Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1234567 101 - 150 of 1058
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    To populate places with allies: on human-thing entanglements in contested polar spaces2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Valfångst, industriarv och geopolitik i Sydatlanten2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Working geopolitics: sealing, whaling, and industrialized Antarctica2017In: Handbook on the politics of Antarctica / [ed] Klaus Dodds, Alan D. Hemmings, Peder Roberts, Cheltenham UK; Northhampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing , 2017, p. 485-506Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Brugmans, Peter
    Opp og ned i 100 år: Sveagruva 1917-20172018Book (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grönlund-Myrberg, Lena
    Falun Copper Mine World Heritage Site.
    Falun copper mine – industrial heritage in mining futures2014In: Industrial and Mining Landscapes within world heritage context / [ed] Albrecht, Helmuth and Hansell, Friederike, Freiberg: IWTG/TU Bergakademie Freiberg , 2014, p. 142-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Falun copper mine is an industrial heritage site locatedin middle Sweden. Mining began here in the 8th century AD. Over a thousand years later, in 1992, the mine was closed and in 2001 Unesco declared it a world heritage site. Eight years later the Australian company Drake Resources started prospect drilling, right in the middle of the world heritage area, to investigate the possibilities for re-opening the mine again. This development is not unique. Rising world market prices for raw materials in recent years is driving a mining boom, in which companies seek licenses for prospecting and mining in increasingly remote locations, as well as in national parks and cultural heritage sites. World heritage sites are not excluded. From Cornwall to Falun, prospecting and mining companies attempt to reopen mining operations in world heritage sites where the historical remains that form the bases of the sites are a result of a long history of mining. This has led to a discussion within global heritage organisations such as TICCIH and ICOMOS, on how to deal with this development – are new mining operations in historical mining districts only a problem or could it also be seen as a resource, an activity representing continuity rather than destruction?

    The objective of this article is to describe the developmentof prospecting activities and mining plans at the Falu coppermine world heritage site and its possible consequences. What prospecting activities have taken place at the Falu copper mine after Unesco inscribed it on the world heritage list and why? How has local media and the organizations managing and protecting, responded to these plans andactivities and why? What could be the consequences of renewedmining operations at Falun?

  • 106.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    The history and heritage of natural resource exploitation in the Arctic and Antarctic: the LASHIPA project2008In: Patrimoine de l'industrie, ISSN 1296-7750, Vol. 19, p. 7-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 107.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Wrakberg, Urban
    Industrial extraction of Arctic natural resources since the sixteenth century: technoscience and geo-economics in the history of northern whaling and mining2014In: Journal of Historical Geography, ISSN 0305-7488, E-ISSN 1095-8614, Vol. 44, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative perspective is applied in analyzing the large-scale utilization of Arctic natural resources driven by economies and agents outside the Arctic and subarctic regions. This paper focuses on whaling since the sixteenth century, and on the development of mining from the nineteenth century to the present. The European sector of the Arctic and subarctic regions including the high-Arctic archipelago of Spitsbergen provides the main cases for this study. The social, economic and environmental contexts and consequences of northern industry are considered; as part of this line of research, the little-known symbolic and geopolitical uses of industrial field installations are considered. The northern transfer of Western technoscience, including scientific navigation, colonial geography, steam-propulsion and aviation, often failed initially despite much enthusiasm and underwent painstaking on-site modification. In this industrialists and other Arctic entrepreneurs attempted to control a complex combination of factors including the sparse local population, the lack of major infrastructure, and the environmental impact of their own businesses. This combined with the social problems of keeping peace among collaborators and competitors under isolated and lawless conditions. In conclusion, the greatest challenges to industry in the Arctic throughout modern history were local and social rather than climatic or geopolitical. Indigenous interests were long disregarded while Arctic seas and some land areas were exploited by Western nations as unregulated commons. Not only nature and local inhabitants but also the industry itself suffered from increased scales of operations. The record of Arctic extractive industries over four hundred years reveals a need to develop and share relevant environmental and socio-economic knowledge and to develop international regulations and instruments such as industry certification to guarantee sustainable northern resource utilization.

  • 108.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Houltz, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Industriarvet Idag2013In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, p. 5-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction to thematic issue of Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, identifying trends.

  • 109.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Houltz, Anders
    Maths Isacson: att förstå det globala i det lokala2015In: Fabrik og bolig, ISSN 0106-3324, p. 3-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Under the Ice: Exploring the Arctic’s Energy Resources, 1898-19852013In: Media and the Politics of Arctic Climate Change: When the Ice Breaks / [ed] Miyase Christensen, Annika E. Nilsson and Nina Wormbs, Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 128-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 111.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Foreign Policy and Natural Resources: Swedish Neutrality from an Environmental History Perspective2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The year 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the last time that Sweden was technically at war. Since then, Sweden has built an international image of itself as a peace-loving and morally advanced country. This is in sharp contrast with earlier Swedish history, in which Swedish Vikings and famous warrior kings like Gustavus Adolphus and Charles XII caused havoc across much of the European continent. In Swedish history-writing as well as in the country's dominant social and political self-understanding, the 200 years of peace are typically attributed to a policy of neutrality, or non-alignment. The non-alignment policy has also been coupled - both in theoretical terms and in practical effect - with an expansive development aid policy towards former colonies and other developing countries in the South. The image of a benevolent and disinterested neutral country was further strengthened by high-profile international pro-activism, for example, through the United Nations and institutions like the Nobel Prize. However, after the fall of the Iron Curtain, a vivid debate among Swedish historians has led to reinterpretations Swedish neutrality during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This paper contributes to this debate by applying an environmental history lens to the analysis of political neutrality. Our hypothesis is that Sweden's non-alignment has been intimately linked to the country's role in the global natural resource system. Starting from the observation that Swedish non-alignment policy became firmly established precisely at the time of Sweden's resource-dependent industrial breakthrough in the late nineteenth century, we use primary and secondary sources to explore the intimate connections between two sets of actors: foreign policy actors and the rapidly expanding community of industrial actors. The latter sought to influence foreign policymaking both in the context of the need for secure access to natural resources not available domestically - of crucial importance for the country's growing production and export of steel, agricultural produce, and increasingly sophisticated technological artefacts - and in the context of investment in extractive industries abroad, particularly in colonial regions. At the same time, however, Swedish industrialists, engineers, and scientists active abroad were also eyed by the government as political tools.

  • 112.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sweden and the Origins of Global Resource Colonialism: Exploring a Neutral Country's Natural Resource Interests in Africa, Caucasia and the Arctic2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quest for the world's remaining natural resources has intensified markedly in recent years. A salient and controversial point of debate in this context has become the extent to and ways in which old colonial relations are argued to live on in a new global “resource colonialism”. Although Sweden is rarely thought of as a colonial power, Swedish actors are currently very active when it comes to resource exploitation in many parts of the world. As a small, neutral country with an excellent international reputation and virtually without enemies, we argue that Sweden has been able to mobilize the international resource system to its benefit much more effectively than many other European countries. This paper takes an historical perspective on the present by exploring the origins of Swedish interests and activities in the colonial resource arena from around 1880 to 1945. More precisely, we analyze and compare Swedish natural resource interests in three colonial arenas: Africa, Caucasia and the Arctic. In the case of Africa, we explore Sweden's virtually unknown - but highly active - participation at the Berlin conference in 1884-85. In the Caucasus case, we reinterpret the Nobel brothers crucial role in creating Baku's oil industry as a salient example of Swedish involvement in Russian resource colonialism. In the Arctic, we explore the connections between state and private interests in coal mining in Spitsbergen. An essential research issue concerns the extent to which it is possible to discern a common Swedish 'style' with regard to the country's interests and activities in colonial areas.

  • 113.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, David
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Swedish Explorers, In-Situ Knowledge, and Resource-Based Business in the Age of Empire2018In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 43, p. 324-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The period from 1870 to 1914 plays a unique role in the history of natural resource exploration and extraction. This article analyses, from a Swedish viewpoint, the connections between two actor categories of special importance in this context: scientific-geographical explorers and industrial actors. The article examines their activities in three broadly defined regions: the Arctic, Russia, and Africa. We show that the Swedes generally had far-reaching ambitions, on par with those of the large imperial powers. In some cases, notably in Africa, Sweden was not able to compete with the larger imperial powers; but in other cases, such as the exploration of the Arctic – from Spitsbergen to Siberia – and the industrial exploitation of coal at Spitsbergen and petroleum in Russia’s colonial periphery, Swedish actors played a leading role, in competition with players from the larger European nations. Our paper shows that scientific exploration and industry were closely linked, and that foreign policy also influenced the shaping of these links. We distinguish different types of knowledge produced by the Swedish actors, pointing to local, situated knowledge as the most important type for many resource-based businesses, although modern, scientific knowledge was on the increase during this period.

  • 114.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Vikström, Hanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Colonizing the poles2015In: Seminar : the monthly symposium, ISSN 0037-1947Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 115.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kunnas, Jan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Pettersson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Pettersson, Örjan
    Department of Geography and Economic History, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Solbär, Lovisa
    Department of Geography and Economic History, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Warde, Paul
    Pembroke College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom..
    Wråkberg, Urban
    Department of Tourism and Northern Studies, UiT The Arctic University of Norway in Kirkenes, Kirkenes, Norway..
    Constructing northern Fennoscandia as a mining region2019In: The Politics of Arctic Resources: Change and Continuity in the “Old North” of Northern Europe / [ed] Keskitalo, Carina, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 78-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Assessing Arctic Futures: Voices, Resources, and Governance2013In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 431-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in the future of the Arctic is running high, motivated in large part by belief that climate change will open new possibilities (and unleash new threats). Wealth from shipping and natural resource extraction features prominently in narratives about the Arctic in the media, and governance of the region has become a major concern as new actors demand influence. We use three components of current discourse about the Arctic to help reveal connections between how the region is constructed and how the right to decide its future is articulated. Voices are the actors who participate in the discursive construction of Arctic futures, with varying degrees of influence. Resources are objects upon which actors inscribe values, thus locating them in the discourse. Governance refers to the structural features through which action is regulated within spaces, restricting also the range of legitimate actors. We demonstrate the usefulness of these concepts through brief case studies of coal on Spitsbergen, hydrocarbons in the Barents Sea and whaling in the North Atlantic. We conclude by emphasizing the value of a historical perspective to understanding contemporary debates about the future of the Arctic.

  • 117.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Heritage, Conservation, and the Geopolitics of Svalbard: Writing the History of Arctic Environments2017In: Arctic Environmental Modernities: From the age of polar exploration to the era of the anthropocene / [ed] Lill-Ann Körber, Scott MacKenzie, Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan , 2017, p. 125-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Industrial Heritage and Arctic Mining Sites: Material Remains as Resources for the Present – and the Future2017In: Heritage and Change in the Arctic: Resources for the Present, and the Future / [ed] Robert C Thomsen and Lill Rastad Bjørst, Aalborg: Aalborg Universitetsforlag, 2017, p. 127-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Resource extraction and sustainable arctic communities2016In: TICCIH bulletin / The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, ISSN 1605-6647, Vol. 71, p. 12-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sustainable Communities and the Legacies of Mining in the Nordic Arctic2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 121.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Why history and industrial heritage matter for Arctic communities2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Robin, Libby
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Placing the Anthropocene2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Solnes, Sander
    Registrering av kulturminner i Pyramiden: Registrering utfört på oppdrag fra Sysselmannen på Svalbard2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en rapport från ett uppdrag vars syfte var att 1) registrere fredete kulturminner och 2) finna och kartfeste faste kulturminner fra før 1946 samt beskrive dem slik de er i dag og prøve å tolke tidligere funksjon. I uppdraget ingick att se närmmere på de teknisk industrielle kulturminnene som ligger i dagen, samt vurdere verdien av tidligere (men ikke fredete) industrielle kulturminner. Uppdraget ble utført av Dag Avango og Sander Solnes i Pyramiden i perioden 21.08-28.08. Rapporten innehåller resultaten av Avangos och Solnes inventering.

  • 124.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    van der Watt, Lize-Marie
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    On constructing Cultural Heritage in Antarctica (CHAQ)2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Azar, Christian
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Gothenburg University.
    Johansson-Stenman, Olof
    Gothenburg University.
    Ledin, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Munthe, John
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nordin, Annika
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University.
    Smith, Henrik
    Lund University.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Turesson, Anders
    Swedish Ministry of Environment and Energy.
    Vahter, Marie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Miljöpolitikens spelplan: Rapport från Miljöforskningsberedningen2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 126.
    Azar, Christian
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Gothenburg University.
    JohanssonStenman, Olof
    Gothenburg University.
    Ledin, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Munthe, John
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Nordin, Annika
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University.
    Smith, Henrik
    Lund University.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Vahter, Marie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Inrätta ett miljöpolitiskt råd direkt under statsministern2014In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2014-10-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 127.
    Balmaceda, Margarita
    et al.
    Seton Hall Univ, Sch Diplomacy & Int Relat, S Orange, NJ 07079 USA..
    Högselius, Per
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Johnson, Corey
    UNC Greensboro, Dept Geog Environm & Sustainabil, POB 26170, Greensboro, NC 27403 USA..
    Pleines, Heiko
    Univ Bremen, Res Ctr East European Studies, Klagenfurter St 8, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Rogers, Douglas
    Yale Univ, Dept Anthropol, Box 208277, New Haven, CT 06511 USA..
    Tynkkynen, Veli-Pekka
    Univ Helsinki, Aleksanteri Inst, POB 42, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Energy materiality: A conceptual review of multi-disciplinary approaches2019In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 56, article id UNSP 101220Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This jointly authored essay reviews recent scholarship in the social sciences, broadly understood, that focuses on the materiality of energy. Although this work is extraordinarily diverse in its disciplinary and interdisciplinary influences and its theoretical and methodological commitments, we discern four areas of convergence and divergence that we term the locations, uses, relationalities, and analytical roles of energy materiality. We trace these convergences and divergences through five recent scholarly conversations: materiality as a constraint on actors' behavior; historical energy systems; mobility, space and scale; discourse and power via energy materialities; and energy becoming material.

  • 128. Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Colding, Johan
    Erixon, Hanna
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Grahn, Sara
    Kärsten, Carl
    Marcus, Lars
    Torsvall, Jonas
    Principles of Social Ecological Design: Case study Albano Campus, Stockholm2013Book (Other academic)
  • 129. Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Colding, Johan
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grahn, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Erixon, Hanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Kärsten, Carl
    Torsvall, Jonas
    Chans sätta Stockholm på kartan2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    Sätta Stockholm på kartan
  • 130. Behrsin, I.
    et al.
    Palolo De Rosa, Salvatore
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Contaminant, Commodity and Fuel: A Multi-sited Study of Waste's roles in Urban Transformations from Italy to Austria2020In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 90-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article traces the flow of municipal solid waste from southern Italy through a waste-to-energy facility and district heating system in Austria, examining the roles that waste's transformation from contaminant to commodity to fuel plays in interconnected, distributed, and contested urbanization processes. It contends that, while metabolic circulation hides socioecological costs in one place to facilitate valorization in another, specific spatial configurations emerge through territorialization—of waste economies, in this case—providing the spatial base to realize metabolic flows and to anchor political narratives. A decisive effect is that certain patterns of urbanization become locked-in, impeding alternative metabolic transitions and spatial configurations. Attending to the coproduction of three sites—Naples, Italy; Zwentendorf, Austria; and St Pölten, Austria—through the circulation and transformation of waste and energy the article provides an empirical multi-sited case study of a political ecology of urbanization.

  • 131. Behrsin, Ingrid
    et al.
    De Rosa, Salvatore Paolo
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Contaminant, Commodity and Fuel: A Multi‐sited Study of Waste's roles in Urban Transformations from Italy to Austria2020In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 90-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article traces the flow of municipal solid waste from southern Italy through a waste‐to‐energy facility and district heating system in Austria, examining the roles that waste's transformation from contaminant to commodity to fuel plays in interconnected, distributed, and contested urbanization processes. It contends that, while metabolic circulation hides socioecological costs in one place to facilitate valorization in another, specific spatial configurations emerge through territorialization—of waste economies, in this case—providing the spatial base to realize metabolic flows and to anchor political narratives. A decisive effect is that certain patterns of urbanization become locked‐in, impeding alternative metabolic transitions and spatial configurations. Attending to the coproduction of three sites—Naples, Italy; Zwentendorf, Austria; and St Pölten, Austria—through the circulation and transformation of waste and energy the article provides an empirical multi‐sited case study of a political ecology of urbanization.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 132.
    Benner, Mats
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Higher Education in the Knowledge Society: Miracle or Mirage2016In: Multilevel Governance in Universities: Strategy, Structure and Control / [ed] Jetta Frost , Fabian Hattke , Markus Reihlen, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2016, p. 75-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Benner, Mats
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Corporatization of the Business School: Minerva Meets the Market2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Benner, Mats
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Lund University School of Economics and Management.
    The new global politics of science: Knowledge, markets and the state2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science has become a central political concern with massive increases in public investments and expectations, but resources are embedded in a complex web of societal expectations, which vary between countries and regions. This book outlines an insightful understanding of science policy as both concerning the governance of science itself (priority-setting, funding, organization and articulation with polity, society, and economy) and its extra-organizational connections, in terms of higher education, innovation and national policy concerns.

  • 135.
    Benner, Mats
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Conflicting Rationalities: Mergers and Consolidations in Swedish Higher Education Policy2016In: Mergers in Higher Education: The Experience from Northern Europe / [ed] Romulo Pinheiro, Lars Geschwind, Timo Aarrevaara, Berlin: Springer, 2016, p. 43-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Benner, Mats
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Lund University, Sweden.
    Huzzard, T.
    Minerva meets the market: From managerialism to critical reflexivity2017In: The Corporatization of the Business School: Minerva Meets the Market, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2017, p. 234-245Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Benner, Mats
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Samverkansuppgiften i ett historiskt och institutionellt perspektiv2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Universitet och högskolor (UoH) spelar en viktig roll för Sveriges innovationskraft, konkurrenskraft och attraktionskraft. Sverige satsar i internationell jämförelse stora resurser på utbildning och forskning vid UoH. Samverkan mellan lärosäten å ena sidan och företag, offentliga verksamheter och civilsamhället å andra sidan är avgörande för UoHs effekter på det omgivande samhället. Sådan samverkan är även viktig för kvaliteten i forskning och utbildning vid UoH.

    Regeringen har gett VINNOVA uppdrag, i samråd med Vetenskapsrådet samt forskningsråden Forte och Formas, att utforma metoder och kriterier för bedömning av prestation och kvalitet i lärosätenas samverkan med det omgivande samhället, i termer av relevans och nyttiggörande av forskningsbaserad kunskap.

    Utgångspunkter för arbetet med uppdraget har varit ett brett perspektiv på lärosätenas samverkan och hänsyn till UoHs olika roller och förutsättningar. I arbetet med uppdraget har VINNOVA också valt att definiera samverkan som en interaktiv process som skapar ömsesidig nytta, både för UoH och samverkanspartners.

    Syftet med föreliggande rapport är att sätta samverkan i en större historisk, nationell och institutionell kontext för att förstå hur synen på och arbetet med samverkan har utvecklats vid svenska universitet över tiden.

  • 138. Benner, Mats
    et al.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Vad vill ministern?2019In: Forskningspolitikk, ISSN 0333-0273, E-ISSN 0805-8210, ISSN 0333-0273, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 139. Bergström, Roger
    et al.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Danell, Kjell
    von Essen, Hans
    Mörner, Torsten
    Utbildning och forskning2016In: Jaktens historia i Sverige: Vilt – människa – samhälle – kultur, Stockholm: Liber Hermods , 2016, p. 291-300Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 140. Bergthaller, Hannes
    et al.
    Emmett, Rob
    Johns-Putra, Adeline
    Kneitz, Agnes
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    McCorristine, Shane
    Pérez Ramos, Isabel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Phillips, Dana
    Rigby, Kate
    Robin, Libby
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mapping Common Ground: Ecocriticism, Environmental History, and the Environmental Humanities2014In: Environmental humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, E-ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 5, p. 261-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the environmental humanities presents a unique opportunity for scholarship to tackle the human dimensions of the environmental crisis. It might finally allow such work to attain the critical mass it needs to break out of customary disciplinary confines and reach a wider public, at a time when natural scientists have begun to acknowledge that an understanding of the environmental crisis must include insights from the humanities and social sciences. In order to realize this potential, scholars in the environmental humanities need to map the common ground on which close interdisciplinary cooperation will be possible. This essay takes up this task with regard to two fields that have embraced the environmental humanities with particular fervour, namely ecocriticism and environmental history. After outlining an ideal of slow scholarship which cultivates thinking across different spatiotemporal scales and seeks to sustain meaningful public debate, the essay argues that both ecocriticism and environmental history are concerned with practices of environing: each studies the material and symbolic transformations by which “the environment” is configured as a space for human action. Three areas of research are singled out as offering promising models for cooperation between ecocriticism and environmental history: eco-historicism, environmental justice, and new materialism. Bringing the fruits of such efforts to a wider audience will require environmental humanities scholars to experiment with new ways of organizing and disseminating knowledge.

  • 141.
    Bertilsson, Fredrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Public Space and Informal Accountability: Verdandi’s Study Manual, the Press and Uppsala University2019In: Cogent Arts and Humanities, E-ISSN 2331-1983, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 1586622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is concerned with the introduction of new forms of accountability. Instead of studying political reforms in the present, it explores a process in 19th century Sweden where the university became informally accountable to the public. It focuses not on large-scale government interventions but on seemingly mundane educational documentation: the study handbook published by Verdandi, a fraternity at Uppsala University, in 1887. The study is concerned with the impact of the handbook on the infrastructure of control, transparency and agency of the university. It shows how the handbook rearranged the academic structure of agency and provided new venues of assessment. The handbook was the first of its kind and it received nation-wide press coverage. It provided the press and the public with an official point of reference to informally and publicly assess, question and judge university education. At the same time, students were enabled to strengthen their influence within and without the university. The study illuminates a dual process of agency and accountability that was arguably an integral part to the 19th century “modern” university emerging in relation to the public space and contemporary political and social developments.

  • 142.
    Bertilsson, Fredrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Verksamhetsöverskridande universitetspolitiska samarbeten: Införandet av en juristexamen i Sverige 17492019In: Universitetets gränser / [ed] Peter Josephson och Thomas Karlsohn, Göteborg: Arche Press , 2019, 1, p. 94-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 143. Biasillo, R.
    et al.
    Armiero, Marco
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The transformative potential of a disaster: a contextual analysis of the 1882 flood in Verona, Italy2019In: Journal of Historical Geography, ISSN 0305-7488, E-ISSN 1095-8614, Vol. 66, p. 69-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores institutional responses to and societal understandings of the 1882 Adige flood in northern Italy, which particularly affected the city of Verona. The article investigates the transformative power of that disaster on a national scale in terms of forest policy and at a city level in terms of water management and urban planning. After the flood, an extensive programme of works aiming to contain and discipline both the river and its adjacent city dwellers coexisted with the launch of forest conservation and reforestation plans. This flood and its recovery phase incorporated and materialized the early Italian state's relationship to the natural world. We interpret the flood as providing an opportunity for redirecting Italy's local and national flood management strategies, triggering an explicit awareness of the interrelation between lowlands and highlands and enhancing modernization processes in many respects. Despite its historical and symbolic relevance, this flood has not yet been fully researched and poses crucial questions about ways of organising and selectively obliterating collective memories of disasters.

  • 144.
    Biasillo, Roberta
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grassroots initiatives in climate change-adaptation for justice and sustainability2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    While climate campaigners organize direct action groups and city councils begin considering climate change an undeniable imperative in planning and policy, school strikers have launched the international platform School Strike 4 Climate. The support for local climate action around the world is growing and will not stop.

  • 145.
    Biasillo, Roberta
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Ockupera Klimatförändringarna2019In: Tidningen BrandArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 146.
    Biasillo, Roberta
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Past on Display: How To Tell History in a Museum?2019In: Public History Weekly. The International Blogjournal, ISSN 2197-6376, Vol. 29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Biasillo, Roberta
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Armiero, Marco
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Italian eco-narratives.: Paths into the nationalisation of forests2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    What if we let Italy talk through its forests? What if we unfold Italian history through its forests? Today’s blog discusses Italian forest narratives and how they may be read.

  • 148.
    Biasillo, Roberta
    et al.
    Università degli Studi di Bari ‘Aldo Moro’, Piazza Umberto I, 1, Bari, BA 70121, Italy.
    Armiero, Marco
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Seeing the nation for the trees: at the frontier of the Italian nineteenth century modernity2018In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 497-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyse the emergence and the transformation of three different socio-natural spaces in a particular historical context – that is, the establishment of a modern state. We explore this issue by researching the relationship between forests and modernisation from Unification in 1861 to the 1890s. Over this period Italy experienced a radical change connected with the state-building process, and forests represented a material place where innovations in social and economic development were tested. Based on three case studies, this article explores how modernity was articulated through urban parks, ironworks, and infrastructures. The three cases speak of both depletion and conservation; they exemplify the patterns through which, in the very making of modernity, Italian society articulated its relationship to nature in an attempt to overcome customary rights and the traditional rural organisation of society. Forests were constructed as socio-ecological spaces reflecting Italy’s contested and heterogeneous modernisation process through which political tensions, social conflicts and economic development theories were inscribed on transformed landscapes.

  • 149.
    Biasillo, Roberta
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    da Silva, Claiton Marcio
    Cultivating Arid Soils in Libya and Brazil during World War Two: The Two-fold War between Colonial and Neo-colonial Experiences2019In: Global Environment, ISSN 1973-3739, E-ISSN 2053-7352, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 154-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares two schemes of agrarian transformation that occurred during World War Two in Libya and northeast Brazil, undertaken by the Italian fascist regime and US private and governmental officials respectively. Although developing different historical trajectories, these similar efforts aiming to convert desert and semi-arid areas into productive fields intertwined with military services and reflected colonial and post-colonial appropriations in the Global South. The article demonstrates how both Libya and Brazil represented militarised environments and contested spaces well beyond the WW2 timeframe and how the colonial expansion projects that preceded and resulted from WW2 combined military campaigns and mastery over nature. Our analysis builds upon Italian and US primary sources and scholarly publications in environmental history.

  • 150. Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    Nilsson, David
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Juma, Benard
    Sitokic, Lewis
    Bridging the critical interface: Ambidextrous innovation for water provision in Nairobi's informal settlements2020In: Technology in society, ISSN 0160-791X, E-ISSN 1879-3274, Vol. 60, article id 101221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines innovation activities in water infrastructure in Nairobi, Kenya. The focus is on efforts by Nairobi City Water and Sewerage Corporation (NCWSC) to provide water services to the inhabitants in the informal areas of the city using an automated vending machine, or Pre-Paid Dispenser (PPD). In this study, we investigate what happens when a regime actor like NCWSC tries to implement an ambidextrous (two-handed) strategy: managing the existing system according to conventional practice and at the same time innovate in new technical solutions and business models to cater for unconnected users.

    Besides presenting our results, our aim in this article is also to introduce a research strategy for innovation studies in infrastructural systems in low-income urban areas. Three interconnected parts stand out as our contribution:

    First, we present a novel conceptual framework, by adding ideas from innovation studies to the Large Technical Systems approach. We investigate how regime actors can innovate to provide water to unconnected users, without expanding the system in a traditional way.

    Second, we propose a novel method for analysing and understanding innovation on the margins of the infrastructural system, or in our terms, innovation in the critical interface. Central to our method is, through empirical observation, to identify misalignment between the innovation (PPD) and contextual factors at the local level, where the innovation is implemented (interface misalignment), and misalignment between the innovation and the existing water regime (internal misalignment). We use a qualitative method and results forms as a basis for further research and starting point for regime actors in search of an improved ambidextrous strategy.

    Third, we analyse the innovation process per se. In the Nairobi case, we assess the ambidextrous innovation strategy, and claim that the PPD functions as an adapter in the critical interface, enabling the regime actors to operate in an environment of misalignment.

1234567 101 - 150 of 1058
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf