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  • 1.
    Aass, Lisbeth Kjelsrud
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Moen, Øyfrid Larsen
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Center.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway; Faculty of Medicine and Health, University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Family support and quality of community mental health care: Perspectives from families living with mental illness2022Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 31, nr 7-8, s. 935-948Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: Describe patients' and family members' perceptions of family support from nurses and other mental healthcare professionals, and quality of care in community mental healthcare service. Further, compare the perceptions of patients and family members.

    Background: While patients value family involvement, family members feel unprepared and lack the necessary skills to be supportive. Since healthcare professionals predominantly focus on patients, they may fail to understand the complex needs of families. Family perceived support and quality of community mental health care may vary across patients and family members.

    Design and methods: Cross-sectional study with patients suffering from mental illness and family members in community mental healthcare services in Norway. Altogether 86 participants, of whom 33 patients and 33 family members had a family relationship-paired samples. Participants filled in the translated version of the Iceland Family Perceived Support Questionnaire (FPSQ-N) and Quality in Psychiatric Care-Community Out-Patient (QPC-COP) and Community Out-Patient Next of Kin (QPC-COPNK). STROBE checklist was used.

    Results: Family members scored family perceived support and quality of community mental health care lower than patients. Family members feel the loss of support. Patient and family members found the Patient-healthcare professionals' relationship to be of high quality, while family members gave low score to being respected and invited to take part in care by nurses and other mental healthcare professionals.

    Conclusion: Family members' unmet need of support highlights the need for nurses and other community mental healthcare professionals to assess complex family needs and to intervene. Barriers to collaboration exist, and family members need to be respected and invited into community mental health care. Relevance to clinical practice Contributes knowledge of how to meet the family's needs and provides a basis for further care and treatment development in similar contexts nationally and internationally.

  • 2.
    Aass, Lisbeth Kjelsrud
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Moen, Øyfrid Larsen
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    It's Not a Race, It's a Marathon!: Families Living with a Young Adult Suffering from Mental Illness2021Ingår i: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 42, nr 1, s. 15-23Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore families' perceptions of everyday life when living with a young adult suffering from mental illness. Findings include: 1) Families balance between letting go and enabling the young adult to become independent while remaining close to help him/her complete education, work and have a social life. 2) Young adults try to deal with symptoms of mental illness by themselves and not be a burden, although longing for family members to understand them and the situation. 3) Healthcare professionals still hold back information although young adults have consented to giving family members insight.

  • 3.
    Aass, Lisbeth Kjelsrud
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik, Norway; Faculty of Medicine and Health, University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Moen, Øyfrid Larsen
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Young Adults and Their Families Living With Mental Illness: Evaluation of the Usefulness of Family-Centered Support Conversations in Community Mental Health care Settings2020Ingår i: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. 302-314Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of Family-Centered Support Conversations (FCSC) offered in community mental health care in Norway to young adults and their families experiencing mental illness. The FCSC is a family nursing intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models and the Illness Beliefs Model and is focused on how family members can be supportive to each other, how to identify strengths and resources of the family, and how to share and reflect on the experiences of everyday life together while living with mental illness. Interviews were conducted with young adults and their family members in Norway who had received the FCSC intervention and were analyzed using phenomenography. Two descriptive categories were identified: "Facilitating the sharing of reflections about everyday life" and "Possibility of change in everyday life." The family nursing conversations about family structure and function in the context of mental illness allowed families to find new meanings and possibilities in everyday life. Health care professionals can play an important role in facilitating a safe environment for young adults and their families to talk openly about the experience of living with and managing mental illness.

  • 4.
    Abawi, Akram
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Samano, Ninos
    Region Örebro län. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Five-Year Follow-Up After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Concomitant Coronary Artery Disease: A Single-Center Experience2023Ingår i: Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery, ISSN 0102-7638, E-ISSN 1678-9741, Vol. 39, nr 1, artikel-id e20220461Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus on the impact of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Therefore, the objective of this study was, in a single-center setting, to evaluate the five-year outcome of transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with or without coronary artery disease.

    METHODS: All transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients between 2009 and 2019 were included and grouped according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease. The primary endpoint, five-year all-cause mortality, was evaluated using Cox regression adjusted for age, sex, procedure years, and comorbidities. Comorbidities interacting with coronary artery disease were evaluated with interaction tests. In-hospital complications was the secondary endpoint.

    RESULTS: In total, 176 patients had aortic stenosis and concomitant coronary artery disease, while 170 patients had aortic stenosis only. Mean follow-up was 2.2±1.6 years. There was no difference in the adjusted five-year all-cause mortality between transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with and without coronary artery disease (hazard ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.70, P=0.99). In coronary artery disease patients, impaired renal function, peripheral arterial disease, or ejection fraction < 50% showed a significant interaction effect with higher five-year all-cause mortality. No significant differences in complications between the groups were found.

    CONCLUSION: Five-year mortality did not differ between transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with or without coronary artery disease. However, in patients with coronary artery disease and impaired renal function, peripheral arterial disease, or ejection fraction < 50%, we found significantly higher five-year all-cause mortality.

  • 5.
    Abdeldaim, Guma M. K.
    et al.
    Section of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Clinical Mycobacteriology, National Center for Diseases Control, Benghazi, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.
    Strålin, Kristoffer
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olcén, Per
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Jonas
    Section of Clinical Virology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mölling, Paula
    Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Herrmann, Björn
    Section of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Quantitative fucK gene polymerase chain reaction on sputum and nasopharyngeal secretions to detect Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia2013Ingår i: Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease, ISSN 0732-8893, E-ISSN 1879-0070, Vol. 76, nr 2, s. 141-146Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the fucK gene was developed for specific detection of Haemophilus influenzae. The method was tested on sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) from 78 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). With a reference standard of sputum culture and/or serology against the patient's own nasopharyngeal isolate, H. influenzae etiology was detected in 20 patients. Compared with the reference standard, fucK PCR (using the detection limit 10(5) DNA copies/mL) on sputum and NPA showed a sensitivity of 95.0% (19/20) in both cases, and specificities of 87.9% (51/58) and 89.5% (52/58), respectively. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sputum fucK PCR was found to be significantly superior to sputum P6 PCR for detection of H. influenzae CAP. NPA fucK PCR was positive in 3 of 54 adult controls without respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, quantitative fucK real-time PCR provides a sensitive and specific identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions.

  • 6.
    Abduljabbar, Zahra Athab
    et al.
    Specialist Dental Clinic, Folktandvården Sörmland AB, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Krister G
    Swedish Armed Forces HQ, Surgeon General's Department, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjalmarsson, Lars
    Specialist Dental Clinic, Folktandvården Sörmland AB, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Franke Stenport, Victoria
    Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Dental Research Department.
    Chewing side preference and laterality in patients treated with unilateral posterior implant-supported fixed partial prostheses2022Ingår i: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 49, nr 11, s. 1080-1086Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is not clear to what extent chewing is improved by unilateral oral rehabilitation with implant-supported fixed partial prostheses (ISFPPs).

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate whether patients treated with unilateral ISFPPs in the maxilla use their prostheses during mastication to the same extent as they used their contralateral natural teeth. A further aim was to investigate whether there is a correlation between preferred chewing side and laterality.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Chewing side preference was assessed in 15 participants treated with unilateral ISFPPs in the maxilla. The first, second, third, fifth, and tenth chewing cycles were assessed, and the test was repeated ten times. All participants also answered a questionnaire about their chewing side preference.

    RESULTS: Most of the participants presented bilateral chewing, but two (13%) chewed only on the ISFPP. There was no statistically significant association between the objectively assessed chewing side and dental status (natural teeth or ISFPPs) during any of the recorded chewing cycles (p >.1). There were statistically significant correlations between both the subjectively reported usually preferred chewing side and the subjective chewing side preference during the test, and the objectively assessed chewing side for the first three chewing cycles (p <.01). No correlation was found between handedness and the objectively assessed chewing side.

    CONCLUSION: In the present study, most participants chewed bilaterally, and chewing was performed both on the ISFPP and on the natural teeth. No correlation was found between the preferred chewing side, objectively or subjectively determined, and laterality.

  • 7.
    Abedi, Mohammad R.
    et al.
    Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Transfusion Medicine.
    Doverud, Ann-Charlotte
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Transfusion Medicine, Örebro University Hospital. Örebro, Sweden.
    Preparation and Pathogen Inactivation of Double Dose Buffy Coat Platelet Products using the INTERCEPT Blood System2012Ingår i: Journal of Visualized Experiments, E-ISSN 1940-087X, nr 70, artikel-id UNSP e4414Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood centers are faced with many challenges including maximizing production yield from the blood product donations they receive as well as ensuring the highest possible level of safety for transfusion patients, including protection from transfusion transmitted diseases. This must be accomplished in a fiscally responsible manner which minimizes operating expenses including consumables, equipment, waste, and personnel costs, among others.

    Several methods are available to produce platelet concentrates for transfusion. One of the most common is the buffy coat method in which a single therapeutic platelet unit (>= 2.0 x10(11) platelets per unit or per local regulations) is prepared by pooling the buffy coat layer from up to six whole blood donations. A procedure for producing "double dose" whole blood derived platelets has only recently been developed.

    Presented here is a novel method for preparing double dose whole blood derived platelet concentrates from pools of 7 buffy coats and subsequently treating the double dose units with the INTERCEPT Blood System for pathogen inactivation. INTERCEPT was developed to inactivate viruses, bacteria, parasites, and contaminating donor white cells which may be present in donated blood. Pairing INTERCEPT with the double dose buffy coat method by utilizing the INTERCEPT Processing Set with Dual Storage Containers (the "DS set"), allows blood centers to treat each of their double dose units in a single pathogen inactivation processing set, thereby maximizing patient safety while minimizing costs. The double dose buffy coat method requires fewer buffy coats and reduces the use of consumables by up to 50% (e.g. pooling sets, filter sets, platelet additive solution, and sterile connection wafers) compared to preparation and treatment of single dose buffy coat platelet units. Other cost savings include less waste, less equipment maintenance, lower power requirements, reduced personnel time, and lower collection cost compared to the apheresis technique.

  • 8.
    Abuhasanein, Suleiman
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Chaves, Vanessa
    Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Mohsen, Ali Moustafa
    Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Al-Haddad, Jasmine
    Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Sunila, Merete
    Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Ströck, Viveka
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Jerlström, Tomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Urology.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Institution of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Swärd, Jesper
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Henrik
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Diagnostic value of repeated comprehensive investigation with CT urography and cystoscopy for recurrent macroscopic haematuria2024Ingår i: BJUI Compass, E-ISSN 2688-4526, Vol. 5, nr 2, s. 253-260Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To perform a descriptive analysis of a series of patients with recurrent macroscopic haematuria after a primary standard evaluation including computed tomography urography (CTU) and cystoscopy negative for urinary bladder cancer (UBC) and upper tract urothelial cancer (UTUC) and to identify potential factors associated with occurrence of recurrent macroscopic haematuria.

    Methods: All patients older than 50 years who underwent urological investigation for macroscopic haematuria with both cystoscopy and CTU 2015-2017 were retrospectively reviewed. A descriptive analysis of the primary and later investigations for recurrent macroscopic haematuria was performed. To investigate the association between explanatory variables and the occurrence of recurrent macroscopic haematuria, a Poisson regression analysis was performed.

    Results: A total of 1395 eligible individuals with primary standard investigation negative for UBC and UTUC were included. During a median follow-up of 6.2 (IQR 5.3-7) years, 248 (18%) patients had recurrent macroscopic haematuria, of whom six patients were diagnosed with UBC, two with prostate cancer, one with renal cell carcinoma and one had a suspected UTUC at the repeated investigation. Within 3 years, 148 patients (11%) experienced recurrent macroscopic haematuria, of whom two patients were diagnosed with low-grade UBC (TaG1-2), one with T2G3 UBC and one with low-risk prostate cancer. The presence of an indwelling catheter, use of antithrombotic medication, pathological findings at CTU or cystoscopy or history of pelvic radiotherapy were all statistically significant independent predictors for increased risk for recurrent macroscopic haematuria.

    Conclusion: In the case of recurrent macroscopic haematuria within 3 years of primary standard evaluation for urinary tract cancer, there was a low risk of later urological malignancies in patients initially negative for UBC and UTUC. Therefore, waiting 3 years before conducting another complete investigation in cases of recurrent macroscopic haematuria might be appropriate.

  • 9.
    Abuhasanein, Suleiman
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of surgery, Urology section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jerlström, Tomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Urology.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden and Institution of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ströck, Viveka
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Henrik
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Do not throw out the baby with the bath water2022Ingår i: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 56, nr 3, s. 235-236Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 10.
    Abuhasanein, Suleiman
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jerlström, Tomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Urology.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Institution of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ströck, Viveka
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Henrik
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Standardized care pathways for patients with suspected urinary bladder cancer: the Swedish experience2022Ingår i: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 56, nr 3, s. 227-232Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare time intervals to diagnosis and treatment, tumor characteristics, and management in patients with primary urinary bladder cancer, diagnosed before and after the implementation of a standardized care pathway (SCP) in Sweden.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer was studied before (2011-2015) and after (2016-2019) SCP. Data about time from referral to transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT), patients and tumor characteristics, and management were analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed for cT1 and cT2-4 tumors.

    RESULTS: Out of 26,795 patients, median time to TURBT decreased from 37 to 27 days after the implementation of SCP. While the proportion of cT2-T4 tumors decreased slightly (22-21%, p < 0.001), this change was not stable over time and the proportions cN + and cM1 remained unchanged. In the subgroups with cT1 and cT2-4 tumors, the median time to TURBT decreased and the proportions of patients discussed at a multidisciplinary team conference (MDTC) increased after SCP. In neither of these subgroups was a change in the proportions of cN + and cM1 observed, while treatment according to guidelines increased after SCP in the cT1 group.

    CONCLUSION: After the implementation of SCP, time from referral to TURBT decreased and the proportion of patients discussed at MDTC increased, although not at the levels recommended by guidelines. Thus, our findings point to the need for measures to increase adherence to SCP recommendations and to guidelines.

  • 11.
    Acevedo, Reinaldo
    et al.
    Biologic Evaluation Department, Finlay Institute of Vaccines, Havana, Cuba.
    Bai, Xilian
    Meningococcal Reference Unit, Public Health England, Manchester, UK.
    Borrow, Ray
    Meningococcal Reference Unit, Public Health England, Manchester, UK.
    Caugant, Dominique A.
    Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlos, Josefina
    Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of the East – Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Ceyhan, Mehmet
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Christensen, Hannah
    Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Climent, Yanet
    Biologic Evaluation Department, Finlay Institute of Vaccines, Havana, Cuba.
    De Wals, Philippe
    Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City QC, Canada.
    Dinleyici, Ener Cagri
    Department of Paediatrics, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Faculty of Medicine, Eskisehir, Turkey.
    Echaniz-Aviles, Gabriela
    Center for Research on Infectious Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, México.
    Hakawi, Ahmed
    Infectious Diseases Control, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Kamiya, Hajime
    Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.
    Karachaliou, Andromachi
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Lucidarme, Jay
    Meningococcal Reference Unit, Public Health England, Manchester, UK.
    Meiring, Susan
    Division of Public Health Surveillance and Response, National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Mironov, Konstantin
    Central Research Institute of Epidemiology, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Safadi, Marco A. P.
    Department of Pediatrics, FCM Santa Casa de São Paulo School of Medical Sciences, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Shao, Zhujun
    National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
    Smith, Vinny
    Meningitis Research Foundation, Bristol, UK.
    Steffen, Robert
    Department of Epidemiology and Prevention of Infectious Diseases, WHO Collaborating Centre for Travellers’ Health, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Stenmark, Bianca
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Taha, Muhamed-Kheir
    Institut Pasteur, National Reference Centre for Meningococci, Paris, France.
    Trotter, Caroline
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Vazquez, Julio A.
    National Centre of Microbiology, Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
    Zhu, Bingqing
    National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
    The Global Meningococcal Initiative meeting on prevention of meningococcal disease worldwide: Epidemiology, surveillance, hypervirulent strains, antibiotic resistance and high-risk populations2019Ingår i: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 15-30Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The 2018 Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) meeting focused on evolving invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) epidemiology, surveillance, and protection strategies worldwide, with emphasis on emerging antibiotic resistance and protection of high-risk populations. The GMI is comprised of a multidisciplinary group of scientists and clinicians representing institutions from several continents.

    Areas covered: Given that the incidence and prevalence of IMD continually varies both geographically and temporally, and surveillance systems differ worldwide, the true burden of IMD remains unknown. Genomic alterations may increase the epidemic potential of meningococcal strains. Vaccination and (to a lesser extent) antimicrobial prophylaxis are the mainstays of IMD prevention. Experiences from across the globe advocate the use of conjugate vaccines, with promising evidence growing for protein vaccines. Multivalent vaccines can broaden protection against IMD. Application of protection strategies to high-risk groups, including individuals with asplenia, complement deficiencies and human immunodeficiency virus, laboratory workers, persons receiving eculizumab, and men who have sex with men, as well as attendees at mass gatherings, may prevent outbreaks. There was, however, evidence that reduced susceptibility to antibiotics was increasing worldwide.

    Expert commentary: The current GMI global recommendations were reinforced, with several other global initiatives underway to support IMD protection and prevention.

  • 12.
    Adamic, M.
    et al.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Pavlovic, M. D.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Fac Med, Univ Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Rubin, A. Troilius
    Ctr Laser & Vasc Anomalies, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Palmetun-Ekback, M.
    Region Örebro län. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Boixeda, P.
    Dept Dermatol, Laser Serv, Ramon & Cajal Hosp, Univ Alcala De Henares, Madrid, Spain.
    Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology2015Ingår i: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, nr 9, s. 1661-1678Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AimLasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. MethodsThese guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. ResultsLasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects.

  • 13.
    Adams, A.
    et al.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Kalla, R.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Vatn, S.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Bonfiglio, F.
    BioCruces Health Research Institue, Bilbao, Spain.
    Nimmo, E.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Kennedy, N.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Ventham, N.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Vatn, M.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Ricanek, P.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Akershus University, Akershus, Norway.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Söderholm, J.
    Department of Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden;.
    Pierik, M.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Törkvist, L.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gomollon, F.
    University Hospital Clinic Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Gut, I.
    CNAG-CRG Centre for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Barcelona, Spain.
    Jahnsen, J.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Satsangi, J.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Epigenetic alterations at diagnosis predict susceptibility, prognosis and treatment escalation in inflammatory bowel disease - IBD Character2017Ingår i: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 11, nr Suppl. 1, s. S108-S108Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Adolfsson, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Helenius, Gisela
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Faculty of Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Samano, Ninos
    Region Örebro län. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Cardiology.
    Johansson, Karin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells from donors with coronary artery disease: growth, yield, gene expression and the effect of oxygen concentration2020Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 80, nr 4, s. 318-326Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cardiovascular cell therapy are procured from different sources including bone marrow and adipose tissue. Differently located MSCs differ in growth potential, differentiation ability and gene expression when cultured in vitro, and studies show different healing abilities for different MSC subgroups. In this study, bone marrow derived MSCs (BMSCs) and adipose tissue derived MSCs (ADSCs) from six human donors with coronary artery disease were compared for growth potential and expression of target genes (Angpt1, LIF, HGF, TGF-β1 and VEGF-A) in response to exposure to 1% and 5% O2, for up to 48 h. We found greater growth of ADSCs compared to BMSCs. ADSCs expressed higher levels of Angpt1, LIF and TGF-β1 and equal levels of VEGF-A and HGF as BMSCs. In BMSCs, exposure to low oxygen resulted in upregulation of TGF-β1, whereas other target genes were unaffected. Upregulation was only present at 1% O2. In ADSCs, LIF was upregulated in both oxygen concentrations, whereas Angpt1 was upregulated only at 1% O2. Different response to reduced oxygen culture conditions is of relevance when expanding cells in vitro prior to administration. These findings indicate ADSCs as better suited for cardiovascular cell therapy compared to BMSCs.

  • 15.
    Adolfsson, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kashyap, Aniruddh
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nordensköld, Anna
    Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Green, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    CNV-Z; a new tool for detecting copy number variation in next generation sequencing data2023Ingår i: SoftwareX, E-ISSN 2352-7110, Vol. 24, artikel-id 101530Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We developed an efficient approach to diagnostic copy number analysis of targeted gene panel or whole exome sequence (WES) data. Here we present CNV-Z as a new tool for detection of copy number variants (CNVs). Deletions and duplications of chromosomal regions are widely implicated in both genomic evolution and genetic disorders. However, calling CNVs from targeted or exome sequence data is challenging. In most cases, the copy number of a chromosomal region is estimated as the depth of reads mapping to a certain bin or sliding window divided by the expected number of reads derived from a set of reference samples. This approach will inevitably miss smaller CNVs on an irregular basis, and quite frequently results in a disturbing number of false positive CNVs. We developed an alternative approach to detect CNVs based on deviation from expected read depth per position, instead of region. Cautiously used, the cohort of samples in the same run will do as a reference. With appropriate filtering, given high quality DNA and a set of suitable reference samples, CNV-Z detects CNVs ranging in length from one nucleotide to an entire chromosome, with few false positives. Performance is proved by benchmarking using both in-house targeted gene panel NGS data and a publicly available NGS dataset, both sets with multiplex ligation-dependent amplification probe (MLPA) validated CNVs. The outcome shows that CNV-Z detects single- and multi-exonic CNVs with high specificity and sensitivity using different kind of NGS data. On gene level, CNV-Z shows both excellent sensitivity and specificity. Compared to competing CNV callers, CNV-Z shows higher specificity and positive predictive value for detecting exonic CNVs.

  • 16.
    Adolfsson, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Qvick, Alvida
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gréen, Henrik
    Division of Drug Research, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kling, Daniel
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Department of Clinical Genetics and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Centre for Rare Diseases in South East Region of Sweden, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Department of Clinical Genetics and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Green, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Technical in-depth comparison of two massive parallel DNA-sequencing methods for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from victims of sudden cardiac death2021Ingår i: Forensic Science International: Genetics, ISSN 1872-4973, E-ISSN 1878-0326, Vol. 53, artikel-id 102522Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a tragic and traumatic event. SCD is often associated with hereditary genetic disease and in such cases, sequencing of stored formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue is often crucial in trying to find a causal genetic variant. This study was designed to compare two massive parallel sequencing assays for differences in sensitivity and precision regarding variants related to SCD in FFPE material. From eight cases of SCD where DNA from blood had been sequenced using HaloPlex, corresponding FFPE samples were collected six years later. DNA from FFPE samples were amplified using HaloPlex HS, sequenced on MiSeq, representing the first method, as well as amplified using modified Twist and sequenced on NextSeq, representing the second method. Molecular barcodes were included to distinguish artefacts from true variants. In both approaches, read coverage, uniformity and variant detection were compared using genomic DNA isolated from blood and corresponding FFPE tissue, respectively. In terms of coverage uniformity, Twist performed better than HaloPlex HS for FFPE samples. Despite higher overall coverage, amplicon-based HaloPlex technologies, both for blood and FFPE tissue, suffered from design and/or performance issues resulting in genes lacking complete coverage. Although Twist had considerably lower overall mean coverage, high uniformity resulted in equal or higher fraction of genes covered at ≥ 20X. By comparing variants found in the matched samples in a pre-defined cardiodiagnostic gene panel, HaloPlex HS for FFPE material resulted in high sensitivity, 98.0% (range 96.6-100%), and high precision, 99.9% (range 99.5-100%) for moderately fragmented samples, but suffered from reduced sensitivity (range 74.2-91.1%) in more severely fragmented samples due to lack of coverage. Twist had high sensitivity, 97.8% (range 96.8-98.7%) and high precision, 99.9% (range 99.3-100%) in all analyzed samples, including the severely fragmented samples.

  • 17.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Orthopedics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    What keeps a shoulder stable - Is there an ideal method for anterior stabilisation?2024Ingår i: Shoulder & Elbow, ISSN 1758-5732, Vol. 16, nr 1, s. 4-7Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The gleno-humeral joint is by far the most mobile in the human body but also afflicted by dislocations, predominantly anterior. Surgical stabilisation is often successful but failures not uncommon. The following review describes potential causes of failure and highlights the need of adapting surgical methods to pathomorphology.

  • 18.
    Adwall, Linda
    et al.
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Liljegren, Göran
    Region Örebro län.
    Olsson, Lars
    Centralsjukhuset, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Warnberg, Fredrik
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Antibiotikaprofylax vid bröstkirurgi? Ja, men inte till alla. Kvalitetsdata fran Uppsala läns landsting ger förslag till riktlinjer2013Ingår i: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, nr 5, s. 213-215Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    I randomiserade studier har det visats att antibiotikaprofylax minskar infektionsfrekvensen med cirka 30–40 procent vid bröstcancerkirurgi.

    Statens beredning för medicinsk utvärdering rekommenderar därför sedan 2010 antibiotikaprofylax vid bröstcancerkirurgi.

    I Uppsala läns landsting fick totalt cirka 10 procent postoperativ infektion efter bröstkirurgi under 2009 och 2010. Ingreppets omfattning relaterar klart till risken för infektion.

    Vi diskuterar i denna artikel när det kan vara indicerat att ge eller inte ge antibiotikaprofylax vid bröstcancerkirurgi.

  • 19.
    Afshari, Mariam
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Wide, Ulla
    Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Region Örebro län. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Unit of Cranio- & Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kashani, Hossein
    Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Development of an oral health-related quality of life questionnaire on neurosensory disturbances after orthognathic surgery - a pilot study2022Ingår i: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 80, nr 8, s. 635-640Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Development of a new questionnaire, Oral Health-Related Quality of Life - Neurosensory Disturbances after Orthognathic Surgery (OHRQL-NDO), designed to measure the effects of neurosensory disturbance (NSD) on patients' oral health-related quality of life (OHRQL) and to evaluate reliability and validity of this questionnaire.

    Materials and methods: A questionnaire including 11 items was constructed. Thirty patients with NSD affecting the lower lip and/or chin following orthognathic surgery were included. Convergent validity was assessed by comparing OHRQL-NDO with OHIP-14 and two global questions. Test-retest reliability was assessed by asking the patients to complete OHRQL-NDO at two different occasions with an interval of two to three weeks.

    Results: The internal consistency, measured with Cronbach's alpha, was 0.84. The test-retest reliability, measured with ICC, was 0.89 (95% CI 0.77-0.95). The correlation between the mean sum score for the OHRQL-NDO and the mean sum score for the OHIP-14 was r = 0.75, using Pearson correlation coefficient. The correlations between the mean total score for the OHRQL-NDO and the global questions 1 and 2 were r = 0.74 and r = 0.72, respectively.

    Conclusions: The current instrument OHRQL-NDO is a promising test, but needs further development to better capture the different aspects of OHRQL. Further tests of the questionnaire must follow in other samples to finalize the instrument.

  • 20.
    Agardh, Carl-David
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahrén, Bo
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hanås, Ragnar
    Jansson, Stefan
    Region Örebro län. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Smith, Ulf
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Toft, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Varning för okritisk användning av överviktskirurgi vid typ 2-diabetes2012Ingår i: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, nr 25, s. 1208-1209Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    Överviktskirurgi diskuteras nu som ett behandlingsalternativ även för patienter med typ 2-diabetes där BMI inte överstiger nuvarande indikationsgräns 35 kg/m2. Artikelförfattarna vill varna för en sådan utveckling i avvaktan på kritisk värdering av denna typ av kirurgi.

  • 21.
    Aguado, J. M.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain.
    Anttila, V. J.
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finlan; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Galperine, T.
    Hop Claude Huriez, Lille, France.
    Goldenberg, S. D.
    Ctr Clin Infect & Diagnost Res, Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, London, England; Kings Coll London, London, England.
    Gwynn, S.
    Triducive Ltd, St Albans, England.
    Jenkins, D.
    Univ Hosp Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, England.
    Norén, Torbjörn
    Region Örebro län.
    Petrosillo, N.
    Natl Inst Infect Dis, Rome, Italy.
    Seifert, H.
    Inst Med Microbiol Immunol & Hyg, Univ Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Stallmach, A.
    Dept Internal Med 4, Univ Klinikum Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Warren, T.
    Triducive Ltd, St Albans, England.
    Wenisch, C.
    Sud Kaiser Franz Josef Spital, Vienna, Austria.
    Highlighting clinical needs in Clostridium difficile infection: the views of European healthcare professionals at the front line2015Ingår i: Journal of Hospital Infection, ISSN 0195-6701, E-ISSN 1532-2939, Vol. 90, nr 2, s. 117-125Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhoea in Europe. Despite increased focus, its incidence and severity are increasing in many European countries. Aim: We developed a series of consensus statements to identify unmet clinical needs in the recognition and management of CDI. Methods: A consortium of European experts prepared a series of 29 statements representing their collective views on the diagnosis and management of CDI in Europe. The statements were grouped into the following six broad themes: diagnosis; definitions of severity; treatment failure, recurrence and its consequences; infection prevention and control interventions; education and antimicrobial stewardship; and National CDI clinical guidance and policy. These statements were reviewed using questionnaires by 1047 clinicians involved in managing CDI, who indicated their level of agreement with each statement. Findings: Levels of agreement exceeded the 66% threshold for consensus for 27 out of 29 statements (93.1%), indicating strong support. Variance between countries and specialties was analysed and showed strong alignment with the overall consensus scores. Conclusion: Based on the consensus scores of the respondent group, recommendations are suggested for the further development of CDI services in order to reduce transmission and recurrence and to ensure that appropriate diagnosis and treatment strategies are applied across all healthcare settings.

  • 22.
    Ah, Rebecka
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    BChir, M. B.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Geijer, Håkan
    Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Taha, Kardo
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pourhossein-Sarmeh, Sahar
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Talving, Peep
    Division of Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery, North Estonia Medical Center, Tallinn, Estonia; Department of Surgery, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery.
    Prognostic Value of P-POSSUM and Osteopenia for Predicting Mortality After Emergency Laparotomy in Geriatric Patients2019Ingår i: Bulletin of emergency and trauma, ISSN 2322-2522, Vol. 7, nr 3, s. 223-231Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the Portsmouth-Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity (P-POSSUM) in comparison with other risk factors for mortality including osteopenia as an indicator for frailty in geriatric patients subjected to emergency laparotomy.

    Methods: All geriatric patients (≥65 years) undergoing emergency laparotomy at a single university hospital between 1/2015 and 12/2016 were included in this cohort study. Demographics and outcomes were retrospectively collected from medical records. Association between prognostic markers and 30-day mortality was assessed using Poisson and backward stepwise regression models. Prognostic value was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.

    Results: =0.004) while osteopenia was not. P-POSSUM had poor prognostic value for 30-day mortality with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.59. The prognostic value of P-POSSUM improved significantly when adjusting for patient covariates (AUC=0.83).

    Conclusion: P-POSSUM and osteopenia alone hardly predict 30-day mortality in geriatric patients following emergency laparotomy. P-POSSUM adjusted for other patient covariates improves the prediction.

  • 23.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barmparas, Galinos
    Division of Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA.
    Riddez, Louis
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ley, Eric J.
    Division of Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Does beta-blockade reduce the risk of depression in patients with isolated severe extracranial injuries?2017Ingår i: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 41, nr 7, s. 1801-1806Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Approximately half of trauma patients develop post-traumatic depression. It is suggested that beta-blockade impairs trauma memory recollection, reducing depressive symptoms. This study investigates the effect of early beta-blockade on depression following severe traumatic injuries in patients without significant brain injury.

    METHODS: Patients were identified by retrospectively reviewing the trauma registry at an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2011. Severe extracranial injuries were defined as extracranial injuries with Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3, intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score <3 and an Injury Severity Score ≥16. In-hospital deaths and patients prescribed antidepressant therapy ≤1 year prior to admission were excluded. Patients were stratified into groups based on pre-admission beta-blocker status. The primary outcome was post-traumatic depression, defined as receiving antidepressants ≤1 year following trauma.

    RESULTS: Five hundred and ninety-six patients met the inclusion criteria with 11.4% prescribed pre-admission beta-blockade. Patients receiving beta-blockers were significantly older (57 ± 18 vs. 42 ± 17 years, p < 0.001) with lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (12 ± 3 vs. 14 ± 2, p < 0.001). The beta-blocked cohort spent significantly longer in hospital (21 ± 20 vs. 15 ± 17 days, p < 0.01) and intensive care (4 ± 7 vs. 3 ± 5 days, p = 0.01). A forward logistic regression model was applied and predicted lack of beta-blockade to be associated with increased risk of depression (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-7.2, p = 0.04). After adjusting for group differences, patients lacking beta-blockers demonstrated an increased risk of depression (AOR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-8.6, p = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS: Pre-admission beta-blockade is associated with a significantly reduced risk of depression following severe traumatic injury. Further investigation is needed to determine the beneficial effects of beta-blockade in these instances.

  • 24.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Sweden Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forssten, Maximilian Peter
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pourlotfi, Arvid
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Bass, Gary Alan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Traumatology, Surgical Critical Care and Emergency Surgery, Penn Medicine, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    The Association Between Revised Cardiac Risk Index and Postoperative Mortality Following Elective Colon Cancer Surgery: A Retrospective Nationwide Cohort Study2021Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 111, nr 1, artikel-id 14574969211037588Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Despite improvements in the perioperative care during the last decades for oncologic colon resection, there is still a substantial risk for postoperative complications and mortality. Opportunities exist for improvement in preoperative risk stratification in this patient population. We hypothesize that the Revised Cardiac Risk Index, a user-friendly tool, could better identify patients with high postoperative mortality risks.

    METHODS: A retrospective analysis of operated patients between the years 2007 and 2017 was undertaken, using the prospectively recorded Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry, which has a 99.5% national coverage for all cases of colon cancer. Patients were cross-referenced with the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare dataset, a government registry of mortality and comorbidity data. Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) scores were calculated for each patient and stratified into four groups (RCRI 1, 2, 3, ⩾ 4). A Poisson regression model with robust standard errors of variance was employed to correlate the 90-day postoperative survival with each level of the Revised Cardiac Risk Index.

    RESULTS: A total of 24,198 patients met the study inclusion criteria. 90-day postoperative mortality increased from 2.4% in patients with RCRI 1 to 10.1% in patients with RCRI ⩾ 4 (p < 0.001). Adjusted 90-day postoperative mortality increased linearly with an increasing RCRI, where an RCRI of 2, 3, and ≥ 4 respectively led to a 46%, 80%, and 167% increased risk of mortality compared to RCRI 1 (p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: A strong association between an increasing Revised Cardiac Risk Index score and increased 90-day postoperative mortality risk was detected. The Revised Cardiac Risk Index may facilitate risk stratification of patients undergoing elective colon cancer surgery.

  • 25.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Rickard
    Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riddez, Louis
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Orebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Risk factors for depression following traumatic injury: An epidemiological study from a scandinavian trauma center2017Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, nr 5, s. 1082-1087Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: A significant proportion of patients suffer depression following traumatic injuries. Once manifested, major depression is challenging to overcome and its presence risks impairing the potential for physical rehabilitation and functional recovery. Risk stratification for early detection and intervention in these instances is important. This study aims to investigate patient and injury characteristics associated with an increased risk for depression.

    METHODS: All patients with traumatic injuries were recruited from the trauma registry of an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2012. Patient and injury characteristics as well as outcomes were collected for analysis. Patients under the age of eighteen, prescribed antidepressants within one year of admission, in-hospital deaths and deaths within 30days of trauma were excluded. Pre- and post-admission antidepressant data was requested from the national drugs registry. Post-traumatic depression was defined as the prescription of antidepressants within one year of trauma. To isolate independent risk factors for depression a multivariable forward stepwise logistic regression model was deployed.

    RESULTS: A total of 5981 patients met the inclusion criteria of whom 9.2% (n=551) developed post-traumatic depression. The mean age of the cohort was 42 [standard deviation (SD) 18] years and 27.1% (n=1620) were females. The mean injury severity score was 9 (SD 9) with 18.4% (n=1100) of the patients assigned a score of at least 16. Six variables were identified as independent predictors for post-traumatic depression. Factors relating to the patient were female gender and age. Injury-specific variables were penetrating trauma and GCS score of≤8 on admission. Furthermore, intensive care admission and increasing hospital length of stay were predictors of depression.

    CONCLUSION: Several risk factors associated with the development of post-traumatic depression were identified. A better targeted in-hospital screening and patient-centered follow up can be offered taking these risk factors into consideration.

  • 26.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, P.
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fang, X.
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery.
    Lindgren, R.
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Surgery.
    Effect of beta-blocker therapy on early mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery2019Ingår i: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 106, nr 4, s. 477-483Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Emergency colorectal cancer surgery is associated with significant mortality. Induced adrenergic hyperactivity is thought to be an important contributor. Downregulating the effects of circulating catecholamines may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes. This study assessed whether regular preoperative beta-blockade reduced mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery.

    METHODS: This cohort study used the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry to recruit all adult patients requiring emergency colonic cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. Patients were subdivided into those receiving regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery and those who were not (control). Demographics and clinical outcomes were compared. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated using Poisson regression analysis.

    RESULTS: A total of 3187 patients were included, of whom 685 (21·5 per cent) used regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery. The overall 30-day mortality rate was significantly reduced in the beta-blocker group compared with controls: 3·1 (95 per cent c.i. 1·9 to 4·7) versus 8·6 (7·6 to 9·8) per cent respectively (P < 0·001). Beta-blocker therapy was the only modifiable protective factor identified in multivariable analysis of 30-day all-cause mortality (incidence rate ratio 0·31, 95 per cent c.i. 0·20 to 0·47; P < 0·001) and was associated with a significant reduction in death of cardiovascular, respiratory, sepsis and multiple organ failure origin.

    CONCLUSION: Preoperative beta-blocker therapy may be associated with a reduction in 30-day mortality following emergency colonic cancer surgery.

  • 27.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The Relationship Between Severe Complications, Beta-Blocker Therapy and Long-Term Survival Following Emergency Surgery for Colon Cancer2019Ingår i: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 43, nr 10, s. 2527-2535Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Emergency surgery for colon cancer carries significant morbidity, and studies show more than doubled mortality when comparing elective to emergency surgery. The relationship between postoperative complications and survival has been outlined. Beta-blocker therapy has been linked to improved postoperative outcomes. This study aims to assess the impact of postoperative complications on long-term survival following emergency surgery for colon cancer and to determine whether beta-blockade can reduce complications.

    STUDY DESIGN: This cohort study utilized the prospective Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry to identify adults undergoing emergency colon cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. Prescription data for preoperative beta-blocker therapy were collected from the national drug registry. Cox regression was used to evaluate the effect of beta-blocker exposure and complications on 1-year mortality, and Poisson regression was used to evaluate beta-blocker exposure in patients with major complications.

    RESULTS: A total of 3139 patients were included with a mean age of 73.1 [12.4] of which 671 (21.4%) were prescribed beta-blockers prior to surgery. Major complications occurred in 375 (11.9%) patients. Those suffering major complications showed a threefold increase in 1-year mortality (adjusted HR = 3.29; 95% CI 2.75-3.94; p < 0.001). Beta-blocker use was linked to a 60% risk reduction in 1-year mortality (adjusted HR = 0.40; 95% CI 0.26-0.62; p < 0.001) but did not show a statistically significant association with reductions in major complications (adjusted IRR = 0.77; 95% CI 0.59-1.00; p = 0.055).

    CONCLUSION: The development of major complications after emergency colon cancer surgery is associated with increased mortality during one year after surgery. Beta-blocker therapy may protect against postoperative complications.

  • 28.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fang, Xin
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Rickard
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Surgery.
    β-Blockade in Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Simple Measure of Improving Outcomes2020Ingår i: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 271, nr 1, s. 140-146Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether regular β-blocker exposure can improve short- and long-term outcomes after rectal cancer surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Surgery for rectal cancer is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence to suggest that there is a survival benefit in patients exposed to β-blockers undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Studies investigating the effects on outcomes in patients subjected to surgery for rectal cancer are lacking.

    METHODS: All adult patients undergoing elective abdominal resection for rectal cancer over a 10-year period were recruited from the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Patients were subdivided according to preoperative β-blocker exposure status. Outcomes of interest were 30-day complications, 30-day cause-specific mortality, and 1-year all-cause mortality. The association between β-blocker use and outcomes were analyzed using Poisson regression model with robust standard errors for 30-day complications and cause-specific mortality. One-year survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model.

    RESULTS: A total of 11,966 patients were included in the current study, of whom 3513 (29.36%) were exposed to regular preoperative β-blockers. A significant decrease in 30-day mortality was detected (incidence rate ratio = 0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.13, P < 0.001). Deaths of cardiovascular nature, respiratory origin, sepsis, and multiorgan failure were significantly lower in β-blocker users, as were the incidences in postoperative infection and anastomotic failure. The β-blocker positive group had significantly better survival up to 1 year postoperatively with a risk reduction of 57% (hazard ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.52, P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative β-blocker use is strongly associated with improved survival and morbidity after abdominal resection for rectal cancer.

  • 29.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Effects of beta-blocker therapy on mortality after elective colon cancer surgery: a Swedish nationwide cohort study2020Ingår i: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, nr 7, artikel-id e036164Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Colon cancer surgery remains associated with substantial postoperative morbidity and mortality despite advances in surgical techniques and care. The trauma of surgery triggers adrenergic hyperactivation which drives adverse stress responses. We hypothesised that outcome benefits are gained by reducing the effects of hyperadrenergic activity with beta-blocker therapy in patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. This study aims to test this hypothesis.

    DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.

    SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a nationwide study which includes all adult patients undergoing elective colon cancer surgery in Sweden over 10 years. Patient data were collected from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. The national drugs registry was used to obtain information about beta-blocker use. Patients were subdivided into exposed and unexposed groups. The association between beta-blockade, short-term and long-term mortality was evaluated using Poisson regression, Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression.

    PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Primary outcome of interest was 1-year all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included 90-day all-cause and 5-year cancer-specific mortality.

    RESULTS: The study included 22 337 patients of whom 36.1% were prescribed preoperative beta-blockers. Survival was higher in patients on beta-blockers up to 1 year after surgery despite this group being significantly older and of higher comorbidity. Regression analysis demonstrated significant reductions in 90-day deaths (IRR 0.29, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.35, p<0.001) and a 43% risk reduction in 1-year all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.63, p<0.001) in beta-blocked patients. In addition, cancer-specific mortality up to 5 years after surgery was reduced in beta-blocked patients (adjusted HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.88, p<0.001).

    CONCLUSION: Preoperative beta-blockade is associated with significant reductions in postoperative short-term and long-term mortality following elective colon cancer surgery. Its potential prophylactic effect warrants further interventional studies to determine whether beta-blockade can be used as a way of improving outcomes for this patient group.

  • 30.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Medical Science, Örebro University, Örebro, sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Surgery.
    The Effects of Beta-Blocker Therapy on Mortality After Elective Colon Cancer SurgeryManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 31.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohammad Ismail, Ahmad
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Borg, Tomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Forssten, Maximilian Peter
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Wretenberg, Per
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    A nationwide observational cohort study of the relationship between beta-blockade and survival after hip fracture surgery2022Ingår i: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 48, nr 2, s. 743-751Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Despite advances in the care of hip fractures, this area of surgery is associated with high postoperative mortality. Downregulating circulating catecholamines, released as a response to traumatic injury and surgical trauma, is believed to reduce the risk of death in noncardiac surgical patients. This effect has not been studied in hip fractures. This study aims to assess whether survival benefits are gained by reducing the effects of the hyper-adrenergic state with beta-blocker therapy in patients undergoing emergency hip fracture surgery.

    METHODS: This is a retrospective nationwide observational cohort study. All adults [Formula: see text] 18 years were identified from the prospectively collected national quality register for hip fractures in Sweden during a 10-year period. Pathological fractures were excluded. The cohort was subdivided into beta-blocker users and non-users. Poisson regression with robust standard errors and adjustments for confounders was used to evaluate 30-day mortality.

    RESULTS: 134,915 patients were included of whom 38.9% had ongoing beta-blocker therapy at the time of surgery. Beta-blocker users were significantly older and less fit for surgery. Crude 30-day all-cause mortality was significantly increased in non-users (10.0% versus 3.7%, p < 0.001). Beta-blocker therapy resulted in a 72% relative risk reduction in 30-day all-cause mortality (incidence rate ratio 0.28, 95% CI 0.26-0.29, p < 0.001) and was independently associated with a reduction in deaths of cardiovascular, respiratory, and cerebrovascular origin and deaths due to sepsis or multiorgan failure.

    CONCLUSIONS: Beta-blockers are associated with significant survival benefits when undergoing emergency hip fracture surgery. Outlined results strongly encourage an interventional design to validate the observed relationship.

  • 32.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phelan, Herb A
    Univ of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, USA.
    Dogan, Sinan
    Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cook, Allyson C.
    UT-Southwestern Medical Center. Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, USA.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predicting In-Hospital and 1-Year Mortality in Geriatric Trauma Patients Using Geriatric Trauma Outcome Score2017Ingår i: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, ISSN 1072-7515, E-ISSN 1879-1190, Vol. 224, nr 3, s. 264-269Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Geriatric Trauma Outcome Score, GTOS (= [age] + [Injury Severity Score (ISS)x2.5] + 22 [if packed red blood cells (PRBC) transfused ≤24hrs of admission]), was developed and validated as a prognostic indicator for in-hospital mortality in elderly trauma patients. However, GTOS neither provides information regarding post-discharge outcomes, nor discriminates between patients dying with and without care restrictions. Isolating the latter, GTOS prediction performance was examined during admission and 1-year post-discharge in a mature European trauma registry.

    Study Design: All trauma admissions ≥65years in a university hospital during 2007-2011 were considered. Data regarding age, ISS, PRBC transfusion ≤24hrs, therapy restrictions, discharge disposition and mortality were collected. In-hospital deaths with therapy restrictions and patients discharged to hospice were excluded. GTOS was the sole predictor in a logistic regression model estimating mortality probabilities. Performance of the model was assessed by misclassification rate, Brier score and area under the curve (AUC).

    Results: The study population was 1080 subjects with a median age of 75 years, mean ISS of 10 and PRBC transfused in 8.2%). In-hospital mortality was 14.9% and 7.7% after exclusions. Misclassification rate fell from 14% to 6.5%, Brier score from 0.09 to 0.05. AUC increased from 0.87 to 0.88. Equivalent values for the original GTOS sample were 9.8%, 0.07, and 0.87. One-year mortality follow-up showed a misclassification rate of 17.6%, and Brier score of 0.13.

    Conclusion: Excluding patients with care restrictions and discharged to hospice improved GTOS performance for in-hospital mortality prediction. GTOS is not adept at predicting 1-year mortality.

  • 33.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sarani, Babak
    Department of Surgery, Center for Trauma and Critical Care, George Washington University, Washington, USA.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Surgery.
    The Association of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring and Mortality: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort of Isolated Severe Blunt Traumatic Brain Injury2019Ingår i: Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock, ISSN 0974-2700, E-ISSN 0974-519X, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. 18-22Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common. Yet, its efficacy varies between studies, and the actual effect on the outcome is debated. This study investigates the association of ICP monitoring and clinical outcome in patients with an isolated severe blunt TBI.

    Patients and Methods: Patients were recruited from the American College of Surgeons-Trauma Quality Improvement Program database during 2014. Inclusion criteria were limited to adult patients (>= 18 years) who had a sustained isolated severe intracranial injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] head of >= 3 and Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] of <= 8) following blunt trauma to the head. Patients with AIS score >0 for any extracranial body area were excluded. Patients' demographics, injury characteristics, interventions, and outcomes were collected for analysis. Patients receiving ICP monitoring were matched in a 1:1 ratio with controls who were not ICP monitored using propensity score matching.

    Results: A total of 3289 patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 601 (18.3%) were ICP monitored. After propensity score matching, 557 pairs were available for analysis with a mean age of 44 (standard deviation 18) years and 80.2% of them were male. Median GCS on admission was 4[3,7], and a third of patients required neurosurgical intervention. There were no statistical differences in any variables included in the analysis between the ICP-monitored group and their matched counterparts. ICP-monitored patients required significantly longer intensive care unit and hospital length of stay and had an increased mortality risk with odds ratio of 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.1-2.5, P = 0.038).

    Conclusion: ICP monitoring is associated with increased in-hospital mortality in patients with an isolated severe TBI. Further investigation into which patients may benefit from this intervention is required.

  • 34.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Corrigendum to "Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?": [Injury 48 (2017) 101–105]2017Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, nr 11, s. 2612-2612Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 35.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?2017Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, nr 1, s. 101-105Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Depressive symptoms occur in approximately half of trauma patients, negatively impacting on functional outcome and quality of life following severe head injury. Pontine noradrenaline has been shown to increase upon trauma and associated beta-adrenergic receptor activation appears to consolidate memory formation of traumatic events. Blocking adrenergic activity reduces physiological stress responses during recall of traumatic memories and impairs memory, implying a potential therapeutic role of beta-blockers. This study examines the effect of pre-admission beta-blockade on post-traumatic depression.

    Methods: All adult trauma patients (>= 18 years) with severe, isolated traumatic brain injury (intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score (AIS) >= 3 and extracranial AIS <3) were recruited from the trauma registry of an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2011. Exclusion criteria were in-hospital deaths and prescription of antidepressants up to one year prior to admission. Pre- and post-admission beta-blocker and antidepressant therapy data was requested from the national drugs registry. Post-traumatic depression was defined as the prescription of antidepressants within one year of trauma. Patients with and without pre-admission beta-blockers were matched 1: 1 by age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score and head AIS. Analysis was carried out using McNemar's and Student's t-test for categorical and continuous data, respectively.

    Results: A total of 545 patients met the study criteria. Of these, 15% (n = 80) were prescribed beta-blockers. After propensity matching, 80 matched pairs were analyzed. 33% (n = 26) of non beta-blocked patients developed post-traumatic depression, compared to only 18% (n = 14) in the beta-blocked group (p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in ICU (mean days: 5.8 (SD 10.5) vs. 5.6 (SD 7.2), p = 0.85) or hospital length of stay (mean days: 21 (SD 21) vs. 21 (SD 20), p = 0.94) between cohorts.

    Conclusion: beta-blockade appears to act prophylactically and significantly reduces the risk of posttraumatic depression in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injuries. Further prospective randomized studies are warranted to validate this finding.

  • 36.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden ; .
    Thelin, Eric Peter
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bellander, Bo Michael
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riddez, Louis
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Talving, Peep
    Department of Surgery, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden.
    β-Blocker after severe traumatic brain injury is associated with better long-term functional outcome: a matched case control study2017Ingår i: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 43, nr 6, s. 783-789Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the predominant cause of death and disability following trauma. Several studies have observed improved survival in TBI patients exposed to β-blockers, however, the effect on functional outcome is poorly documented.

    METHODS: Adult patients with severe TBI (head AIS ≥ 3) were identified from a prospectively collected TBI database over a 5-year period. Patients with neurosurgical ICU length of stay <48 h and those dying within 48 h of admission were excluded. Patients exposed to β-blockers ≤ 48 h after admission and who continued with treatment until discharge constituted β-blocked cases and were matched to non β-blocked controls using propensity score matching. The outcome of interest was Glasgow Outcome Scores (GOS), as a measure of functional outcome up to 12 months after injury. GOS ≤ 3 was considered a poor outcome. Bivariate analysis was deployed to determine differences between groups. Odds ratio and 95% CI were used to assess the effect of β-blockers on GOS.

    RESULTS: 362 patients met the inclusion criteria with 21% receiving β-blockers during admission. After propensity matching, 76 matched pairs were available for analysis. There were no statistical differences in any variables included in the analysis. Mean hospital length of stay was shorter in the β-blocked cases (18.0 vs. 26.8 days, p < 0.01). The risk of poor long-term functional outcome was more than doubled in non-β-blocked controls (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.01-6.03, p = 0.03).

    CONCLUSION: Exposure to β-blockers in patients with severe TBI appears to improve functional outcome. Further prospective randomized trials are warranted.

  • 37.
    Ahlberg, Rickard
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Garcia-Argibay, Miguel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Du Rietz, Ebba
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Butwicka, Agnieszka
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Stockholm, Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Centre for Innovation in Mental Health, School of Psychology, Faculty of Environmental and Life sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; Solent NHS Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom; Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; Clinical and Experimental Sciences (CNS and Psychiatry), Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; Hassenfeld Children´s Hospital at NYU Langone, New York University Child Study Center, New York City, New York; The Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    D'Onofrio, Brian M.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Associations Between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), ADHD Medication and Shorter Height: A Quasi-Experimental and Family-based Study2023Ingår i: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 62, nr 12, s. 1316-1325Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and shorter height is unclear. This study examined the risk of shorter height in individuals with ADHD, and the influence of prenatal factors, ADHD medication, psychiatric comorbidity, socioeconomic factors and familial liability.

    METHOD: We draw on Swedish National Registers for two different study designs. First, height data for 14,268 individuals with ADHD and 71,339 controls were stratified into two groups: 1: Before and 2: After stimulant treatment were introduced in Sweden. Second, we used a family-based design including 833,172 relatives without ADHD with different levels of relatedness to the individuals with ADHD and matched controls.

    RESULTS: ADHD was associated with shorter height both before (below average height: OR=1.31, 95 % CI=1.22-1.41) and after (below average height: OR=1.21, 95 % CI=1.13-1.31) stimulants for ADHD were introduced in Sweden and was of similar magnitude in both cohorts. The association between ADHD and shorter height attenuated after adjustment for prenatal factors, psychiatric disorders and SES. Relatives of individuals with ADHD had an increased risk of shorter height (below average height in full siblings: OR=1.14, 95 % CI=1.09-1.19; maternal half siblings: OR=1.10, 95 % CI=1.01-1.20; paternal half siblings: OR=1.15, 95 % CI=1.07-1.24, first full cousins: OR=1.10, 95 % CI=1.08-1.12).

    CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that ADHD is associated with shorter height. On a population level, this association was present both before and after ADHD-medications were available in Sweden. The association between ADHD and height was partly explained by prenatal factors, psychiatric comorbidity, low SES and a shared familial liability for ADHD.

  • 38.
    Ahlroth Pind, Caroline
    et al.
    Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Kisiel, Marta A.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandelowsky, Hanna
    NVS, Section for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Academic Primary Care Centre, Region Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Division, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nager, Anna
    NVS, Section for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Centre for Clinical Research and Education, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Division, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Janson, Christer
    Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pharmacological treatment of asthma in Sweden from 2005 to 20152024Ingår i: Journal of Asthma, ISSN 0277-0903, E-ISSN 1532-4303, Vol. 61, nr 4, s. 313-321Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Despite access to effective therapies many asthma patients still do not have well-controlled disease. This is possibly related to underuse of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and overuse of short-acting β2-agonists (SABA). Our aim was to investigate longitudinal trends and associated factors in asthma treatment.

    METHODS: Two separate cohorts of adults with physician-diagnosed asthma were randomly selected from 14 hospitals and 56 primary health centers in Sweden in 2005 (n = 1182) and 2015 (n = 1225). Information about symptoms, maintenance treatment, and use of rescue medication was collected by questionnaires. Associations between treatment and sex, age, smoking, education, body mass index (BMI), physical activity, allergic asthma, and symptom control were analyzed using Pearson's chi2-test. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression.

    RESULTS: Maintenance treatment with ICS together with long-acting β2-agonists (LABA) and/or montelukast increased from 39.2% to 44.2% (p = 0.012). The use of ICS + LABA as-needed increased (11.1-18.9%, p < 0.001), while SABA use decreased (46.4- 41.8%, p = 0.023). Regular treatment with ICS did not change notably (54.2-57.2%, p = 0.14). Older age, former smoking, and poor symptom control were related to treatment with ICS + LABA/montelukast. In 2015, 22.7% reported daily use of SABA. A higher step of maintenance treatment, older age, obesity, shorter education, current smoking, allergic asthma, low or very high physical activity, and a history of exacerbations were associated with daily SABA use.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of ICS + LABA both for maintenance treatment and symptom relief has increased over time. Despite this, the problem of low use of ICS and high use of SABA remains.

  • 39.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Exploration of Theoretical Ganglionated Plexi Ablation Technique in Atrial Fibrillation Surgery COMMENTARY2014Ingår i: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 98, nr 5, s. 1604-1605Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 40.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg.
    Postoperative atrial fibrillation and stroke-is it time to act?2014Ingår i: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 48, nr 2, s. 69-70Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 41.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Dept Cardiol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Birger
    Region Örebro län. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Positioning of the ablation catheter in total endoscopic ablation2014Ingår i: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 125-127Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Minimally invasive ablation of atrial fibrillation is an option in patients not suitable for or refractory to catheter ablation. Total endoscopic ablation can be performed via a monolateral approach, whereby a left atrial box lesion is created. If the ablation is introduced from the right side, the positioning of the ablation catheter on the partly hidden left pulmonary veins is of vital importance. Using thoracoscopy in combination with multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography, the anatomical position of the ablation catheter can be established. Our experience in over 60 procedures has confirmed this to be a safe technique of total endoscopic ablation.

  • 42.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandin, Mathias
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Souza, Domingos S. R.
    Region Örebro län. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Annular abscess leading to free wall rupture2014Ingår i: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 45, nr 2, s. E39-E39Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 43.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Department of Medicine, Hematology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Anders
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Clinical Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Persson, Lennart
    Region Örebro län. Department of Infectious diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mölling, Paula
    Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tidefelt, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Infectious diseases & Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Evaluation of a PCR method to determine the clinical significance of blood cultures with Staphylococcus epidermidis in patients with hematological malignancies2014Ingår i: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 122, nr 6, s. 539-544Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate whether the detection and quantification of Staphylococcus epidermidis DNA in blood could distinguish S. epidermidis blood stream infections (BSIs) from blood culture contaminations in patients with hematological malignancies. The hld gene was chosen to identify S. epidermidis DNA and DNA in blood samples was detected by real-time PCR. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously with blood cultures positive for S. epidermidis (n = 30), during blood culture-negative episodes (n = 10) and episodes of bacteremia with other bacteria than S. epidermidis (n = 4) and from healthy blood donors (n = 10). In addition, DNA from S. epidermidis and a selection of other bacterial species were analyzed. Three different sets of criteria were used to classify episodes with positive blood cultures with S. epidermidis as BSIs or contaminations. All DNA preparations from S. epidermidis (n = 48) were hld-positive, but other bacterial species (n = 13) were negative. Sixteen (53%) of 30 blood samples from patients with blood cultures positive for S. epidermidis were hld-positive, but none of the controls. There was no clear association between a positive hld PCR and episodes interpreted as BSIs. In conclusion, hld PCR failed to distinguish S. epidermidis BSIs from blood culture contaminations in patients with hematological malignancies.

  • 44.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    et al.
    Region Örebro län. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Medicine.
    Cajander, Sara
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Cajander, Per
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Löf, Erika
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wegener, Matthias
    Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lidén, Mats
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Radiology.
    Visual scoring of chest CT at hospital admission predicts hospitalization time and intensive care admission in Covid-192021Ingår i: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 53, nr 8, s. 622-632Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Chest CT is prognostic in Covid-19 but there is a lack of consensus on how to report the CT findings. A chest CT scoring system, ÖCoS, was implemented in clinical routine on 1 April 2020, in Örebro Region, Sweden. The ÖCoS-severity score measures the extent of lung involvement. The objective of the study was to evaluate the ÖCoS scores as predictors of the clinical course of Covid-19.

    METHODS: Population based study including data from all hospitalized patients with Covid-19 in Örebro Region during March to July 2020. We evaluated the correlations between CT scores at the time of admission to hospital and intensive care in relation to hospital and intensive care length of stay (LoS), intensive care admission and death. C-reactive protein and lymphocyte count were included as covariates in multivariate regression analyses.

    RESULTS: In 381 included patients, the ÖCoS-severity score at admission closely correlated to hospital length of stay, and intensive care admission or death. At admission to intensive care, the ÖCoS-severity score correlated with intensive care length of stay. The ÖCoS-severity score was superior to basic inflammatory biomarkers in predicting clinical outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: Chest CT visual scoring at admission to hospital predicted the clinical course of Covid-19 pneumonia.

  • 45.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hellmark, Bengt
    Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svensson, Karolina
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för läkarutbildning. Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Long-term molecular epidemiology of staphylococcus epidermidis blood culture isolates from patients with hematological malignancies2014Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, nr 6, artikel-id e99045Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an important cause of bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies. Knowledge of the long-term epidemiology of these infections is limited. We surveyed all S. epidermidis blood culture isolates from patients treated for hematological malignancies at the University Hospital of Orebro, Sweden from 1980 to 2009. A total of 373 S. epidermidis isolates were identified and multilocus sequence typing, staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing and standard antibiotic susceptibility testing were employed to characterize these isolates. The majority of the isolates 361/373 (97%) belonged to clonal complex 2, and the 373 isolates were divided into 45 sequence types (STs); Simpson's Diversity Index was 0.56. The most prevalent STs were ST2 (243/373, 65%) and ST215 (28/373, 8%). Ninety three percent (226/243) of the ST2 isolates displayed either SCCmec type III or IV. ST2 and 215 were isolated during the entire study period, and together these STs caused temporal peaks in the number of positive blood cultures of S. epidermidis. Methicillin resistance was detected in 213/273 (78%) of all isolates. In the two predominating STs, ST2 and ST215, methicillin resistance was detected in 256/271 isolates (95%), compared with 34/100 (34%) in other STs (p<0.001). In conclusion, in this long-term study of patients with hematological malignancies, we demonstrate a predominance of methicillin-resistant ST2 among S. epidermidis blood culture isolates.

  • 46.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    et al.
    Region Örebro län. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Jan
    Department of Hematology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Marie
    Department of Medicine, Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Helna
    Division of Hematology, Specialist Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Liljeholm, Maria
    Department of Hematology, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ravn-Landtblom, Anna
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Stockholm South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheding, Stefan
    Division of Molecular Hematology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund Stem Cell Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Hematology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Andréasson, Björn
    Division of Hematology, Specialist Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Highly Reduced Survival in Essential Thrombocythemia and Polycythemia Vera Patients with Vascular Complications during Follow-up2020Ingår i: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 104, nr 3, s. 271-278Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the relative importance of risk factors, treatments and blood counts for the occurrence of vascular complications and their impact on life expectancy in Essential Thrombocythemia (ET) and Polycythemia Vera (PV).

    METHODS: Nested case-control study within the Swedish MPN registry. From a cohort of 922 ET patients and 763 PV patients, 71 ET and 81 PV cases with vascular complications were compared to matched controls.

    RESULTS: Incidence of vascular complications were 2.0 and 3.4 events per 100 patient-years in ET and PV, respectively. At diagnosis, no significant risk factor differences were observed between cases and controls in neither of the diseases. At the time of vascular event, ET complication cases did not differ significantly from controls but in PV, cases had significantly higher WBCs and were to a lesser extent treated with antithrombotic and cytoreductive therapy. Life expectancy was significantly decreased in both ET and PV cases compared to controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: The risk of vascular complications is high in both ET and PV and these complications have a considerable impact on life expectancy. The protective effect of antithrombotic and cytoreductive therapy for vascular complications in PV underscores the importance of avoiding undertreatment.

  • 47.
    Ahmad, Abrar
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Askari, Shlear
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Befekadu, Rahel
    Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Transfusion Medicine.
    Hahn-Strömberg, Victoria
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Investigating the association between polymorphisms in connective tissue growth factor and susceptibility to colon carcinoma2015Ingår i: Molecular Medicine Reports, ISSN 1791-2997, E-ISSN 1791-3004, Vol. 11, nr 4, s. 2493-2503Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been numerous studies on the gene expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in colorectal cancer, however very few have investigated polymorphisms in this gene. The present study aimed to determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CTGF gene are associated with a higher susceptibility to colon cancer and/or an invasive tumor growth pattern. The CTGF gene was genotyped for seven SNPs (rs6918698, rs1931002, rs9493150, rs12526196, rs12527705, rs9399005 and rs12527379) by pyrosequencing. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples (n=112) from patients diagnosed with colon carcinoma, and an equal number of blood samples from healthy controls, were selected for genomic DNA extraction. The complexity index was measured using images of tumor samples (n=64) stained for cytokeratin-8. The images were analyzed and correlated with the identified CTGF SNPs and clinicopathological parameters of the patients, including age, gender, tumor penetration, lymph node metastasis, systemic metastasis, differentiation and localization of tumor. It was demonstrated that the frequency of the SNP rs6918698 GG genotype was significantly associated (P=0.05) with an increased risk of colon cancer, as compared with the GC and CC genotypes. The other six SNPs (rs1931002, rs9493150, rs12526196, rs12527705, rs9399005 and rs12527379) exhibited no significant difference in the genotype and allele frequencies between patients diagnosed with colon carcinoma and the normal healthy population. A trend was observed between genotype variation at rs6918698 and the complexity index (P=0.052). The complexity index and genotypes for any of the studied SNPs were not significantly correlated with clinical or pathological parameters of the patients. These results indicate that the rs6918698 GG genotype is associated with an increased risk of developing colon carcinoma, and genetic variations at the rs6918698 are associated with the growth pattern of the tumor. The present results may facilitate the identification of potential biomarkers of the disease in addition to drug targets.

  • 48.
    Ahmad, Irma
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Edin, Alicia
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Granvik, Christoffer
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kumm Persson, Lowa
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tevell, Staffan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Infectious Diseases, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research and Education, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden .
    Månsson, Emeli
    Centre for Clinical Research, Region Västmanland-Uppsala University, Västmanland Hospital Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Marklund, Ingela
    Centre for Clinical Research and Education, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Persson, Ida-Lisa
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kauppi, Anna
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsell, Mattias N. E.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lange, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Cajander, Sara
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Normark, Johan
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    High prevalence of persistent symptoms and reduced health-related quality of life 6 months after COVID-192023Ingår i: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, artikel-id 1104267Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The long-term sequelae after COVID-19 constitute a challenge to public health and increased knowledge is needed. We investigated the prevalence of self-reported persistent symptoms and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in relation to functional exercise capacity, 6 months after infection, and explored risk factors for COVID-19 sequalae.

    METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, cohort study including 434 patients. At 6 months, physical exercise capacity was assessed by a 1-minute sit-to-stand test (1MSTST) and persistent symptoms were reported and HRQoL was evaluated through the EuroQol 5-level 5-dimension (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaire. Patients with both persistent symptoms and reduced HRQoL were classified into a new definition of post-acute COVID syndrome, PACS+. Risk factors for developing persistent symptoms, reduced HRQoL and PACS+ were identified by multivariable Poisson regression.

    RESULTS: Persistent symptoms were experienced by 79% of hospitalized, and 59% of non-hospitalized patients at 6 months. Hospitalized patients had a higher prevalence of self-assessed reduced overall health (28 vs. 12%) and PACS+ (31 vs. 11%). PACS+ was associated with reduced exercise capacity but not with abnormal pulse/desaturation during 1MSTST. Hospitalization was the most important independent risk factor for developing persistent symptoms, reduced overall health and PACS+.

    CONCLUSION: Persistent symptoms and reduced HRQoL are common among COVID-19 survivors, but abnormal pulse and peripheral saturation during exercise could not distinguish patients with PACS+. Patients with severe infection requiring hospitalization were more likely to develop PACS+, hence these patients should be prioritized for clinical follow-up after COVID-19.

  • 49.
    Akhras, Michael S.
    et al.
    Stanford Genome Technol Ctr, Stanford Univ, Palo Alto CA, USA.
    Pettersson, Erik
    Stanford Genome Technol Ctr, Stanford Univ, Palo Alto CA, USA.
    Diamond, Lisa
    Stanford Genome Technol Ctr, Stanford Univ, Palo Alto CA, USA.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Region Örebro län.
    Okamoto, Jennifer
    Dept Bioengn, Stanford Univ, Stanford CA, USA.; Howard Hughes Med Inst, Stanford Univ, Stanford CA, USA.
    Davis, Ronald W.
    Stanford Genome Technol Ctr, Stanford Univ, Palo Alto CA , USA.
    Pourmand, Nader
    Dept Biomol Engn, University of California, Santa Cruz CA, USA.
    The Sequencing Bead Array (SBA), a Next-Generation Digital Suspension Array2013Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 10, artikel-id UNSP e76696Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we describe the novel Sequencing Bead Array (SBA), a complete assay for molecular diagnostics and typing applications. SBA is a digital suspension array using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), to replace conventional optical readout platforms. The technology allows for reducing the number of instruments required in a laboratory setting, where the same NGS instrument could be employed from whole-genome and targeted sequencing to SBA broad-range biomarker detection and genotyping. As proof-of-concept, a model assay was designed that could distinguish ten Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. SBA was used to genotype 20 cervical tumor samples and, when compared with amplicon pyrosequencing, was able to detect two additional co-infections due to increased sensitivity. We also introduce in-house software Sphix, enabling easy accessibility and interpretation of results. The technology offers a multi-parallel, rapid, robust, and scalable system that is readily adaptable for a multitude of microarray diagnostic and typing applications, e. g. genetic signatures, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), structural variations, and immunoassays. SBA has the potential to dramatically change the way we perform probe-based applications, and allow for a smooth transition towards the technology offered by genomic sequencing.

  • 50.
    Akhtar, Zubair
    et al.
    Infectious Diseases Division, ICDDRB, Dhaka, Dhaka District, Bangladesh.
    Chowdhury, Fahmida
    Infectious Diseases Division, ICDDRB, Dhaka, Dhaka District, Bangladesh.
    Aleem, Mohammad Abdul
    Infectious Diseases Division, ICDDRB, Dhaka, Dhaka District, Bangladesh; Biosecurity Research Program, Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Ghosh, Probir Kumar
    Infectious Diseases Division, ICDDRB, Dhaka, Dhaka District, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Mahmudur
    Infectious Diseases Division, ICDDRB, Dhaka, Dhaka District, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Mustafizur
    Infectious Diseases Division, ICDDRB, Dhaka, Dhaka District, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Mohammad Enayet
    Infectious Diseases Division, ICDDRB, Dhaka, Dhaka District, Bangladesh.
    Sumiya, Mariya Kibtiya
    Infectious Diseases Division, ICDDRB, Dhaka, Dhaka District, Bangladesh.
    Islam, A. K. M. Monwarul
    Department of Cardiology, National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases Dhaka (NICVD), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Uddin, Mir Jamal
    Department of Cardiology, National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases Dhaka (NICVD), Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    MacIntyre, C. Raina
    Biosecurity Research Program, Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Cajander, Sara
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Orebro, Swede.
    Undiagnosed SARS-CoV-2 infection and outcome in patients with acute MI and no COVID-19 symptoms2021Ingår i: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 8, nr 1, artikel-id e001617Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the prevalence and outcome of occult infection with SARS-CoV-2 and influenza in patients presenting with myocardial infarction (MI) without COVID-19 symptoms.

    METHODS: We conducted an observational study from 28 June to 11 August 2020, enrolling patients admitted to the National Institute of Cardiovascular Disease Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh, with ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI) or non-ST-segment elevation MI who did not meet WHO criteria for suspected COVID-19. Samples were collected by nasopharyngeal swab to test for SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. We followed up patients at 3 months (13 weeks) postadmission to record adverse cardiovascular outcomes: all-cause death, new MI, heart failure and new percutaneous coronary intervention or stent thrombosis. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method.

    RESULTS: We enrolled 280 patients with MI, 79% male, mean age 54.5±11.8 years, 140 of whom were diagnosed with STEMI. We found 36 (13%) to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 and 1 with influenza. There was no significant difference between mortality rate observed among SARS-CoV-2 infected patients compared with non-infected (5 (14%) vs 26 (11%); p=0.564). A numerically shorter median time to a recurrent cardiovascular event was recorded among SARS-CoV-2 infected compared with non-infected patients (21 days, IQR: 8-46 vs 27 days, IQR: 7-44; p=0.378).

    CONCLUSION: We found a substantial rate of occult SARS-CoV-2 infection in the studied cohort, suggesting SARS-CoV-2 may precipitate MI. Asymptomatic patients with COVID-19 admitted with MI may contribute to disease transmission and warrants widespread testing of hospital admissions.

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