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  • 101.
    Malmenholt, Ann
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lohmander, Anette
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS): a survey of knowledge and experience of Swedish Speech-Language Pathologists2012In: / [ed] Alice Lee & Fiona Gibbon, Cork University College, 2012, p. 143-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) are seen by many speech and language pathologists (SLPs) in Sweden. It is commonly believed that these patients are difficult to diagnose and treat due to the absence of a validated list of diagnostic features (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2007) and lack of evidence for a wide range of treatment approaches reported (Morgan & Vogel, 2009). Speech-language pathologists’ perspectives on assessment of CAS have been studied by Forrest (2003). She asked SLPs about which three characteristics they thought were crucial for diagnosing CAS. The diversity of SLPs view on CAS diagnostic markers was documented. Not less than 50 different characteristics were listed, making inconsistent productions the most frequently noted feature (14.1%).  Experience and knowledge about the typical symptoms of CAS among Swedish SLPs would be a valuable first step towards a common routine for diagnosis of this group of patients in Sweden. Aim: The aim of this paper was to perform a survey among Swedish clinical SLPs regarding symptoms, praxis for clinical diagnosis and description of patients with CAS. Methods & Procedures: A web-based questionnaire was sent to Swedish SLPs working with pre- and primary school-aged children asking 25 questions about the clinicians background, years of clinical experience, skills of assessment and intervention, estimation of own competence and opinion about need for further education concerning this particular group. The SLPs were asked to estimate the prevalence for CAS based on their own clinical experience.Outcomes & Results: One hundred-seventy-five clinical SLPs with varying experience responded, which equals a response rate of 60%. About half of them usually diagnosed CAS. In the rating of typical symptoms of CAS 85% suggested inconsistent errors as the core feature of the disorder, 82% noticed difficulties with automaticity and 71% difficulties with sequence maintenance. In 88 % of answers children with CAS were considered to make slow progress in treatment and 80% estimated that these children typically had persisting difficulties and constraints even in primary school. There was a wide range of estimated prevalence figures for CAS from less than 1% to around 50%. Almost all SLPs who answered the questionnaire reported a need for further education about CAS.Conclusions: Although Swedish SLPs rated their own knowledge about CAS as insufficient, the rating of the key classification criterion for the disorder was high, as was the view that these children make slow progress in treatment. Estimation of prevalence for CAS was highly diverse, reflecting the difficulties with the broad definition and large variation within this disorder. The collected data of the Swedish clinical SLPs experience and knowledge about CAS revealed an important consensus on the core diagnostic features but also a vagueness regarding best treatment. This reflects the current knowledge in this field and will be taken into account in continuing work towards a common and evidence based practice.

    References

    American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Childhood Apraxia of Speech [Position Statement] 2007. Available from www.asha.org/policy.)

    Forrest, K. (2003). Diagnostic criteria of developmental apraxia of speech used by clinical speech-language pathologists. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 12, 376–380.

    Morgan & Vogel. Cochrane review of treatment for childhood apraxia of speech. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2009 Mar;45(1):103-10.)

  • 102.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    A comparison of studio recordings and recordings of spontaneous speech: assessments of voice quality in pre-school children2011In: Pan European Voice Conference (PEVOC9), Marseille, France / [ed] Antoine Giovanni & Nathalie Henrich, Marseille, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well controlled recording in a studio is the basis for voice rehabilitation. However, this laboratory like recording method can be questioned since voice use in a natural environment may be quite different. In children’s natural environment high background noise levels are common and an important factor contributing to voice problems. The noise exposure often occurs in day-care centers with the children themselves as the primary noise source (McAllister, Granqvist, Sjölander, Sundberg 2009). The aim of the present study was to compare perceptual evaluations of voice quality from a controlled recording to recordings of spontaneous speech in children’s natural environment in a day-care setting. Ten five-year-old children were recorded three times during a day at the day-care. The controlled speech material consisted of repeated sentences. Matching sentences were selected from the spontaneous speech. All sentences were repeated times three. The recordings were randomized and analyzed acoustically and evaluated perceptually by three expert listeners. Statistic analyses of all recordings showed that the laboratory sentences represent spontaneous speech characteristics regarding degree of hoarseness (r=.52) and to a lesser extent also for breathiness (r=. 401). For boys a correlation was found only for the parameter breathiness (r=.539) and for girls only for hoarseness (r=.648).  

     

    References

    McAllister, A., Granqvist, S. Sjölander, P. Sundberg, J. (2009). Child voice and noise: A pilot study of the effect of a day at the day-care on ten children’s voice quality according to perceptual evaluation. J Voice, Sep;23(5):587-93.

  • 103.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, intervention och teknik, Logopedi, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Oral and Verbal Apraxia in Children: Assessment, intervention and outcome2013Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Two advanced courses on oral and verbal apraxia in children have been held at Linköping University in the spring of 2009 and 2011. Several international researchers participated as lecturers and contributed to the success of the courses and the high course evaluations. As an examination assignment several students chose to do case studies investigating the treatment outcome of different methods for children or teenagers with oral and verbal apraxia. Many were inspired by the method Dynamic Temporal and Tactile Cueing, DTTC that was thoroughly described by Professor Edythe Strand during the course. The case studies are presented as chapters in the present publication. Most chapters are written in English but some also in Swedish depending on the requirements of the specific course. At present there is a significant lack of treatment efficacy research in the area of childhood verbal apraxia, and many publications have indicated the need for this type of clinical research. Since these reports represent an important contribution to the limited number of outcome studies in children with diagnosed or suspected CAS we decided to make them available to a larger audience.

  • 104.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Aanstoot, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johannesson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berglind, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning in the tutorial group: A balance between individual freedom and institutional control2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates factors in problem-based learning tutorial groups which promote or inhibit learning. The informants were tutors and students from speech-language pathology and physiotherapy programmes. Semi-structured focus-group interviews and individual interviews were used. Results revealed three themes: Responsibility, Time and Support. Under responsibility, the delicate balance between individual and institutional responsibility and control was shown. Time included short and long-term perspectives on learning. Under support, supporting documents, activities and personnel resources were mentioned. In summary, an increased control by the program and tutors decreases students motivation to assume responsibility for learning. Support in tutorial groups needs to adapt to student progression and to be well aligned to tutorial work to have the intended effect. A lifelong learning perspective may help students develop a meta-awareness regarding learning that could make tutorial work more meaningful.

  • 105.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    Kompetenscenter, Odontologiska Institutionen, Jönköping.
    Sjögreen, Lotta
    Mun-H-Center, Folktandvården, Västra Götalandsregionen.
    Applications and results using the Nordic Orofacial Test–Screening protocol2011In: / [ed] Professor Göran Koch, Jönköping, Jönköping: Swedish Dental Association and the Swedish Dental Society , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Orofacial function includes a multitude of actions, some of them vital, such as breathing, chewing and swallowing, and also acts as the basis for social interaction in terms of speech, emotional communication, facial expression and appearance. Impaired orofacial function is a common feature in many inherited disorders or may be acquired as a consequence of disease and trauma. The Nordic Orofacial Test–Screening (NOT-S) is a comprehensive method for screening of orofacial function developed by a Scandinavian network of dentists and speech and language pathologists. NOT-S comprises evaluation of twelwe domains of orofacial function. They are assessed from a structured interview and a clinical examination with a picture manual illustrating the different tasks in the examination. A method study of 120 individuals with chronic disease or disability compared to 60 healthy controls showed good intra- and interexaminer agreement. The aim was to present current applications and results from publications on the use of NOT-S.

    Materials and Methods: Beside the method study published in 2007 to date four studies has been published. One was a study in individuals with Parkinson´s disease (n=15), two were studies in individuals with rare disorders; Ectodermal dysplasia (n=46), and Prader-Willi Syndrome (n=45), and one was a study evaluating surgical treatment in children with tonsillar hyperthophy (n=67). In order o visualize to what degree the domains of orofacial function are affected in different conditions, connected plots were made from the mean NOT-S scores for the twelwe domains of NOT-S, here called dysfunction profiles.

    Results: The groups with different diagnoses showed specific dysfunction profiles indicating patterns of domains with impaired orofacial function. The use of NOT-S to assess orofacial function before and after surgery in children with tonsillar hypertrophy showed that the method can also be used to evaluate interventions.

    Conclusions: Screening with NOT-S proved to be a quick and reliable way of assessing orofacial function. NOT-S discriminated between groups with different diagnoses and also in evaluation of treatment. The results indicate that NOT-S has good reliability and discriminant validity.

  • 106.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Brandt, Signe Kofoed
    Habilitation Services, Kullbergska Hospital, Katrineholm, Sweden.
    A Comparison of Recordings of Sentences and Spontaneous Speech: Perceptual and Acoustic Measures in Preschool Children's Voices.2012In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 13-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-controlled recording in a studio is fundamental in most voice rehabilitation. However, this laboratory like recording method has been questioned because voice use in a natural environment may be quite different. In children's natural environment, high background noise levels are common and are an important factor contributing to voice problems. The primary noise source in day-care centers is the children themselves. The aim of the present study was to compare perceptual evaluations of voice quality and acoustic measures from a controlled recording with recordings of spontaneous speech in children's natural environment in a day-care setting. Eleven 5-year-old children were recorded three times during a day at the day care. The controlled speech material consisted of repeated sentences. Matching sentences were selected from the spontaneous speech. All sentences were repeated three times. Recordings were randomized and analyzed acoustically and perceptually. Statistic analyses showed that fundamental frequency was significantly higher in spontaneous speech (P<0.01) as was hyperfunction (P<0.001). The only characteristic the controlled sentences shared with spontaneous speech was degree of hoarseness (Spearman's rho=0.564). When data for boys and girls were analyzed separately, a correlation was found for the parameter breathiness (rho=0.551) for boys, and for girls the correlation for hoarseness remained (rho=0.752). Regarding acoustic data, none of the measures correlated across recording conditions for the whole group.

  • 107.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johannesson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berglind, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning in the tutorial group – a challenge between freedom and control2011In: The Third International Conference on Problem Based Learning in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology / [ed] Tara Whitehill & Susan Bridges, Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In order to improve and clarify the demands within tutorial groups in the speech and language pathology (SLP) and physiotherapy (PT) programs a joint study was conducted exploring problem areas in the tutorial groups.

    The aim was to investigate and further develop the requirements for a passing grade in the tutorial group. A long term goal was that the results could form a base for future changes regarding instructions and requirements in tutorial groups.

    Methodology:  Focus-group interviews were used to collect data. Three different groups were interviewed, two consisting of tutors from the SLP and PT programs and one consisting of last year student tutors from the SLP-program.  This data was also augmented by individual interviews of four SLP-students and five PT-students on different levels in the education.  A semi structured interview guide was used.  The interviews were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results: The analyses revealed three important themes for work in tutorial groups: Responsibility, Time and Support. Within these themes, several categories were also identified. Responsibility: Within this theme the main category was the importance of balance between individual and institutional responsibility. The students, the tutorial group, the tutor and the program all need to assume their part of the responsibility in order to clarify requirements. Time: Here different aspects of time management and work in the tutorial group were identified. These categories also related to aspects of support and continuous or lifelong learning. Support: Within this theme different support functions were identified such as documents, activities and personnel resources in the tutorial groups.  No suggestions were made in the interviews regarding the requirements for a passing grade in the tutorial groups. 

    Discussion/Conclusion: The main finding was the delicate balance between institutional control and the students own responsibility for the work within the tutorial groups.  An increased control decreases the students’ motivation to assume responsibility for their own learning. Also, study programs should adapt requirements in tutorial groups depending on years in the education.  Different support functions need to be closely coupled to tutorial work in order to have the intended effect.   

  • 108.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Röst, tal och språk ur ett genusperspektiv2010In: Genus och kön inom medicin och vårdutbildningar / [ed] Wijma B, Smirthwaite G, Swahnberg K, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1:1, p. 429-439Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 109.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sjölander, Peta
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden .
    Children's Voice and Voice Disorders2013In: Seminars in Speech and Language, ISSN 0734-0478, E-ISSN 1098-9056, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the differences between children's voices and adult voices. We give an overview of the anatomy in the head and neck and specifically the anatomy of the respiratory system and the larynx. We also describe the development of children's voices including different physiological measures and voice quality. The development and consequences for voice production and voice quality are addressed and related to gender differences in the growing child. We also discuss the prevalence of voice problems and hoarseness in children. Environmental and other factors contributing to voice problems in children are described, and finally, issues related to intervention and evidence-based practice are discussed.

  • 110.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Royal institute of technology, Research Institute Hearing Bridge, KTH.
    Ellis, Rachel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Online administration of a speech in noise test and its relationship to cognition, hearing problems and mental health2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing loss is common, but often both undetected and untreated. In this two-part study we evaluated an online hearing test and used this test to explore potential links between hearing status, cognitive abilities, psychological distress as well as quality of life.

    Out of a total of 1370 online recruited participants who completed the procedure, 16.2% failed the online hearing test. Hearing difficulties were more prevalent among the older participants. Poor self-rated hearing ability, as measured by the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Handicap, increased the odds ratio for failing the hearing test (OR 2.34, 95 % CI 1.74-3.15). The same was true for scoring above the cut-off score of 11 on the anxiety subscale on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (OR 2.55, 95 % CI 1.22-5.33). On the other hand, good performance on the cognitive tasks lowered the risk for a failed hearing test.

    We conclude that online hearing tests may have the potential to reduce the time lag between noticing hearing difficulties and beginning a process to address the problem. Moreover, online data collection facilitate large scale investigations on the links between hearing, cognition and perceived communication and mental health problems.

  • 111.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internet-based hearing screening using speech-in-noise: validation and comparisons of self-reported hearing problems, quality of life and phonological representation2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 3223-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives For the last decade a host of different projects have been launched to allow persons who are concerned about their hearing status to quickly and at a low cost test their hearing ability. Most often, this is carried out without collecting complementary information that could be correlated with hearing impairment. In this two-part study we first, present the development and validation of a novel Internet-based hearing test, and second, report on the associations between this test and phonological representation, quality of life and self-reported hearing difficulties.

    Design Cross-sectional study.

    Setting An opportunity sample of participants was recruited at the Stockholm central station for the first study. All parts of the second study were conducted via the Internet, with testing and self-report forms adapted for online use.

    Participants The first part of the study was carried out in direct contact with the participants, and participants from the second study were recruited by means of advertisements in newspapers and on webpages. The only exclusion criterion was that participants had to be over 18 years old. Most participants were between 60 and 69 years old. There were almost an equal number of men and women (total n=316).

    Outcome measures 48 participants failed the Internet-based hearing screening test. The group failing the test reported more problems on the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Disability. In addition, they were found to have diminished phonological representational skills. However, no difference in quality of life was found.

    Conclusions Almost one in five participants was in need of contacting their local hearing clinic. This group had more complaints regarding tinnitus and hyperacusis, rated their own hearing as worse than those who passed, and had a poorer capability of generating accurate phonological representations. This study suggests that it is feasible to screen for hearing status online, and obtain valid data.

  • 112.
    Moradi, Shahram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Gated auditory speech perception in elderly hearing aid users and elderly normal-hearing individuals: effects of hearing impairment and cognitive capacity2014In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared elderly hearing aid (EHA) users and elderly normal-hearing (ENH) individuals on identification of auditory speech stimuli (consonants, words, and final word in sentences) that were different when considering their linguistic properties. We measured the accuracy with which the target speech stimuli were identified, as well as the isolation points (IPs: the shortest duration, from onset, required to correctly identify the speech target). The relationships between working memory capacity, the IPs, and speech accuracy were also measured. Twenty-four EHA users (with mild to moderate hearing impairment) and 24 ENH individuals participated in the present study. Despite the use of their regular hearing aids, the EHA users had delayed IPs and were less accurate in identifying consonants and words compared with the ENH individuals. The EHA users also had delayed IPs for final word identification in sentences with lower predictability; however, no significant between-group difference in accuracy was observed. Finally, there were no significant between-group differences in terms of IPs or accuracy for final word identification in highly predictable sentences. Our results also showed that, among EHA users, greater working memory capacity was associated with earlier IPs and improved accuracy in consonant and word identification. Together, our findings demonstrate that the gated speech perception ability of EHA users was not at the level of ENH individuals, in terms of IPs and accuracy. In addition, gated speech perception was more cognitively demanding for EHA users than for ENH individuals in the absence of semantic context.

  • 113.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bergman, P
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Improved speech recognition and good self-reported benefit from cochlear implantation in adults2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Departmet of Otolaryngology, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bergström, Pia
    Department of Otolaryngology, Ryhov Hospital Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Outcome of cochlear implants in elderly adults2011In: First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2011, p. 89-89Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The proportion of elderly population increases and an increasing number of old adults have severe to profound hearing impairment, thus being possible cochlear implant (CI) candidates. The aim of the project was to assess the outcome of CI in terms of speech audiometric results and self-reported benefit in adults with a special emphasis on elderly adults.Subjects and methods: All 124 adult patients (≥ 18 years at implantation) who have been implanted in the Linköping CI program in 1992-2009 were eligible for the study. In addition to audiological tests, the pre-operative assessment of adult patients includes tests of working memory capacity, phonological and lexical processing skills. Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), a self-assessment instrument covering general health, degree of social support and physical state, was mailed to the CI recipients.Results: Response rate was high (90%) and 43 of the participants were ≥ 65 years. The mean time the participants had used their CI was 5.1 years (SD 4, range 1.2-16.9). All patients, with one exception, reached some degree of open set speech recognition. GBI results were comparable to earlier reports in CI populations. Analyses of the cognitive test results and more detailed analyses of speech reception and GBI among the oldest olds (≥75 years) will be reported.Discussion: According to our preliminary results, CI gives good benefit in the whole group. Provided that a careful assessment of cognitive abilities has been made and general health is reasonably good, a good outcome can be expected also in the oldest part of the population.

  • 115.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Förväntningar och nytta av CI hos vuxna2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Expectations and benefit of cochlear implants in elderly adults2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and other Implantable Auditory Technologies, 2010, p. 111-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted intervention for children with hearing impairment: Cognitive factors and phonological change2013In: CHSCOM2013, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-two children with hearing impairment (HI) using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids (HA), and sixteen with normal hearing (NH) participated in a computer-assisted intervention study that focused on perceiving and memorizing phonemic sounds. The first purpose was to study cognitive abilities in NH and HI children, how they related to phonological processing skills (PhPS) pre intervention and to phonological growth post intervention. The second purpose was to analyze children’s performance at different fine-grained levels of phonological processing, i.e. how they manipulated, stored and produced phonological entities of different size with or without semantic content. This was put in relation to children’s type of auditory stimulation (electrical; bilateral CI, bimodal: CI + HA and acoustical; bilateral HA). Results showed significant correlations between complex working memory and PhPS in children with HI but not in children with NH. This suggests different cognitive strategies in the children when dealing with phonological processing tasks. Poor phoneme discrimination was the strongest predictor of phonological growth in the children with HI as a function of training. Thus, the computer-assisted program was beneficial for HI children with weak initial phoneme discrimination skills. Children with CI showed reduced performance at fine-grained levels of receptive phonological processing but not on expressive phonological lexical tasks.

  • 118.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Ors, Marianne
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institutet (CLINTEC), Dept of Audiology and Neurootology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predictors of phonological change in deaf and hard of hearing children who use cochlear implants or hearing aids2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine cognitive abilities (i.e., working memory (WM), lexical access, phonological processing skills (PhPS), and letter knowledge) in deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) children in relation to a reference group with normal hearing (NH) children pre intervention with a computer-assisted program that focused on phonological coding. A more specific purpose was to explore how cognitive abilities were associated to PhPS pre intervention and to phonological change post intervention in D/HH children in general, and specifically in D/HH children with weak initial PhPS.

    Methods: Participants were thirty-two children using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or both in combination, and sixteen children with NH 5, 6 and 7 years of age. Children practiced with phonological coding 10 min per day for 4 weeks with support by their parents. Cognitive abilities were examined pre and post intervention.

    Results: NH and D/HH children displayed a similar performance level on the majority of cognitive tasks, but the D/HH children demonstrated weaker lexical access and PhPS. A significant correlation between complex WM and PhPS pre intervention was only observed in D/HH children. Weak initial performance on one phonological processing task capturing both lower level and higher level auditory processing was the main significant predictor of phonological change in all D/HH children. In D/HH children with weak initial PhPS letter naming was associated with phonological change.

    Conclusions: The associations between complex working memory and PhPS in D/HH children and the lack of such associations in children with NH may indicate that phonological processing skills require more cognitive resources in the D/HH children. Letter knowledge can act as a driving force for phonological change following intervention in D/HH children with weak PhPS.

  • 119.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Ors, Marianne
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institutet (CLINTEC), Dept of Audiology and Neurootology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Segmental and suprasegmental properties in nonword repetition: An explorative study of the associations with nonword decoding in children with normal hearing and children with bilateral cochlear implants2015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 216-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explored nonword repetition (NWR) and nonword decoding in normalhearing (NH) children and in children with cochlear implants (CIs). Participants were 11 children with bilateral CIs, 5:0-7:11 years (M = 6.5 yrs.), and 11 NH children, individually age-matched to the children with CIs. The purpose was twofold; to thoroughly describe aspects of repetition and decoding of novel words and to study possible associations between them. All children were assessed after having practiced with a computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach during four weeks. Results showed that NH children outperformed children with CIs on the majority of aspects of NWR. The analysis of syllable length in NWR revealed that children with CIs made more syllable omissions than did the NH children, and predominantly in prestressed positions. Additionally, the consonant cluster analysis showed significantly more consonant omissions and substitutions in children with CIs suggesting that reaching fine- grained levels of phonological processing was particularly difficult for these children. No significant difference was found for decoding accuracy between the groups, as measured by percent nonwords and percent phonemes correctly decoded, but differences were observed regarding error patterns. Further, phoneme deletions and lexicalizing of nonwords occurred more often in children with CIs than in those with NH. The correlation analysis revealed that the ability to repeat consonant clusters in NWR had the strongest associations to nonword decoding in both groups.

  • 120.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted intervention for Deaf and Hard of hearing (D/HH) children with cochlear implants or hearing aids: Cognitive factors and phonological change2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Study cognitive abilities; specifically working memory and lexical access in NH and DHH children, and their correlations to phonological processing skills (PhPS) pre intervention. Analyze how cognitive abilities related to phonological change post intervention. 

    Material and Method: Tasks for lexical access, complex and visual working memory and Phpr were assessed pre and post intervention.

    Conclusion: DHH children performed at a lower level than NH children on lexical access but equally on complex and visual working memory. Significant correlations between complex working memory and PhPS were evident in DHH children but not in NH. This suggests that DHH children recruit more cognitive resources when performing PhPr tasks. Weak initial performance on a task for phonological representations (Phrep) was the only significant predictor of phonological change in DHH children. Weak PhRep was associated with a higher age at diagnosis, higher age at implant, and shorter usage-time with CI. 

  • 121.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Ors, Marianne
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for children using cochlear implants or hearing aids2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children in Sweden using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or a combination of both. The study included forty-eight children, 5, 6 and 7 years of age. Sixteen children with normal hearing (NH) served as a reference group. The first purpose of the study was to compare NH and DHH children’s reading ability at pre and post intervention. The second purpose was to investigate effects of the intervention. Cognitive and demographic factors were analyzed in relation to reading improvement. Results showed no statistically significant difference for reading ability at the group level, although NH children showed overall higher reading scores at both test points. Age comparisons revealed a statistically significant higher reading ability in the NH 7-year olds compared to the DHH 7-year olds. The intervention proved successful for word decoding accuracy, passage comprehension and as a reduction of nonword decoding errors in both NH and DHH children. Reading improvement was associated with complex working memory and phonological processing skills in NH children. Correspondent associations were observed with visual working memory and letter knowledge in the DHH children. Age was the only demographic factor that was significantly correlated with reading improvement. The results suggest that DHH children’s beginning reading may be influenced by visual strategies that might explain the reading delay in the older children.

  • 122.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Phonics Approach in Swedish Children using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids: Inspecting Phonological Gain2014In: Journal of Communication Disorders, Deaf Studies & Hearing Aids, ISSN 2375-4427, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 117-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated cognitive abilities (i.e. Phonological Processing Skills (PhPS), lexical access, complex and visual Working Memory (WM), and letter knowledge) in Deaf and Hard of Hearing children (DHH) 5, 6 and 7 years of age using cochlear implants or hearing aids. Children with Normal Hearing (NH) served as a reference group. All children took part of a computer-assisted intervention with a phonics approach for 4 weeks aimed to support PhPS. The first aim of the study was to examine associations between cognitive abilities and Phonological Processing Skills (PhPS) pre intervention in DHH and NH children respectively. The second aim was to examine cognitive predictors of phonological gain post intervention. Finally, the influence of background variables on phonological gain was examined in NH and DHH respectively and in DHH children with weak PhPS particularly. Results showed comparable performance level in NH and DHH children on the majority of cognitive tasks, but weaker PhPS and lexical access in the DHH children. A significant association between PhPS and complex WM was only evident in DHH children. This finding suggests that DHH recruit more cognitive resources in phonological processing. A phonological representation task was the single predictor of phonological gain in DHH children. Children with initial weak performance on this task but had letter-naming skills, displayed relatively more phonological gain from the phonics training. Children with difficulties with the phonological representation task were older when diagnosed and had an older age at amplification. Further, these children displayed broader cognitive difficulties, suggesting that reduced access to auditory stimulation may have wide ranging effects on cognitive development.

  • 123.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention in children with cochlear implants and/or hearing aid. Effects on cognition, language and reading, neurophysiological findings2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 124.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants- effects on phonological processing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants- effects on phonological processing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer assisted intervention for children who use cochlear implants or hearing aids: Effects on phonological processing skills. Cognitive factors and phonological change2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted training of phoneme–grapheme correspondence for children who are deaf and hard of hearing: Effects on phonological processing skills2013In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 77, no 12, p. 2049-2057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Examine deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children's phonological processing skills in relation to a reference group of children with normal hearing (NH) at two baselines pre intervention. Study the effects of computer-assisted phoneme–grapheme correspondence training in the children. Specifically analyze possible effects on DHH children's phonological processing skills.

    Methods

    The study included 48 children who participated in a computer-assisted intervention study, which focuses on phoneme–grapheme correspondence. Children were 5, 6, and 7 years of age. There were 32 DHH children using cochlear implants (CI) or hearing aids (HA), or both in combination, and 16 children with NH. The study had a quasi-experimental design with three test occasions separated in time by four weeks; baseline 1 and 2 pre intervention, and 3 post intervention. Children performed tasks measuring lexical access, phonological processing, and letter knowledge. All children were asked to practice ten minutes per day at home supported by their parents.

    Results

    NH children outperformed DHH children on the majority of tasks. All children improved their accuracy in phoneme–grapheme correspondence and output phonology as a function of the computer-assisted intervention. For the whole group of children, and specifically for children with CI, a lower initial phonological composite score was associated with a larger phonological change between baseline 2 and post intervention. Finally, 18 DHH children, whereof 11 children with CI, showed specific intervention effects on their phonological processing skills, and strong effect sizes for their improved accuracy of phoneme–grapheme correspondence.

    Conclusion

    For some DHH children phonological processing skills are boosted relatively more by phoneme–grapheme correspondence training. This reflects the reciprocal relationship between phonological change and exposure to and manipulations of letters.

  • 128.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Computer based Phonological Intervention for children with CI and/or HA: Effects on phonological processing2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholms Research Centre, Denmark.
    Thorén, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    A randomized controlled trial of professional online rehabilitation for adult hearing-aid users2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Exploring narrative effects in hearing aid fitting2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring narrative effects

    The clinical meeting is a narrative (‘story’) in itself. To be able to study narrative effects in isolation, the narrative must be separated from the outcome of the hearing-aid fitting. In this study the test persons were given two hearing aids. These were accompanied by different narratives, but had identical amplification/acoustic signal processing.

     

     

    Testing narrative effects

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the power of the narrative in affecting the client’s perception of the dispensing process. The experimental approach was to implement alternative dispensing processes with divergent narratives but identical acoustical results. Then, in a balanced crossover design, to carry out fittings with these processes on a group of hearing-aid clients. The two carefully rehearsed dispensing processes were: a ‘Diagnostic’ process and an ‘Interactive’ process.

     

     

     

     

     

     Narrative 1: ‘Diagnostic’ process. The client is inactive and the dispenser makes a number of adjustments based on hearing assessments, during which the client is passive. Fitting is based on hearing thresholds only.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Narrative 2: ‘Interactive’ process. The client is led to believe that they have adjusted the HA settings to their own preferences. Fitting is based on hearing thresholds only (hearing-aid settings identical for Narratives 1 and 2.)

     

     

     

     

     Results

    20 of the 24 subjects had a clear fitting preference. This is surprising, since the two fittings were acoustically identical. We must suppose that it is the subjects’ perception of the fitting process which determined their preferences. However, all subjects except one gave exclusively sound-related reasons for their preferences (“Sounds more clear” etc.). Thus it seems that clinicians may not always hear the ‘true’ reasons for preferences from their clients.

  • 131.
    Nilsson, C
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    La Fleur, L
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Differences in radiation, cisplatin, and cetuximab sensitivity between subpopulations of head and neck cancer cells in EJC SUPPLEMENTS, vol 8, issue 5, pp 107-1072010In: EJC SUPPLEMENTS, Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2010, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 107-107Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 132.
    Nosrati-Zarenoe, Ramesh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Corticosteroid Treatment, the Diagnostic Protocol and Outcome2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL) is a rapid loss of hearing caused by damage to the cochlea or auditory nerve. Spontaneous recovery has been seen in 32%–81%. The incidence of the ISSNHL has been estimated to be between 5 and 20 per 100,000 per year. Different theories (vascular catastrophes, immunologic damage, infections or intracochlear membrane break) about the etiology have resulted in different treatment policies. The effect of therapy is difficult to evaluate for a single physician who sees just a few patients annually.

    The aim of the present thesis was: 1) to investigate the current management and treatment of ISSNHL patients in Sweden with regard to outcome, 2) to evaluate whether, in comparison to placebo, the most common drug given in the treatment of ISSNHL in any way influences the outcome, and 3) to analyze which variables such as background data, concomitant disease, audiogram shape and laboratory tests, best can predict the outcome of ISSNHL.

    A national database was developed with half of all ENT clinics in Sweden participating by submitting a questionnaire for each patient with SSNHL (I-II). The questionnaire covered the patient’s background, current disorder, past and family history of different diseases, examinations, and treatment. Audiograms at the onset of SSNHL and after three months were requested.

    A randomized placebo controlled multicenter trial (RCT) was performed (III) using a modified version of the questionnaire used in the national database. Prednisolone in high tapering dosage, or placebo was given with a total treatment period of eight days. If recovery was complete, treatment stopped, otherwise medication was continued at 10 mg daily to a total of 30 days from beginning. After an initial pure tone audiogram, new audiograms were taken at three follow-up visits: day eight of treatment, after one month, and after three months.

    Meta-analysis (IV) was used in order to strengthen the analysis from the RCT by increasing the material with corresponding data drawn from the Swedish national database for ISSNHL.

    Results from the national database showed that out of 400 patients included in the study with ISSNHL, almost 60% were medically treated, of which nearly 90% were given corticosteroids. Hearing improvement was not statistically associated with receipt of medication. 40% of all patients had an MRI or CT, where 3–4% had acoustic neuroma. 24% of the patients with ISSNHL who had hematological tests taken, had one or more pathological findings.

    In the RCT, 47 patients were randomized to Prednisolone and 46 to placebo. No significant difference of hearing recovery was observed between the Prednisolone group and placebo group at either first or final follow-up regarding the effect of treatment. Presence of vertigo had significant negative effect on hearing improvement in both groups. Inflammatory signs in laboratory work-up had a positive prognostic effect, irrespective of treatment.

    The meta-analysis showed no significant difference between the Prednisolone group and placebo/no treatment group (p>0.05). Vertigo at the onset of hearing loss and age had a negative prognostic value equally in all groups and signs of inflammation had a positive.

    Conclusion: Regardless of diagnostic protocol, treatment of ISSNHL in Sweden is mainly limited to corticosteroids (50%) or to no medical treatment. In a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial no positive effect of Prednisolone on ISSNHL could be demonstrated. A Meta-analysis of patient data from the Swedish national database for SSNHL and the RCT for ISSNHL demonstrated no effect of Prednisolone on ISSNHL. Is it time to change the focus of research to find new ways to treat ISSNHL?

  • 133.
    Nosrati-Zarenoe, Ramesh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Corticosteroid treatment of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Part 1: a randomized triple-blind placebo controlled trialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effect of Prednisolone and placebo on recovery of unilateral Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Study design: Prospective, randomized, triple-blind placebo-controlled multicentre trial.

    Setting: Four tertiary and ten secondary referral centers.

    Patients: Of 103 patients randomly assigned, 93 included in the modified intention-to treat analysis. The patients were aged 18–80 years seeking care between Jan 2006–Sept 2010 within one week after onset of acute unilateral sensorineural hearing loss with a PTA of ≥30dB in the three contiguous frequencies most affected.

    Intervention: Patients were randomly assigned in permuted blocks of ten to receive Prednisolone or placebo in tapering doses from 60 mg for 3 days, and thereafter 50, 40, 30, 20, 10 mg each day until day 8. If complete recovery, no more medication given, otherwise medication continued at 10 mg per day until day 30. Final follow-up was after 3 months with audiogram. 47 patients received Prednisolone and 46 placebo.

    Main outcome measure: Primary endpoint was efficacy of treatment on recovery at day 8 and day 90. Analysis was by modified Intention-To Treat and Per Protocol. The secondary endpoints were prognostic factors for hearing recovery.

    Results: The hearing improvement for 47 patients treated with Prednisolone was 25.5 ± 27.1 dB compared to 46 patients treated with placebo 26.4 ± 26.2 dB at day eight and 39 ± 20.1 dB vs. 35.1 ± 38.3 dB after three months. (ns). Presence of vertigo had significant negative effect on hearing improvement in both groups. Inflammatory signs in laboratory work-up had a positive prognostic effect, irrespective of treatment.

    Conclusion: Prednisolone in customary dosage does not seem to influence recovery of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  • 134.
    Novozhilova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olivius, Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Siratirakun, Piyaporn
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Cecilia
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Englund-Johansson, Ulrica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Neuronal Differentiation and Extensive Migration of Human Neural Precursor Cells following Co-Culture with Rat Auditory Brainstem Slices2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Congenital or acquired hearing loss is often associated with a progressive degeneration of the auditory nerve (AN) in the inner ear. The AN is composed of processes and axons of the bipolar spiral ganglion neurons (SGN), forming the connection between the hair cells in the inner ear cochlea and the cochlear nuclei (CN) in the brainstem (BS). Therefore, replacement of SGNs for restoring the AN to improve hearing function in patients who receive a cochlear implantation or have severe AN malfunctions is an attractive idea. A human neural precursor cell (HNPC) is an appropriate donor cell to investigate, as it can be isolated and expanded in vitro with maintained potential to form neurons and glia. We recently developed a post-natal rodent in vitro auditory BS slice culture model including the CN and the central part of the AN for initial studies of candidate cells. Here we characterized the survival, distribution, phenotypic differentiation, and integration capacity of HNPCs into the auditory circuitry in vitro. HNPC aggregates (spheres) were deposited adjacent to or on top of the BS slices or as a monoculture (control). The results demonstrate that co-cultured HNPCs compared to monocultures (1) survive better, (2) distribute over a larger area, (3) to a larger extent and in a shorter time-frame form mature neuronal and glial phenotypes. HNPC showed the ability to extend neurites into host tissue. Our findings suggest that the HNPC-BS slice co-culture is appropriate for further investigations on the integration capacity of HNPCs into the auditory circuitry.

  • 135.
    Nygren, Mariana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Tyboni, Mikaela
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Lindstrom, Fredric
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    van Doorn, Jan
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Gender Differences in Childrens Voice Use in a Day Care Environment2012In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 26, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The prevalence of dysphonia is higher in boys than in girls before puberty. This could be because of the differences in boys and girls voice use. Previous research on gender differences in prepubescent childrens voice parameters has been contradictory. Most studies have focused on examining fundamental frequency. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to investigate voice use in boys and girls in a day care environment based on the voice parameters fundamental frequency (Hz), vocal intensity (dB SPL), and phonation time (%) and to ascertain whether there were any significant gender differences. Study Design. Prospective comparative design. Method. The study was conducted in a day care environment where 30 children (17 boys and 13 girls aged 4-5 years) participated. The participants voices were measured continuously for 4 hours with a voice accumulator that registered fundamental frequency, vocal intensity level, phonation time, and background noise. Results. Mean (standard deviation) fundamental frequency was 310 (22) and 321 (16) Hz, vocal intensity was 93 (4) and 91 (3) dB SPL, and phonation time was 7.7 (2.0)% and 7.6 (2.5)% for boys and girls, respectively. No differences between genders were statistically significant. Conclusion. The finding of no statistically significant gender differences for measurements of voice parameters in a group of children aged 4-5 years in a day care environment is an important finding that contributes to increased knowledge about young boys and girls voice use.

  • 136.
    Palmgren, Bjorn
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Jiao, Yu
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Novozhilova, Ekaterina
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Stupp, Samuel I
    Northwestern University.
    Olivius, Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Survival, migration and differentiation of mouse tau-GFP embryonic stem cells transplanted into the rat auditory nerve2012In: Experimental Neurology, ISSN 0014-4886, E-ISSN 1090-2430, Vol. 235, no 2, p. 599-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stem cells have been investigated as treatment for a variety of diagnoses such as Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease and spinal cord injuries. Here, we investigated the possibility of using stem cells as a replacement therapy for lesions of the auditory nerve (AN). We transplanted tau-GFP mouse embryonic stem cells into the AN either by the internal auditory meatus or via the modiolus in rats that had been previously deafened by application of beta-bungarotoxin to the round window niche. We investigated the effect of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cell transplant survival and differentiation. Additionally chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), a digestive enzyme that cleaves the core chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, was used in order to promote possible migration of cells and axons through the transitional zone. A bioactive isoleucine-lysine-valine-alanine-valine (IKVAV) peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofiber gel was applied around the cell injection site. This nanofiber gel has been shown to promote neural differentiation and other similar gels have been used to encapsulate and release proteins. Three weeks after injection, transplanted cells were found in the scala tympani, the modiolus, the AN trunk and the brain stem. As compared to cell transplantation and gel only, BDNF content in the PA gel increased cell survival and neuronal differentiation. In the animals treated with ChABC we observed extensive migration of cells through the transitional zone to or from the CNS.

  • 137.
    Palmisano, Sadie
    et al.
    Ohio State University, USA .
    Schwartzbaum, Judith
    Ohio State University, USA .
    Prochazka, Michaela
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Pettersson, David
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    University of Umeå Hospital, Sweden .
    Florentzson, Rut
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Mathiesen, Tiit
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Siesjo, Peter
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden .
    Feychting, Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Role of Tobacco Use in the Etiology of Acoustic Neuroma2012In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 175, no 12, p. 1243-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two previous studies suggest that cigarette smoking reduces acoustic neuroma risk; however, an association between use of snuff tobacco and acoustic neuroma has not been investigated previously. The authors conducted a case-control study in Sweden from 2002 to 2007, in which 451 cases and 710 population-based controls completed questionnaires. Cases and controls were matched on gender, region, and age within 5 years. The authors estimated odds ratios using conditional logistic regression analyses, adjusted for education and tobacco use (snuff use in the smoking analysis and smoking in the snuff analysis). The risk of acoustic neuroma was greatly reduced in male current smokers (odds ratio (OR) = 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23, 0.74) and moderately reduced in female current smokers (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.40, 1.23). In contrast, current snuff use among males was not associated with risk of acoustic neuroma (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.57, 1.55). The authors findings are consistent with previous reports of lower acoustic neuroma risk among current cigarette smokers than among never smokers. The absence of an association between snuff use and acoustic neuroma suggests that some constituent of tobacco smoke other than nicotine may confer protection against acoustic neuroma.

  • 138.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Malardalen University, Sweden .
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioural approach in addition to prescribed physical activity for individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders: a prospective randomised study2013In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 14, no 311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Up to 50% of chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD) patients experience considerable pain and disability and remain on sick-leave. No evidence supports the use of physiotherapy treatment of chronic WAD, although exercise is recommended. Previous randomised controlled studies did not evaluate the value of adding a behavioural therapy intervention to neck-specific exercises, nor did they compare these treatments to prescription of general physical activity. Few exercise studies focus on patients with chronic WAD, and few have looked at patients ability to return to work and the cost-effectiveness of treatments. Thus, there is a great need to develop successful evidence-based rehabilitation models. The study aim is to investigate whether neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioural approach (facilitated by a single caregiver per patient) improves functioning compared to prescription of general physical activity for individuals with chronic WAD. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods/Design: The study is a prospective, randomised, controlled, multi-centre study with a 2-year follow-up that includes 216 patients with chronic WAD (andgt;6 months and andlt;3 years). The patients (aged 18 to 63) must be classified as WAD grade 2 or 3. Eligibility will be determined with a questionnaire, telephone interview and clinical examination. The participants will be randomised into one of three treatments: (A) neck-specific exercise followed by prescription of physical activity; (B) neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach followed by prescription of physical activity; or (C) prescription of physical activity alone without neck-specific exercises. Treatments will be performed for 3 months. We will examine physical and psychological function, pain intensity, health care consumption, the ability to resume work and economic health benefits. An independent, blinded investigator will perform the measurements at baseline and 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after inclusion. The main study outcome will be improvement in neck-specific disability as measured with the Neck Disability Index. All treatments will be recorded in treatment diaries and medical records. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDiscussion: The study findings will help improve the treatment of patients with chronic WAD.

  • 139.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Futurum, County Council Jönköping, Sweden .
    Persson, Liselott
    Lunds University, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Outcome of physiotherapy after surgery for cervical disc disease: a prospective randomised multi-centre trial2014In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Many patients with cervical disc disease require leave from work, due to long-lasting, complex symptoms, including chronic pain and reduced levels of physical and psychological function. Surgery on a few segmental levels might be expected to resolve disc-specific pain and reduce neurological deficits, but not the non-specific neck pain and the frequent illness. No study has investigated whether post-surgery physiotherapy might improve the outcome of surgery. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a well-structured rehabilitation programme might add benefit to the customary post-surgical treatment for cervical disc disease, with respect to function, disability, work capability, and cost effectiveness.

    METHODS/DESIGN:

    This study was designed as a prospective, randomised, controlled, multi-centre study. An independent, blinded investigator will compare two alternatives of rehabilitation. We will include 200 patients of working age, with cervical disc disease confirmed by clinical findings and symptoms of cervical nerve root compression. After providing informed consent, study participants will be randomised to one of two alternative physiotherapy regimes; (A) customary treatment (information and advice on a specialist clinic); or (B) customary treatment plus active physiotherapy. Physiotherapy will follow a standardised, structured programme of neck-specific exercises combined with a behavioural approach. All patients will be evaluated both clinically and subjectively (with questionnaires) before surgery and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after surgery. The main outcome variable will be neck-specific disability. Cost-effectiveness will also be calculated.

    DISCUSSION:

    We anticipate that the results of this study will provide evidence to support physiotherapeutic rehabilitation applied after surgery for cervical radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease.

  • 140.
    Pettersson, David
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Mathiesen, Tiit
    Karolinska Hospital, Sweden .
    Prochazka, Michaela
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Florentzson, Rut
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Siesjo, Peter
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Feychting, Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Long-term Mobile Phone Use and Acoustic Neuroma Risk2014In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is concern about potential effects of radiofrequency fields generated by mobile phones on cancer risk. Most previous studies have found no association between mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma, although information about long-term use is limited. Methods: We conducted a population-based, nation-wide, case-control study of acoustic neuroma in Sweden. Eligible cases were persons aged 20 to 69 years, who were diagnosed between 2002 and 2007. Controls were randomly selected from the population registry, matched on age, sex, and residential area. Postal questionnaires were completed by 451 cases (83%) and 710 controls (65%). Results: Ever having used mobile phones regularly (defined as weekly use for at least 6 months) was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.18 (95% confidence interval = 0.88 to 1.59). The association was weaker for the longest induction time (10 years) (1.11 [0.76 to 1.61]) and for regular use on the tumor side (0.98 [0.68 to 1.43]). The OR for the highest quartile of cumulative calling time (680 hours) was 1.46 (0.98 to 2.17). Restricting analyses to histologically confirmed cases reduced all ORs; the OR for 680 hours was 1.14 (0.63 to 2.07). A similar pattern was seen for cordless land-line phones, although with slightly higher ORs. Analyses of the complete history of laterality of mobile phone revealed considerable bias in laterality analyses. Conclusions: The findings do not support the hypothesis that long-term mobile phone use increases the risk of acoustic neuroma. The study suggests that phone use might increase the likelihood that an acoustic neuroma case is detected and that there could be bias in the laterality analyses performed in previous studies.

  • 141.
    Proczkowska Björklund, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale2012In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 491-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (m-YPAS) is an observational behavioral checklist that has been widely used as an indicator of pre-operative anxiety in children. The present study describes the translation process of m-YPAS into Swedish and the testing of its reliability and validity when used with Swedish children. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: The questionnaire was translated using standard forward-back-forward translation technique. The validation process was divided into two phases: a pilot study with 61 children as a first version and a test of a final version with 102 children. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The reliability tested with Cronbachs alpha was acceptable to good. Interrater reliability analyzed with weighted kappa was acceptable to good with Students Registered Nurse Anesthetists and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) as evaluators (phase 1) and good to excellent with CRNAs very experienced in child anesthesia (phase 2). Both concurrent and constructed validity could be demonstrated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: This validation study of the Swedish version of the m- YPAS shows good consistency, interrater validity, and construct validity when used by experienced assessors.

  • 142.
    Rayner, Manny
    et al.
    University of Geneva, Switzerland.
    Gerlach, Johanna
    University of Geneva, Switzerland.
    Starlander, Marianne
    University of Geneva, Switzerland.
    Tsourakis, Nikos
    University of Geneva, Switzerland.
    Kruckenberg, Anita
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Chua, Cathy
    Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia.
    A web-deployed Swedish spoken CALL systembased on a large shared English/Swedish feature grammar2012In: Proceedings of the SLTC 2012 workshop on NLP for CALL / [ed] Lars Borin and Elena Volodina, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 37-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a Swedish version of CALL-SLT,a web-deployed CALL system that allows beginner/intermediate students to practise generativespoken language skills. Speech recognitionis grammar-based, with language modelsderived, using the Regulus platform, fromsubstantial domain-independent feature grammars.The paper focusses on the Swedishgrammar resources, which were developedby generalising the existing English featuregrammar into a shared grammar for Englishand Swedish. It turns out that this can be donevery economically: all but a handful of rulesand features are shared, and English grammaressentially ends up being treated as a reducedform of Swedish. We conclude by presentinga simple evaluation which compares theSwedish and French versions of CALL-SLT.

  • 143.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 4Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the development of a working memory model for Ease-of Language Understanding (ELU)2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory is important for online language processing in a dialogue. We use it to store relevant information, to inhibit or ignore irrelevant information, and to attend to conversation selectively. Working memory helps us keep track of a dialogue while taking turns and following the gist. This paper examines the Ease-of Language Understanding model (i.e., the ELU model, Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008) in light of new behavioral and neural findings concerning the role of working memory capacity (WMC) in sound and speech processing. The new ELU model is a meaning prediction system that depends on phonological and semantic interactions in rapid implicit and slower explicit processing mechanisms that both depend on working memory, albeit in different ways. New predictions and clinical implications are outlined.

  • 144.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model: theoretical, empirical, and clinical advances2013In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5137, E-ISSN 1662-5137, Vol. 7, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory is important for online language processing during conversation. We use it to maintain relevant information, to inhibit or ignore irrelevant information, and to attend to conversation selectively. Working memory helps us to keep track of and actively participate in conversation, including taking turns and following the gist. This paper examines the Ease of Language Understanding model (i.e., the ELU model, Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008) in light of new behavioral and neural findings concerning the role of working memory capacity (WMC) in uni-modal and bimodal language processing. The new ELU model is a meaning prediction system that depends on phonological and semantic interactions in rapid implicit and slower explicit processing mechanisms that both depend on WMC albeit in different ways. It is based on findings that address the relationship between WMC and (a) early attention processes in listening to speech, (b) signal processing in hearing aids and its effects on short-term memory, (c) inhibition of speech maskers and its effect on episodic long-term memory, (d) the effects of hearing impairment on episodic and semantic long-term memory, and finally, (e) listening effort. New predictions and clinical implications are outlined. Comparisons with other WMC and speech perception models are made.

    Keywords: working memory capacity, speech in noise, attention, long-term memory, hearing loss, brain imaging analysis, oscillations, language understanding

  • 145.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Experiences from Two Swedish Speech and Language Pathology Education Programmes Using Different Approaches to Problem-Based Learning2012In: Problem-Based Learning in Clinical Education: The Next Generation / [ed] Susan Bridges, Colman McGrath and Tara L. Whitehill, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2012, p. 47-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In many programmes within higher education, including speech language pathology (SLP) education, students are expected to develop collaborative skills alongside acquisition of theoretical knowledge. The focus of the present chapter is to evaluate SLP graduates’ opinions on how well prepared for the professional life they feel after their education. A questionnaire, focusing on perceived professional skills in relation to education, was distributed to former SLP students from two programmes with different applications of problem-based learning (PBL). A total of 55 students (69%) completed the questionnaire. PBL has been identified as one efficient way to facilitate the development of speech and language pathology students’ abilities to meet the demands of self-directed learning in everyday worklife. Moreover, it has been shown that the use of PBL throughout the programme is beneficial to the perception of attaining general competencies. It is also demonstrated that the students from both the PBL throughout and the semi-PBL curricula rated themselves high on many specific competencies.

  • 146.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Prosody and working memory in children with cochlear implants2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Prosody, Grammar and Working Memory in Children with Cochlear Implants2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Phonology, prosody and working memory in children with cochlear implants2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Skogman, Barbro H
    et al.
    Falun General Hospital, Sweden Centre Clin Research Dalarna, Sweden .
    Glimaker, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Long-term Clinical Outcome After Lyme Neuroborreliosis in Childhood2012In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 262-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine long-term clinical outcome in children with confirmed Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and to evaluate persistent subjective symptoms compared with a control group. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: After a median of 5 years, 84 children with confirmed LNB underwent a neurologic re-examination, including a questionnaire. Medical records were analyzed, and a control group (n = 84) was included. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The total recovery rate was 73% (n = 61). Objective neurologic findings, defined as "definite sequelae," were found in 16 patients (19%). The majority of these children had persistent facial nerve palsy (n = 11), but other motor or sensory deficits occurred (n = 5). Neurologic signs and/or symptoms defined as "possible sequelae" were found in another 7 patients (8%), mainly of sensory character. Nonspecific subjective symptoms were reported by 35 patients (42%) and 32 controls (38%) (nonsignificant). Affected daily activities or school performance were reported to the same extent in both groups (23% vs 20%, nonsignificant). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: The long-term clinical recovery rate was 73% in children with confirmed LNB. Persistent facial nerve palsy occurred in 13%, whereas other motor or sensory deficits were found in another 14%. Neurologic deficits did not affect daily activities or school performance more often among patients than controls and should be considered as mild. Furthermore, nonspecific subjective symptoms such as headache, fatigue, or memory or concentration problems were reported as often among patients as controls and should not be considered as sequelae after LNB.

  • 150.
    Stalfors, J.
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, C.
    Aleris Sabbatsberg, Stockholm.
    Hessén-Söderman, A-C
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Solna.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Roos, K.
    Lundby Sjukhus, Göteborg.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Årsrapport av kvalitetsregisterdata för tonsilloperation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
12345 101 - 150 of 204
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