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  • 101.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Sjogren, Johan
    Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Batra, Gorav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Dept Med, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Outcome of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe coronary artery disease who had a coronary artery bypass graft or a percutaneous coronary intervention2017In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 930-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who also have acute coronary syndromes are a high-risk population with a high mortality rate. Little is known about these patients following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS: Patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes between 2006 and 2014 with an angiogram showing 3-vessel disease or left main coronary artery involvement who were treated with CABG or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) only were included from the nationwide SWEDEHEART registry. Patients were stratified according to COPD status and compared with regard to outcome. The primary end-point was the 5-year mortality rate; secondary outcomes were the 30-day mortality rate and in-hospital complications after CABG. RESULTS: We identified 6985 patients in the population who had CABG (COPD prevalence = 8.0%) and 14 209 who had PCI only (COPD = 8.2%). Patients with COPD were older and had more comorbidities than patients without COPD. The 5-year mortality rate was nearly doubled in patients with COPD versus patients without COPD (CABG: 27.2% vs 14.5%, P < 0.001; PCI only: 50.1% vs 29.1%, P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex and comorbidities, patients with COPD in both CABG-treated [hazard ratio = 1.52 (1.25-1.86), P < 0.001] and PCI-treated populations still had a significantly higher 5-year mortality rate. COPD was also independently associated with significantly more postoperative infections in need of antibiotics [odds ratio = 1.48 (1.07-2.04), P = 0.017] and pneumonia [odds ratio = 2.21 (1.39-3.52), P = 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD presenting with acute coronary syndromes and severe coronary artery disease are a high-risk population following CABG or PCI only, with higher risk of long-term and short-term death and postoperative infections. Preventive measures, including careful monitoring for signs of infection and prompt antibiotic treatment when indicated, should be considered.

  • 102.
    Andersen, Kasper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate associations of fitness and types and levels of physical activity with subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Four large-scale longitudinal cohort studies were used. The exposures were different measures related to physical activity and the outcomes were obtained through linkage to the Swedish In-Patient Register. In a cohort of 466 elderly men without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, we found that skeletal muscle morphology was associated with risk of cardiovascular events. A high amount of type I (slow-twitch, oxidative) skeletal muscle fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and high amount of type IIx was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. This association was only seen among physically active men. Among 39,805 participants in a fundraising event, higher levels of both total and leisure time physical activity were associated with lower risk of heart failure. The associations were strongest for leisure time physical activity. In a cohort of 53,755 participants in the 90 km skiing event Vasaloppet, a higher number of completed races was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation and a higher risk of bradyarrhythmias. Further, better relative performance was associated with a higher risk of bradyarrhythmias. Among 1,26 million Swedish 18-year-old men, exercise capacity and muscle strength were independently associated with lower risk of vascular disease. The associations were seen across a range of major vascular disease events (ischemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke and cardiovascular death). Further, high exercise capacity was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation and a U-shaped association with bradyarrhythmias was found. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of bradyarrhythmias and lower risk of ventricular arrhythmias.

    These findings suggest a higher rate of atrial fibrillation with higher levels of physical activity. The higher risk of atrial fibrillation does not appear to lead to a higher risk of stroke. In contrast, we found a strong inverse association of higher exercise capacity and muscle strength with vascular disease. Further, high exercise capacity and muscle strength are related to lower risk of cardiovascular death, including arrhythmia deaths. From a population perspective, the total impact of physical activity on cardiovascular disease is positive.

  • 103.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Daniela, Mariosa
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Nyren, Olof
    Ye, Weimin
    Bellocco, Rino
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Dose–Response Relationship of Total and Leisure Time Physical Activity to Risk of Heart Failure: a prospective cohort study2014In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 16p. 701-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background—The nature of the association between levels of physical activity and risk of heart failure is little known. We investigated nonlinear associations of total and leisure time physical activity with risk of heart failure.

    Methods and Results—In 1997, 39 805 persons without heart failure completed a questionnaire of lifestyle factors and medical history. We used Cox regression models to investigate total (adjusting for education and previous myocardial infarction) and direct (multivariable-adjusted) effects of self-reported total and leisure time physical activity on risk of heart failure of any cause and heart failure of nonischemic origin. Heart failure diagnoses were obtained until December 31, 2010. Higher leisure time physical activity was associated with lower risk of heart failure of any cause; hazard ratio of the total effect of leisure time physical activity was for fifth versus first quintile 0.54; 95% confidence interval was 0.44 to 0.66. The direct effect was similar. High total daily physical activity level was associated with lower risk of heart failure, although the effect was less pronounced than for leisure time physical activity (total effect hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–0.95; fifth versus first quintile). A similar direct effect observed.

    Conclusions—Leisure time physical activity was inversely related to risk of developing heart failure in a dose–response fashion. This was reflected in a similar but less pronounced association of total physical activity with risk of heart failure. Only part of the effects appeared to be mediated by traditional risk factors.

  • 104.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Neovius, Martin
    Tynelius, Per
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias: A cohort study of 1.26 million young menManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    While physical activity and exercise protects against cardiovascular disease, athletes have higher risk of atrial fibrillation and other arrhythmias. Graded independent and joint influences of exercise capacity and muscle strength on these diseases are unknown.

    Methods:

    All 1.26 million Swedish men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1972 and 1995 (at a median age of 18.2 years) contributed. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the associations of maximal exercise capacity and muscle strength at conscription to subsequent risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias, as identified in national registries.

    Results:

    During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, about 26,000 hospitalizations for vascular disease events and 17,000 for arrhythmias occurred. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.67]; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was muscle strength (HR 0.79; 0.76-0.83; for 5th vs. 1st quintile ). Similar associations were seen across a range of major vascular disease events. Exercise capacity was associated with incidence of arrhythmias in a U-shaped fashion (HR 0.91; 0.86-0.96; for 3rd vs. 1st quintile, and 0.99; 0.94-1.04; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmias (HR 0.87; 0.83-0.91; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). 

    Conclusion:

    Exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence are independently and jointly associated with long-term risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias. The lower risk of vascular events with higher exercise capacity was not outweighed by higher risk of arrhythmias.

  • 105.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Skeletal muscle morphology and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly men2015In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    While it is well known that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, there is still a search for the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its positive effect. Skeletal muscle fibre type can be affected to some extent by exercise, and different fibre types possess different anti-inflammatory and glucometabolic properties that may influence cardiovascular disease risk.

    DESIGN:

    Population-based cohort study.

    METHODS:

    We investigated relations of skeletal muscle morphology to risk of cardiovascular events in a sample of 466 71-year-old men without cardiovascular disease, of which 295 were physically active (strenuous physical activity at least 3 h/week).

    RESULTS:

    During a median of 13.1 years of follow up, 173 major cardiovascular events occurred. Among physically active men, 10% higher proportion of type-I (slow-twitch oxidative) fibres was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.95) for cardiovascular events, and 10% higher proportion of type-IIx (fast-twitch glycolytic) fibres was associated with a HR of 1.24 (1.06-1.45), adjusting for age. Similar results were observed in several sets of multivariable-adjusted models. No association of muscle fibre type with risk of cardiovascular events was observed among physically inactive men.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Higher skeletal muscle proportion of type-I fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and a higher proportion of type-IIx fibres was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. These relations were only observed in physically active men. Skeletal muscle fibre composition may be a mediator of the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease.

  • 106.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Rasmussen, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Neovius, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tynelius, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Anthropometric measures and risk of atrial fibrillation - a cohort study of 1.2 million young men2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 910-910Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Rasmussen, F.
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Neovius, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynelius, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Epidemiol & Community Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Body size and risk of atrial fibrillation: a cohort study of 1.1 million young men2018In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 283, no 4, p. 346-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Whilst tall stature has been related to lower risk of vascular disease, it has been proposed as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Little is known about other anthropometric measures and their joint effects on risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Objectives: We aim to investigate associations and potential joint effects of height, weight, body surface area (BSA) and body mass index (BMI) with risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Methods: In a cohort covering 1 153 151 18-year-old men participating in the Swedish military conscription (1972-1995), Cox regression was used to investigate associations of height, weight, BSA and BMI with risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Results: During a median of 26.3 years of follow-up, higher height was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.80; 95% CI 2.63-2.98; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was larger BSA (HR 3.05; 95% CI 2.82-3.28; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher weight and BMI were to a lesser extent associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (BMI: 1.42; 95% CI 1.33-1.52, for 5th vs. 1st quintile). We found a multiplicative joint effect of height and weight. Adjusting for muscle strength, exercise capacity and diseases related to atrial fibrillation attenuated these measures.

    Conclusions: Higher height and weight are strongly associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation. These associations are multiplicative and independent of each other and are summarized in a strong association of body surface area with risk of atrial fibrillation. The mechanisms remain unknown but may involve increased atrial volume load with larger body size.

  • 108.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Child & Adolescent Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tynelius, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Child & Adolescent Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia in 1.1 million young Swedish men: cohort study2015In: BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 351, article id h4543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the associations of exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence with risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING General population in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS 1.1 million men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1 August 1972 and 31 December 1995, at a median age of 18.2 years. Participants were followed until 31 December 2010. MAIN OUTCOMES Associations between exercise capacity and muscle strength with risk of vascular disease and subgroups (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and cardiovascular death) and risk of arrhythmia and subgroups (atrial fibrillation or flutter, bradyarrhythmia, supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death). Maximum exercise capacity was estimated by the ergometer bicycle test, and muscle strength was measured as handgrip strength by a hand dynamometer. High exercise capacity or muscle strength was deemed as above the median level. RESULTS During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, 26 088 vascular disease events and 17 312 arrhythmia events were recorded. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease and its subgroups. Muscle strength was also inversely associated with vascular disease risk, driven by associations of higher muscle strength with lower risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death. Exercise capacity had a U shaped association with risk of arrhythmia, driven by a direct association with risk of atrial fibrillation and a U shaped association with bradyarrhythmia. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmia (specifically, lower risk of bradyarrhythmia and ventricular arrhythmia). The combination of high exercise capacity and high muscle strength was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.70) for vascular events and 0.92 (0.88 to 0.97) for arrhythmia compared with the combination of low exercise capacity and low muscle strength. CONCLUSIONS Exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence are independently and jointly associated with long term risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. The health benefit of lower risk of vascular events with higher exercise capacity was not outweighed by higher risk of arrhythmia.

  • 109.
    Andersson, Jessika
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Department of Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Department of Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Thomas
    Department of Signals and Systems, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hulthe, Johannes
    Wallenberg Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Elmgren, Anders
    AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Zilmer, Kersti
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Zilmer, Mihkel
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Lind, Lars
    Department of Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The carotid artery plaque size and echogenicity are related to different cardiovascular risk factors in the elderly: the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study2009In: Lipids, ISSN 0024-4201, E-ISSN 1558-9307, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 397-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carotid plaques can be characterised by ultrasound by size and echogenicity. Both size and echogenicity are predictors of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to examine whether traditional risk factors and markers of inflammation and oxidation were associated with plaque size and echogenicity. Computerised analysis of carotid plaque size and echogenicity (grey scale median, GSM) were performed by ultrasound in a population-based health survey in 1,016 subjects aged 70 years (PIVUS study). Information on cardiovascular risk factors was collected, together with markers of inflammation and oxidation. Increased Framingham risk score, systolic blood pressure, higher BMI and decreased HDL, lower glutathione levels were related to echolucent plaques. Previous or present smoking was common with significantly more pack-years related to the echorich plaques. Plaque size was associated with increased Framingham risk score, systolic blood pressure, blood glucose levels, smoking, ApoB/A1 ratio, OxLDL, TNF alpha, HOMA insulin resistance, leucocyte count, decreased BCD-LDL and low levels of l-selectin. Low HDL, increased BMI and decreased glutathione levels were associated with the echolucency of carotid plaques, implying metabolic factors to play a role for plaque composition. Markers of inflammation were related to plaque size alone, implying inflammation to be predominantly associated with the amount of atherosclerosis. These results suggest that plaque size and echogenicity are influenced by different risk factors.

  • 110.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Inflammation and lifestyle in cardiovascular medicine2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite major advances in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis the last several decades, cardiovascular disease still accounts for the majority of deaths in Sweden. With the population getting older, more obese and with rising numbers of diabetics, the cardiovascular disease burden may increase further in the future.

    The focus in cardiovascular disease has shifted with time from calcification and narrowing of arteries to the biological processes within the atherosclerotic plaque. C-reactive protein (CRP) has emerged as one of many proteins that reflect a low grade systemic inflammation and is suitable for analysis as it is more stable and easily measured than most other inflammatory markers. Several large prospective studies have shown that CRP is not only an inflammatory marker, but even a predictive marker for cardiovascular disease. C-reactive protein is associated with several other risk factors for cardiovascular disease including obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Our study of twenty healthy men during a two week endurance cross country skiing tour demonstrated a decline in already low baseline CRP levels immediately after the tour and six weeks later.

    In a study of 200 obese individuals with impaired glucose tolerance randomised to a counselling session at their health care centre or a one month stay at a wellness centre, we found decreased levels of CRP in subjects admitted to the wellness centre. The effect remained at one, but not after three years of follow-up.

    In a prospective, nested, case-referent study with 308 ischemic strokes, 61 intracerebral haemorrhages and 735 matched referents, CRP was associated with ischemic stroke in both uni- and multivariate analyses. No association was found with intracerebral haemorrhages. When classifying ischemic stroke according to TOAST criteria, CRP was associated with small vessel disease. The CRP 1444 (CC/CT vs. TT) polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of CRP, but neither with ischemic stroke nor with intracerebral haemorrhage.

    A study on 129 patients with atrial fibrillation was used to evaluate whether inflammation sensitive fibrinolytic variables adjusted for CRP could predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation after electrical cardioversion. In multivariate iv models, lower PAI-1 mass was associated with sinus rhythm even after adjusting for CRP and markers of the metabolic syndrome.

    In conclusion, lifestyle intervention can be used to reduce CRP levels, but it remains a challenge to maintain this effect. CRP is a marker of ischemic stroke, but there are no significant associations between the CRP1444 polymorphism and any stroke subtype, suggesting that the CRP relationship with ischemic stroke is not causal. The fibrinolytic variable, PAI-1, is associated with the risk of recurrence of atrial fibrillation after electrical cardioversion after adjustment for CRP. Our findings suggest a pathophysiological link between atrial fibrillation and PAI-1, but the relation to inflammation remains unclear.

  • 111.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ladenvall, Per
    Wiklund, Per-Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jern, Christina
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    C-reactive protein is a determinant of first-ever stroke: prospective nested case-referent study2009In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 544-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a determinant of stroke, but there are no prospective studies on CRP and first ischemic stroke divided into etiologic subtypes. Our primary aim was to study CRP as a determinant of ischemic stroke, classified according to Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a prospective study. A secondary aim was to study the relationship between the 1444C>T polymorphism, plasma levels of CRP and stroke.

    METHODS: The study was a prospective population-based case-referent study nested within the Northern Sweden Cohorts. We defined 308 cases of ischemic stroke and 61 ICH. Two controls for each case were defined from the same cohort.

    RESULTS: The OR for the highest (>3 mg/l) versus lowest group (<1 mg/l) of CRP was 2.58 (95% CI 1.74-3.84) for ischemic stroke and 1.63 (95% CI 0.67-3.93) for ICH. In a multivariate model including traditional risk factors, CRP remained associated with ischemic stroke (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.29-3.29). Small-vessel disease was associated with CRP in the multivariate model (OR 3.88; 95% CI 1.10-13.7). The CRP 1444 (CC/CT vs. TT) polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of CRP but neither with ischemic stroke nor with ICH.

    CONCLUSIONS: This prospective population-based study shows that CRP is significantly associated with the risk of having a first ischemic stroke, especially for small-vessel disease. No significant associations were found between the CRP 1444C>T polymorphism and any stroke subtype.

  • 112.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Mellberg, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Otten, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ryberg, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rinnström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Larsson, Christel
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hauksson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. d Department of Radiography and Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Left ventricular remodelling changes without concomitant loss of myocardial fat after long-term dietary intervention2016In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 216, p. 92-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Accumulation of myocardial triglycerides (MTG) is associated with impaired left ventricular (LV) remodelling and function in obese and diabetic subjects. The role of MTG accumulation in development of heart failure in this group of patients is unknown. Short-term studies suggest that diets that lead to weight loss could mobilize MTG, with a favourable effect on cardiac remodelling. In a 24-month, randomized, investigator-blinded study, we assessed the effect of two different diets and subsequent weight loss on cardiac function and MTG in postmenopausal women. Methods: Sixty-eight healthy postmenopausal women with body mass index [BMI] >= 27 kg/m(2) were randomized to an ad libitum Palaeolithic diet (PD) or a Nordic Nutrition Recommendation (NNR) diet for 24 months. Morphology, cardiac function, and MTG levels were measured using magnetic resonance (MR) scanning, including proton spectroscopy at baseline and 6 and 24 months. Results: Despite mean weight losses of 4.9 (1.0) kg (NNR) and 7.8 (1.1) kg (PD), the MTG content did not change over time (p = 0.98 in the NNR and p = 0.11 in the PD group at 24 months). Reduced left ventricular mass was observed in both diet groups over 24 months. Blood pressure was reduced at 6 months, but returned to baseline levels at 24 months. End diastolic volume, stroke volume, and cardiac output decreased over time. No differences between diet groups were observed. Conclusions: Diet intervention and moderate weight loss over 24 months improved LV remodelling but did not alter MTG levels in overweight/obese postmenopausal women.

  • 113.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Tornvall, Per
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    NT-proBNP predicts maintenance of sinus rhythm after electrical cardioversion.2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 135, no 2, p. 289-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia. NT-proBNP is a fragment of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide. Previous studies indicate that increased levels of NT-proBNP are associated with higher recurrence rates of AF after electrical cardioversion. Our null hypothesis was that NT-proBNP does not predict recurrence of AF after restoration of sinus rhythm.

    METHODS: We performed a hypothesis generating study within a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, prospective multicentre study of the effects of atorvastatin on recurrence of AF after electrical cardioversion. 199 patients with persistent AF and an indication for cardioversion were included in the present substudy. NT-proBNP was assessed prior to cardioversion. Cardioversion was performed according to local standard clinical practice on an elective outpatient basis. Patients were followed-up one month after cardioversion.

    RESULTS: 181 patients had a successful cardioversion and 91 of the study group remained in sinus rhythm at day 30. Recurrence of AF was observed in 108 patients at day 30. An optimal cutpoint for NT-proBNP at 500 ng/L predicted recurrence of AF after cardioversion (OR 2.94; 95% CI 1.30-6.63). In multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, and treatment group strengthened the results (OR 3,56; 95% CI 1,44-8,81). When analysing the ROC curve of NT-proBNP in baseline and atrial fibrillation at day 30 the result was 0.57.

    CONCLUSION: NT-proBNP levels are a predictor of recurrence of AF 30 days after cardioversion. ROC curves indicates that the practical value of NT-proBNP for the individual patient is limited.

  • 114.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Escher, Stefan A
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Diabetes mellitus, high BMI and low education level predict sudden cardiac death within 24 hours of incident myocardial infarction2016In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 23, no 17, p. 1814-1820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: More than half of cardiovascular mortality occurs outside the hospital, mainly due to consistently low survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    METHODS: This is a prospective, nested, case-control study derived from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme and the World Health Organization's Multinational Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease study in northern Sweden (1986-2006). To determine predictors for sudden cardiac death risk factors for cardiovascular disease were compared between incident myocardial infarction with sudden cardiac death (n = 363) and survivors of incident myocardial infarction (n = 1998) using multivariate logistic regression analysis.

    RESULTS: Diabetes had the strongest association with sudden cardiac death out of all evaluated risk factors (odds ratio (OR) 1.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-2.59), followed by low education (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.19-2.01), high body mass index (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08) and male sex (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.001-2.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of risk factors for incident myocardial infarction is different among survivors and those who die within 24 hours. The risk factors that contribute the most to death within 24 hours are diabetes mellitus, high body mass index and low education level, and can be addressed at both the public health level and by general practitioners.

  • 115.
    Andersson, Kennet
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Faes, Luca
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Directed coherence analysis in patients with severe autonomic dysfunction2014In: 2014 8th conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations (ESGCO), IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, p. 167-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many different approaches have been applied to analyse the coupling between cardiovascular signals. This study evaluated the use of directed coherence, based on multivariate autoregressive modelling, for analysis of cardiovascular signals in patients with transthyretin amyloidosis, a rare disease where severe autonomic dysfunction is common.

  • 116.
    Andersson, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Vårdcentralen Centrum Flen, Sweden; Research and Development Centre, Sörmland County Council.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Research and Development Centre, Sörmland County Council.
    Heart Failure Patients' Perceptions of Received and Wanted Information: A Cross-Sectional Study2019In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 340-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate heart failure patients’ perceptions of received and wanted information and to identify differences regarding received and wanted information in relation to sociodemographic variables. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Patients with heart failure (n = 192) were recruited from six primary health care centers in Sweden. Data were collected by a postal questionnaire. A majority of the respondents had received information about the condition and the medication. Within primary health care, most respondents had been informed about medication. The respondents wanted more information about continued care and treatment, medication, and the condition. There were significant differences between sociodemographic groups concerning what information they wanted. Clinical nurses can support patients with heart failure by using evidence-based methods that strengthen the patients’ self-efficacy and by individualized information that increases patients’ knowledge and improves their self-care behaviors. Future studies are needed to identify informational needs of particular fragile groups of patients.

  • 117.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Östholm Balkhed, Åse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holmbom, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hällgren, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Delay of appropriate antibiotic treatment is associated with high mortality in patients with community-onset sepsis in a Swedish setting2019In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1223-1234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial in patients with sepsis and septic shock. Studies often focus on time to first dose of appropriate antibiotics, but subsequent dosing is equally important. Our aim was to investigate the impact of fulfillment of early treatment, with focus on appropriate administration of first and second doses of antibiotics, on 28-day mortality in patients with community-onset severe sepsis and septic shock. A retrospective study on adult patients admitted to the emergency department with community-onset sepsis and septic shock was conducted 2012-2013. The criterion early appropriate antibiotic treatment was defined as administration of the first dose of adequate antibiotics within 1h, and the second dose given with less than 25% delay after the recommended dose interval. A high-risk patient was defined as a septic patient with either shock within 24h after arrival or red triage level on admittance according to the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System Adult. Primary endpoint was 28-day mortality. Of 90 patients, less than one in four (20/87) received early appropriate antibiotic treatment, and only one in three (15/44) of the high-risk patients. The univariate analysis showed a more than threefold higher mortality among high-risk patients not receiving early appropriate antibiotic treatment. Multivariable analysis identified early non-appropriate antibiotic treatment as an independent predictor of mortality with an odds ratio for mortality of 10.4. Despite that the importance of early antibiotic treatment has been established for decades, adherence to this principle was very poor.

  • 118.
    Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Ronmark, Eva
    Lindberg, Anne
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Physical activity and fatigue in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - A population based study2015In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 109, no 8, p. 1048-1057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), symptoms of fatigue, concomitant heart disease and low physical activity levels are more frequently described than in subjects without COPD. However, there are no population-based studies addressing the relationship between physical activity, fatigue and heart disease in COPD. The aim was to compare physical activity levels among subjects with and without COPD in a population based study, and to evaluate if concomitant heart disease and fatigue was associated to physical activity. Methods: In this, 470 subjects with COPD and 659 subjects without COPD (non-COPD) participated in examinations including structured interview and spirometry. A ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/best of forced vital capacity (FVC) and vital capacity (VC) <0.7 was used to define COPD. Physical activity was assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and fatigue with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue scale (FACIT-F). Results: The prevalence of low physical activity was higher among subjects with FEV1 <80% predicted compared to non-COPD subjects (22.4% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.041). The factors most strongly associated with low physical activity in subjects with COPD were older age, OR 1.52, (95% CI 1.12-2.06), a history of heart disease, OR 2.11 (1.10-4.08), and clinically significant fatigue, OR 2.33 (1.31-4.13); while obesity was the only significant factor among non-COPD subjects, OR 2.26 (1.17-4.35). Conclusion: Physical activity levels are reduced when lung function is decreased below 80% of predicted, and the factors associated with low physical activity are different among subject with and without COPD. We propose that the presence of fatigue and heart disease are useful to evaluate when identifying subjects for pulmonary rehabilitation.

  • 119.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

  • 120.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Sjöberg, Rickard L
    Öhrvik, John
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Effects of family history and personal experience of illness on inclination to change health related behavior2009In: Central European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1210-7778, E-ISSN 1803-1048, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 3-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to examine how personal experience of illness and family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), adjusted for gender, education and nationality, affects risk behaviour. Subjects were 2054 men and women of age 50 from two countries, Sweden (n=1011) and Poland (n=1043), who were recruited from screening program in primary health care. Family history, personal experience and risk behaviours (smoking habits, exercise habits, BMI-level) were self-reported. The results show that smoking behaviour is affected by personal experience of illness but not by family history of CVD. No effects of these variables were found on the remaining risk related variables that were tested in this study.  These results suggest that individuals with a personal experience of illness may be inclined to change smoking behaviour more than the average person. Smoking prevention strategies may thus benefit from targeting this group in particular.

     

  • 121.
    Andersson, T. A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Larsen, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Pulmonary embolism in Sweden, a national cohort and survival analysis2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no suppl. 1, p. 29-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Andersson, T.
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, I. L.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, A.
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, K.
    Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, N.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    What do patients with incident atrial fibrillation and no comorbidities at the time of diagnosis die of?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Little is known about the long-term mortality risk and the causes of death in patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Purposes: To identify the causes of death in patients with AF and without comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis.

    Methods: We identified 9 519 patients with first diagnosed AF and no co-morbidities at the time of AF diagnosis in a nation-wide registry of patients hospitalized between 1995 and 2008. They represented 3.5% of the original cohort of 271186 patients hospitalized with incident AF. Patients with any diagnosis from ICD9 and ICD10 at the time of AF diagnosis wereexcluded. They were matched for age, sex and calendar year of AF diagnosis with 12 468 controls. The follow-up continued until December 2008. Causes of death were classified according to the ICD-10 codes.

    Results: During follow-up, 11.1% and 8.3% of patients with AF and controls died, HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.4. Most of the difference was explained by deaths of cardiovascular causes, 8.3% versus 3.9%, (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.8–2.3). The cause of death pattern was the same in controls although at much lower rates. The age adjusted relative risk was higher in women than in men, HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.9–2.8 versus HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4–2.0. Myocardial infarction was the most common cardiovascular cause of death but was less common among patients with AF than in controls, 20.5% versus 32.0%. Stroke was a more common cause among patients with AF, 13.1% versus 9.7% (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8–4.0), while cerebral hemorrhage was more common among controls, 4.7% versus 10.2% (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6–1.5). The time from AF diagnosis to death was 6.0±3.1 years, as compared to the time from inclusion to death, 5.8±3.1 years, in controls.

    Conclusions: Only cardiovascular diseases were more often causes of death than in controls. Women carried a significantly higher relative risk than men. The duration between AF diagnosis and death suggests that there is often time enough for early intervention with antithrombotic therapy, rhythm and/or rate control and treatment of risk factors as they appear. Interestingly, controls had the same cause of death pattern although at much lower rates.

  • 123.
    Andersson, T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Larsen, F.
    Soderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Searching for CTEPH: a Swedish National Follow-Up after en Episode of Acute Pulmonary Embolism2016In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 35, no 4, p. S149-S149Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Andersson, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Incidence of acute pulmonary embolism, related comorbidities and survival: analysis of a Swedish national cohort2017In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 17, article id 155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in Sweden and any regional differences. To assess short-and long-term survival analysis after an episode of PE, before and after excluding patients with known malignancies, and to determine the most common comorbidities prior to the PE event. Methods: All in-hospital patients, including children, diagnosed with acute PE in 2005 were retrieved from the Swedish National Patient Registry (NPR) and incidence rates were calculated. All registered comorbidities from 1998 until the index events were collected and survival up to 4 years after the event were calculated and compared to matched controls. Results: There were 5793 patients of all ages diagnosed with acute PE in 2005 resulting in a national incidence of 0.6/1000/year. The mean age was 70 years and 52% were women. The most frequent comorbidities were cardiac-, vascular-, infectious-and gastrointestinal diseases, injuries and malignancies. The mortality rates were more than doubled in patients with recent PE compared to that in a matched control group (49.1% vs 21.9%), and the excess mortality remained after exclusion of deaths occurring within one year and after exclusion of patients with any malignancy prior to the event. Conclusions: PE is associated with high age as well as with multiple comorbidities, and with an increased shortand long-term mortality. This study highlights the importance of a proper follow-up after an acute PE.

  • 125.
    Andersson, Tommy
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Atrial fibrillation and cause of death, sex differences in mortality, and anticoagulation treatment in low-risk patients2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia but information on cause of death in patients with AF is sparse, and whether individuals at low risk of cerebral infarction (CVL) should receive antico-agulant medication is controversial. Studies of sex differences with respect to mortality risk have shown conflicting results.

    Methods: Data were obtained from Swedish National Registers. In Study I, there were 272 186 AF patients and matched controls and in Studies II and III, 9519 AF patients and no other diagnosis and matched controls. Study IV compared treatment with warfarin to no treatment in 48 433 patients with AF. Hazard ratio (HR) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals and outcome rates as number per 1000 person-years.

    Results: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) was the most common underlying cause of death and was present in 40.2% of AF patients at a HR of 1.7 (1.4-2.1). CVL/stroke was a cause of death in 13.1%, HR 2.7 (1.8-4.0). Among underlying and contributing causes of death, the most common diagnoses were IHD in 43.5%, HR 1.7 (1.4-2.0) and heart failure in 33.1%, HR 2.9 (2.2-3.7). The HRs for mortality in females with AF in age categories ≤65, 65-74, and 75-85 were 2.15, 1.72, and 1.44, and for males 1.76, 1.36, and 1.24. The rates of mortality in females with AF in age categories 55-64, 65-74, and 75-85 were 6.2, 20.7, and 57.3, and for males 8.5, 27.3, and 64.5. In patients 65-74 years, females with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2, and males with a score of 1 receiving warfarin treatment showed a significantly reduced risk of cerebral infarc-tion/stroke, HR 0.46 (0.25-0.83) for females and for males, HR 0.39 (0.21-0.73).

    Conclusions: Most common causes of death in AF patients were CVL/stroke, heart failure, and IHD. HR of mortality in patients with AF was higher in females than in males but absolute risk was higher in males with AF compared to females with AF. Anticoagulant therapy was benefi-cial in patients ≥65 years, regardless of the CHA2DS2-VASc score.

  • 126. Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Frobert, Ole
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Poci, Dritan
    Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: A nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies of patients with "lone" and "idiopathic" atrial fibrillation (AF) have provided conflicting evidence concerning the development, management and prognosis of this condition. Methods: In this nation-wide, retrospective, cohort study, we studied patients diagnosed with incidental AF recorded in national Swedish registries between 1995 and 2008. Controls were matched for age, sex and calendar year of the diagnosis of AF in patients. All subjects were free of any in-hospital diagnosis from 1987 and until patients were diagnosed with AF and also free of any diagnosis within one year from the time of inclusion. Follow-up continued until 2009. We identified 9519 patients (31% women) and 12,468 matched controls. Results: Relative risks (RR) versus controls for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in women were 19.6, 4.4, 3.4 and 2.5 in the age categories <55, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-85, years respectively. Corresponding figures for men were 3.4, 2.5, 1.7 and 1.9. RR for heart failure were 6.6, 6.6, 6.3 and 3.8 in women and 7.8, 4.6, 4.9 and 2.9 in men. All RR were statistically significant with p < 0.01. RR for myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality were statistically significantly increased only in the two oldest age categories in women and 65-74 years in men. Conclusions: Patients with AF and no co-morbidities at inclusion had at least a doubled risk of stroke or TIA and a tripled risk of heart failure, through all age categories, as compared to controls. Women were at higher RR of stroke or TIA than men. 

  • 127.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Magnuson, Anders
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Orebro, Sweden..
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Orebro, Sweden..
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. AstraZeneca R&D, Molndal, Sweden..
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Poci, Dritan
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: causes of death during long-term follow-up compared to matched controls2017In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 40, no 11, p. 1076-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundLittle is known about the long-term, cause-specific mortality risk in patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF). MethodsFrom a nation-wide registry of patients hospitalized with incident AF between 1995 and 2008 we identified 9 519 patients with a first diagnosed AF and no comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis. They were matched with 12 468 controls. The follow-up continued until December 2008. Causes of death were classified according to the ICD-10 codes. ResultsDuring follow-up, 11.1% of patients with AF and 8.3% of controls died. Cardiovascular diseases were the most common causes of death and the only diagnoses which showed significantly higher relative risk in patients with AF than controls (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.3), and the relative risk was significantly higher in women than in men. Stroke was a more common cause among patients with AF, 13.1% versus 9.7% (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.0), while cerebral hemorrhage was more common among controls, 4.7% versus 10.2% (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5). The time from AF diagnosis to death was 6.03.1years. ConclusionsIn patients with incident AF and no known comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis, only cardiovascular diseases were more often causes of death as compared to controls. Women carried a significantly higher relative risk than men.

  • 128.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Dept Cardiology, Örebro Univ Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Dept. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Örebro Univ Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Dept. Laboratory Medicine, Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden; The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University Hospital.
    All-cause mortality in 272 186 patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation 1995-2008: a Swedish nationwide long-term case-control study2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 14, p. 1061-1067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To evaluate long-term all-cause risk of mortality in women and men hospitalized for the first time with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with matched controls. Methods and results A total of 272 186 patients (44% women) <= 85 years at the time of hospitalization with incidental AF 1995-2008 and 544 344 matched controls free of in-hospital diagnosis of AF were identified. Patients were followed via record linkage of the Swedish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry. Using Cox regression models, the long-term relative all-cause mortality risk, adjusted for concomitant diseases, in women vs. controls was 2.15, 1.72, and 1.44 (P < 0.001) in the age categories <= 65, 65-74, and 75-85 years, respectively. The corresponding figures for men were 1.76, 1.36, and 1.24 (P < 0.001). Among concomitant diseases, neoplasm, chronic renal failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease contributed most to the increased all-cause mortality vs. controls. In patients with AF as the primary diagnosis, the relative risk of mortality was 1.63, 1.46, and 1.28 (P < 0.001) in women and 1.45, 1.17, and 1.10 (P < 0.001) in men. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation was an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality in patients with incident AF. The concomitant diseases that contributed most were found outside the thromboembolic risk scores. The highest relative risk of mortality was seen in women and in the youngest patients compared with controls, and the differences between genders in each age category were statistically significant.

  • 129.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Dept Cardiol, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clin Epidemiol & Biostat Unit, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Dept Med Sci, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden; AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: A nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies of patients with "lone" and "idiopathic" atrial fibrillation (AF) have provided conflicting evidence concerning the development, management and prognosis of this condition.

    Methods: In this nation-wide, retrospective, cohort study, we studied patients diagnosed with incidental AF recorded in national Swedish registries between 1995 and 2008. Controls were matched for age, sex and calendar year of the diagnosis of AF in patients. All subjects were free of any in-hospital diagnosis from 1987 and until patients were diagnosed with AF and also free of any diagnosis within one year from the time of inclusion. Follow-up continued until 2009. We identified 9519 patients (31% women) and 12,468 matched controls.

    Results: Relative risks (RR) versus controls for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in women were 19.6, 4.4, 3.4 and 2.5 in the age categories <55, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-85, years respectively. Corresponding figures for men were 3.4, 2.5, 1.7 and 1.9. RR for heart failure were 6.6, 6.6, 6.3 and 3.8 in women and 7.8, 4.6, 4.9 and 2.9 in men. All RR were statistically significant with p < 0.01. RR for myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality were statistically significantly increased only in the two oldest age categories in women and 65-74 years in men.

    Conclusions: Patients with AF and no co-morbidities at inclusion had at least a doubled risk of stroke or TIA and a tripled risk of heart failure, through all age categories, as compared to controls. Women were at higher RR of stroke or TIA than men. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-SA license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

  • 130.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patients with atrial fibrillation and outcomes of cerebral infarction in those with treatment of warfarin versus no warfarin with references to CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score, age and sex: A Swedish nationwide observational study with 48 433 patients2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e0176846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: There is controversy in the guidelines as to whether patients with atrial fibrillation and a low risk of stroke should be treated with anticoagulation, especially those with a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 1 point.

    Methods: In a retrospective, nationwide cohort study, we used the Swedish National Patient Registry, the National Prescribed Drugs Registry, the Swedish Registry of Education and the Population and Housing Census Registry. 48 433 patients were identified between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2008 with incident atrial fibrillation who were divided in age categories, sex and a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 0, 1, 2 and >= 3 and they were included in a time-varying analysis of warfarin treatment versus no treatment. The primary end-point was cerebral infarction and stroke, and patients were followed until 31 December 2009.

    Results: Patients with 1 point from the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score showed the following adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with a 95% confidence interval: men 65-74 years 0.46 (0.25-0.83), men < 65 years 1.11 (0.56-2.23) and women < 65 years 2.13 (0.94-4.82), where HR < 1 indicates protection with warfarin. In patients < 65 years and 2 points, HR in men was 0.35 (0.18-0.69) and in women 1.84 (0.86-3.94) while, in women with at least 3 points, HR was 0.31 (0.16-0.59). In patients 65-74 years and 2 points, HR in men was 0.37 (0.23-0.59) and in women 0.39 ( 0.21-0.73). Categories including age >= 65 years or >= 3 points showed a statistically significant protection from warfarin.

    Conclusions: Our results support that treatment with anticoagulation may be considered in all patients with an incident atrial fibrillation diagnosis and an age of 65 years and older, i.e. also when the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score is 1.

  • 131.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Magnuson, Anders
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Frøbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala and AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poçi, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: causes of death during long-term follow-up compared to matched controls2017In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 40, no 11, p. 1076-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the long-term, cause-specific mortality risk in patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF).

    METHODS: From a nation-wide registry of patients hospitalized with incident AF between 1995 and 2008 we identified 9 519 patients with a first diagnosed AF and no comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis. They were matched with 12 468 controls. The follow-up continued until December 2008. Causes of death were classified according to the ICD-10 codes.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 11.1% of patients with AF and 8.3% of controls died. Cardiovascular diseases were the most common causes of death and the only diagnoses which showed significantly higher relative risk in patients with AF than controls (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.3), and the relative risk was significantly higher in women than in men. Stroke was a more common cause among patients with AF, 13.1% versus 9.7% (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.0), while cerebral hemorrhage was more common among controls, 4.7% versus 10.2% (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5). The time from AF diagnosis to death was 6.0 ± 3.1 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: In patients with incident AF and no known comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis, only cardiovascular diseases were more often causes of death as compared to controls. Women carried a significantly higher relative risk than men.

  • 132. Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Nagy, Peter
    Niazi, Mohammad
    Nylander, Sven
    Galbraith, Hal
    Ranjan, Santosh
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Effect of Esomeprazole With/Without Acetylsalicylic Acid, Omeprazole and Lansoprazole on Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Clopidogrel in Healthy Volunteers2014In: American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs, ISSN 1175-3277, E-ISSN 1179-187X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 217-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel was assessed in two healthy volunteer crossover studies. Study 1: subjects received clopidogrel alone (300-mg loading dose, then 75 mg/day for 28 days) and two of three PPIs (omeprazole 80 mg, esomeprazole 40 mg or lansoprazole 60 mg) plus clopidogrel for 29 days in three treatment periods (randomized treatment sequence assignment). Study 2: subjects received clopidogrel alone (75 mg/day for 9 days) and clopidogrel alone for 4 days followed by clopidogrel plus fixed-combination esomeprazole 20 mg/low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 81 mg for 5 days in two treatment periods (randomized treatment sequence assignment). Pharmacokinetic effects were estimated by measuring active metabolite of clopidogrel, and pharmacodynamic effects by inhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation. There was a relative decrease of up to 50 % in exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel with the different PPIs (study 1), and close to 40 % with esomeprazole/low-dose ASA (study 2), compared with clopidogrel alone. There was an absolute decrease of up to 17 % in inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation with co-administration of different PPIs, compared with clopidogrel alone; however, no differences in platelet inhibition were observed during co-administration with the esomeprazole/low-dose ASA fixed-dose combination. Omeprazole, esomeprazole and lansoprazole decreased systemic exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel in healthy volunteers, leading to modest decreases in its antiplatelet effect. However, no apparent differences in platelet inhibition were observed when esomeprazole was co-administered with low-dose ASA as a fixed-dose combination.

  • 133.
    Andreae, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Appetite in patients with heart failure: Assessment, prevalence and related factors2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Appetite is an important component in nutrition for maintaining the food intake needed by the body. Decreased appetite is a common clinical problem in patients with heart failure. It has a negative impact on food intake and possibly on malnutrition and health outcomes. There is a lack of evidence on how to assess appetite in heart failure. Furthermore, there are knowledge gaps about factors associated with appetite and which role appetite plays for health status in heart failure.  

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate appetite in patients with heart failure. Four studies were conducted with the goal to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) (I) and to explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and related factors associated with appetite in patients with heart failure (II-IV).  

    Methods: A multicenter study was conducted in three outpatient heart failure clinics in the center of Sweden during 2009-2012. Data were collected through a baseline measurement (I-IV) and an 18-month follow-up (IV). The first study was a psychometric evaluation study (I), while the other studies had an observational cross-sectional design (II-III) and an observational prospective design (IV). One hundred and eighty-six patients diagnosed with heart failure and experiencing heart failure symptoms participated at baseline. At the 18-month follow-up study (IV), one hundred and sixteen participants from the baseline participated. Data were collected from medical records (pharmacological treatment, comorbidity, left ventricle ejection fraction, time of diagnosis), self-reported questionnaires (demographic background data, appetite, symptoms of depression, health status, sleep, self-reported physical activity), objective measurements (anthropometric assessment of body size, blood samples, six minutes’ walk test, and physical activity measured with an actigraph) and clinical assessment (New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification, and cognitive assessment). The main outcome variables included appetite (I, II and IV) and health status (III). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the studies (I-IV).  

    Results: The majority of the participants had moderate heart failure symptoms, i.e., NYHA class II (n=114, 61%). Most of the participants were men (n=130, 70%). Mean age was 70,7 years, (SD=11,0), and mean BMI was 28.7 (SD=5.3). The CNAQ showed acceptable psychometric properties for assessing appetite in patients with heart failure (I). This thesis shows that 38% of the participants experienced an appetite level that put them at risk of weight loss (I). It was shown that factors such as biological, medical, psychological (II) and physical activity/exercise capacity (IV) are associated with appetite. Also, appetite was associated with impaired health status. However, this association was found to be moderated by symptoms of depression (III). Neither appetite nor physical activity changed during the 18-month follow-up (IV).  

    Conclusion: Decreased appetite is a serious phenomenon that needs attention in the care of patients with heart failure. Health care professionals can now use a validated and simple appetite instrument to assess appetite in heart failure. In addition, attention should be paid to elderly patients and those who have symptoms of depression, sleep problems, impaired cognitive function and impaired physical activity, as well as to patients on suboptimal medical treatment. Higher appetite was shown to contribute to a better health status, but this was only evident in patients without symptoms of depression. Therefore, special attention should be paid to symptoms of depression, as this risk factor affected the association between appetite and health status. This thesis enhances the understanding of the magnitude of the problem with decreased appetite in heart failure both in numbers and factors. New priorities in nutrition care and new ideas can be established, both in practice and in research, in order to improve a nutrition care that is vital for patients with heart failure.  

  • 134.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Kalmar, Sweden;Res Sect, Kalmar, Region Kalmar C, Sweden.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Sch Nursing, Irvine, CA USA.
    Stromberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden;Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Sch Nursing, Irvine, CA USA;Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure: A prospective observational study2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite are important components for maintaining health. Yet, the association between physical activity and appetite in heart failure (HF) populations is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, functional capacity, and appetite in patients with HF. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. In total, 186 patients diagnosed with HF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV (mean age 70.7, 30% female), were included. Physical activity was measured using a multi-sensor actigraph for seven days and with a self-reported numeric rating scale. Physical capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test. Appetite was measured using the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire. Data were collected at inclusion and after 18 months. A series of linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, NYHA class, and B-type natriuretic peptide were conducted. Results: At baseline, higher levels of physical activity and functional capacity were significantly associated with a higher level of appetite in the unadjusted models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.019) and the six-minute walk test (p = 0.007) remained significant. At the 18-month follow-up, all physical activity variables and functional capacity were significantly associated with appetite in the unadjusted regression models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.001) and metabolic equivalent daily averages (p = 0.040) remained significant. Conclusion: A higher level of physical activity measured by number of steps/day was associated with better self-reported appetite, both at baseline and the 18-month follow-up. Further research is needed to establish causality and explore the intertwined relationship between activity and appetite in patients with HF.

  • 135.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden; Linköping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linköping, Sweden; Univ Calif Irvine, Program Nursing Sci, Irvine, CA USA.
    Chung, Misook L.
    Univ Kentucky, Coll Nursing, Lexington, KY USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Hosp, Dept Res, Kalmar, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    Results: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    Conclusions: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  • 136.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook L
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  • 137.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western Univ, Sch Nursing, Langley, BC, Canada.;Providence Hlth Care Res Inst, Ctr Hlth Evaluat & Outcome Sci, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure2015In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 954-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

  • 138.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden;Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kalmar County, Sweden.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Univ Calif Irvine, USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Sweden;Univ Calif Irvine, USA.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure: A prospective observational study2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite are important components for maintaining health. Yet, the association between physical activity and appetite in heart failure (HF) populations is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, functional capacity, and appetite in patients with HF. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. In total, 186 patients diagnosed with HF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV (mean age 70.7, 30% female), were included. Physical activity was measured using a multi-sensor actigraph for seven days and with a self-reported numeric rating scale. Physical capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test. Appetite was measured using the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire. Data were collected at inclusion and after 18 months. A series of linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, NYHA class, and B-type natriuretic peptide were conducted. Results: At baseline, higher levels of physical activity and functional capacity were significantly associated with a higher level of appetite in the unadjusted models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.019) and the six-minute walk test (p = 0.007) remained significant. At the 18-month follow-up, all physical activity variables and functional capacity were significantly associated with appetite in the unadjusted regression models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.001) and metabolic equivalent daily averages (p = 0.040) remained significant. Conclusion: A higher level of physical activity measured by number of steps/day was associated with better self-reported appetite, both at baseline and the 18-month follow-up. Further research is needed to establish causality and explore the intertwined relationship between activity and appetite in patients with HF.

  • 139.
    Andreassen, A.K.
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Andersson, B.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, F.
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Eiskjaer, H.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark .
    Rdegran, G.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden Lund University, Sweden .
    Gude, E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Solbu, D.
    Novartis Norge AS, Norway .
    Sigurdardottir, V.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Arora, S.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Dellgren, G.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Gullestad, L.
    University of Oslo, Norway University of Oslo, Norway University of Oslo, Norway .
    Everolimus Initiation and Early Calcineurin Inhibitor Withdrawal in Heart Transplant Recipients: A Randomized Trial2014In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1828-1838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a randomized, open-label trial, everolimus was compared to cyclosporine in 115 de novo heart transplant recipients. Patients were assigned within 5 days posttransplant to low-exposure everolimus (3-6 ng/mL) with reduced-exposure cyclosporine (n 56), or standard-exposure cyclosporine (n = 59), with both mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. In the everolimus group, cyclosporine was withdrawn after 7-11 weeks and everolimus exposure increased (6-10 ng/mL). The primary efficacy end point, measured GFR at 12 months posttransplant, was significantly higher with everolimus versus cyclosporine (mean +/- SD: 79.8 +/- 17.7 mL/min/1.73m 2 vs. 61.5 +/- 19.6 mL/min/1.73m 2; pless than0.001). Coronary intravascular ultrasound showed that the mean increase in maximal intimal thickness was smaller (0.03 mm [95% CI 0.01, 0.05 mm] vs. 0.08 mm [95% CI 0.05, 0.12 mm], p = 0.03), and the incidence of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) was lower (50.0% vs. 64.6%, p = 0.003), with everolimus versus cyclosporine at month 12. Biopsy-proven acute rejection after weeks 7-11 was more frequent with everolimus (p = 0.03). Left ventricular function was not inferior with everolimus versus cyclosporine. Cytomegalovirus infection was less common with everolimus (5.4% vs. 30.5%, pless than0.001); the incidence of bacterial infection was similar. In conclusion, everolimus-based immunosuppression with early elimination of cyclosporine markedly improved renal function after heart transplantation. Since postoperative safety was not jeopardized and development of CAV was attenuated, this strategy may benefit long-term outcome.

  • 140. Andreotti, Felicita
    et al.
    Rocca, Bianca
    Husted, Steen
    Ajjan, Ramzi A
    Ten Berg, Jurrien
    Cattaneo, Marco
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    De Caterina, Raffaele
    Fox, Keith A A
    Halvorsen, Sigrun
    Huber, Kurt
    Hylek, Elaine M
    Lip, Gregory Y H
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Morais, Joao
    Patrono, Carlo
    Verheugt, Freek W A
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Weiss, Thomas W
    Storey, Robert F
    Antithrombotic therapy in the elderly: expert position paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 46, p. 3238-+Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 141. Angeras, O.
    et al.
    Albertsson, P.
    Ramunddal, T.
    Petursson, P.
    Sarno, Giovanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Persson, J.
    Jensen, U.
    Sjogren, I.
    Olsson, H.
    Omerovic, E.
    Impact of left main stenosis on one-year mortality in patients undergoing coronary angiography2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, p. 150-150Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Angeras, Oskar
    et al.
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Haraldsson, Inger
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Redfors, Bjorn
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Petursson, Petur
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Albertsson, Per
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ioanes, Dan
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Odenstedt, Jacob
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Olsson, Hans
    Karlstad Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Witt, Nils
    South Hosp Stockholm, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ruck, Andreas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Millgard, Jonas
    Sunderby Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Sunderbyn, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Johan
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Heart Ctr, Umea, Sweden..
    Persson, Jonas
    Danderyd Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Soderbom, Mans
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Econ, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wedel, Hans
    Univ Gothenburg, Hlth Metr, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ramunddal, Truls
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Impact of Thrombus Aspiration on Mortality, Stent Thrombosis, and Stroke in Patients With ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report From the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e007680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Thrombus aspiration is still being used in a substantial number of patients despite 2 large randomized clinical trials showing no favorable effect of routine thrombus aspiration during primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with STsegment- elevation myocardial infarction. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of thrombus aspiration on mortality, stent thrombosis, and stroke using all available data from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR). Methods and Results-We identified 42 829 consecutive patients registered in SCAAR between January 2005 and September 2014 who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Thrombus aspiration was used in 25% of the procedures. We used instrumental variable analysis with administrative healthcare region as the treatmentpreference instrumental variable to evaluate the effect of thrombus aspiration on mortality, stent thrombosis, and stroke. Thrombus aspiration was not associated with mortality at 30 days (risk reduction: -1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], -5.4 to 3.0; P=0.57) and 1 year (risk reduction: -2.4; 95% CI, -7.6 to 3.0; P=0.37). Thrombus aspiration was associated with a lower risk of stent thrombosis both at 30 days (risk reduction: -2.7; 95% CI, -4.1 to -1.4; P<0.001) and 1 year (risk reduction: -3.5; 95% CI, -5.3 to -1.7; P<0.001). In-hospital stroke and neurologic complications did not differ between groups (risk reduction: 0.1; 95% CI, -0.8 to 1.1; P=0.76). Conclusions-Mortality was not different between the groups. Thrombus aspiration was associated with decreased risk of stent thrombosis. Our study provides important evidence for the external validity of previous randomized studies regarding mortality.

  • 143.
    Angerås, Oskar
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haraldsson, Inger
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Redfors, Björn
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology.
    Petursson, Petur
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Albertsson, Per
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ioanes, Dan
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Odenstedt, Jacob
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Department of Cardiology, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Witt, Nils
    Department of Cardiology, South Hospital Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rück, Andreas
    Department of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Millgård, Jonas
    Department of Cardiology, Sunderby Hospital, Sunderbyn, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Persson, Jonas
    Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderbom, Måns
    Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Health Metrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Department of Cardiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    James, Stefan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ramunddal, Truls
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Impact of Thrombus Aspiration on Mortality, Stent Thrombosis, and Stroke in Patients With ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report From the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e007680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Thrombus aspiration is still being used in a substantial number of patients despite 2 large randomized clinical trials showing no favorable effect of routine thrombus aspiration during primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with STsegment- elevation myocardial infarction. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of thrombus aspiration on mortality, stent thrombosis, and stroke using all available data from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR).

    Methods and Results: We identified 42 829 consecutive patients registered in SCAAR between January 2005 and September 2014 who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Thrombus aspiration was used in 25% of the procedures. We used instrumental variable analysis with administrative healthcare region as the treatmentpreference instrumental variable to evaluate the effect of thrombus aspiration on mortality, stent thrombosis, and stroke. Thrombus aspiration was not associated with mortality at 30 days (risk reduction: -1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], -5.4 to 3.0; P=0.57) and 1 year (risk reduction: -2.4; 95% CI, -7.6 to 3.0; P=0.37). Thrombus aspiration was associated with a lower risk of stent thrombosis both at 30 days (risk reduction: -2.7; 95% CI, -4.1 to -1.4; P<0.001) and 1 year (risk reduction: -3.5; 95% CI, -5.3 to -1.7; P<0.001). In-hospital stroke and neurologic complications did not differ between groups (risk reduction: 0.1; 95% CI, -0.8 to 1.1; P=0.76).

    Conclusions: Mortality was not different between the groups. Thrombus aspiration was associated with decreased risk of stent thrombosis. Our study provides important evidence for the external validity of previous randomized studies regarding mortality.

  • 144.
    Angiolillo, Dominick J.
    et al.
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiol, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Rollini, Fabiana
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiol, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Storey, Robert F.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Infect Immun & Cardiovasc Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Harvard Med Sch, Heart & Vasc Ctr, Boston, MA USA..
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Schneider, David J.
    Univ Vermont, Cardiovasc Res Inst, Cardiol Unit, Dept Med, Burlington, VT 05405 USA..
    Sibbing, Dirk
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Cardiol, Munich, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Berlin, Germany..
    So, Derek Y. F.
    Univ Ottawa, Heart Inst, Div Cardiol, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Trenk, Dietmar
    Univ Heart Ctr Freiburg Bad Krozingen, Dept Cardiol & Angiol 2, Freiberg, Germany..
    Alexopoulos, Dimitrios
    Natl & Capodistrian Univ Athens, Dept Cardiol 2, Attikon Univ Hosp, Athens, Greece..
    Gurbel, Paul A.
    Inova Heart & Vasc Inst, Inova Ctr Thrombosis Res & Drug Dev, Falls Church, VA USA..
    Hochholzer, Willibald
    Univ Heart Ctr Freiburg Bad Krozingen, Dept Cardiol & Angiol 2, Freiberg, Germany..
    De Luca, Leonardo
    San Giovanni Evangelista Hosp, Lab Intervent Cardiol, Div Cardiol, Tivoli Rome, Italy.;Mediterranean Acad Assoc Res & Studies Cardiol, Marseille, France.;Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, UMRS 1076, Marseille, France..
    Bonello, Laurent
    Hop Nord Marseille, AP HP, Dept Cardiol, Marseille, France..
    Aradi, Daniel
    Heart Ctr Balatonfured, Budapest, Hungary.;Semmelweis Univ Budapest, Budapest, Hungary..
    Cuisset, Thomas
    CHU Timone, Dept Cardiol, Marseille, France.;Aix Marseille Univ, Fac Med, Marseille, France..
    Tantry, Udaya S.
    Inova Heart & Vasc Inst, Inova Ctr Thrombosis Res & Drug Dev, Falls Church, VA USA..
    Wang, Tracy Y.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Valgimigli, Marco
    Bern Univ Hosp, Swiss Cardiovasc Ctr Bern, Bern, Switzerland..
    Waksman, Ron
    MedStar Washington Hosp Ctr, Sect Intervent Cardiol, Washington, DC USA..
    Mehran, Roxana
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, New York, NY USA..
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne Univ Paris 6, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, ACTION Study Grp, Paris, France..
    Franchi, Francesco
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiol, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Price, Matthew J.
    Scripps Clin, Div Cardiovasc Dis, La Jolla, CA USA..
    International Expert Consensus on Switching Platelet P2Y(12) Receptor-Inhibiting Therapies2017In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 136, no 20, p. 1955-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y(12) inhibitor is the treatment of choice for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. The availability of different oral P2Y(12) inhibitors (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) has enabled physicians to contemplate switching among therapies because of specific clinical scenarios. The recent introduction of an intravenous P2Y(12) inhibitor (cangrelor) further adds to the multitude of modalities and settings in which switching therapies may occur. In clinical practice, it is not uncommon to switch P2Y(12) inhibitor, and switching may be attributed to a variety of factors. However, concerns about the safety of switching between these agents have emerged. Practice guidelines have not fully elaborated on how to switch therapies, leaving clinicians with limited guidance on when and how to switch therapies when needed. This prompted the development of this expert consensus document by key leaders from North America and Europe with expertise in basic, translational, and clinical sciences in the field of antiplatelet therapy. This expert consensus provides an overview of the pharmacology of P2Y(12) inhibitors, different modalities and definitions of switching, and available literature and recommendations for switching between P2Y(12) inhibitors.

  • 145. Antoni, Gunnar
    et al.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Estrada, Sergio
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Carlson, Kristina
    Lindsjö, Lars
    Kero, Tanja
    Långström, Bengt
    Granstam, Sven-Olof
    Rosengren, Sara
    Vedin, Ola
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Wikstrom, Gerhard
    Westermark, Per
    Sörensen, Jens
    In Vivo Visualization of Amyloid Deposits in the Heart with C-11-PIB and PET2013In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac amyloidosis is a differential diagnosis in heart failure and is associated with high mortality. There is currently no noninvasive imaging test available for specific diagnosis. N-[methyl-C-11]2-(4'-methylamino-phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (C-11-PIB) PET is used in the evaluation of brain amyloidosis. We evaluated the potential use of C-11-PIB PET in systemic amyloidosis affecting the heart. Methods: Patients (n = 10) diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis-including heart involvement of either monoclonal immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) or transthyretin (ATTR) type- and healthy volunteers (n = 5) were investigated with PET/CT using C-11-PIB to study cardiac amyloid deposits and with C-11-acetate to measure myocardial blood flow to study the impact of global and regional perfusion on PIB retention. Results: Myocardial C-11-PIB uptake was visually evident in all patients 15-25 min after injection and was not seen in any volunteer. A significant difference in C-11-PIB retention in the heart between patients and healthy controls was found. The data indicate that myocardial amyloid deposits in patients diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis could be visualized with C-11-PIB. No correlation between C-11-PIB retention index and myocardial blood flow as measured with C-11-acetate was found on the global level, whereas a positive correlation on the segmental level was seen in a single patient. Conclusion: C-11-PIB and PET could be a method to study systemic amyloidosis of type AL and ATTR affecting the heart and should be investigated further both as a diagnostic tool and as a noninvasive method for treatment follow-up.

  • 146. Antoniewicz, L.
    et al.
    Kabele, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundback, M.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Increased Arterial Stiffness In Chronic Swedish Snus Users2017In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 195Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Antoniewicz, Lukasz
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Internal Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Novo, Mirza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Brief exposure to Swedish snus causes divergent vascular responses in healthy male and female volunteers2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The use of Swedish oral moist snuff, known as snus, has for a long time been limited to the Scandinavian countries. With declining cigarette sales in the western world, tobacco companies have looked to the development of alternative tobacco products. In 2006 snus products were launched in the US. Even though several studies have demonstrated negative health effects, snus is often depicted as harmless.

    The aim of the present study was to investigate acute vascular effects of snus as measured by arterial stiffness as well as blood pressure and heart rate.

    Methods: Two separate randomized double-blind crossover studies with the same study design were pooled for analysis. Twenty-nine healthy snus-users (17 females, 12 males) were included. Snus (Göteborgs Rapé) and tobacco free snus (Onico) were administered in a randomized order at two separate visits. Arterial stiffness, blood pressure and heart rate were measured at baseline as well as every five minutes for 40 minutes during exposure. Following snus removal, measurements continued for 30 minutes post exposure. Arterial stiffness was measured using pulse wave velocity (Vicorder) and pulse wave analysis (Sphygmocor).

    Results: Compared to placebo, snus significantly increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as heart rate, however, only in females (p = 0.004, p = 0.006 and p<0.001 respectively). No changes were seen in arterial stiffness measurements in either gender.

    Conclusion: We observed an increase in blood pressure and heart rate only in females, but not in males due to snus usage as compared to placebo. This novel finding was surprising and needs to be further investigated considering most of the earlier studies have mainly focused on male snus users and the increasing usage of snus among females.

  • 148. Apers, Silke
    et al.
    Kovacs, Adrienne H.
    Luyckx, Koen
    Alday, Luis
    Berghammer, Malin
    Budts, Werner
    Callus, Edward
    Caruana, Maryanne
    Chidambarathanu, Shanthi
    Cook, Stephen C.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Enomoto, Junko
    Eriksen, Katrine
    Fernandes, Susan M.
    Jackson, Jamie L.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Khairy, Paul
    Kutty, Shelby
    Menahem, Samuel
    Rempel, Gwen
    Sluman, Maayke A.
    Soufi, Alexandra
    Thomet, Corina
    Veldtman, Gruschen
    Wang, Jou-Kou
    White, Kamila
    Moons, Philip
    Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study (APPROACH-IS): Rationale, design, and methods2015In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 179, p. 334-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Data on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) are inconsistent and vary across the world. Better understanding of PROs and their differences across cultural and geographic barriers can best be accomplished via international studies using uniform research methods. The APPROACH-IS consortium (Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study) was created for this purpose and investigates PROs in adults with CHD worldwide. This paper outlines the project rationale, design, and methods. Methods/design: APPROACH-IS is a cross-sectional study. The goal is to recruit 3500-4000 adults with CHD from 15 countries in five major regions of the world (Asia, Australia, Europe, North and South America). Self-report questionnaires are administered to capture information on PRO domains: (i) perceived health status (12-item Short-form Health Survey & EuroQOL-5D); (ii) psychological functioning (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale); (iii) health behaviors (Health-Behavior Scale-Congenital Heart Disease); and (iv) quality of life (Linear Analog Scale & Satisfaction With Life Scale). Additionally, potential explanatory variables are assessed: (i) socio-demographic variables; (ii) medical history (chart review); (iii) sense of coherence (Orientation to Life Questionnaire); and (iv) illness perceptions (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire). Descriptive analyses and multilevel models will examine differences in PROs and investigate potential explanatory variables. Discussion: APPROACH-IS represents a global effort to increase research understanding and capacity in the field of CHD, and will have major implications for patient care. Results will generate valuable information for developing interventions to optimize patients' health and well-being. 

  • 149.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Neurology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Farahmand, Bahman
    Epi-consultants (Formerly Karolinska Institute), Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Terént, Andreas
    Department of Medical Sciences,Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åsberg, Signild
    Department of Medical Sciences, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    To Treat or Not to Treat: Anticoagulants as Secondary Preventives to the Oldest Old With Atrial Fibrillation.2017In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1617-1623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Anticoagulant treatment is effective for preventing recurrent ischemic strokes in patients who have atrial fibrillation. This benefit is paid by a small increase of hemorrhages. Anticoagulant-related hemorrhages seem to increase with age, but there are few studies showing whether the benefits of treatment persist in old age.

    METHODS: For this observational study, 4 different registers were used, among them Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Register. Patients who have had a recent ischemic stroke, were 80 to 100 years of age, and had atrial fibrillation, were included from 2006 through 2013. The patients were stratified into 3 age groups: 80 to 84, 85 to 89, and ≥90 years of age. Information on stroke severity, risk factors, drugs, and comorbidities was gathered from the registers. The patients were followed with respect to ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, other hemorrhages, or death.

    RESULTS: Of all 23 356 patients with atrial fibrillation, 6361 (27%) used anticoagulants after an ischemic stroke. Anticoagulant treatment was associated with less recurrent ischemic stroke in all age groups. Hemorrhages increased most in the ≥90-year age group, but this did not offset the overall beneficial effect of the anticoagulant. Apart from age, no other cardiovascular risk factor or comorbidity was identified that influenced the risk of anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage. Drugs other than anticoagulants did not influence the incidence of major hemorrhage.

    CONCLUSIONS: Given the patient characteristics in this study, there is room for more patients to be treated with anticoagulants, without hemorrhages to prevail. In nonagenarians, hemorrhages increased somewhat more, but this did not affect the overall outcome in this age stratum.

  • 150.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro Univ Hosp.
    Farahmand, Bahman
    Alzheimer Dis Res Ctr, Epiconsultant Formerly Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Åsberg, Signild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    To Treat or Not to Treat: Anticoagulants as Secondary Preventives to the Oldest Old With Atrial Fibrillation2017In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1617-1622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose-Anticoagulant treatment is effective for preventing recurrent ischemic strokes in patients who have atrial fibrillation. This benefit is paid by a small increase of hemorrhages. Anticoagulant-related hemorrhages seem to increase with age, but there are few studies showing whether the benefits of treatment persist in old age.

    Methods-For this observational study, 4 different registers were used, among them Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Register. Patients who have had a recent ischemic stroke, were 80 to 100 years of age, and had atrial fibrillation, were included from 2006 through 2013. The patients were stratified into 3 age groups: 80 to 84, 85 to 89, and ?90 years of age. Information on stroke severity, risk factors, drugs, and comorbidities was gathered from the registers. The patients were followed with respect to ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, other hemorrhages, or death.

    Results-Of all 23 356 patients with atrial fibrillation, 6361 (27%) used anticoagulants after an ischemic stroke. Anticoagulant treatment was associated with less recurrent ischemic stroke in all age groups. Hemorrhages increased most in the >= 90-year age group, but this did not offset the overall beneficial effect of the anticoagulant. Apart from age, no other cardiovascular risk factor or comorbidity was identified that influenced the risk of anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage. Drugs other than anticoagulants did not influence the incidence of major hemorrhage.

    Conclusions-Given the patient characteristics in this study, there is room for more patients to be treated with anticoagulants, without hemorrhages to prevail. In nonagenarians, hemorrhages increased somewhat more, but this did not affect the overall outcome in this age stratum.

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