of anxiety towards performing the pelvic exam. The validity of the scale was examined using item analysis, reliability assessments and analysis of the construct validity in comparing the F-PEXS with the Spielberger State and Trait Anxiety Inventory and Becks Anxiety Inventory. Results: The F-PEXS has very good reliability (Cronbachs alpha 0.96) and good construct validity. The mean score on the F-PEXS did not differ between gender either before or after the learning session. Conclusions: The F-PEXS can be used to assess students fear of performing the pelvic examination, to evaluate new strategies for learning the pelvic exam and to evaluate the outcome of such interventions.

  • 132.
    Skagerström, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Asking about alcohol consumption during pregnancy: how prevalence rate is affected by the formulation of the questionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of alcohol consumption during pregnancy in Sweden have reported prevalence rates from 6% to 30%. The reason for these differences is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare how alcohol consumption is reported by pregnant women when asked explicitly to report drinking after pregnancy recognition compared with asking about drinking during pregnancy without stating if the time before pregnancy recognition should be included. Data were collected from two groups of women. The women in group A were asked to estimate their alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the women in group B were asked to estimate their alcohol consumption during pregnancy, after pregnancy recognition. There was a significant difference in the reported prevalence rate between the cohorts: 9.3% in cohort A (n=1041) and 6.8% in cohort B (n=933). The results from this study may explain some of the variations in previously reported prevalence rates. To be able to compare different studies, it is important to be clear about the methodological aspects.

  • 133.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lampic, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Attitudes about donor information differ greatly between IVF couples using their own gametes and those receiving or donating oocytes or sperm2016In: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, ISSN 1058-0468, E-ISSN 1573-7330, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 703-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study is to examine attitudes towards aspects of donation treatment based on a national Swedish sample of gamete donors and couples undergoing assisted reproductive techniques (ART). The present study was part of the Swedish study on gamete donation, a prospective longitudinal cohort study including all fertility clinics performing gamete donation in Sweden. The sample comprised 164 oocyte donors, 89 sperm donors, 251 people treated with their own gametes (in vitro fertilisation (IVF)), 213 oocyte recipients and 487 sperm recipients. A study-specific questionnaire was used. Attitudes vary widely between couples using their own gametes for IVF and those receiving or donating oocyte or sperm. The groups differed in their responses to most questions. Oocyte and sperm donors were more likely to agree with the statements "The donor should be informed if the donation results in a child" and "Offspring should receive some information about the donor during mature adolescence" than recipients of donated gametes and couples treated with their own gametes. Donor recipients, IVF couples and donors expressed different attitudes towards openness and information when it came to gamete donation, and those differences seemed to depend on their current reproductive situation.

  • 134.
    Smirthwaite, Goldina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Lundstrom, Mats
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lykke, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Correction: Inequity in waiting for cataract surgery - an analysis of data from the Swedish National Cataract Register (vol 15, 10, 2016)2016In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 15, no 63Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 135.
    Smirthwaite, Goldina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Lundstrom, Mats
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lykke, Nina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Inequity in waiting for cataract surgery - an analysis of data from the Swedish National Cataract Register2016In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 15, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Swedish Health and Medical Services act states that good care should be given to the entire population on equal terms. Still studies show that access to care in Sweden differ related to for example gender and socioeconomic variables. One of the areas in Swedish health care that has attracted attention for potential inequity in access is Cataract Extraction (CE). Previous studies of access to CE in Sweden show that female patients have in general poorer vision before they are operated and longer waiting times for CE than male patients. The aim of the study was to describe the waiting times in different patient groups with regards to visual acuity, gender, age, native country, educational level, annual income and whether the patient was retired or still working. Methods: The study was designed as a register study of 102 532 patients who have had CE performed in Sweden 2010-2011. Linear regression was used to analyse the association between patient characteristics and waiting times. Mean waiting times for women and men were calculated for all groups. Results: At significance level p &lt; 0.05 longer waiting times corresponded to patients having good visual acuity, being of female gender, high age, retired, born outside the Nordic countries and having low income and education. Calculations of mean waiting times for all groups showed that women had longer waiting times than men. Conclusions: The differences between groups defined, for example, by gender, age, native country, income, education and retirement are statistically significant. We do not consider them as clinically significant, but we consider the consistent pattern that we have found noteworthy in relation to the principle of equity in health care.

  • 136.
    Stalberg, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Skane Univ Hosp Lund, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Carlson, Joseph
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Dahm-Kahler, Pernilla
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Floter-Radestad, Angelique
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hellman, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Marcickiewicz, Janusz
    Reg Canc Ctr Vast, Sweden; Hallands Hosp Varberg, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Tholander, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Hogberg, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lymphovascular space invasion as a predictive factor for lymph node metastases and survival in endometrioid endometrial cancer - a Swedish Gynecologic Cancer Group (SweGCG) studyIn: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) on the risk of lymph node metastases and survival in endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: As regard the study design, this is a cohort study based on prospectively recorded data. Patients with endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma registered in the Swedish Quality Registry for Gynecologic Cancer 2010-2017 with FIGO stages I-III and verified nodal status were identified (n = 1587). LVSI together with established risk factors, namely DNA ploidy, FIGO grade, myometrial invasion and age, were included in multivariable regression analyses with lymph node metastases as the dependent variable. Associations between the risk factors and overall and relative survival were included in multivariable models. Estimates of risk ratios (RR), hazard ratios (HR), excess mortality rate ratios (EMR), and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results: The presence of LVSI presented the strongest association with lymph node metastases (RR = 5.46, CI 3.69-8.07, p amp;lt; .001) followed by deep myometrial invasion (RR = 1.64, CI 1.13-2.37). In the multivariable survival analyses, LVSI (EMR = 7.69, CI 2.03-29.10,) and non-diploidy (EMR = 3.23, CI 1.25-8.41) were associated with decreased relative survival. In sub-analyses including only patients with complete para-aortic and pelvic lymphadenectomy and negative lymph nodes (n = 404), only LVSI (HR = 2.50, CI 1.05-5.98) was associated with a worsened overall survival. Conclusion: This large nationwide study identified LVSI as the strongest independent risk factor for lymph node metastases and decreased survival in patients with endometrioid adenocarcinomas. Moreover, decreased overall survival was also seen in patients with LVSI-positive tumors and negative lymph nodes, indicating that hematogenous dissemination might also be important.

  • 137.
    Stenfelt, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Fertilitetsctr Stockholm, Sweden.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wanggren, Kjell
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Attitudes toward surrogacy among doctors working in reproductive medicine and obstetric care in Sweden2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 9, p. 1114-1121Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionThe aim of this study was to investigate attitudes and opinions towards surrogacy among physicians working within obstetrics and reproductive medicine in Sweden. Material and methodsPhysicians working within medically assisted reproduction (MAR), antenatal care and obstetrics were invited to participate in a cross-sectional nationwide survey study. The study-specific questionnaire measured attitudes and experiences in three domains: attitudes towards surrogacy, assessment of prospective surrogate mothers, and antenatal and obstetric care for surrogate mothers. ResultsOf the 103 physicians who participated (response rate 74%), 63% were positive or neutral towards altruistic surrogacy being introduced in Sweden. However, only 28% thought that it should be publicly financed. Physicians working at fertility clinics were more positive towards legalization as well as public financing of surrogacy compared than were those working within antenatal and delivery care. The majority of the physicians agreed that surrogacy involves the risk of exploitation of womens bodies (60%) and that there is a risk that the commissioning couple might pay the surrogate mother under the table (82%). They also expressed concerns about potential surrogate mothers not being able to understand fully the risks of entering pregnancy on behalf of someone else. ConclusionThere is a relatively strong support among physicians working within obstetrics and reproductive medicine for the introduction of surrogacy in Sweden. However, the physicians expressed concerns about the surrogate mothers health as well as the risk of coercion. Further discussions about legalization of surrogacy should include views from individuals within a wide field of different medical professions and laymen.

  • 138.
    Stålberg, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bjurberg, M.
    Skånes University of Sjukhus, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahm-Kahler, P.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falconer, H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Holmberg, E.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Staf, C.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Tholander, B.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Högberg, T.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Risk factors for lymph node metastases in women with endometrial cancer: A population-based, nation-wide register studyOn behalf of the Swedish Gynecological Cancer Group2017In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 12, p. 2693-2700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of lymphadenectomy in the management of early endometrial cancer remains controversial. In the recent ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO guidelines, lymphadenectomy is recommended for patients with endometrioid adenocarcinoma Grade 3 with deep myometrial invasion, but complete agreement was not achieved. In Sweden, DNA aneuploidy has been included as a high-risk factor. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of tumor histology, FIGO grade, DNA ploidy and myometrial invasion (MI) on occurrence of lymph node metastasis (LNM) in patients with endometrial cancer. The study design is a retrospective cohort study based on prospectively recorded register data. Endometrial cancer patients registered in the Swedish Quality Registry for Gynecologic Cancer 2010-2015 with FIGO Stages I-III and verified nodal status were included. Data on DNA ploidy, histology, FIGO grade and MI were included in multivariable log-binomial regression analyses with LNM as dependent variable. 1,165 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The multivariable analyses revealed increased risk of LNM in patients with tumors with MI50% (risk ratio [RR]=4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0-5.6), nonendometrioid compared to endometrioid histology (RR 1.8; CI 1.4-2.4) and FIGO Grade 3 compared to Grade 1-2 tumors (RR 1.5; CI 1.1-2.0). No statistically significant association between DNA ploidy status and LNM was detected. This population-based, nation-wide study in women with endometrial cancer confirms a strong association between MI50%, nonendometrioid histology and FIGO Grade 3, respectively, and LNM. DNA ploidy should not be included in the preoperative decision making of removing nodes or not. Whats new? Whether lymphadenectomy is beneficial for women with endometrial cancer remains uncertain. Moreover, additional studies are needed to explore factors that reliably predict lymph node metastasis (LNM). Here, multiple factors, including tumor histology, grade of differentiation and DNA aneuploidy, were evaluated for associations with LNM risk in women with endometrial cancer and verified lymph node status. Most significantly, deep myometrial invasion in tumors increased LNM risk fourfold, whereas DNA ploidy had essentially no impact on LNM risk. The findings confirm the predictive relevance of myometrial invasion, histology and grade reported in previous single-center and multicenter studies.

  • 139.
    Sundell, Micaela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ginstman, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Månsson, Agnes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Forslund, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Patterns of prescription and discontinuation of contraceptives for Swedish women with obesity and normal-weight women2019In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aimed to explore the prescription of different contraceptive methods to Swedish women with obesity and to compare the pattern of prescription and adherence to treatment between this group and normal-weight women. Materials and methods: This study included 371 women with obesity and 744 matched normal-weight women, aged 18-40. Medical records were scrutinised for the period 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014. The retrieved variables included: background characteristics, prescribed contraceptive methods, adverse effects, duration of treatment, reason for discontinuation and bleeding pattern. Result: Progestin-only pills were mainly prescribed to women with obesity (44% vs. 20%, p = 0.001) whereas combined hormonal contraception was mainly prescribed to normal-weight women (60% vs. 21%, p amp;lt; 0.0001). Thirty-three percent vs. 25% (p = 0.003) discontinued their contraceptive method within 1 year. The most commonly declared reason for discontinuation was bleeding disturbance (14.7% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The most commonly prescribed contraceptive method in women with obesity was progestin-only pills, but surprisingly many women with obesity were prescribed combined hormonal contraception despite current Swedish and European guidelines. Incident users with obesity were significantly more likely to discontinue their contraceptive method within the first year of the study period, compared with incident normal-weight users.

  • 140.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wendel, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Freland, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Geffers, Robert
    Mucosal Immunity, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HCI), Braunschweig, Germany.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Decidual macrophages contribute to the unique leukocyte composition at the fetal-maternal interface by production of IL-35, induction of Treg cells and production of homeostatic chemokines2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reproductive success depends on the ability of the maternal immune system to adapt in order to tolerate and support the growing semi-allogenic fetus. Macrophages, being a major leukocyte population in the uterine mucosa (decidua), may play a central role in promoting the unique composition and regulatory phenotype of leukocytes that is characteristic for the fetal-maternal interface. We show that decidual macrophages display a predominantly immune regulatory gene profile and produce the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-35 but no other members of the IL-12 family (IL-12, IL-23 and IL-27). Decidual macrophages also promoted the selective expansion of CD25highFoxp3+ Tregs but not of Tbet+ Th1, GATA-3+ Th2 and Rorγt+ Th17 cells. In addition, these macrophages preferentially secreted the monocyte- and Treg-associated chemokines CCL2 and CCL18, while Th1-, Th2- and Th17-related chemokines were produced at low levels. Among in vitro macrophages, distinct chemokine profiles were observed; IL-4/13 upregulated Th2-associated chemokines (CCL17, CCL22, CCL26) while LPS/IFNγ upregulated Th1-associated chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL5). M(IL-10) macrophages (induced by M-CSF and IL-10) showed a chemokine profile similar to that of decidual macrophages, as shown by gene expression and protein analysis. By using M(IL-10) macrophages as a model of decidual macrophages, we show that these cells promote the recruitment of CD14+ monocytes, while migration of several lymphocyte populations was unaltered or prevented. These data implicate decidual macrophages as critical regulators of the decidual leukocyte composition and phenotype that is associated with successful reproduction.

  • 141.
    Svenvik, Maria
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Preterm Birth: A Prominent Risk Factor for Low Apgar Scores2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 978079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To determine predictive risk factors for Apgar scores less than 7 at 5 minutes at two hospitals providing tertiary care and secondary care, respectively. Methods. A retrospective registry cohort study of 21126 births (2006-2010) using data from digital medical records. Risk factors were analyzed by logistic regression analyses. Results. AS(5min) less than 7 was multivariately associated with the following: preterm birth; gestational week 32 + 0-36 + 6, OR = 3.9 (95% CI 2.9-5.3); week 28 + 0-31 + 6, OR = 8 (5-12); week less than 28 + 0, OR = 15 (8-29); postterm birth, OR = 2.0 (1.7-2.3); multiple pregnancy, OR = 3.53 (1.79-6.96); previous cesarean section, OR = 3.67 (2.31-5.81); BMI 25-29, OR = 1.30 (1.09-1.55); BMI greater than= 30 OR = 1.70 (1.20-2.41); nonnormal CTG at admission, OR = 1.98 (1.48-2.66). greater than= 1-para was associated with a decreased risk for AS(5min) less than 7, OR = 0.34 (0.25-0.47). In the univariate logistic regression analysis AS(5min) less than 7 was associated with tertiary level care, OR = 1.48 (1.17-1.87); however, in the multivariate analysis there was no significant difference. Conclusion. A number of partially preventable risk factors were identified, preterm birth being the most evident. Further, no significant difference between the two hospital levels regarding the risk for low Apgar scores was detected.

  • 142.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Agnafors, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Anxiety in women - a Swedish national three-generational cohort study2018In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 18, article id 168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Findings from animal and human studies indicate that anxiety and stress have a negative influence on the child and mother. The aim of this study was to explore the risk for having an anxiety diagnosis and the impact of the diagnosis in a three generational perspective. Methods: The information was retrieved from Swedish population-based registries. All women who gave birth between 1973 and 1977 (n 169,782), their daughters (n 244,152), and subsequently also the offspring of the daughters (n 381,953) were followed until 2013. Results: We found that 4% of the mothers and 6% of the grandmothers had been diagnosed with anxiety. Women who had mothers with an anxiety disorder were more than twice as likely to have an anxiety disorder themselves compared to all other women (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 2.04-2.30). In the third generation, the children born to mothers with an anxiety disorder, the odds ratio of being diagnosed with anxiety was more than twice as high than for the rest of the population (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 2.01-3.20). If both the mother and the grandmother had had an anxiety disorder the odds ratio for the child having a diagnosis of anxiety was three times higher (OR = 3.11, 95% CI = 2.04-4.75). Anxiety diagnosis in the two previous generations also increased the likelihood of the child having either more than two inpatient visits or more than 10 outpatient visits (OR = 2.64, 95% CI = 2.40-2.91 and OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 2.01-2.43, respectively). Conclusions: The intergenerational effect on anxiety is high. In order to minimize the risk for further transmission of anxiety disorders, increased awareness and generous use of effective treatment regimes might be of importance.

  • 143.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Palmquist, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Angerbjörn, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Effects of continuous midwifery labour support for women with severe fear of childbirth2015In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, no 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Continuous support by a midwife during childbirth has shown positive effects on the duration of active labour, use of pain relief and frequency of caesarean section (CS) in women without fear of childbirth (FOC). We have evaluated how continuous support by a specially assigned midwife during childbirth affects birth outcome and the subjective experience of women with severe FOC. Methods: A case-control pilot study with an index group of 14 women with severe FOC and a reference group of 28 women without FOC giving birth. In this study the index group received continuous support during childbirth. Results: The women with severe FOC more often had an induction of labour. The parous women with severe FOC had a shorter duration of active labour compared to the parous reference women (p = 0.047). There was no difference in caesarean section frequency between the two groups. Women with severe FOC experienced a very high anxiety level during childbirth (OR = 20.000, 95 % CI: 3.036-131.731). Conclusion: Women with severe FOC might benefit from continuous support by a midwife during childbirth. Midwives should acknowledge the importance of continuous support in order to enhance the experience of childbirth in women with severe FOC.

  • 144.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kvist, Ulrik
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordgaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Swedish Police Authority, National Forensic Centre, Linkoping, Sweden.
    The optimal number of offspring per gamete donor2015In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 94, no 9, p. 1022-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our aim was to create a mathematical basis to calculate the risks for unintended matings of consanguineous half-siblings from a donor in a society with approximately 10 million inhabitants. The Curie-Cohen model for calculation of the risk for consanguineous mating was used. When the number of offspring per donor is limited to 10, then the model gives a yearly risk for consanguineous matings below 1%. Thus 10 offspring gives a risk for consanguineous matings of 0.9% per year, or approximately once in every 100years. The risk increases exponentially: with 15 offspring it exceeds 2% and with 25 it reaches up above 5%.

  • 145.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindell Pettersson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nedstrand, Elizabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Evaluation of risk factors’ importance on adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes in women aged 40 years or older2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, article id 92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Women of advanced age (40 years or older) are generally, at risk for pregnancy and delivery related problems. In addition, there is limited knowledge on being of advanced age and having been given Assisted Reproductive Treatment (ART) and its association with negative obstetric outcomes. Therefore, data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register was used to investigate pregnancy and neonatal outcomes for women aged 40 or more who had given birth. The secondary aim was to compare the obstetric outcomes of women who had used ART and women who had not undergoneART while adjusting for marital status across the age groups.

    Method

    Women of advanced age who had given birth in Sweden during 2007–2012 formed the index group, n = 37,558; a reference group of women comprised 71,472 women under the age of 40. An additional subgroup of women aged 45 or older when giving birth was also formed, n = 2229. The obstetric and neonatal data for all the women was derived from national register data.

    Results

    Women of advanced age were more often single, had undergone ART, and more often experienced adverse obstetric outcomes than did younger women. The neonate’s health was also more often adversely affected expressed as being born with low birth weight and Small for Gestational Age (SGA), having lower Apgar scores, and having more health problems during the first week compared to the reference group.

    Conclusions

    Women who are approaching the upper limit of fecundity are at greater risk for having children who are preterm and SGA. The adverse effects of being preterm and SGA may have negative long-term effects, not only on the children but also on the mothers. This needs to be addressed more frequently in a clinical setting when advising women of all ages on pregnancy and ART treatment.

  • 146.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Cross-border surrogacy: Experiences of heterosexual and gay parents in Sweden2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 68-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Surrogacy is a controversial method of assisted reproduction that is not permitted in many countries. While there is some evidence that families following surrogacy seem to fare well, there is limited knowledge about the experiences of parents who turn to cross-border surrogacy. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the experiences of heterosexual parents and gay fathers who chose cross-border surrogacy to have a child. Material and methods This cross-sectional survey describes the experiences of 30 families (18 heterosexual parent and 12 gay father families). Participants were recruited through a website for a Swedish surrogacy interest group. The participants were requested individually to complete a postal questionnaire including study-specific questions on their experiences of disclosure and the Swedish Parenting Stress Questionnaire. Results All couples but one were still living together and had a child (3 months to 5 years). Parenting stress levels were generally low and were not related to sexual orientation. While almost all parents were open about the childs mode of conception in contacts with health care, gay fathers were significantly more open about using surrogacy in contacts with preschool (P = 0.004) and child recreational activities (P = 0.005) compared with heterosexual parents. A majority described being treated positively or "as any other parent" in these contexts. Conclusions Heterosexual and gay parents reported low levels of parenting stress and generally experienced positive or neutral reactions to their parenthood in contacts with healthcare providers, in preschool, and in the childs recreational activities.

  • 147.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Törnblom, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Nelson Follin, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Women born with very low birth weight have similar menstrual cycle pattern, pregnancy rates and hormone profiles compared with women born at term2019In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Individuals born very preterm or with very low birth weight (VLBW) have a reduced likelihood to reproduce according to population-based register studies. Extremely low-birth weight born adults had a lower reproduction rate for both men and women in a follow-up study.

    Aim

    To investigate if being born with VLBW is associated with differences in the reproductive health, i.e. age of menarche, menstrual cycle pattern, pregnancy rates and hormone profile compared with women born at term.

    Methods

    A prospective long-term follow-up of a cohort of live-born VLBW children and their controls studied repeatedly since birth and now assessed at 26–28 years of age. Of the totally 80 girls enrolled from birth 49 women (24 VLBW women and 25 controls) participated in the current follow-up. The women’s anthropometric data and serum hormone levels were analysed.

    Results

    The reproductive hormone levels, including Anti-Mullerian Hormone, did not differ significantly between VLBW women and their controls. Both groups reported menstrual cycle irregularities and pregnancies to the same extent but the VLBW women reported 1.5 years later age of menarche. The VLBW subjects had a catch-up growth within 18 months of birth but remained on average 5 cm shorter in adult height. There were no significant differences in BMI, sagittal abdominal diameter, blood pressure or in their answers regarding life style between the VLBW women and the controls.

    Conclusion

    No differences in the reproductive hormone levels were found between VLBW women and their controls. Although age at menarche was somewhat higher in the VLBW group menstrual cycles and pregnancy rates were similar in the VLBW and control groups. Further follow-up studies are required to elucidate the health outcomes of being born VLBW.

  • 148.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Vikström, Josefin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jablonowska, Barbara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Men report good mental health 20 to 23 years after in vitro fertilisation treatment2015In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, no 1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Infertility and infertility treatment are known to have negative short-term psychological consequences for men and women, with more long-term consequences for women. The long-term wellbeing and mental health of men who have experienced in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment has not been extensively described in the literature. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the mental health of men 20 to 23 years after IVF treatment. Method: The Symptom Checklist 90 tool was used to assess the self-perceived mental health of men who were part of a couple that underwent IVF treatment at Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden, 20 to 23 years earlier. We enrolled 292 out of the 490 men who took part in the hospitals IVF programme from 1986 to 1989 and compared them to an aged-matched control group. In addition, the men who had remained childless were compared to those who had fathered biological children and those who had adopted children. Results: The overall mental health of the men who had received IVF was good. We found that 54 % of the men had fathered their own biological children, 21 % were childless and the remainder were part of a couple that had gone on to adopt. The childless men displayed more mental health problems than the other men in the study, as did men who were unemployed, single or divorced. Conclusion: This study carried out 20 to 23 years after IVF treatment showed that the majority of the men who took part were in good mental health. Those who remained childless faced an increased risk of negative psychological symptoms and men who were single showed more symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders.

  • 149.
    Sörensdotter, Renita
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Siwe, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Touching the private parts: how gender and sexuality norms affect medical students first pelvic examination2016In: Culture, Health and Sexuality, ISSN 1369-1058, E-ISSN 1464-5351, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 1295-1308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gynaecologists are in a position to challenge norms about gender and sexuality in relation to female genitals. Through their work they have the opportunity to educate patients, which is why teaching medical students to perform examinations in a gender sensitive way is significant. Medical students performing their first pelvic examination often experience the examination as uncomfortable because it is a body part that is connected to sex and to something private. This paper uses medical students interpretations of performing their first pelvic examination as a means to discuss how cultural norms for gender, sexuality and female genitals affect these examinations. Issues raised include how cultural connotations of female genitals affect the pelvic examination, how female and male students relate differently to examining female genitals and the interpretations they make in relation to themselves. Findings show that the female genitals are perceived as a special body part connected to sexuality and intimacy. Students gender also affects the interpretations they make during pelvic examinations. Norms of gender, sexuality and female genitals need to be challenged in the teaching and performance of pelvic examination in order to demystify this experience.

  • 150.
    Tordön, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Fredlund, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Pribe, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Background, experience of abuse, and mental health among adolescents in out-of-home care: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish high school national sample2019In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To compare experiences for adverse events, especially sexual abuse, and mental health in a group of high school students in out-of-home care with a representative sample of peers of the same age and similar educational attainment living with their parents.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A sample of 5839 students in the third year of Swedish high school, corresponding to a response rate of 59.7%, answered a study specific questionnaire. Data from 41 students living in out-of-home care were compared with data from peers not in out-of-home care in a cross-sectional analyze.

    RESULTS: Students in out-of-home care had more often an immigrant background and a non-heterosexual orientation, had more often experienced physical and penetrative sexual abuse, and more often sought healthcare for mental problems. Disclosure of sexual abuse was less common, and acts of persuasion or adults' use of their social position was more common among students in out-of-home care.

    CONCLUSIONS: Even where the protective factor 'senior educational attainment' is present, risks for abuse and poor mental health are evident for adolescents in out-of-home care. Disclosure of adversity, when it has occurred, ought to be higher among these adolescents with regular contact with social services, but our findings indicate tendencies for the opposite. We therefore suggest routines to be established to screen for adverse life events and mental health actively, along with general and systematic assessments of adversity and mental health during care.

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