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  • 101.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Umeå University.
    Räisänen, Petri
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Andersson, Martin
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Umeå University.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine/the OLIN unit, Umeå University.
    Increased prevalence of allergic asthma from 1996 to 2006 and further to 2016: results from three population surveys2017In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1426-1435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the latter half of the 20th century, the prevalence of asthma and many other allergic diseases has increased. Information on asthma prevalence trends among adults after 2010, especially regarding studies separating allergic asthma from non-allergic asthma, is lacking.

    Objective

    The aim was to estimate prevalence trends of current asthma among adults, both allergic and non-allergic, from 1996 to 2016.

    Methods

    Three cross-sectional samples from the same area of Sweden, 20-69 years, participated in surveys with the same questionnaire in 1996 (n=7104 participants, 85% response rate), 2006 (n=6165, 77%) and 2016 (n=5466, 53%), respectively. Allergic rhino-conjunctivitis (ARC) was used as a marker for allergic sensitization to define allergic asthma.

    Results

    The prevalence of current asthma increased from 8.4% (95% CI: 7.8-9.0) in 1996 to 9.9% (95% CI: 9.2-10.6) in 2006 and 10.9% (95% CI: 10.1-11.7) in 2016 (P<.001). Allergic asthma increased from 5.0% (95% CI: 4.5-5.5) in 1996 to 6.0% (95% CI: 5.4-6.6) in 2006 and further to 7.3% (95% CI: 6.6-8.0) in 2016 (P<.001), while the prevalence of non-allergic asthma remained stable around 3.4%-3.8%. The increase in current asthma was most pronounced among women and among the middle-aged. Physician-diagnosed asthma, asthma medication use and ARC also increased significantly, while the prevalence of symptoms common in asthma such as wheeze and attacks of shortness of breath decreased slightly or was stable. The prevalence of current smoking decreased from 27.4% in 1996 to 12.3% in 2016.

    Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

    The prevalence of allergic asthma increased from 1996 to 2006 and further to 2016, while the prevalence of non-allergic asthma remained on a stable prevalence level. The prevalence of symptoms common in asthma decreased slightly or was stable despite a substantial decrease in the prevalence of current smoking. Clinicians should be aware that the previously observed increase in prevalence of allergic asthma is still ongoing.

  • 102.
    Backman, Ylva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Alerby, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Gardelli, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hertting, Krister
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Improvement of school environment from a student perspective: Tensions and opportunities2012In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 19-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managerial documents for the national school system in Sweden have emphasised taking students’ voices as a starting point in forming education, and several previous studies have indicated the benefits of giving students opportunities to participate in school. This study aimed to explore students’ reflections on what they would do if they were to decide how to make school the best place for learning. A total of 200 students aged 11 to 15 years from four schools (rural and urban) in two municipalities in the northern part of Sweden participated. The empirical data consisted of the students’ written reflections. The findings fall within four themes: (i) influencing educational settings; (ii) striving for reciprocity; (iii) managing time struggles; and (iv) satisfying well-being needs. Tensions between the students’ previous experiences and future visions appeared. The findings can offer direction regarding aspects of the learning environment in school that could be improved.

  • 103.
    Backman, Ylva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Alerby, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Gardelli, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hertting, Krister
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Learning within and beyond the classroom: compulsory school students voicing their positive experiences of school2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 555-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe, reflect upon, and create a deeper understanding of aspects relevant for promoting a positive school environment from a student perspective. The data was analyzed by using an inductive phenomenological method and based on written responses from 200 Swedish students from grades 5–9. The results indicated that the students found aspects within, as well as beyond, the classroom relevant for a positive school environment. For instance, outings were considered relevant for building and maintaining friendships and for learning processes. Moreover, the students discussed formal and informal conditions and considered social as well as structural circumstances important for having a good time in school. The relation between learning and well-being was also emphasized by the students.

  • 104.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    The Establishment of DisorderedSpeechBank: A digital archive of disordered speech across languages2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Ball, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Isaksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dysarthria in Swedish2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Principles of clinical phonology: theoretical approaches2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Those working on the description of disordered speech are bound to be also involved with clinical phonology to some extent. This is because interpreting the speech signal is only the first step to an analysis. Describing the organization and function of a speech system is the next step. However, it is here that phonologists differ in their descriptions, as there are many current approaches in modern linguistics to undertaking phonological analyses of both normal and disordered speech.

    Much of the work in theoretical phonology of the last fifty years or so is of little use in either describing disordered speech or explaining it. This is because the dominant theoretical approach in linguists as a whole attempts elegant descriptions of linguistic data, not a psycholinguistic model of what speakers do when they speak. The latter is what is needed in clinical phonology. In this text, Martin J. Ball addresses these issues in an investigation of what principles should underlie a clinical phonology. This is not, however, simply another manual on how to do phonological analyses of disordered speech data, though examples of the application of various models of phonology to such data are provided. Nor is this a guide on how to do therapy, though a chapter on applications is included. Rather, this is an exploration of what theoretical underpinnings are best suited to describing, classifying, and treating the wide range of developmental and acquired speech disorders encountered in the speech-language pathology clinic.

  • 107.
    Ball, Martin J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Howard, Sara
    Esling, John
    Dickson, Craig
    Revisions to the extIPA and VoQS symbol sets.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Barzangi, Jir
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Infant Dental Enucleation in Sweden: Perspectives on a Practice among Residents of Eastern African Origin2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Infant dental enucleation (IDE) is a practice consisting of the removal of deciduous canine tooth buds in infants. Practiced mainly in Eastern Africa, the purpose is to treat or to prevent bodily symptoms and diseases. IDE can cause both general and oral complications. The occurrence of IDE among Eastern African immigrants in a few European countries has been reported. However, knowledge surrounding the practice in Sweden was poor. The overall aim of this work was to explore IDE in the Swedish context. Four studies were conducted. Paper I presents a review of scientific publications. An overview of IDE was gained, and some knowledge gaps were identified. Paper II describes a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of IDE in small children. Dental records of 1133 children (mean age 4.6 years, SD 1.4) from a multi-ethnic area were studied. Missing deciduous canines without any registered reason were documented. One or more deciduous canines were missing in 21% of the children with known Eastern African origin (n=101), compared to only three children in the rest of the population (n=1032). Six adults of Somali origin were interviewed to explore their experiences and perceptions of IDE (paper III). These experiences and perceptions were categorised in four essentially different ways: an effective and necessary treatment, a disputed tradition, an option to failure and a desperate measure. Their experiences and perceptions were found to be highly influenced by contexts. In the final study (paper IV), the knowledge, experiences and attitudes among dental and health care personnel were examined. Questionnaires were sent to licensed personnel working in emergency departments, midwifery and child health centres, school health services and public dental health services in ten municipalities. Less than 20% had any knowledge of IDE, while 12.5% of the respondents encountering children had seen at least one patient subjected to IDE. Different attitudes were reported between clinical settings regarding responsibilities and possibilities concerning the management and prevention of IDE. From the findings presented in this thesis, it was concluded that there is a need for initiatives to increase awareness of and knowledge on IDE among dental and health care professionals. Legally obligated responsibilities in these professions regarding IDE need to be clarified, and initiatives should include guidelines regarding both the management of IDE and its prevention in Sweden. Educational programmes should also be produced for residents of Eastern African origin to change their perceptions of IDE, and a culturally sensitive approach should be adopted to ensure that such programmes are effective.

  • 109.
    Barzangi, Jir
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Public Dental Health Service, Västmanland County Council, Västerås, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Helath Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    School of Helath Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Dental Research Department, Public Dental Helath Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden .
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Department of Nursing Science, University College of Southeast Norway, Drammen, Norway.
    Experiences and perceptions of infant dental enucleation among Somali immigrants in Sweden: A phenomenographic studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Barzangi, Jir
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Public Dental Health Service, Västmanland County Council, Västerås, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    School of Helath Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Dental Research Department, Public Dental Helath Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden .
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Department of Nursing Science, University College of Southeast Norway, Drammen, Norway.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Helath Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Knowledge, experiences and attitudes of dental and health care personnel in Sweden towards infant dental enucleationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Basavoju, Srinivas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Boström, Dan
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Pharmaceutical salts of fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs with acesulfame sweetener2012In: Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals, ISSN 1542-1406, E-ISSN 1563-5287, Vol. 562, no 1, p. 254-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel organic salts of norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin with artificial sweeteners such as saccharin and acesulfame were prepared. The two salts 1 and 2 were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Finally, the crystal structures were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction data and the structures were analyzed in terms of supramolecular synthons. In norfloxacin acesulfamate 1, two norfloxacin cations and two acesulfame anions form an eight membered cyclic tetramer supramolecular synthon. The salt, ciprofloxacin acesulfamate 2, has a similar structure as salt 1. This study contributes the importance of crystal engineering and supramolecular chemistry to the pharmaceutical applications in terms of interactions and structural correlations in the design of new solid phases. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Molecular Crystals and Liquid Crystals to view the free supplemental file

  • 112.
    Bawa, Shaibu
    Road Research Institute, Ghana.
    Towards establishing a reliable accident data system in Ghana2001In: Proceedings of the conference Road Safety on Three Continents: International conference in Pretoria, South Africa, 20-22 September 2000 / [ed] Asp, Kenneth, Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2001, Vol. 15A, p. 272-284Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Accident data collection and analysis was institutionalise in 1987 in order to provide vital data-led support to accident remedial activities pursued by the National Road Safety Committee and the road agencies of Ghana. The paper presents the modest achievements made by the Accident Analysis Unit since its creation, at local accident registration and analysis in order to identify main local problems and develop the necessary action programme. It also stresses the importance of transfer of experiences from the more developed countries to improve local safety work.

  • 113.
    Beck, Ingela
    et al.
    Lunds universitet; Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Olsson Möller, Ulrika
    Lunds universitet.
    Malmström, Marlene
    Lunds universitet.
    Klarare, Anna
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Samuelsson, Henrik
    Palliativ vård och ASIH Ystad .
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet högskola; Karolinska institutet.
    Rasmussen, Birgit
    Lunds universitet.
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    Translation and cultural adaptation of the Integrated Palliative care Outcome Scale including cognitive interviewing with patients and staff2017In: BMC Palliative Care, ISSN 1472-684X, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 16, p. 1-10, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To expand our clinical and scientific knowledge about holistic outcomes within palliative care, there is a need for agreed-upon patient-reported outcome measures. These patient-reported outcome measures then require translation and cultural adaptation, either from country-specific languages to English, or the other way around. The aim of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Integrated Palliative care Outcome Scale (IPOS) to the Swedish care context.

    METHODS: Swedish versions of IPOS Patient and IPOS Staff were developed and culturally adapted using recommended guidelines including cognitive interviews with patients (n = 13) and staff (n = 15) from different care contexts including general and specialised palliative care.

    RESULTS: The comprehension and judgement difficulties identified in the pre-final patient and staff versions were successfully solved during the cognitive interviewing process. IPOS was well accepted by both patients and staff, none of the questions were experienced as inappropriate, and all questions were judged important.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we translated and culturally adapted the patient and staff versions of IPOS, and demonstrated face and content validity and acceptability of the scale through cognitive interviewing with patients and staff within residential care facility, surgical and specialised palliative home care units. Cognitive interviewing in parallel with patients and staff in rounds, with tentative analysis in between, was a suitable method for identifying and solving challenges with comprehension and evaluation in the pre-final version of IPOS. The Swedish IPOS is now available for use in a variety of clinical care settings.

  • 114.
    Becker, Wulf
    et al.
    National Food Administration, Uppsala.
    Lennernäs, Maria
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University.
    Gustafsson, Inga Britt
    Department of Culinary Art.
    Haraldsdóttir, Johanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary/Agricultural University, Copenhagen.
    Nydahl, Margaretha C.
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Vessby, Bengt O. H.
    Unit for Clinical Nutrition Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Ytterfors, Arne
    Unit for Clinical Nutrition Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Precoded food records compared with weighed food records for measuring dietary habits in a population of Swedish adults1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, ISSN 1102-6480, E-ISSN 1651-2359, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 145-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a cross-over design, 82 women and men recorded their food intake by a precoded 7-day record book (PR) including both standard portions in household measures and photographs, and a weighed 7-day record (WR), respectively. Single 24-h urine samples, for determination of nitrogen excretion, were collected for 39 subjects during the WR period. Comparing the PR to the WR method, the mean intake of some foods, as cheese, was higher, and bread and vegetables lower. For energy and nutrients, the fat energy percent (E%) was higher, and protein E%, dietary fibre, iron, thiamin, folate, carotene and α-tocopherol were all lower. Protein intake registered by the PR method was 20% lower compared to 24-h urine samples, and 11% lower for the WR method. The results indicate that some of the standard portion sizes, used by the PR method, contributed to the observed differences in food and nutrient intakes. The subjects found it easier and less time-consuming to record their food intake with the PR than with the WR method. The time spent on processing data was reduced by 50% when using the PR method. The results of the study will be used for improvements in the design of the PR for use in large-scale dietary surveys for monitoring dietary habits.

  • 115.
    Becker, Wulf
    et al.
    National Food Administration, Uppsala.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University.
    Gustafsson, Inga Britt
    Department of Culinary Art.
    Haraldsdóttir, Johanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary/Agricultural University, Copenhagen.
    Nydahl, Margaretha C.
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Vessby, Bengt O.H.
    Unit for Clinical Nutrition Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Ytterfors, Arne
    Unit for Clinical Nutrition Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Precoded food records compared with weighed food records for measuring dietary habits in a population of Swedish adults1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, ISSN 1102-6480, E-ISSN 1651-2359, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 145-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a cross-over design, 82 women and men recorded their food intake by a precoded 7-day record book (PR) including both standard portions in household measures and photographs, and a weighed 7-day record (WR), respectively. Single 24-h urine samples, for determination of nitrogen excretion, were collected for 39 subjects during the WR period. Comparing the PR to the WR method, the mean intake of some foods, as cheese, was higher, and bread and vegetables lower. For energy and nutrients, the fat energy percent (E%) was higher, and protein E%, dietary fibre, iron, thiamin, folate, carotene and α-tocopherol were all lower. Protein intake registered by the PR method was 20% lower compared to 24-h urine samples, and 11% lower for the WR method. The results indicate that some of the standard portion sizes, used by the PR method, contributed to the observed differences in food and nutrient intakes. The subjects found it easier and less time-consuming to record their food intake with the PR than with the WR method. The time spent on processing data was reduced by 50% when using the PR method. The results of the study will be used for improvements in the design of the PR for use in large-scale dietary surveys for monitoring dietary habits.

  • 116.
    Beckhusen, Benedict
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Mobile Apps and the ultimate addiction to the Smartphone: A comprehensive study on the consequences of society’s mobile needs2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The smartphone is omnipresent and is cherished and held close by people. It allows for constant connection within a digitally connected society, as well as for many other purposes such as leisure activity or informational purpose. Within the Information Systems studies deeper investigation is required as to what impact this “taken – for – granted” mobile access to information and mobile apps has for individuals and society and if a “technological addiction”can be developed when using the smartphone for everything during the day on such a constant basis.

    The aim of this study was to understand the role of the smartphone in society and to shed light on this unclear relationship between the constant use of a smartphone and its development towards an addictive quality. To reach a conclusion, in depth – interviews were conducted with participants about their relationship to the smartphone and their smartphone use based on questions derived from literature on mobile communication technologies and the types of digital addictions existing.

    The results are that the smartphone is a device that seamlessly integrates into our daily lives in that we unconsciously use it as a tool to make our daily tasks more manageable, and enjoyable. It also supports us in getting better organized, to be in constant touch with family and friends remotely, and to be more mobile which is a useful ability in today’s mobility driven society.

    Smartphones have been found to inhabit a relatively low potential to addiction. Traits of voluntary behaviour, habitual behaviour, and mandatory behaviour of smartphone use have been found. All of these behaviours are not considered a true addiction. In the end, it seems that the increase of smartphone use is mainly due to the way we communicate nowadays digitally,and the shift in how we relate to our social peers using digital means.

  • 117.
    Beijer, Evelina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hagman, Helén
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hör du vad jag säger?: En kvalitativ intervjustudie om hur en hörselnedsättning påverkar samtalet i en parrelation2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 118.
    Belkacem, Jamilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sexuellt självförtroende.: Hur tenderar vuxna skatta sitt sexuella självförtroende?2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 119.
    Bengtsson, Sara K S
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Johansson, Maja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Umecrine Cognit AB, Umea, Sweden.
    Bäckström, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Long-term continuous allopregnanolone elevation causes memory decline and hippocampus shrinkage, in female wild-type B6 mice2016In: Hormones and Behavior, ISSN 0018-506X, E-ISSN 1095-6867, Vol. 78, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic stress in various forms increases the risk for cognitive dysfunction, dementia and Alzheimer's disease. While the pathogenesis behind these findings is unknown, growing evidence suggests that chronic increase in neurosteroid levels, such as allopregnanolone, is part of the mechanism. We treated wild-type C57BL/6J mice with allopregnanolone for 5months, using osmotic pumps. This treatment led to moderately increased levels of allopregnanolone, equivalent to that of mild chronic stress. After an interval of no treatment for 1month, female mice showed impaired learning and memory function in the Morris water maze (MWM) in combination with diminished hippocampus weight and increased cerebellum weight, both correlating to MWM performance. Male mice showed a minor reduction in memory function and no differences in brain structure. We conclude that chronic allopregnanolone elevation can lead to cognitive dysfunction and negative brain alterations. We suggest that allopregnanolone could play a key role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced cognitive disturbances and perhaps dementia.

  • 120.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Behov av vård och stöd2014In: Att leva med psykisk funktionsnedsättning: livsssituation och effektiva vård- och stödinsatser / [ed] David Brunt & Lars Hansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2, p. 153-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 121.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Hot och våld mot personer med psykisk funktionsnedsättning2014In: Att leva med psykisk funktionsnedsättning: livsssituation och effektiva vård- och stödinsatser / [ed] David Brunt & Lars Hansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2, p. 207-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Växjö universitet.
    I väntan ...: Rapport om vardagslivet på privata vårdhem utifrån de boendes perspektiv2005Report (Other academic)
  • 123. Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Vi är många: övergrepp mot kvinnor som använder psykiatrin : en omfångsstudie2004Report (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Våld mot kvinnor med psykisk funktionsnedsättning på grund av psykossjukdom2013In: Våld mot kvinnor med funktionsnedsättning, Uppsala: Nationellt centrum för kvinnofrid (NCK), Uppsala universitet , 2013, p. 75-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 125.
    Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    Växjö universitet.
    Övergrepp mot kvinnor och psykisk ohälsa: Utvärdering av innovativ fortbildningsinsats för poliser, socionomer och sjuksköte2007Report (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Bennett, Rebecca J.
    et al.
    Ear Sci Inst Australia, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark.
    Meyer, Carly J.
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Eikelboom, Robert H.
    Ear Sci Inst Australia, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Australia; Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    Exploring Hearing Aid Problems: Perspectives of Hearing Aid Owners and Clinicians2018In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 172-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To gather perspectives of hearing aid owners and hearing healthcare clinicians with regard to problems that arise after hearing aid fitting and use these perspectives to generate a conceptual framework to gain a better understanding of these problems. Design: Participants included a group of 17 hearing aid owners and a group of 21 hearing healthcare clinicians; data collection occurred separately for each group. Participants each attended two group sessions in Perth, Western Australia, wherein they: (1) generated statements describing the problems associated with hearing aids and (2) grouped and rated the statements to identify key themes. Concept mapping was used to generate a conceptual framework. Results: Participants identified four concepts regarding hearing aid problems as follows: (1) hearing aid management; (2) hearing aid sound quality and performance; (3) feelings, thoughts, and behaviors; and (4) information and training. While hearing aid owners and clinicians generated similar results regarding the concepts derived, the clinicians reported that the problems identified had a greater negative impact on hearing aid success than did hearing aid owners. Conclusions: The magnitude and diversity of hearing aid problems identified in this study highlight the ongoing challenges that hearing aid owners face and suggest that current processes for hearing aid fitting can be improved. Problems relating to hearing aid management were most often deemed to have the greatest impact on hearing aid success and be the most preventable/solvable, and thus are a good starting point when addressing hearing aid-related problems.

  • 127.
    Berg, Carolina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Eklundh, My
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Effekten av plugging som behandling av Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome: En systematisk litteraturstudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 128.
    Berg, Jessica
    et al.
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Levin, Lena
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    “I want complete freedom”: car use and everyday mobility among the newly retired2015In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To investigate car use among newly retired people, to explore to what extent car transport is used for everyday mobility and how it is valued in comparison to other transport modes.

    Methods

    The data consists of travel diaries and qualitative interviews with 24 individuals, aged between 61 and 67, living in a middle-sized Swedish city. They were recruited via the local branch of one of the main associations of pensioners, one large employer in the municipality, and through another study. The informants filled in a travel diary during 1 week that were analysed by VISUAL- TimePAcTS, an application for visualising and exploring activity diary data. The semi-structured qualitative interviews were analysed using a qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The car was used for several trips daily and often for short trips. The informants had a lot of everyday projects that they would not be able to perform if they did not have access to a car. The importance of the car does not seem to have changed upon retirement, albeit it is partly used for other reasons than before. The informant’s social context implies new space-time constraints. Commitments to family members, engagement in associations and spouses’ occupations affect how much and when they use the car, and their overall mobility.

    Conclusions

    In contrast to much research on older people’s mobility that has studied slightly older people, this study have focused on a specific group that are relatively healthy, well-off, and have the possibility to choose between different modes of transport. By combining travel diaries and qualitative interviews, we have explored how newly retired people reason as regard their travel behaviour but also how they actually travel. Although the car was used more than other transport modes, being able to walk and cycle now that they had more time as retirees was highly valued. Our results indicate that urban residents that are retiring now and in the future are a key target group in transport planning when it comes to reduce car use in favour of slow modes of transport.

  • 129.
    Bergerum, Carolina
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Quality Improvement in a Maternity Ward and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. What are staff and patients' experiences of Experience-based Co-design?: Part 1: A qualitative study2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent focus on quality and patient safety has underlined the need to involve patients in improving healthcare. “Experience-based Co-design” (EBCD) is an approach to capture and understand patient and staff (i. e. users) experiences, identifying so called “touch points” and then working together equally in improvement efforts.

    Purpose:This article elucidates patient (defined as the mother-newborn couple with next of kin) and staff experiences following improvement work carried out according to EBCD in a maternity ward and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a small, acute hospital in Sweden.

    Method: An experience questionnaire, derived from the EBCD approach tool set, was used for continuously evaluating each event of the EBCD improvement project. Furthermore, a focus group interview with staff and in-depth interviews with mother-father couples were held in order to collect and understand the experiences of working together according to EBCD. The analysis and interpretation of the interview data was carried through using qualitative, problem-driven content analysis. Themes, categories and sub-categories presented in this study constitute the manifest and latent content of the participants’ experiences of Experience-based Co-design.

    Results:The analysis of the experience questionnaires, prior to the interviews, revealed mostly positive experiences of the participation. Both staff and patient participants stated generally happy, involved, safe, good and comfortable experiences following each event of the improvement project so far.

    Two themes emerged during the analysis of the interviews. For staff participants the improvement project was a matter of learning within the microsystem through managing practical issues, moving beyond assumptions of improvement work and gaining a new way of thinking. For patients, taking part of the improvement project was expressed as the experience of involvement in healthcare through their participation and through a sense of improving for the future.

    Discussion: This study confirms that, despite practical obstacles for participants, the EBCD approach to improvement work provided an opportunity for maternity ward /NICU care being explored respectfully at the experience level, by assuring the sincere sharing of useful information within the microsystem continuously, and by encouraging and supporting the equal involvement of both staff and patients. Staff and patients wanted and were able to contribute to the EBCD process of gathering information about their experiences, analyzing and responding to collected data, and engaging themselves in improving the same. Furthermore, the EBCD approach provided staff and patients the opportunity of learning within the microsystem. Nevertheless, the responsibility of the improvement work remained the responsibility of the healthcare professionals.

  • 130.
    Berglund, Josefin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hasselquist, Kaisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fonologi hos svenska 5- och 6-åringar med typisk språkutveckling: Referensmaterial till det fonologiska testmaterialet LINUS2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A new phonological test, LINUS, for Swedish-speaking children between the ages of three and seven, has been developed at the speech and language pathology department at Linköping University. The aim of the present study was to create a reference manual for the long version of the new test. The participants in the present study were children between the ages of five to seven in a medium-sized municipality in the Northern part of Kalmar County, Sweden. In total, 124 native Swedish-speaking children (58 girls and 66 boys) with typical language development participated. The children were divided into two age groups, 5;0-5;11;31 and 6;0-6;11;31 years. The collected data was analysed with respect to acquisition of phonemes and word structure processes. Percentage of correctly produced words (PWC), consonants (PCC) and vowels (PVC) were calculated.All phonemes, except /s/, were established in both age groups. The phoneme /s/ was found to be either substituted or distorted. Among the 5-year old children /s/ was established for 84%, substitutions of /s/ were found in 7% and distortions were found in 23%. Among the 6-year old children /s/ was established for 88%. Substitutions of /s/ were found in 3% and distortions in 16% of the 6-year old children. The phoneme /r/ proved to be a borderline case for acquisition in the younger age group (91%). The most common word structure process in both groups was assimilation. A significant difference between the two age groups was found for assimilation (p=0,022), with lower occurrence in the older group. Two-consonant clusters (CC) and three-consonant clusters (CCC) were not frequently reduced, although it was found that CC-clusters were reduced more frequently than CCC-clusters. Both the age groups had high percentages of correctly produced words, consonants and vowels. The analysis revealed the following results: PWC for 5-years olds was 93% and 6-years olds 97%. PCC for 5-year olds was 98% and for 6-year olds 99%. PVC for both age groups was 100%. An age difference was shown for PWC, but not for the other measures. No gender differences were found.

  • 131.
    Berglund, Lotta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tossavainen, Mia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Health on thin ice: methods of giving voice to Swedish citizens in urban planning and design to promote health in a cold climate2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the northern, sub-arctic, regions of the world the climate is cold a substantial part of the year which affecting people's health as low temperatures and darkness stress the body. At the same time the cold climate offers opportunities that can be utilized in an innovative manner, both technically and aesthetically, to develop the winter environment to be attractive and health promoting in outdoor activities.The aim of the study was to develop a methodology for giving voice to citizens to be used in the process of urban planning and design for good health in a cold climate. The qualitative investigations of citizen’s experiences of health promoting aspects included two workshops focused on the following questions; What are your experiences of health and well-being in a cold climate? How can this city be planned to promote health during the winter season? The 53 participants came from two cities in the northern part of Sweden. At Workshop 1 small groups of citizens (5-8) were asked to make a collective collage cutting and pasting images from magazines without talking to each other while soft music was playing in the background.When finished the silence was broken and the participants presented their contributions. At Workshop 2 small groups of citizens (5-8) were given maps of the city with different paths for walking tours aimed to pinpoint areas for improvement. After the walk the group presented their ideas for each other and a number of innovative ideas surfaced.Including citizens in the process of urban planning is not only a good source of ideas and information useful in the planning process but may be an opportunity to strengthen health literacy and healthy behavior. This study may serve as an example of an empowerment - based method including citizens in the process of urban planning and design.

  • 132. Bergman, Stefan
    et al.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Hagberg, Mats
    Jacobsson, Ulf
    Linton, Steven J
    Strender, Lars-Erik
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Långvarig smärta i nacke, skuldror och rygg i Nationella riktlinjer för rörelseorganens sjukdomar 2010 – stöd för styrning och ledning: Preliminär version2010Report (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Appreciation as fuel for school improvement2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Appreciative based learning and research: amplifying the positive2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will explore and discuss possibilities to learn and research through an appreciative approach in order to enhance continuing professional development for teachers and leaders in school systems. Traditionally humans are used to define problems and trying to find solutions. This involves identification of the bad or threatening and preventing it from taking place, in other words prevention. What would happen if we choose to solve problems in a different way: identify what we appreciate and let this be the base for continued development and improvement? A promoting perspective and salutogenic focus has shown to be successful in helping humans increase their experience of health, which may also create opportunities for learning. How would it be if we changed our point of departure in learning and research processes from problems to appreciation?Our thoughts about Appreciative Based Learning (ABL) has evolved while working with Problem Based Learning (PBL) as teachers. When we came in contact with Participatory and Appreciative Action Research (PAAR) and Appreciative Inquiry we sensed an increased opportunity for positive change, a new way of working with education and research. PAAR can be seen both as a process of building and sustaining change in organizations (Participation, Appreciation, Action and Reflection) and also as a research methodology. PAAR has its roots in action research which is a problem based method aiming at developing and improving practice. Action research can be seen as participatory and collaborative research. A central question in this kind of research is how change of practice can be done, individually or collectively. The new aspect in PAAR is appreciation. An improvement process starts from for example acknowledging factors that work well in an organization or for an individual and the next step is to amplify these positive factors. PAAR research seeks for example to explore positive experiences of a phenomenon and how these experiences can be amplified and sustained in a practice.Central aspects of ABL are appreciation, participation, multimodalities, learning from each other and reflection. Just like PAAR, ABL can offer an opportunity to take positive questions and turn them into positive actions. We will give examples of how we as teachers and researchers have applied ABL in our own teaching and research. Finally we raise questions of how ABL can play a role in school improvement and educational research, building not only a better school but a better future as well.Methodology or methods/research instruments or sources used:We will focus on how to use ABL in the field of school improvement generally and specifically pertaining to educational research, through giving the theoretical background and examples of how we have applied ABL. We have been inspired by ABL in our own research, when teaching in higher education and when working with continuing professional development for teachers and leaders in school systems.Conclusions or expected outcomes or findings:This paper seeks to introduce and explore ABL as a method in school improvement processes and in educational research. We will share our process in developing ABL; how we have applied ABL in our teaching and research. We hope that our thoughts about the possibility to learn and research through an appreciative approach will inspire the participants to reflect on their own practice.

  • 135.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Creating opportunities for diversity and unpredictability: inviting children to be co-researchers2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Leadership for learning and well-being with an appreciative attitude2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Let’s have a “school-rules-attitude”2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences. , 2015, p. 309-311Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Listen to me when I have something to say: students paricipation in research for sustainable school improvement2009In: Improving Schools, ISSN 1365-4802, E-ISSN 1475-7583, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 249-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on student participation in the research process as a contribution to school improvement. The specific aim of this article was to explore students' participation in different phases of a research process and discuss how their participation can contribute to school improvement. Based on a life-world phenomenological ontology, we used two research and development projects - Full of Value and Arctic Children - to shed light on participation in research. When doing research together with students, we have been inspired by Participatory Appreciative Action Research (PAAR). The methods used in the projects were open writing, group reflection, drawings, and exhibition discussions. This research showed that students were able to explore and express their lived experiences of behaviour and well-being in school, and how this was linked to positive change. We found students trustworthy, capable, and competent, enriching the process of school improvement.

  • 139.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Researcher’s role: possibilities and challenges when giving voice to students’ experiences2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 140.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Student visual narratives giving voice to positive learning experiences: a contribution to educational change2012In: Academic Leadership, ISSN 1533-7812, E-ISSN 1533-7812, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore students’ positive experiences of their learning through the use of visual narratives, observation, and field notes in two secondary school classes in Sweden. Four themes were found: (1) knowing the needs of mind and body, (2) embracing each other in mutual support, (3) learning in a facilitating environment, and (4) using a variety of learning modalities. Students wished to have a voice in setting the curriculum, favored a variety of assignments, and sought to expand their learning environment beyond the classroom. Finally, challenges for teachers and school leaders are discussed.

  • 141.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Students’ Experiences of Meaningful Situations in School2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 538-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on school situations students experienced as meaningful and how these experiences can guide educational improvement. Participants included 15 students in grade 3 from a Swedish school. In this qualitative study, the data consisted of drawings, multimodal productions, interviews, and field notes. The analysis resulted in four themes: Having the opportunity to learn in different spaces; Being free and able to participate; Experiencing caring and sharing, and Recognizing one’s own growth and achievement. The findings suggest that situations students find meaningful involve aspects of both learning and wellbeing. The practical implication for these results is that student-generated qualitative data can help indicate needs for educational improvement.

  • 142.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    ’Tact of researching’: the ethically aware researcher giving voice to students in a Swedish context2011In: The Student Voice Handbook: Bridging the Academic/Practitioner Divide, Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011, p. 399-408Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    The cup is half full: appreciating the positive present in research and in practical work in school2008In: ECER 2008 Gothenburg: The European Conference on Educational Research in Gothenburg, Sweden, 8 - 9 September 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop we will present the background and the development of Participatory Appreciative Action Research (PAAR) as a research methodology and a school improvement process as well. This method has its roots in participatory action research which emphasizes the improvement of practice through involvement and participation. The new addition in PAAR is the appreciative aspect, this means for example working together and sharing the best practices and appreciating each other and our abilities. PAAR can be viewed as the opposite of problem-solving because it focuses on success and what works well instead of problems. Key concepts in PAAR are re-framing, positive questions, participation and positive present. These concepts will be discussed and explored. PAAR offers an opportunity to take positive questions and turn them into positive actions. This can be compared to Antonovsky's way of looking at health and development driven by the positive, in other words what is healthy not what is ill. This perspective can also be used when building an educational setting that encourages co-operation and sharing which make possible a positive psychosocial culture enhancing the learning process.We will give examples of how we as researchers have applied PAAR to our own research areas that include ethical perspectives on learning and health promotion with children in compulsory school in Sweden. Finally we raise questions of how educational research and school improvement relate to each other and if, in what way and when they can cooperate in building not only a better school but a better future.Methodology or methods/research instruments or sources used:We will focus on how to use PAAR methodology in the field of school improvement generally and specifically pertaining to educational research and health promotion, through giving the theoretical background and examples of how we have applied PAAR in our own research with students in compulsory school.Conclusions or expected outcomes or findings: This hour-long workshop seeks to introduce and explore PAAR as a method in educational research and in school improvement processes. After giving the background of PAAR, the participants in the workshop will have the opportunity to begin to explore how PAAR can be used in their own research and/or practice. This is done through interactive activities. We will present how we have used PAAR in our research and hope that this will inspire the participants to reflect on their own research and practice. We also want to address the issue of the relationship between research and improvement of a practice.

  • 144.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Uppskattningens kraft: lärande, etik och hälsa2011Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 145.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Jahncke, Helena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Schemalagt arbete - Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten: Delområde Färjerederiet2017Report (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Jahncke, Helena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Schemalagt arbete - Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten: Delområde Förarprov2017Report (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Jahncke, Helena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Schemalagt arbete - Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten: Delområde Trafikledning2017Report (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Bergstrand, Irene
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Hur långt sträcker sig arbetsgivarens rehabiliteringsansvar?: en studie i arbetsrättens gränser2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 149.
    Bergstrom-Wuolo, Maya
    et al.
    Public Health Center, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Dahlström, Josefin
    Health Counselor in Luleå.
    Hertting, Krister
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    My heart has no hurt: the health of young immigrants2018In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore health from the perspective of young immigrants in Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A total of 25 newly arrived young immigrants attending Swedish language classes in northern Sweden participated by drawing and writing open letters. They continued the open-ended sentence “Now I’ll draw and describe a day when I was feeling good, that was […].”

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in three themes: longing to be in control for a better life, searching for power in the good and the bad, and striving for a sense of belonging in the new society. The findings illuminate young immigrants’ perspectives of a health-promoting everyday life consisting of agency, reflection and a sense of community. The findings also highlight the young immigrants’ experiences when health-promoting aspects are lacking, characterized by disillusionment, anxiety and loneliness. The findings are discussed with health promotion, health literacy and young immigrants in mind.

    Practical implications

    According to young immigrants, meeting basic needs such as food, sleep and housing is health promoting but easily taken for granted. Being able to have a say in matters concerning everyday life, social inclusion and finding power in memories – positive and negative – can promote health in young immigrants.

    Originality/value

    The young immigrants were able to communicate via drawings and words to overcome language barriers.

  • 150.
    Bergström, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Persson, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sick leave and healthcare utilisation in women reporting pregnancy related low back pain and/or pelvic girdle pain at 14 months postpartum2016In: Chiropractic and Manual Therapies, ISSN 2045-709X, E-ISSN 2045-709X, Vol. 24, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pregnancy related low back pain (PLBP) and pelvic girdle pain (PGP) are considered common complications of pregnancy. The long-term consequences for women with persistent PLBP/PGP postpartum are under-investigated. The main objective was to investigate the prevalence, pattern and degree of sick leave as well as healthcare utilisation and its perceived effect in women with persistent PLBP/PGP at 12 months postpartum.

    Method: This is a follow-up study of a cohort involving of a sample of women, who delivered from January 1st 2002 to April 30th in 2002 at Umea University Hospital and Sunderby Hospital, and who reported PLBP/PGP during pregnancy. A total of 639 women were followed-up by a second questionnaire (Q2) at approximately 6 months postpartum. Women with persistent PLBP/PGP at the second questionnaire (N = 200) were sent a third questionnaire (Q3) at approximately 12 months postpartum.

    Results: The final study sample consisted of 176 women reporting PLBP/PGP postpartum where N = 34 (19.3 %) reported 'no' pain, N = 115 (65.3 %) 'recurrent' pain, and N = 27 (15.3 %) 'continuous' pain. The vast majority (92.4 %) of women reported that they had neither been on sick leave nor sought any healthcare services (64.1 %) during the past 6 months at Q3. Women with 'continuous' pain at Q3 reported a higher extent of sick leave and healthcare seeking behaviour compared to women with 'recurrent' pain at Q3. Most women with persistent PLBP/PGP had been on sick leave on a full-time basis. The most commonly sought healthcare was physiotherapy, followed by consultation with a medical doctor, acupuncture and chiropractic.

    Conclusion: Most women did not report any sick leave or sought any healthcare due to PLBP/PGP the past 6 months at Q3. However, women with 'continuous' PLBP/PGP 14 months postpartum did report a higher prevalence and degree of sick leave and sought healthcare to a higher extent compared to women with 'recurrent' PLBP/PGP at Q3. Women with more pronounced symptoms might constitute a specific subgroup of patients with a less favourable long-term outcome, thus PLBP/PGP needs to be addressed early in pregnancy to reduce both individual suffering and the risk of transition into chronicity.

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