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  • 101.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Cognitive function in relation to hearing aid use2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, p. S49-S58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate possible relationships between cognitive function and hearing aid use. In Experiment 1. 72 first-time hearing aid users were tested for speech recognition in noise (Hagerman sentence test) with and without hearing aids. Cognitive function was assessed by tests of working memory (reading span test) and verbal information-processing speed. The results indicate that. after controlling for age and hearing loss, significant correlations exist between the measures of cognitive performance and speech recognition in noise, both with and without hearing aids. High cognitive performance was associated with high performance in the speech recognition task. In Experiment 2, 17 first-time hearing aid users with either high or low working-memory capacity tested ail experimental hearing aid which processed the sound differently depending on whether or not speech was detected. The results revealed that those with high working-memory capacity were better than those with low capacity at identifying and reporting the specific processing effects of the aid. This may have implications for how reported results should be interpreted in a research context, how a person's rehabilitation needs are formulated, and how hearing aid controls should be supervised. In conclusion, careful attention should be paid to the cognitive status of listeners, as it can have a significant influence on their ability to utilize their hearing aids.

  • 102. Luxon, Linda
    et al.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advances in pediatric audiological and vestibular disorders2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 533-534Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Children with Hearing Loss: Developing Listening and Talking, Birth to Six, Second Edition2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 645-645Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognitive Psychology.
    Borg, E.
    Ohlsson, I-S
    Working memory capacity and phonological skills in speech understanding in severe hearing-impaired individuals2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Borg, E
    Ohlsson, IS
    Working-memory capacity and phonological processing in deafened adults and individuals with a severe hearing impairment2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, p. S86-S89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present article is to review a number of studies conducted in our own laboratory with respect to working memory capacity and phonological processing in deafened adults and individuals with a severe hearing impairment, and how these two cognitive components relate to speech processing. The results demonstrate that one specific component in the phonological processing system (i.e., the phonological representation system) is deteriorating, whereas other parts are preserved intact. The characteristic of the individual's phonological representation is further correlated with success in speech reading and speech understanding with some cochlear implant systems. Working memory capacity is a capacity that remains intact despite a long duration of deafness/severe hearing loss. The size of the working memory is related to skill in speech reading and level of speech understanding with cochlear implants and perceived effort in a noisy environment.

  • 106.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Lunds universitet.
    Cognitive development in children with cochlear implants:: Relations to reading and communication2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl. 2, p. S47-S52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present article is to present an overview of a set of studies conducted in our own laboratory on cognitive and communicative development in children with cochlear implants (CI). The results demonstrate that children with CIs perform at significantly lower levels on the majority of the cognitive tasks. The exceptions to this trend are tasks with relatively lower demands on phonological processing. A fairly high proportion of the children can reach a level of reading comprehension that matches hearing children, despite the fact that they have relatively poor phonological skills.General working memory capacity is further correlated with the type of questions asked in a referential communication task. The results are discussed with respect to issues related to education and rehabilitation.

  • 107.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden;.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cognitive development in children with cochlear implants: relations to reading and communication2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl 2, p. S47-S52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present article is to present an overview of a set of studies conducted in our own laboratory on cognitive and communicative development in children with cochlear implants (CI). The results demonstrate that children with CIs perform at significantly lower levels on the majority of the cognitive tasks. The exceptions to this trend are tasks with relatively lower demands on phonological processing. A fairly high proportion of the children can reach a level of reading comprehension that matches hearing children, despite the fact that they have relatively poor phonological skills. General working memory capacity is further correlated with the type of questions asked in a referential communication task. The results are discussed with respect to issues related to education and rehabilitation.

  • 108.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Linköping, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Wass, Malin
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina Margareetta
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Lund University.
    Cognitive development in children with cochlear implants: Relations to reading and communication2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl. 2, p. S47-S52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present article is to present an overview of a set of studies conducted in our own laboratory on cognitive and communicative development in children with cochlear implants (CI). The results demonstrate that children with CIs perform at significantly lower levels on the majority of the cognitive tasks. The exceptions to this trend are tasks with relatively lower demands on phonological processing. A fairly high proportion of the children can reach a level of reading comprehension that matches hearing children, despite the fact that they have relatively poor phonological skills. General working memory capacity is further correlated with the type of questions asked in a referential communication task. The results are discussed with respect to issues related to education and rehabilitation.

  • 109. Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Sundewall Thoren, Elisabet
    Öberg, Marie
    Lunner, Thomas
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Kähäri, Kim
    Experiences of an Internet-based aural rehabilitation (IAR) program for hearing aid users: a qualitative study2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 570-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Internet interventions for hearing aid (HA) users have been shown to be effective in helping persons with hearing problems. As earlier research refers to objective data on these effects, little is known about how participants experience the Internet interventions subjectively. The aim of the present study was to explore participants' experiences of an Internet-based aural rehabilitation (IAR) program for HA-users, and to explore the possible subjective benefits of such a program. Design: A qualitative exploratory design was implemented involving semi-structured telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using content analysis. Study sample: Interviews were conducted with 20 participants (9 men and 11 women) who had completed an IAR program for HA-users. The participants were 57-81 years old and had used HAs for 2-25 years. Results: The results are organised in three main categories: general experiences associated with participating in the program, knowledge obtained from the program and perceived impact of taking part in the program. Conclusions: The overall results indicate positive experiences of the IAR program, and an overreaching theme of increased self-esteem was identified. The findings provide some valuable information for developers of future IAR programs.

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  • 110.
    Malmberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Hearing Org, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thoren, Elisabet Sundewall
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kahari, Kim
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Experiences of an Internet-based aural rehabilitation (IAR) program for hearing aid users: a qualitative study2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 570-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Internet interventions for hearing aid (HA) users have been shown to be effective in helping persons with hearing problems. As earlier research refers to objective data on these effects, little is known about how participants experience the Internet interventions subjectively. The aim of the present study was to explore participants experiences of an Internet-based aural rehabilitation (IAR) program for HA-users, and to explore the possible subjective benefits of such a program. Design: A qualitative exploratory design was implemented involving semi-structured telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using content analysis. Study sample: Interviews were conducted with 20 participants (9 men and 11 women) who had completed an IAR program for HA-users. The participants were 57-81 years old and had used HAs for 2-25 years. Results: The results are organised in three main categories: general experiences associated with participating in the program, knowledge obtained from the program and perceived impact of taking part in the program. Conclusions: The overall results indicate positive experiences of the IAR program, and an overreaching theme of increased self-esteem was identified. The findings provide some valuable information for developers of future IAR programs.

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    fulltext
  • 111.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Cambridge University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Pyykko, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Kentala, Erna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Levo, Hilla
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Positive experiences associated with acquired hearing loss, Menieres disease, and tinnitus: A review2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: It is common to study and understand how various illness and disorders result in negative consequences. However, positive experiences have been reported in a range of disabling conditions including multiple sclerosis, heart disease, physical and sensory disabilities. This paper presents a literature review of studies that have explored positive experiences associated with acquired hearing loss, Menieres disease, and tinnitus. Design: A review of the peer reviewed scientific literature. Study sample: A comprehensive search strategy identified 15 articles after applying inclusion criteria. Results: A range of positive experiences have been reported by patients with hearing and balance disorders and by their significant others. Associations between demographic variables (e.g. age, gender), audiological variables (e.g. severity of the condition, duration) and the reported positive experiences are low. In Menieres disease, self-reported positive experiences can predict the impact of the condition. However, this phenomenon has not yet been demonstrated in relation to hearing loss and tinnitus. Conclusions: Positive experiences associated with audio-vestibular disorders have been demonstrated. Further research is needed on the long-term benefits of the encouragement of such experiences and positive attitudes in persons with hearing loss, tinnitus, and imbalance.

  • 112.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India; Audiology India, Mysore, India.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Grover, Vibhu
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Saunders, Gabrielle H.
    Eriksholm Research Center, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Ann Hall, Deborah
    NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; Hearing Sciences, Division of Clinical Neuroscience School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK; University of Nottingham Malaysia, Semenyih, Malaysia.
    Content validity and readability of patient-reported questionnaire instruments of hearing disability2019In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 565-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the content validity (i.e. domains assessed) and readability levels of patient-reported questionnaire instruments using internationally recognised procedures and tools.

    DESIGN: A review of the literature to identify candidate instruments and a synthesis of information including mapping extracted items onto the World Health Organisation's - International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (WHO-ICF) and estimating readability.

    STUDY SAMPLE: 14 patient-reported questionnaire instruments.

    RESULTS: In general, item content focussed on body function and on activity limitations and participation restrictions, with less emphasis on environmental and personal factors and with different emphases across instruments. Many items did not clearly map onto any of the WHO-ICF categories (i.e. not coded items ranged from 3.7 to 39.1% across the 14 questionnaires). All 14 instruments exceeded the sixth-grade reading level when calculated according to the FORCAST formula which is appropriate for assessing a non-narrative text.

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical assessment of hearing disability is only as comprehensive as the items covered by the chosen measurement instrument. Our findings confirmed the diversity of domains covered by hearing disability instruments and gaps in assessment. Some concern is raised about whether the item content is appropriate for those respondents with poor literacy.

  • 113.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Freeman, Barry
    Starkey Laboratories Inc., Eden Praire, MN, USA.
    Audiogram: Is there a need for change in the approach to categorise degree/severity of hearing loss?2011In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 638-640Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Zhao, Fei
    University of Bristol, UK.
    Professor Dafydd Stephens 1942–20122012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 10, p. 714-714Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Munoz, Maria F.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Hatfield, Elia
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Fagelson, Marc A.
    East Tennessee State Univ, TN USA; Vet Affairs Med Ctr, TN USA.
    Aronson, Elizabeth Parks
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Translation and adaptation of three English tinnitus patient-reported outcome measures to Spanish2020In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of this study was to improve the range of standardised tinnitus Spanish Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMS) available by translating and ensuring cross-cultural adaptation of three English PROMs to Spanish. Design: The Tinnitus and Hearing Survey, Tinnitus Cognition Questionnaire, and Tinnitus Qualities Questionnaire were translated to Spanish using recently established good practice guidelines. Study sample: The translation process addressed 22 items included in six main steps specified in the guidelines. The translated PROMs were field tested on a sample of tinnitus patients who were recruited through convenience sampling using cognitive debriefing (n = 5) and pilot testing (n = 10) methods. Results: The translation process employed the required steps and provided specific details about the process and procedures. In addition, practical issues encountered while translating and adapting the questionnaires that may influence future translations were revealed. Conclusions: This is the first account of translating and adapting PROMs from one language to another using the good practice guidelines specific to hearing-related questionnaires. Following the rigorous procedures should ensure that the translated PROMs have linguistic and cultural equivalence to the original versions, although psychometric evaluation would remain necessary to confirm the functional equivalence.

  • 116. Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Zhao, Fei
    Widen, Stephen
    Auzenne, Jasmin
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    Ahmadi, Tayebeh
    Tome, David
    Mahadeva, Deepthi
    Krishna, Rajalakshmi
    Germundsson, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Social representation of "music" in young adults: a cross-cultural study2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study was aimed to explore perceptions of and reactions to music in young adults (18-25 years) using the theory of social representations (TSR). Design: The study used a cross-sectional survey design and included participants from India, Iran, Portugal, USA and UK. Data were analysed using various qualitative and quantitative methods. Study sample: The study sample included 534 young adults. Results: The Chi-square analysis showed significant differences between the countries regarding the informants' perception of music. The most positive connotations about music were found in the responses obtained from Iranian participants (82.2%), followed by Portuguese participants (80.6%), while the most negative connotations about music were found in the responses obtained from Indian participants (18.2%), followed by Iranian participants (7.3%). The participants' responses fell into 19 main categories based on their meaning; however, not all categories were found in all five countries. The co-occurrence analysis results generally indicate that the category positive emotions or actions was the most frequent category occurring in all five countries. Conclusions: The results indicate that music is generally considered to bring positive emotions for people within these societies, although a small percentage of responses indicate some negative consequences of music.

  • 117.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont TX, USA; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore, India.
    Zhao, Fei
    Centre for Speech Language Therapy and Hearing Science, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales, UK; Department of Hearing and Speech Science, Xinhua College, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Auzenne, Jasmin
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont TX, USA.
    Beukes, Eldré W.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Ahmadi, Tayebeh
    Department of Audiology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Tomé, David
    Department of Audiology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal.
    Deepthi, Mahadeva
    St. John’s Medical College, Bangalore, India.
    Rajalakshmi, Krishna
    Audiology India, Mysore, India; All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, University of Mysore, Mysore, India.
    Germundsson, Per
    The Department of Health and Welfare Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Social representation of "music" in young adults: A cross-cultural study2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The present study was aimed to explore perceptions of and reactions to music in young adults (18-25 years) using the theory of social representations (TSR).

    Design: The study used a cross-sectional survey design and included participants from India, Iran, Portugal, United States, and United Kingdom. Data were analyzed using various qualitative and quantitative methods.

    Study sample: The study sample included 534 young adults.

    Results: The Chi-square analysis showed significant differences between the countries regarding the informants’ perception of music. The most positive connotations about music were found in the responses obtained from Iranian participants (82.2%), followed by Portuguese participants (80.6%), while the most negative connotations about music were found in the responses obtained from Indian participants (18.2%), followed by Iranian participants (7.3%). The participants’ responses fell into 19 main categories based on their meaning; however, not all categories were found in all five countries. The co-occurrence analysis results generally indicate that the category “positive emotions or actions” was the most frequent category occurring in all five countries.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that music is generally considered to bring positive emotions for people within these societies, although a small percentage of responses indicate some negative consequences of music.

  • 118.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deafblindness: a challenge for assessment - is the ICF a useful tool?2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, p. S140-S142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the GPD2 gene, encoding one of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenases, grows slowly under anaerobic conditions, due to reductive stress caused by the accumulation of cytoplasmic NADH. We used 2D-PAGE to study the effect on global protein expression of reductive stress in the anaerobically grown gpd2 strain. The most striking response was a strongly elevated expression of Tdh1p, the minor isoform of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. This increased expression could be reversed by the addition of acetoin, a NADH-specific redox sink, which furthermore largely restored anaerobic growth of the gpd2 strain. Additional deletion of the TDH1 gene (but not of TDH2 or TDH3) improved anaerobic growth of the gpd2 strain. We therefore propose that TDH1 has properties not displayed by the other TDH isogenes and that its expression is regulated by reductive stress caused by an excess of cytoplasmic NADH.

  • 119.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Deafblindness: a challenge for assessment - is the ICF a useful tool?2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no Supplement 1, p. S140-S142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Syskind Perdersen, Michael
    Oticon A/S, Smörum, Denmark.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of noise and working memory capacity on memory processing of speech for hearing-aid users2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 433-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: It has been shown that noise reduction algorithms can reduce the negative effects of noise on memory processing in persons with normal hearing. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether a similar effect can be obtained for persons with hearing impairment and whether such an effect is dependent on individual differences in working memory capacity.

    Design: A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was conducted in two noise backgrounds with and without noise reduction as well as in quiet. Working memory capacity was measured using a reading span (RS) test.

    Study sample: Twenty-six experienced hearing-aid users with moderate to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss.

    Results: Noise impaired recall performance. Competing speech disrupted memory performance more than speech-shaped noise. For late list items the disruptive effect of the competing speech background was virtually cancelled out by noise reduction for persons with high working memory capacity.

    Conclusions: Noise reduction can reduce the adverse effect of noise on memory for speech for persons with good working memory capacity. We argue that the mechanism behind this is faster word identification that enhances encoding into working memory.

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  • 121.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hearing aid experience and background noise affect the robust relationship between working memory and speech recognition in noise2019In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine how background noise and hearing aid experience affect the robust relationship between working memory and speech recognition.

    Design: Matrix sentences were used to measure speech recognition in noise. Three measures of working memory were administered. Study sample: 148 participants with at least 2 years of hearing aid experience.

    Results: A stronger overall correlation between working memory and speech recognition performance was found in a four-talker babble than in a stationary noise background. This correlation was significantly weaker in participants with most hearing aid experience than those with least experience when background noise was stationary. In the four-talker babble, however, no significant difference was found between the strength of correlations between users with different experience.

    Conclusion: In general, more explicit processing of working memory is invoked when listening in a multi-talker babble. The matching processes (cf. Ease of Language Understanding model, ELU) were more efficient for experienced than for less experienced users when perceiving speech. This study extends the existing ELU model that mismatch may also lead to the establishment of new phonological representations in the long-term memory.

  • 122.
    Niemensivu, Riina
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Roine, Risto P.
    Hospital Dist Helsinki and Uusimaa, Finland; University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Kentala, Erna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Sintonen, Harri
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Health-related quality of life in adults with hearing impairment before and after hearing-aid rehabilitation in Finland2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 967-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with hearing impairment in Finland before and after hearing rehabilitation. Design: The study was prospective with hearing-aid rehabilitation as the intervention. The data was collected, using the 15D instrument, before and six months after hearing-aid rehabilitation. The data was analysed using t-tests and multiple linear regression methods. Study sample: The study sample included 949 adults with hearing impairment, and the control group included a sample of age- and gender-standardized general population. Results: The study population had significantly poorer HRQoL on most dimensions of the 15D when compared to the control group both before and after hearing-aid rehabilitation. Hearing-aid rehabilitation resulted in improved mean scores on the dimensions of hearing and in the overall 15D score that were statistically significant, although the mean improvement in the overall score was marginal. Self-reported hearing ability can better predict the change in HRQoL, as a result of a hearing aid, when compared with measured hearing sensitivity. Conclusions: The study supports the hypothesis that on average, use of a unilateral hearing aid results in improved subjective hearing and marginal improvement in HRQoL in adults with hearing impairment.

  • 123.
    Odelius, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Johansson, Örjan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Self-assessment of classroom assistive listening devices2010In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 508-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assessment of classroom assistive listening devices (ALDs) based on induction loop systems was carried out in Swedish classes for hearing-impaired students. A questionnaire was developed and completed by 25 students (bilateral hearing aid users, 10-20 years old). Responses for hearing aid microphone mode (M) and telecoil mode (T) were collected. Two attributes, audibility and awareness, were identified and assigned to either mode. Better audibility was achieved in T-mode. Students with severe hearing loss benefited more using T-mode when compared to the better hearing students, especially in more difficult listening situations. Better awareness was achieved in M-mode; students could better hear, locate and segregate sounds in the environment around them. Depending on the situation, students make different choices between audibility and awareness. Self-assessment is a promising approach for determining what combination of ALD design and function that will best benefit the students

  • 124. Persson, J
    et al.
    Hellbom, Gunn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Balancing societal costs and users' quality of life - priority setting of interventions for the hard-of-hearing2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, p. S9-S12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the need for priority setting in rehabilitation, especially in audiology, and various approaches to providing information for priority setting are discussed. A set of outcome measures is proposed, and their applicbility to vertical and horizontal prioritization are considered. Two types of measures are proposed: individual problems assessment. and utility analysis. Results from a European multicentre study and a Swedish study illustrate the performance of the measures in the areas of mobility, hearing, and speech communication. For rehabilitation in the hard-of-hearing, the two types of measures provide different kinds of information, illustrated by the results of simultaneous use of the instruments.

  • 125.
    Preminger, Jill E.
    et al.
    University of Louisville, KY 40292 USA.
    Oxenboll, Maria
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Barnett, Margaret B.
    University of Louisville, KY 40292 USA.
    Jensen, Lisbeth D.
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Perceptions of adults with hearing impairment regarding the promotion of trust in hearing healthcare service delivery2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This paper describes how trust is promoted in adults with hearing impairment within the context of hearing healthcare (HHC) service delivery. Design: Data were analysed from a previously published descriptive qualitative study that explored perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation. Study sample: Interview transcripts from 29 adults from four countries with different levels of hearing impairment and different experience with the HHC system were analysed thematically. Results: Patients enter into the HHC system with service expectations resulting in a preconceived level of trust that can vary from low to high. Relational competence, technical competence, commercialized approach, and clinical environment (relevant to both the clinician and the clinic) influence a patients resulting level of trust. Conclusions: Trust is evolving rather than static in HHC: Both clinicians and clinics can promote trust. The characteristics of HHC that engender trust are: practicing good communication, supporting shared decision making, displaying technical competence, offering comprehensive hearing rehabilitation, promoting self-management, avoiding a focus on hearing-aid sales, and offering a professional clinic setting.

  • 126.
    Pryce, Helen
    et al.
    Aston University, England.
    Hall, Amanda
    St Michaels Hospital, England.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Clark, Elizabeth
    St Martins Hospital, England.
    A qualitative investigation of decision making during help-seeking for adult hearing loss2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 658-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Any Qualified Provider framework in the National Health Service has changed the way adult audiology services are offered in England. Under the new rules, patients are being offered a choice in geographical location and audiology provider. This study aimed to explore how choices in treatment are presented and to identify what information patients need when they are seeking help with hearing loss. Design: This study adopted qualitative methods of ethnographic observations and focus group interviews to identify information needed prior to, and during, help-seeking. Observational data and focus group data were analysed using the constant comparison method of grounded theory. Study sample: Participants were recruited from a community Health and Social Care Trust in the west of England. This service incorporates both an Audiology and a Hearing Therapy service. Twenty seven participants were involved in focus groups or interviews. Results: Participants receive little information beyond the detail of hearing aids. Participants report little information that was not directly related to uptake of hearing aids. Conclusions: Participant preferences were not explored and limited information resulted in decisions that were clinician-led. The gaps in information reflect previous data on clinician communication and highlight the need for consistent information on a range of interventions to manage hearing loss.

  • 127.
    Pyykko, Ilmari
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland .
    Manchaiah, Vinaya Kumar Channapatna
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Kentala, Erna
    Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
    Levo, Hilla
    Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
    Significant others of patients with hearing and balance disorders report positive experiences2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 285-286Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Pyykko, Ilmari
    et al.
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Levo, Hilla
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kentala, Erna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rasku, Jyrki
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Attitudes of significant others of people with Menieres disease vary from coping to victimization2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 316-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the impact, reactions and coping methods of the significant others (SOs) of people with Menieres disease (MD). Design: SOs of people with MD were asked to answer open-ended questions reporting the life effects and positive experiences they have had as a result of the partners condition. The replies to the life effects question was categorized using the WHO-ICF framework. The responses of `life effects from this study and the positive experiences reported in a recent study (Manchaiah et al, 2013) were evaluated with K-means clustering analysis. Study sample: Eighty-eight SOs (42 male, 42 female, and four did not state gender). Results: While the SOs mainly listed their own problems, a significant number of responses related to the problems of their partner. Personal perspectives tended to focus on the consequences of their partners condition, whereas in perspectives of their partner they focussed on his/her symptoms. Further, replies from 81 SOs were used in evaluation of responses and were classified into four categories: constrained life attitude; disease burden attitude; care and support attitude; and social isolation attitude. Conclusions: The results of this study support the importance of including the SO of people with MD in the rehabilitation process.

  • 129.
    Pyykko, Ilmari
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal University, India.
    Levo, Hilla
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kentala, Erna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Juhola, Martti
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Internet-based peer support for Menieres disease: a summary of web-based data collection, impact evaluation, and user evaluation2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 7, p. 453-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This paper presents a summary of web-based data collection, impact evaluation, and user evaluations of an Internet-based peer support program for Menieres disease (MD). Design: The program is written in html-form. The data are stored in a MySQL database and uses machine learning in the diagnosis of MD. The program works interactively with the user and assesses the participants disorder profile in various dimensions (i.e., symptoms, impact, personal traits, and positive attitude). The inference engine uses a database to compare the impact with 50 referents, and provides regular feedback to the user. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. Study sample: The impact evaluation was based on 740 cases and the user evaluation on a sample of 75 cases of MD respectively. Results: The web-based system was useful in data collection and impact evaluation of people with MD. Among those with a recent onset of MD, 78% rated the program as useful or very useful, whereas those with chronic MD rated the program 55%. Conclusions: We suggest that a web-based data collection and impact evaluation for peer support can be helpful while formulating the rehabilitation goals of building the self-confidence needed for coping and increasing social participation.

  • 130.
    Pyykko, Ilmari
    et al.
    Univ Tampere, Finland.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Zou, Jing
    Univ Tampere, Finland; Second Mil Med Univ, Peoples R China.
    Levo, Hilla
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Kentala, Erna
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Relational quality, illness interference, and partner support in Menieres disease2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The current study aimed to better understand how patients and their significant others (SOs) cope with Menieres disease (MD). Design: The study used a cross-sectional design and the data were collected using questionnaires. Study sample: Seventy-five dyads in which one person had MD. Results: SOs of patients with MD not only experienced activity and participation restrictions but also had positive experiences. In relational quality, the SOs reported uncertainty of their future, limited visits in noisy places, limited activities as walking, watching TV, and participating in social life. The illness interference correlated with the patients complaints, and most significant was the problem of imbalance. The quality of life was significantly reduced in patients with MD, and the illness interference in terms of quality of life was correlated with the SOs in items related to mood and anxiety. The stress related conditions of the SOs were correlated with two positive items (e.g. alleviating the stress factor). The SOs could also identify one positive item (i.e., improved relationship). Conclusions: Perceptions of MD as interfering in couples lives influence dyadic coping in unique ways. The current study identified that dyadic coping has both positive aspects and limitations as a consequence of their partners MD.

  • 131.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Borg, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Philipson, Lennart
    Stranneby, Dag
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Auditive identification of signal-processed environmental sounds: monitoring the environment2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 724-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the present study was to compare six transposing signal-processing algorithms based on different principles (Fourier-based and modulation based), and to choose the algorithm that best enables identification of environmental sounds, i.e. improves the ability to monitor events in the surroundings. Ten children (12-15 years) and 10 adults (21-33 years) with normal hearing listened to 45 representative environmental (events) sounds processed using the six algorithms, and identified them in three different listening experiments involving an increasing degree of experience. The sounds were selected based on their importance for normal hearing and deaf-blind subjects. Results showed that the algorithm based on transposition of 1/3 octaves (fixed frequencies) with large bandwidth was better (p<0.015) than algorithms based on modulation. There was also a significant effect of experience (p<0.001). Adults were significantly (p<0.05) better than children for two algorithms. No clear gender difference was observed. It is concluded that the algorithm based on transposition with large bandwidth and fixed frequencies is the most promising for development of hearing aids to monitor environmental sounds.

  • 132.
    Ratanjee-Vanmali, Husmita
    et al.
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology , University of Pretoria , Pretoria , South Africa; b Hearing Research Clinic Non-Profit Company , Durban , South Africa.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology , University of Pretoria , Pretoria , South Africa; c Ear Sciences Centre , The University of Western Australia , Nedlands , Australia; d Ear Science Institute Australia , Subiaco , Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon Medical , Oticon A/S, Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Characteristics, behaviours and readiness of persons seeking hearing healthcare online2019In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study describes characteristics, behaviours and readiness of people who are interested in seeking hearing healthcare (HHC) online.

    Design: A non-profit clinic was established from which services through a virtual clinic are offered. Most of the patient–audiologist interactions are conducted online. We used online means to invite individuals to take a free online digit-in-noise (DIN) test. Upon failing the test, individuals reported their readiness to seek HHC by using two tools: the line and the staging algorithm.

    Study sample: Individuals ≥18 years of age, within the greater Durban area, South Africa, were eligible to participate in the study.

    Results: A total of 462 individuals completed the online DIN test during the first 3 months. Of those, 58.66% (271/462) failed the test and 11.04% (51/462) submitted their details for further contact from the clinic audiologist. Five individuals proceeded to a comprehensive hearing evaluation and hearing aid trial: all those individuals showed readiness to seek further HHC on the measurement tools. These individuals have reported knowing of their hearing challenges prior to taking the test and have waited for a period of between 5 and 16 years before seeking HHC. A significant association between age and DIN test result was found.

    Conclusion: This explorative study is the first clinic to utilise digital tools across the entire patient journey in combination with face-to-face interactions in providing HHC. Internet-connected devices provide an opportunity for individuals to seek HHC and for providers to offer initial services to detect, counsel and support persons through the initial engagement process of seeking HHC. This may open up new audiology patient pathways through online hearing screening, assessment of readiness to seek further HHC and enhancement of service delivery using hybrid services by combining online and face-to-face modes of synchronous and asynchronous communication.

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  • 133.
    Rosenhall, Ulf
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Idrizbegovic, Esma
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hederstierna, Christina
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Rothenberg, Elisabet
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL).
    Dietary habits and hearing2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no Suppl. 1, p. S53-S56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Study groups from three age cohorts of 70-75 year-olds were investigated to search for possible correlations between dietary habits and auditory function.

    Design: A cross-sectional, epidemiological study.

    Study sample: A total number of 524 people (275 women, 249 men) were recruited from three age cohorts. The study sample was representative of the general population. All participants answered a diet history and were tested with pure-tone audiometry. Eleven categories of food consumption were related to pure-tone averages of low-mid frequency hearing, and high frequency hearing.

    Results: Two consistent correlations between diet and hearing were observed. One was a correlation between good hearing and a high consumption of fish in the male group. The other was a correlation between poor high frequency hearing and a high consumption of food rich in low molecular carbohydrates in both genders; a larger effect size was seen in females.

    Conclusions: The study indicates that diet is important for aural health in aging. According to this study fish is beneficial to hearing, whereas consumption of "junk food", rich in low molecular carbohydrates, is detrimental. Other correlations, e.g. between high consumption of antioxidants, were not demonstrated here, but cannot be excluded.

  • 134.
    Rosenhall, Ulf
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Hederstierna, Christina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hearing of 75-year old persons over three decades: Has hearing changed?2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 11, p. 731-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The state of hearing in 75-year old persons was measured in a population based epidemiological study with the aim of studying if hearing had changed during a time span of 29 years. Design: An epidemiological study of generational effects in three age cohorts. Study sample: Three age cohorts were included: cohort 1 (n: 267) born in 1976-77, cohort 4 (n: 197) in 1990-91, and cohort 6 (n: 570) in 2005. The same test procedures using pure-tone audiometry and a short questionnaire were applied to the three cohorts of 75-year old residents in the same city. Results: The hearing was essentially unchanged during the span of the investigation-almost three decades. Low-frequency hearing was up to about 10 dB poorer in the most recently studied cohort compared to the previously studied cohorts. The reason for this difference is considered to depend on methodological factors. Self-assessed hearing and tinnitus was mainly unchanged, or had minor changes both to the better and to the worse. Conclusions: The hearing, both measured with pure-tone audiometry and with a short questionnaire, of 75-year old persons has not changed at all, or only marginally, over three decades.

  • 135.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sundewall-Thoren, Elisabet
    Oticon A/S, Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Phonological mismatch and explicit cognitive processing in a sample of 102 hearing-aid users2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 2, p. S91-S98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rudner et al (2008) showed that when compression release settings are manipulated in the hearing instruments of Swedish habitual users, the resulting mismatch between the phonological form of the input speech signal and representations stored in long-term memory leads to greater engagement of explicit cognitive processing under taxing listening conditions. The mismatch effect is manifest in significant correlations between performance on cognitive tests and aided-speech-recognition performance in modulated noise and/or with fast compression release settings. This effect is predicted by the ELU model (Ronnberg et al, 2008). In order to test whether the mismatch effect can be generalized across languages, we examined two sets of aided speech recognition data collected from a Danish population where two cognitive tests, reading span and letter monitoring, had been administered. A reanalysis of all three datasets, including 102 participants, demonstrated the mismatch effect. These findings suggest that the effect of phonological mismatch, as predicted by the ELU model (Ronnberg et al, this issue) and tapped by the reading span test, is a stable phenomenon across these two Scandinavian languages.

  • 136.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognition in the hearing impaired and deaf as a bridge between signal and dialogue: A framework and a model2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no SUPPL. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the role of cognition in visual language processing in the deaf and hard of hearing. Although there are modality-specific cognitive findings in the literature on comparisons across speech communication modes and language (sign and speech), there is an impressive bulk of evidence that supports the notion of general modality-free cognitive functions in speech and sign processing. A working-memory framework is proposed for the cognitive involvement in language understanding (sign and speech). On the basis of multiple sources of behavioural and neuroscience data, four important parameters for language understanding are described in some detail: quality and precision of phonology, long-term memory access speed, degree of explicit processing, and general processing and storage capacity. Their interaction forms an important parameter space, and general predictions and applications can be derived for both spoken and signed language conditions. The model is mathematically formulated at a general level, hypothetical ease-of-language-understanding (ELU) functions are presented, and similarities and differences from current working-memory and speech perception formulations are pointed out.

  • 137.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    From signal to dialogue2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no S2, p. S1-S2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    .

  • 138.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Introduction: Assessment of auditory communication2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive hearing science and ease of language understanding2019In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 247-261Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The current update of the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model evaluates the predictive and postdictive aspects of speech understanding and communication.Design: The aspects scrutinised concern: (1) Signal distortion and working memory capacity (WMC), (2) WMC and early attention mechanisms, (3) WMC and use of phonological and semantic information, (4) hearing loss, WMC and long-term memory (LTM), (5) WMC and effort, and (6) the ELU model and sign language.Study Samples: Relevant literature based on own or others data was used.Results: Expectations 1-4 are supported whereas 5-6 are constrained by conceptual issues and empirical data. Further strands of research were addressed, focussing on WMC and contextual use, and on WMC deployment in relation to hearing status. A wider discussion of task demands, concerning, for example, inference-making and priming, is also introduced and related to the overarching ELU functions of prediction and postdiction. Finally, some new concepts and models that have been inspired by the ELU-framework are presented and discussed.Conclusions: The ELU model has been productive in generating empirical predictions/expectations, the majority of which have been confirmed. Nevertheless, new insights and boundary conditions need to be experimentally tested to further shape the model.

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  • 140.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine H. N.
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindestam, Björn
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Zekveld, Adriana A.
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linköping University; Section Ear & Hearing, Deptartment of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Träff, Ulf
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Yumba, Wycliffe
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Signoret, Carine
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pichora-Fuller, M. Kathleen
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping; Department of Psychology, University of Toronto,Toronto, Ontario, Canada; The Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; The Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hearing impairment, cognition and speech understanding: exploratory factor analyses of a comprehensive test battery for a group of hearing aid users, the n200 study2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 623-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of the current n200 study were to assess the structural relations between three classes of test variables (i.e. HEARING, COGNITION and aided speech-in-noise OUTCOMES) and to describe the theoretical implications of these relations for the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model. Study sample: Participants were 200 hard-of-hearing hearing-aid users, with a mean age of 60.8 years. Forty-three percent were females and the mean hearing threshold in the better ear was 37.4 dB HL. Design: LEVEL1 factor analyses extracted one factor per test and/or cognitive function based on a priori conceptualizations. The more abstract LEVEL 2 factor analyses were performed separately for the three classes of test variables. Results: The HEARING test variables resulted in two LEVEL 2 factors, which we labelled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE; the COGNITIVE variables in one COGNITION factor only, and OUTCOMES in two factors, NO CONTEXT and CONTEXT. COGNITION predicted the NO CONTEXT factor to a stronger extent than the CONTEXT outcome factor. TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and SENSITIVITY were associated with COGNITION and all three contributed significantly and independently to especially the NO CONTEXT outcome scores (R2 = 0.40). Conclusions: All LEVEL 2 factors are important theoretically as well as for clinical assessment.

  • 141.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Träff, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Yumba, Wycliffe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, Canada; University of Health Network, Canada; Baycrest Hospital, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hearing impairment, cognition and speech understanding: exploratory factor analyses of a comprehensive test battery for a group of hearing aid users, the n200 study2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 623-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of the current n200 study were to assess the structural relations between three classes of test variables (i.e. HEARING, COGNITION and aided speech-in-noise OUTCOMES) and to describe the theoretical implications of these relations for the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model. Study sample: Participants were 200 hard-of-hearing hearing-aid users, with a mean age of 60.8 years. Forty-three percent were females and the mean hearing threshold in the better ear was 37.4dB HL. Design: LEVEL1 factor analyses extracted one factor per test and/or cognitive function based on a priori conceptualizations. The more abstract LEVEL 2 factor analyses were performed separately for the three classes of test variables. Results: The HEARING test variables resulted in two LEVEL 2 factors, which we labelled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE; the COGNITIVE variables in one COGNITION factor only, and OUTCOMES in two factors, NO CONTEXT and CONTEXT. COGNITION predicted the NO CONTEXT factor to a stronger extent than the CONTEXT outcome factor. TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and SENSITIVITY were associated with COGNITION and all three contributed significantly and independently to especially the NO CONTEXT outcome scores (R-2 = 0.40). Conclusions: All LEVEL 2 factors are important theoretically as well as for clinical assessment.

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  • 142.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognition counts: A working memory system for ease of language understanding (ELU)2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl. 2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general working memory system for ease of language understanding (ELU, Rnnberg, 2003a) is presented. The purpose of the system is to describe and predict the dynamic interplay between explicit and implicit cognitive functions, especially in conditions of poorly perceived or poorly specified linguistic signals. In relation to speech understanding, the system based on (1) the quality and precision of phonological representations in long-term memory, (2) phonologically mediated lexical access speed, and (3) explicit, storage, and processing resources. If there is a mismatch between phonological information extracted from the speech signal and the phonological information represented in long-term memory, the system is assumed to produce a mismatch signal that invokes explicit processing resources. In the present paper, we focus on four aspects of the model which have led to the current, updated version: the language generality assumption; the mismatch assumption; chronological age; and the episodic buffer function of rapid, automatic multimodal binding of phonology (RAMBPHO). We evaluate the language generality assumption in relation to sign language and speech, and the mismatch assumption in relation to signal processing in hearing aids. Further, we discuss the effects of chronological age and the implications of RAMBPHO.

  • 143.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Listening effort and fatigue: What exactly are we measuring? A British Society of Audiology Cognition in Hearing Special Interest Group white paper Comments from Dr. Jerker Ronnberg, Mary Rudner, Thomas Lunner2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 441-442Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 144.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Samuelsson, E
    Borg, E
    Exploring the perceived world of the deaf-blind: On the development of an instrument2002In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 136-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present interview study on a sample of 13 deaf-blind participants (eight Usher patients and five with other diagnoses), all but one with some remaining visual function and all but two with a pure-tone average (PTA) exceeding 100 dB HL, an instrument was developed to assess discovery and localization abilities (DILO), compensatory use of sensory information, emotional and cognitive aspects of communication, and the preferred use of technical aids. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected, and it was found that (1) the importance of early discovery of events and persons is rated high, (2) vision ranks higher than other sensory information, and airflow, smell and residual hearing come next in the perceptual world of this sample, (3) cognitive aspects of communication correlate with the importance of discovery and localization, and (4) technical aids dominated by vision and vibratory senses are preferred. It is concluded that even a small remaining visual function could be of significant importance in rehabilitation. Finally, in the deaf-blind group of subjects with some remaining visual function, utilization of remaining vision was felt to be more important than utilization of other sensory modalities.

  • 145.
    Sadeghi, Andre M.
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Cohn, Edward S.
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, USA.
    Kimberling, William J.
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Halvarsson, Glenn
    Siemens AB, Upplands Väsby, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Expressivity of hearing loss in cases with Usher syndrome type IIA2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 12, p. 832-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the genotype/ phenotype relationship between siblings with identical USH2A pathologic mutations and the consequent audiologic phenotypes, in particular degree of hearing loss (HL). Decade audiograms were also compared among two groups of affected subjects with different mutations of USH2A.

    Design: DNA samples from patients with Usher syndrome type II were analysed. The audiological features of patients and affected siblings with USH2A mutations were also examined to identify genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Study sample : Genetic and audiometric examinations were performed in 18 subjects from nine families with Usher syndrome type IIA.

    Results: Three different USH2A mutations were identified in the affected subjects. Both similarities and differences of the auditory phenotype were seen in families with several affected siblings. A variable degree of hearing loss, ranging from mild to profound, was observed among affected subjects. No significant differences in hearing thresholds were found the group of affected subjects with different pathological mutations.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that mutations in the USH2A gene and the resulting phenotype are probably modulated by other variables, such as modifying genes, epigenetics or environmental factors which may be of importance for better understanding the etiology of Usher syndrome.

  • 146. Sadeghi, Mehdi
    et al.
    Cohn, Edward S.
    Kelly, William J.
    Kimberling, William J.
    Tranebjoerg, Lisbeth
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Audiological findings in Usher syndrome types IIa and II (non-IIa)2004In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 136-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to define the natural history of hearing lossin Usher syndrome type IIa compared to non-IIa. Peoplewith Usher syndrome type II show moderate-to-severehearing loss, normal balance and retinitis pigmentosa.Several genes cause Usher syndrome type II. Our subjectsformed two genetic groups: (1) subjects with Usher syndrometype IIa with a mutation and/or linkage to theUsher IIa gene; (2) subjects with the Usher II phenotypewith no mutation and/or linkage to the Usher IIa gene.Four hundred and two audiograms of 80 Usher IIa subjectswere compared with 435 audiograms of 87 non-IIasubjects. Serial audiograms with intervals of ≥5 yearswere examined for progression in 109 individuals. Thosewith Usher syndrome type IIa had significantly worsehearing thresholds than those with non-IIa Usher syndromeafter the second decade. The hearing loss in Ushersyndrome type IIa was found to be more progressive, andthe progression started earlier than in non-IIa Usher syndrome.This suggests an auditory phenotype for Ushersyndrome type IIa that is different from that of other typesof Usher syndrome II. Thus, this is to our knowledgeone of the first studies showing a genotype-phenotypeauditory correlation.

  • 147. Sadeghi, Mehdi
    et al.
    Cohn, Edward S.
    Kimberling, William J.
    Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Audiological and vestibular features in affected subjects with USH3: a genotype/phenotype correlation2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 307-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims were to compare the genotype/phenotype relationship between USH3 mutations and the consequent hearing and vestibular phenotype; and to compare hearing loss (HL) progression between Usher syndrome types IB, IIA and USH3. Genetic, audiometric and vestibular examinations were performed in 28 subjects with USH3. Five different mutations in USH3 were identified. Severe HL was present from an early age (4 to 6 years) in 35% of subjects with USH3. Progression of HL begins in the first decade, and approximately 50% of subjects with USH3 become profoundly deaf by age 40. Various vestibular abnormalities were found in about half (10/22) of the tested subjects with USH3. Depending on the severity of HL, subjects with USH3 might be misdiagnosed as either Usher type IB or IIA. The results from this study can be used as discriminatory features in differential diagnosis of this syndrome.

  • 148.
    Sandström, Josefin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Carel Myburgh, Hermanus
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Smartphone threshold audiometry in underserved primary health-care contexts2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 232-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To validate a calibrated smartphone-based hearing test in a sound booth environment and in primary health-care clinics.

    DESIGN: A repeated-measure within-subject study design was employed whereby air-conduction hearing thresholds determined by smartphone-based audiometry was compared to conventional audiometry in a sound booth and a primary health-care clinic environment.

    STUDY SAMPLE: A total of 94 subjects (mean age 41 years ± 17.6 SD and range 18-88; 64% female) were assessed of whom 64 were tested in the sound booth and 30 within primary health-care clinics without a booth.

    RESULTS: In the sound booth 63.4% of conventional and smartphone thresholds indicated normal hearing (≤15 dBHL). Conventional thresholds exceeding 15 dB HL corresponded to smartphone thresholds within ≤10 dB in 80.6% of cases with an average threshold difference of -1.6 dB ± 9.9 SD. In primary health-care clinics 13.7% of conventional and smartphone thresholds indicated normal hearing (≤15 dBHL). Conventional thresholds exceeding 15 dBHL corresponded to smartphone thresholds within ≤10 dB in 92.9% of cases with an average threshold difference of -1.0 dB ± 7.1 SD.

    CONCLUSIONS: Accurate air-conduction audiometry can be conducted in a sound booth and without a sound booth in an underserved community health-care clinic using a smartphone.

  • 149.
    Saunders, Gabrielle H.
    et al.
    Portland VA Medical Centre, ME USA; Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97201 USA.
    Frederick, Melissa T.
    Portland VA Medical Centre, ME USA.
    Silverman, ShienPei C.
    Portland VA Medical Centre, ME USA.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Portland VA Medical Centre, ME USA.
    Health behavior theories as predictors of hearing-aid uptake and outcomes2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, p. S59-S68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To understand hearing behaviors of adults seeking help for the first time through the application of two models of health behavior change: the transtheoretical model and the health belief model. Design: The relationships between attitudes and beliefs were examined relative to hearing-aid uptake and outcomes six months later. Study sample: One hundred and sixty adults completed the University of Rhode Island change assessment (targeting the transtheoretical model), and the hearing beliefs questionnaire (targeting the health belief model), as well as the hearing handicap inventory and the psychosocial impact of hearing loss scale, within two months of an initial hearing assessment. Six months later, participants completed these same questionnaires, while those who had taken up hearing aids also completed hearing-aid outcome questionnaires. Results: (1) Attitudes and beliefs were associated with future hearing-aid uptake, and were effective at modeling this behavior; (2) attitudes and beliefs changed following behavior change, and (3) attitudes and beliefs following behavior change were better predictors of hearing-aid outcomes than pre-behavior change attitudes and beliefs. Conclusion: A counseling-based intervention targeting the attitudes and beliefs assessed by the transtheoretical model and the health belief model has the potential to increase uptake of hearing health care.

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  • 150. Siem, Geir
    et al.
    Fagerheim, Toril
    Jonsrud, Christoffer
    Laurent, Claude
    Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty Division Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Otolaryngology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Teig, Erik
    Harris, Sten
    Leren, Trond P
    Früh, Andreas
    Heimdal, Ketil
    Causes of hearing impairment in the Norwegian paediatric cochlear implant program2010In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 596-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe to profound hearing impairment (HI) is estimated to affect around 1/2000 young children. Advances in genetics have made it possible to identify several genes related to HI. This information can cast light upon prognostic factors regarding the outcome in cochlear implantation, and provide information both for scientific and genetic counselling purposes. From 1992 to 2005, 273 children from 254 families (probands) were offered cochlear implants in Norway. An evaluation of the causes of HI, especially regarding the genes GJB2, GJB6, SLC26A4, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and the mutation A1555G in mitochondrial DNA was performed in 85% of the families. The number of probands with unknown cause of HI was thus reduced from 120 to 68 (43% reduction). Ninety-eight (46%) of the probands had an identified genetic etiology of their HI. A relatively high prevalence of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome was found. The main causes of severe and profound HI were similar to those found in other European countries. GJB2 mutations are a common cause of prelingual HI in Norwegian cochlear implanted children.

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