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  • 1.
    Abong'o, Deborah
    et al.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wandiga, Shem
    University of Nairobi. Kenya.
    Jumba, Isac
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    van den Brink, Paul
    Wageningen University, the Netherlands.
    Nazariwo, Betty
    Makerere University, Uganda.
    Madadi, Vincent
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wafula, Godfrey
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nkedi-Kizza, Peter
    University of Florida, USA.
    Organochlorine pesticide residue levels in soil from the Nyando River catchment, Kenya2015In: Africa Journal of Physical Sciences, ISSN 2313-3317, Vol. 2, no 1, 18-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil samples were collected from six locations representative of the Nyando River catchment area of the Lake Victoria over a period of two years. Sampling was done four times in the year in February, May, September and December 2005 and 2006 in farms where maize, tea, sugar cane, coffee, rice and vegetables have been grown over the years. This coincided with the effects of different seasons and farming activities on residue levels of the pesticides in use. The objective was to investigate levels and distribution of organochlorine pesticides that have either been banned or are restricted for use in Kenya. Organochlorine pesticides investigated were DDT, lindane, aldrin, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin, endosulfan (both α- and β- isomers and endosulfan sulphate), the sum is called “total” or Σendosulfan and methoxychlor. Prior to the ban or restriction in use, these pesticides had found wide applications in public health for control of disease vectors and in agriculture for control of crop pests. The analysis revealed presence of all the targeted pesticides with the highest mean concentrations for methoxychlor 140 ± 1.5 μg/kg, Σendosulfan (30 ± 2.1 μg/kg), aldrin (18 ± 0.28 μg/kg), respectively. The results show the presence of these pesticides in soils in the basin and this could be impacting negatively on the ecosystem health of the area.

  • 2.
    Acosta Navarro, Juan Camilo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Anthropogenic influence on climate through changes in aerosol emissions from air pollution and land use change2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Particulate matter suspended in air (i.e. aerosol particles) exerts a substantial influence on the climate of our planet and is responsible for causing severe public health problems in many regions across the globe. Human activities have altered the natural and anthropogenic emissions of aerosol particles through direct emissions or indirectly by modifying natural sources. The climate effects of the latter have been largely overlooked. Humans have dramatically altered the land surface of the planet causing changes in natural aerosol emissions from vegetated areas. Regulation on anthropogenic and natural aerosol emissions have the potential to affect the climate on regional to global scales. Furthermore, the regional climate effects of aerosol particles could potentially be very different than the ones caused by other climate forcers (e.g. well mixed greenhouse gases). The main objective of this work was to investigate the climatic effects of land use and air pollution via aerosol changes.

    Using numerical model simulations it was found that land use changes in the past millennium have likely caused a positive radiative forcing via aerosol climate interactions. The forcing is an order of magnitude smaller and has an opposite sign than the radiative forcing caused by direct aerosol emissions changes from other human activities. The results also indicate that future reductions of fossil fuel aerosols via air quality regulations may lead to an additional warming of the planet by mid-21st century and could also cause an important Arctic amplification of the warming. In addition, the mean position of the intertropical convergence zone and the Asian monsoon appear to be sensitive to aerosol emission reductions from air quality regulations. For these reasons, climate mitigation policies should take into consideration aerosol air pollution, which has not received sufficient attention in the past.

  • 3.
    Addassi, Mouadh
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Schreyer, Lynn
    Washington State University, USA.
    Johannesson, Björn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Lin, Hai
    University of Colorado Denver, USA.
    Pore-scale modeling of vapor transport in partially saturated capillary tube with variable area using chemical potential2016In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 52, no 9, 7023-7035 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we illustrate the usefulness of using the chemical potential as the primary unknown by modeling isothermal vapor transport through a partially saturated cylindrically symmetric capillary tube of variable cross-sectional area using a single equation. There are no fitting parameters and the numerical solutions to the equation are compared with experimental results with excellent agreement. We demonstrate that isothermal vapor transport can be accurately modeled without modeling the details of the contact angle, microscale temperature fluctuations, or pressure fluctuations using a modification of the Fick-Jacobs equation. We thus conclude that for a single, axisymmetric pore, the enhancement factor depends upon relative humidity boundary conditions at the liquid bridge interfaces, distance between liquid bridges, and bridge lengths.

  • 4. Addor, Nans
    et al.
    Rössler, Ole
    Köplin, Nina
    Huss, Matthias
    Weingartner, Rolf
    Seibert, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Robust changes and sources of uncertainty in the projected hydrological regimes of Swiss catchments2014In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 50, no 10, 7541-7562 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Projections of discharge are key for future water resources management. These projections are subject to uncertainties, which are difficult to handle in the decision process on adaptation strategies. Uncertainties arise from different sources such as the emission scenarios, the climate models and their postprocessing, the hydrological models, and the natural variability. Here we present a detailed and quantitative uncertainty assessment, based on recent climate scenarios for Switzerland (CH2011 data set) and covering catchments representative for midlatitude alpine areas. This study relies on a particularly wide range of discharge projections resulting from the factorial combination of 3 emission scenarios, 10–20 regional climate models, 2 postprocessing methods, and 3 hydrological models of different complexity. This enabled us to decompose the uncertainty in the ensemble of projections using analyses of variance (ANOVA). We applied the same modeling setup to six catchments to assess the influence of catchment characteristics on the projected streamflow, and focused on changes in the annual discharge cycle. The uncertainties captured by our setup originate mainly from the climate models and natural climate variability, but the choice of emission scenario plays a large role by the end of the 21st century. The contribution of the hydrological models to the projection uncertainty varied strongly with catchment elevation. The discharge changes were compared to the estimated natural decadal variability, which revealed that a climate change signal emerges even under the lowest emission scenario (RCP2.6) by the end of the century. Limiting emissions to RCP2.6 levels would nevertheless reduce the largest regime changes by the end of the century by approximately a factor of two, in comparison to impacts projected for the high emission scenario SRES A2. We finally show that robust regime changes emerge despite the projection uncertainty. These changes are significant and are consistent across a wide range of scenarios and catchments. We propose their identification as a way to aid decision making under uncertainty.

  • 5. Aggarwal, Pradeep K.
    et al.
    Romatschke, Ulrike
    Araguas-Araguas, Luis
    Belachew, Dagnachew
    Longstaffe, Frederick J.
    Berg, Peter
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Schumacher, Courtney
    Funk, Aaron
    Proportions of convective and stratiform precipitation revealed in water isotope ratios2016In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 9, no 8, 624-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ahlberg, Jesper
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Physics.
    Gustafsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Physics.
    Distributed snow modelling integrating ground penetrating radar data for improved runoff predictions in a Swedish mountain basin2009In: EGU General Assembly 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Operational forecasts of snow melt runoff in Sweden are currently running with precipitation and temperature as the main input variables and calibrated with runoff data, and there is an interest to make better use of new measurement systems for distributed snow data. At the same time, various data assimilation techniques are becoming more frequently used in hydrological modeling, in order to reduce uncertainties related to both model structure errors and errors in input and calibration data. Thus, it is important to address not only what type of snow data that can be used to improve the model predictions, but also what type of input data and model structures that are optimal in relation to the available snow data. The objective of this study is to investigate to what extent the runoff predictions can be improved by assimilation of temporal and spatially distributed snow data, and if the improvements depend on the choice of model structures, for instance the use of energy balance or day-degree snow models. In order to achieve these objectives a new distributed snow model has been implemented into the hydrological modeling framework HYSS/HYPE. This model can easily be setup with either an energy balance model or a day-degree model for the snow pack calculations, and it is easy to run the model with different spatial resolutions. In the fully distributed case, snow drift processes are implicitly included in the model through a precipitation distribution model, based on topographical information and wind direction. The model was applied to a mountain basin in northern Sweden used for hydropower production, where extensive snow measurements were taken during the last two winters 2007-2009. A climate station is located at the outlet of the regulation lake, including automated point measurements of snow depth, snow mass (snow pillow), snow wetness and snow temperature. Distributed snow cover data was sampled using ground-penetrating radar from snow mobiles. Measurements were taken at the time of the maximum snow cover, providing a data set with snow depth, snow density, snow water equivalent along 20 km long transects in representative areas of the basin. The precipitation distribution model was calibrated using the distributed SWE data from the GPR measurements. Application of the calibrated model to previous years without available snow data show that the runoff predictions was improved compared to calibrations without the distributed snow data, however the improvements were larger for the energy balance compared to the day-degree model. Further developments will include assimilation of the temporal and spatial snow data to adjust the distribution of various input variables, for instance air temperature and wind speed.

  • 7.
    Ahlberg, Jesper
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Physics.
    Gustafsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Physics.
    Snow melt runoff simulations using ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of distributed snow data2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Ahlgren, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). The Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, PO Box 260, SE-40530 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Omstedt, Anders
    Rolff, Carl
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). The Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, PO Box 260, SE-40530 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Temperature, DOC level and basin interactions explain the declining oxygen concentrations in the Bothnian Sea2017In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 170, 22-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia and oxygen deficient zones are expanding worldwide. To properly manage this deterioration of the marine environment, it is important to identify the causes of oxygen declines and the influence of anthropogenic activities. Here, we provide a study aiming to explain the declining oxygen levels in the deep waters of the Bothnian Sea over the past 20 years by investigating data from environmental monitoring programmes. The observed decline in oxygen concentrations in deep waters was found to be primarily a consequence of water temperature increase and partly caused by an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the seawater (R-Adj(2). = 0.83) as well as inflow from the adjacent sea basin. As none of the tested eutrophication-related predictors were significant according to a stepwise multiple regression, a regional increase in nutrient inputs to the area is unlikely to explain a significant portion of the oxygen decline. Based on the findings of this study, preventing the development of anoxia in the deep water of the Bothnian Sea is dependent on the large-scale measures taken to reduce climate change. In addition, the reduction of the nutrient load to the Baltic Proper is required to counteract the development of hypoxic and phosphate-rich water in the Baltic Proper, which can form deep water in the Bothnian Sea. The relative importance of these sources to oxygen consumption is difficult to determine from the available data, but the results clearly demonstrate the importance of climate related factors such as temperature, DOC and inflow from adjacent basins for the oxygen status of the sea.

  • 9.
    Ahmed, Rafiq
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Seasonal Variation of Inorganic Nutrients (DSi, DIN and DIP) Concentration in Swedish River2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Rivers have been playing most important role as fresh water source and medium of nutrient transportation from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystem. Inorganic form of nutrients (DSi, DIN and DIP) are plant available mostly control the productivity of aquatic ecosystem. Transfer of these nutrients in higher concentrations cause harmful eutrophication in receiving water body.

    Study of dissolved inorganic nutrients concentrations in 12 Swedish rivers of different basin characteristics demonstrated both similar and varying behaviour from river to river and from season to season depending on catchment hydrology; land use and geology. Highest concentration did not coincide with the highest runoff. High DSi concentration observed in the unperturbed rivers however, high DIN and DIP concentration observed in agriculture dominated river followed by river basin dominated by industrial and urban activities. DSi and DIN concentration observed high in winter and decreased through spring to reach lowest in summer. DIP concentration although found low in summer but high concentration observed in early spring and early autumn. Rivers with low average runoff positively correlated with DSi and DIN concentration however, DIP demonstrated weak correlation.

  • 10. Aich, Valentin
    et al.
    Liersch, Stefan
    Vetter, Tobias
    Andersson, Jafet
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Mueller, Eva N.
    Hattermann, Fred F.
    Climate or Land Use?-Attribution of Changes in River Flooding in the Sahel Zone2015In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 7, no 6, 2796-2820 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study intends to contribute to the ongoing discussion on whether land use and land cover changes (LULC) or climate trends have the major influence on the observed increase of flood magnitudes in the Sahel. A simulation-based approach is used for attributing the observed trends to the postulated drivers. For this purpose, the ecohydrological model SWIM (Soil and Water Integrated Model) with a new, dynamic LULC module was set up for the Sahelian part of the Niger River until Niamey, including the main tributaries Sirba and Goroul. The model was driven with observed, reanalyzed climate and LULC data for the years 1950-2009. In order to quantify the shares of influence, one simulation was carried out with constant land cover as of 1950, and one including LULC. As quantitative measure, the gradients of the simulated trends were compared to the observed trend. The modeling studies showed that for the Sirba River only the simulation which included LULC was able to reproduce the observed trend. The simulation without LULC showed a positive trend for flood magnitudes, but underestimated the trend significantly. For the Goroul River and the local flood of the Niger River at Niamey, the simulations were only partly able to reproduce the observed trend. In conclusion, the new LULC module enabled some first quantitative insights into the relative influence of LULC and climatic changes. For the Sirba catchment, the results imply that LULC and climatic changes contribute in roughly equal shares to the observed increase in flooding. For the other parts of the subcatchment, the results are less clear but show, that climatic changes and LULC are drivers for the flood increase; however their shares cannot be quantified. Based on these modeling results, we argue for a two-pillar adaptation strategy to reduce current and future flood risk: Flood mitigation for reducing LULC-induced flood increase, and flood adaptation for a general reduction of flood vulnerability.

  • 11. Aich, Valentin
    et al.
    Liersch, Stefan
    Vetter, Tobias
    Fournet, Samuel
    Andersson, Jafet
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Calmanti, Sandro
    van Weert, Frank H. A.
    Hattermann, Fred F.
    Paton, Eva N.
    Flood projections within the Niger River Basin under future land use and climate change2016In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 562, 666-677 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses future flood risk in the Niger River Basin (NRB), for the first time considering the simultaneous effects of both projected climate change and land use changes. For this purpose, an ecohydrological process-based model (SWIM) was set up and validated for past climate and land use dynamics of the entire NRB. Model runs for future flood risks were conducted with an ensemble of 18 climate models, 13 of them dynamically downscaled from the CORDEX Africa project and five statistically downscaled Earth System Models. Two climate and two land use change scenarios were used to cover a broad range of potential developments in the region. Two flood indicators (annual 90th percentile and the 20-year return flood) were used to assess the future flood risk for the Upper, Middle and Lower Niger as well as the Benue. The modeling results generally show increases of flood magnitudes when comparing a scenario period in the near future (2021-2050) with a base period (1976-2005). Land use effects are more uncertain, but trends and relative changes for the different catchments of the NRB seem robust. The dry areas of the Sahelian and Sudanian regions of the basin show a particularly high sensitivity to climatic and land use changes, with an alarming increase of flood magnitudes in parts. A scenario with continuing transformation of natural vegetation into agricultural land and urbanization intensifies the flood risk in all parts of the NRB, while a "regreening" scenario can reduce flood magnitudes to some extent. Yet, land use change effects were smaller when compared to the effects of climate change. In the face of an already existing adaptation deficit to catastrophic flooding in the region, the authors argue for a mix of adaptation and mitigation efforts in order to reduce the flood risk in the NRB. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 12. Akselsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Olsson, Jonas
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Belyazid, Salim
    Capell, Réne
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Can increased weathering rates due to future warming compensate for base cation losses following whole-tree harvesting in spruce forests?2016In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 128, no 1-2, 89-105 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Alekseeva, I.
    et al.
    Jarsjö, Jerker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Schrum, C.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Reconstruction of historic changes of the Aral Sea water budget and sea-groundwater interactions by a coupled 3D sea-ice-groundwater model2007In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 10629, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A 3D coupled sea-ice-groundwater model has been developed and applied for an estimation of the water balance and groundwater-seawater interactions in the shrinking Aral Sea. The model developed combines the complete 3D sea-ice hydrodynamics model ECOSMO, including a mass and energy conserving wetting and drying scheme, and a simple groundwater model based on changes in hydraulic gradient in response to the sea surface variability. During the simulation period 1979-1993, the model successfully reproduced the rapid Aral Sea level drop, surface area decrease, coastline position changes and salinization. Model predictions of evaporation and groundwater inflow were also consistent with independent estimations. Model results indicated that within the 15 years period of simulations the net groundwater inflow to the Aral Sea might have increased by 10% or more as a direct effect of the sea level lowering.

    Furthermore, model scenario tests were carried out to examine effects of salinity on sea hydrodynamics and to estimate non-linear feedbacks of the sea thermo- and hydrodynamics, air-sea turbulent fluxes and the sea water balance. It was shown that a neglect of salinity in the sea hydro- and thermo dynamics resulted in considerable differences in the Aral Sea winter thermal conditions, which in turn influenced the air-sea exchange in the following spring and summer. As a result, the zero salinity scenario predicted higher evaporation rates and an considerably accelerated sea level lowering by up to 2 cm/yr, in comparison with the basic model run. An indirect influence of the fresh groundwater inflow in terms of water balance has been identified as less significant, however it was shown that the fresh groundwater input could influence the Aral Sea salinity distribution considerably since 1990’s.

  • 14.
    Alfieri, Lorenzo
    et al.
    European Commiss Joint Res Ctr, TP 122,Via E Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra, VA, Italy.
    Feyen, Luc
    European Commiss Joint Res Ctr, TP 122,Via E Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra, VA, Italy.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Increasing flood risk under climate change: a pan-European assessment of the benefits of four adaptation strategies2016In: Climatic Change, Vol. 136, no 3, 507-521 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future flood risk in Europe is likely to increase due to a combination of climatic and socio-economic drivers. Effective adaptation strategies need to be implemented to limit the impact of river flooding on population and assets. This research builds upon a recently developed flood risk assessment framework at European scale to explore the benefits of adaptation against extreme floods. The effect of implementing four different adaptation measures is simulated in the modeling framework. Measures include the rise of flood protections, reduction of the peak flows through water retention, reduction of vulnerability and relocation to safer areas. Their sensitivity is assessed in several configurations under a high-end global warming scenario over the time range 1976-2100. Results suggest that the future increase in expected damage and population affected by river floods can be compensated through different configurations of adaptation measures. The adaptation efforts should favor measures targeted at reducing the impacts of floods, rather than trying to avoid them. Conversely, adaptation plans only based on rising flood protections have the effect of reducing the frequency of small floods and exposing the society to less-frequent but catastrophic floods and potentially long recovery processes.

  • 15.
    Alfonso, L.
    et al.
    UNESCO IHE Inst Water Educ, Integrated Water Syst & Governance, Delft, Netherlands..
    Mukolwe, M. M.
    UNESCO IHE Inst Water Educ, Integrated Water Syst & Governance, Delft, Netherlands.;Masinde Muliro Univ Sci & Technol, Estates Dept, Kakamega, Kenya..
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Probabilistic Flood Maps to support decision-making: Mapping the Value of Information2016In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 52, no 2, 1026-1043 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Floods are one of the most frequent and disruptive natural hazards that affect man. Annually, significant flood damage is documented worldwide. Flood mapping is a common preimpact flood hazard mitigation measure, for which advanced methods and tools (such as flood inundation models) are used to estimate potential flood extent maps that are used in spatial planning. However, these tools are affected, largely to an unknown degree, by both epistemic and aleatory uncertainty. Over the past few years, advances in uncertainty analysis with respect to flood inundation modeling show that it is appropriate to adopt Probabilistic Flood Maps (PFM) to account for uncertainty. However, the following question arises; how can probabilistic flood hazard information be incorporated into spatial planning? Thus, a consistent framework to incorporate PFMs into the decision-making is required. In this paper, a novel methodology based on Decision-Making under Uncertainty theories, in particular Value of Information (VOI) is proposed. Specifically, the methodology entails the use of a PFM to generate a VOI map, which highlights floodplain locations where additional information is valuable with respect to available floodplain management actions and their potential consequences. The methodology is illustrated with a simplified example and also applied to a real case study in the South of France, where a VOI map is analyzed on the basis of historical land use change decisions over a period of 26 years. Results show that uncertain flood hazard information encapsulated in PFMs can aid decision-making in floodplain planning.

  • 16.
    Algesten, Grete
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Sobek, Sobek
    Department of Limnology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Tranvik, Lars T.
    Department of Limnology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Seasonal variation of CO2 saturation in the Gulf of Bothnia: Indications of marine net heterotrophy2004In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, Vol. 18, 4021-4028 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal variation of pCO2 and primary and bacterioplankton production were measured in the Gulf of Bothnia during an annual cycle. Surface water was supersaturated with CO2 on an annual basis, indicating net heterotrophy and a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, the Gulf of Bothnia oscillated between being a sink and a source of CO2 over the studied period, largely decided by temporal variation in bacterial respiration (BR) and primary production (PP) in the water column above the pycnocline. The calculated annual respiration-production balance (BR-PP) was very similar to the estimated CO2 emission from the Gulf of Bothnia, which indicates that these processes were major determinants of the exchange of CO2 between water and atmosphere. The southern basin (the Bothnian Sea) had a lower net release of CO2 to the atmosphere than the northern Bothnian Bay (7.1 and 9.7 mmol C m−2 d−1, respectively), due to higher primary production, which to a larger extent balanced respiration in this basin.

  • 17. Ali, A Md
    et al.
    Di Baldassarre, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Solomatine, Dimitri P
    Testing different cross-section spacing in 1D hydraulic modelling: A case study on Johor River, Malaysia2014In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, no just-acceptedArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Ali, Genevieve
    et al.
    Tetzlaff, Doerthe
    McDonnell, Jeffrey J.
    Soulsby, Chris
    Carey, Sean
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    McGuire, Kevin
    Buttle, Jim
    Seibert, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Shanley, Jamie
    Comparison of threshold hydrologic response across northern catchments2015In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 29, no 16, 3575-3591 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nine mid-latitude to high-latitude headwater catchments - part of the Northern Watershed Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (North-Watch) programme - were used to analyze threshold response to rainfall and snowmelt-driven events and link the different responses to the catchment characteristics of the nine sites. The North-Watch data include daily time-series of various lengths of multiple variables such as air temperature, precipitation and discharge. Rainfall and meltwater inputs were differentiated using a degree-day snowmelt approach. Distinct hydrological events were identified, and precipitation-runoff response curves were visually assessed. Results showed that eight of nine catchments showed runoff initiation thresholds and effective precipitation input thresholds. For rainfall-triggered events, catchment hydroclimatic and physical characteristics (e.g. mean annual air temperature, median flow path distance to the stream, median sub-catchment area) were strong predictors of threshold strength. For snowmelt-driven events, however, thresholds and the factors controlling precipitation-runoff response were difficult to identify. The variability in catchments responses to snowmelt was not fully explained by runoff initiation thresholds and input magnitude thresholds. The quantification of input intensity thresholds (e.g. snow melting and permafrost thawing rates) is likely required for an adequate characterization of nonlinear spring runoff generation in such northern environments.

  • 19.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Edman, Moa
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Sahlberg, Jörgen
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Modelling nutrient retention in the coastal zone of an eutrophic sea2016In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 13, no 20, 5753-5769 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hordoir, Robinson
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hall, Per O. J.
    Transport of fresh and resuspended particulate organic material in the Baltic Sea - a model study2011In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 87, no 1, 1-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fully coupled high-resolution 3-dimensional biogeochemical-physical ocean model including an empirical wave model was used to investigate the long-term average (1970-2007) distributions and transports of resuspended matter and other types of suspended organic matter in the Baltic Sea. Modelled bottom types were compared to observations and the results showed that the model successfully managed to capture the horizontal, as well as the vertical, distribution of the different bottom types: accumulation, transport and erosion bottoms. The model also captured well the nutrient element contents in the sediments. On average the largest contribution of resuspended organic carbon to the transport of total organic carbon is found at erosion and transport bottoms. Although the relative transport of resuspended organic carbon at deeper accumulation bottoms in general is low (< 10% of total), the central parts of the sub-basins act on average as sinks that import organic matter while the more shallow areas and the coastal regions acts as sources of organic carbon in the water column. This indicates that the particulate organic matter produced in erosion and transport areas might be kept in suspension long enough to be transported and settle in less energetic areas, i.e. on accumulation bottoms. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 21.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Kuznetsov, Ivan
    Hall, Per O. J.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    A new approach to model oxygen dependent benthic phosphate fluxes in the Baltic Sea2015In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 144, 127-141 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new approach to model the oxygen dependent phosphate release by implementing formulations of the oxygen penetration depths (OPD) and mineral bound inorganic phosphorus pools to the Swedish Coastal and Ocean Biogeochemical model (SCOBI) is described. The phosphorus dynamics and the oxygen concentrations in the Baltic proper sediment are studied during the period 1980-2008 using SCOBI coupled to the 3D-Rossby Centre Ocean model. Model data are compared to observations from monitoring stations and experiments. The impact from oxygen consumption on the determination of the OPD is found to be largest in the coastal zones where also the largest OPD are found. In the deep water the low oxygen concentrations mainly determine the OPD. Highest modelled release rate of phosphate from the sediment is about 59 x 10(3) t P year(-1) and is found on anoxic sediment at depths between 60-150 m, corresponding to 17% of the Baltic proper total area. The deposition of organic and inorganic phosphorus on sediments with oxic bottom water is larger than the release of phosphorus, about 43 x 10(3) t P year(-1). For anoxic bottoms the release of total phosphorus during the investigated period is larger than the deposition, about 19 x 10(3) t P year(-1). In total the net Baltic proper sediment sink is about 23.7 x 10(3) t P year(-1). The estimated phosphorus sink efficiency of the entire Baltic Sea is on average about 83% during the period. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  • 22.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Skogen, Morten D.
    A North Sea and Baltic Sea Model Ensemble Eutrophication Assessment2010In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, Vol. 39, no 1, 59-69 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method to combine observations and an ensemble of ecological models is suggested to produce a eutrophication assessment. Using threshold values and methodology from the Oslo and Paris Commissions (OSPAR) and the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM), four models are combined to assess eutrophication for the Baltic and North Seas for the year 2006. The assessment indicates that the entire southeastern part of the North Sea, the Kattegat, the Danish Straits, the Gulf of Finland, and the Gulf of Riga as well as parts of the Arkona Basin, the Bornholm Basin, and the Baltic proper may be classified as problem areas. The Bothnian Bay and parts of the Baltic proper, the Bornholm Basin, and the Arkona Basin are classified as potential problem areas. This method is a useful tool for the classification of eutrophication; however, the results depend on the threshold values, and further work is needed within both OSPAR and HELCOM to harmonize these values.

  • 23.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Skogen, Morten
    Sehested Hansen, Ian
    DHI Water and Environments.
    Stipa, Tapani
    University of Helsinki.
    Niiranen, Susa
    Stockholm University.
    The Year 2006 An Environmental Status report of the North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat and the Baltic Sea2007In: BANSAI- The Baltic and North Sea marine environmental modelling Asessment Initaiative / [ed] the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Sea and Air Group, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24. Al-Yaarubi, A. H.
    et al.
    Pain, C. C.
    Grattoni, C. A.
    Zimmerman, Robert W.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Navier-Stokes Simulations of Fluid Flow Through a Rock Fracture2013In: Dynamic Fluids and Transport Through in Fractured Rock, American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2013, 55-64 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A surface profilometer was used to measure fracture profiles every 10 microns over the surfaces of a replica of a fracture in a red Permian sandstone, to within an accuracy of a few microns. These surface data were used as input to two finite element codes that solve the Navier-Stokes equations and the Reynolds equation, respectively. Numerical simulations of flow through these measured aperture fields were carried out at different values of the mean aperture, corresponding to different values of the relative roughness. Flow experiments were also conducted in casts of two regions of the fracture. At low Reynolds numbers, the Navier-Stokes simulations yielded transmissivities for the two fracture regions that were closer to the experimental values than were the values predicted by the lubrication model. In general, the lubrication model overestimated the transmissivity by an amount that varied as a function of the relative roughness, defined as the standard deviation of the aperture divided by the mean aperture. The initial deviations from linearity, for Reynolds numbers in the range 1-10, were consistent with the "weak inertia" model developed by Mei and Auriault for porous media, and with the results obtained computationally by Skjetne et al in 1999 on a two-dimensional self-affine fracture. In the regime 10 < Re < 40, both the computed and measured transmissivities could be fit very well to a Forchheimer-type equation, in which the additional pressure drop varies quadratically with the Reynolds number.

  • 25. Amaguchi, H.
    et al.
    Kawamura, A.
    Olsson, Jonas
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Takasaki, T.
    Development and testing of a distributed urban storm runoff event model with a vector-based catchment delineation2012In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 420, 205-215 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent advances in GIS technology as well as data availability open up new possibilities concerning urban storm runoff modeling. In this paper, a vector-based distributed storm event runoff model - the Tokyo Storm Runoff (TSR) model - is developed and tested for urban runoff analysis using two historical storm events. The set-up of this model is based on urban landscape GIS delineation that faithfully describes the complicated urban land use features in detail. The flow between single spatial elements is based on established hydraulic and hydrological models with equations that describe all aspects of storm runoff generation in an urban environment. The model was set up and evaluated for the small urban lower Ekota catchment in Tokyo Metropolis, Japan. No calibration or tuning was performed, but the general model formulation was used with standard parameter values obtained from the literature. The runoff response to two storm events were simulated; one minor event resulting only in a small-scale flood wave and one major event which inundated parts of the catchment. For both events, the simulated water levels closely reproduced the observed ones. For the major event, also the reported inundation area was well described by the model. It was also demonstrated how the model can be used to evaluate the flow conditions in specific components of the urban hydrological system, which facilitates e.g. evaluation of flood-preventive measures. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Ameli, A. A.
    et al.
    Univ Western Ontario, Dept Biol, Biol & Geol Sci Bldg, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada.;Univ Saskatchewan, Global Inst Water Secur, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci Air Water & Landscape Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    McDonnell, J. J.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Global Inst Water Secur, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.;Univ Aberdeen, Sch Geosci, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden..
    The exponential decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity with depth: a novel method for exploring its effect on water flow paths and transit time distribution2016In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 30, no 14, 2438-2450 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The strong vertical gradient in soil and subsoil saturated hydraulic conductivity is characteristic feature of the hydrology of catchments. Despite the potential importance of these strong gradients, they have proven difficult to model using robust physically based schemes. This has hampered the testing of hypotheses about the implications of such vertical gradients for subsurface flow paths, residence times and transit time distribution. Here we present a general semi-analytical solution for the simulation of 2D steady-state saturated-unsaturated flow in hillslopes with saturated hydraulic conductivity that declines exponentially with depth. The grid-free solution satisfies mass balance exactly over the entire saturated and unsaturated zones. The new method provides continuous solutions for head, flow and velocity in both saturated and unsaturated zones without any interpolation process as is common in discrete numerical schemes. This solution efficiently generates flow pathlines and transit time distributions in hillslopes with the assumption of depth-varying saturated hydraulic conductivity. The model outputs reveal the pronounced effect that changing the strength of the exponential decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity has on the flow pathlines, residence time and transit time distribution. This new steady-state model may be useful to others for posing hypotheses about how different depth functions for hydraulic conductivity influence catchment hydrological response.

  • 27. Ameli, A.A.
    et al.
    Amvrosiadi, Nino
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Grabs, Thomas
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Creed, I.F.
    McDonnell, J.J.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Hillslope permeability architecture controls on subsurface transit time distribution and flow paths2016In: Journal of Hydrology, Vol. 543, 17-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ameli, Ali A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Univ Saskatchewan, Global Inst Water Secur, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.;Western Univ, Dept Biol, London, ON, Canada.
    Beven, Keith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster, England..
    Erlandsson, Martin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Creed, Irena F.
    Western Univ, Dept Biol, London, ON, Canada..
    McDonnell, Jeffrey J.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Global Inst Water Secur, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.;Univ Aberdeen, Sch Geosci, Aberdeen, Scotland.;Oregon State Univ, Dept Forest Engn Resources & Management, Corvallis, OR 97331 USA..
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Primary weathering rates, water transit times, and concentration-discharge relations: A theoretical analysis for the critical zone2017In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 53, no 1, 942-960 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The permeability architecture of the critical zone exerts a major influence on the hydrogeochemistry of the critical zone. Water flow path dynamics drive the spatiotemporal pattern of geochemical evolution and resulting streamflow concentration-discharge (C-Q) relation, but these flow paths are complex and difficult to map quantitatively. Here we couple a new integrated flow and particle tracking transport model with a general reversible Transition State Theory style dissolution rate law to explore theoretically how C-Q relations and concentration in the critical zone respond to decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-s) with soil depth. We do this for a range of flow rates and mineral reaction kinetics. Our results show that for minerals with a high ratio of equilibrium concentration ( Ceq) to intrinsic weathering rate ( Rmax), vertical heterogeneity in K-s enhances the gradient of weathering-derived solute concentration in the critical zone and strengthens the inverse stream C-Q relation. As <mml:mfrac>CeqRmax</mml:mfrac> decreases, the spatial distribution of concentration in the critical zone becomes more uniform for a wide range of flow rates, and stream C-Q relation approaches chemostatic behavior, regardless of the degree of vertical heterogeneity in K-s. These findings suggest that the transport-controlled mechanisms in the hillslope can lead to chemostatic C-Q relations in the stream while the hillslope surface reaction-controlled mechanisms are associated with an inverse stream C-Q relation. In addition, as <mml:mfrac>CeqRmax</mml:mfrac> decreases, the concentration in the critical zone and stream become less dependent on groundwater age (or transit time).

  • 29.
    Ameli, Ali, A.
    et al.
    Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
    Nino, Amvrosiadi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Grabs, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Creed, Irena
    estern Univ, Dept Biol, Biol & Geol Sci Bldg, London, ON N6A 5B7, Canada.
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, SE-90183 Umeå, Sweden.
    McDonnell, J. J.
    Global Institute for Water Security, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Kevin, Bishop
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hillslope permeability architecture controls on subsurface transit time distribution and flow paths2016In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 543, 17-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defining the catchment transit time distribution remains a challenge. Here, we used a new semi analytical physically-based integrated subsurface flow and advective dispersive particle movement model to assess the subsurface controls on subsurface water flow paths and transit time distributions. First, we tested the efficacy of the new model for simulation of the observed groundwater dynamics at the well-studied S-transect hillslope (Vastrabacken sub-catchment, Sweden). This system, like many others, is characterized by exponential decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity and porosity with soil depth. The model performed well relative to a tracer-based estimate of transit time distribution as well as observed groundwater depth discharge relationship within 30 m of the stream. Second, we used the model to assess the effect of changes in the subsurface permeability architecture on flow pathlines and transit time distribution in a set of virtual experiments. Vertical patterns of saturated hydraulic conductivity and porosity with soil depth significantly influenced hillslope transit time distribution. Increasing infiltration rates significantly decreased mean groundwater age, but not the distribution of transit times relative to mean groundwater age. The location of hillslope hydrologic boundaries, including the groundwater divide and no-flow boundary underlying the hillslope, changed the transit time distribution less markedly. These results can guide future decisions on the degree of complexity that is warranted in a physically-based rainfall runoff model to efficiently and explicitly estimate time invariant subsurface pathlines and transit time distribution.

  • 30. Aminot, A
    et al.
    Kirkwood, D
    Carlberg, Stig
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    The QUASIMEME laboratory performance studies (1993-1995): Overview of the nutrients section1997In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 35, no 1-6, 28-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The QUASIMEME Project (1993-1996) was established to assist European laboratories to improve the data they produce in marine monitoring programmes. Through laboratory performance Studies (with six-monthly reports), workshops and expert visits the programme was fully interactive. There were five rounds of laboratory performance studies. For the nutrient section, in which about 50 laboratories took part, the reference materials distributed to the participants consisted of standard solutions of nutrients and seawater samples stabilized by autoclaving. The material included low and high concentrations typical of those encountered in coastal seawater; at least two samples with different concentrations were distributed in each round. Robust statistics were used to determine the means and standard deviations for each set of results. For inorganic nutrients, the assessment of the data for bias and precision was based mainly on a Z- and P-scoring system in which targets of +/- 6% were allocated to the high concentrations, likewise +/- 12.5% to the low concentrations. This overview discusses overall performance separately for nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonia, phosphate, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and classifies the performance of individual laboratories in each round, while maintaining their anonymity. Performance for nitrate plus nitrite and nitrite improved steadily and these determinands are now fully under control; at the end of the programme, standard deviations (SD) for nitrate plus nitrite were 0.2 mu mol l(-1) at low concentration and 0.6 mu mol l(-1) (4%) at high concentration, and for nitrite they were 0.03 mu mol l(-1) and 0.06 mu mol l(-1) (5%) respectively. Phosphate showed a somewhat stable level of performance with SD of 0.06 mu mol l(-1) and 0.10 mu mol l(-1) (10%) at low and high concentrations respectively, but this could be improved. Ammonia proved the most difficult to determine, and in spite of a substantial improvement at the beginning of the exercise, this determinand is not under control in many laboratories. At low concentrations, ammonia shows a positive bias of 0.2 mu mol l(-1) and a SD of 0.3 mu mol l(-1), while at high concentrations SD reaches 0.5 mu mol l(-1) (20%). For total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP), the exercises show that only two thirds of the participants produced consistent data for TN, and less than half of them produced consistent data for TP. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 31.
    Amland, Sølvi Amland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Where are the soils in sweden that are most sensitive to acidification and nitrogen loss?2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 32.
    Amvrosiadi, Nino
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Seibert, Jan
    Soil moisture storage estimation based on steady vertical fluxes under equilibrium2017In: Journal of Hydrology, Vol. 553, 798-804 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Amvrosiadi, Nino
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Temporal Dynamics of Total Organic Carbon Export Rates in Swedish Streams: Importance of discharge conditions and seasonal effects2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of total organic carbon (TOC) in water is a rough indicator of the waterquality. Driven by the question how the TOC concentration would vary acrossstreams in Sweden under different climate conditions (e.g. more extreme dischargeevents), the temporal dynamics of TOC were examined for different stream subgroupswith six orders of magnitude catchment area span. In addition, the relationshipbetween dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) export (both downstream and evasion) anddischarge conditions was also studied. Another question addressed was if the amountof TOC exported can be affected by export conditions dominating the previousseason. TOC export followed closely the discharge, which is in agreement withprevious studies, and all 42 catchments studied across Sweden were described by thispositive relationship regardless their size. A linear TOC export response to dischargewas identified during extreme discharge conditions. Furthermore, the TOC export wassignificantly related to the antecedent TOC export conditions for approximately halfof the 18 studied catchments with areas ranging between 2.5·10-3 and 67 km2.

  • 34.
    Amvrosiadi, Nino
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Beven, Keith
    Bishop, Kevin
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Seibert, Jan
    Value of virtual experiments for a hillslope scale system understandingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Amvrosiadi, Nino
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Beven, Keith
    Bishop, Kevin
    Seibert, Jan
    Water age dependence on vertical flux assumptionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Amvrosiadi, Nino
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Seibert, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Univ Zurich, Dept Geog, Hydrol & Climate Unit, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Grabs, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Water storage dynamics in a till hillslope: the foundation for modeling flows and turnover times2017In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 31, no 1, 4-14 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on hydrology, biogeochemistry, or mineral weathering often rely on assumptions about flow paths, water storage dynamics, and transit times. Testing these assumptions requires detailed hydrometric data that are usually unavailable at the catchment scale. Hillslope studies provide an alternative for obtaining a better understanding, but even on such well-defined and delimited scales, it is rare to have a comprehensive set of hydrometric observations from the water divide down to the stream that can constrain efforts to quantify water storage, movement, and turnover time. Here, we quantified water storage with daily resolution in a hillslope during the course of almost an entire year using hydrological measurements at the study site and an extended version of the vertical equilibrium model. We used an exponential function to simulate the relationship between hillslope discharge and water table; this was used to derive transmissivity profiles along the hillslope and map mean pore water velocities in the saturated zone. Based on the transmissivity profiles, the soil layer transmitting 99% of lateral flow to the stream had a depth that ranged from 8.9 m at the water divide to under 1 m closer to the stream. During the study period, the total storage of this layer varied from 1189 to 1485 mm, resulting in a turnover time of 2172 days. From the pore water velocities, we mapped the time it would take a water particle situated at any point of the saturated zone anywhere along the hillslope to exit as runoff. Our calculations point to the strengths as well as limitations of simple hydrometric data for inferring hydrological properties and water travel times in the subsurface.

  • 37. Anastasiadis, Stavros
    et al.
    Boglis, Argiris
    Pechlivanidis, Ilias
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Lekkas, Demetris F.
    Baltas, Evaggelos
    APPLICATION OF GIS BASED CLARK'S UNIT HYDROGRAPH AND TRANSFER FUNCTION MODEL TO DESCRIBE RUNOFF RESPONSE IN A SMALL CATCHMENT, CASE STUDY: LYKOREMMA RIVER, GREECE2013In: Fresenius Environmental Bulletin, ISSN 1018-4619, Vol. 22, no 7B, 2152-2158 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrologic community has recently focused substantial attention on ungauged or poorly gauged catchments, since hydrological prediction under these conditions is highly uncertain, but represents the majority of practical applications. Catchments in Greece are usually ungauged, due to resource constrains, whilst in gauged areas the period of record is often short for safe estimation of highly parameterised hydrological models. This paper is driven by the Prediction in Ungauged Basins initiative aiming to estimate catchment responses using readily available data, i.e. topographical, soil and land use information. The parsimonious rainfall-runoff model developed in a Geographical Information System (GIS) environment is based on the Clark's synthetic unit hydrograph technique to estimate the hydrological response. The method requires estimation of the time of concentration (based on the curve number), the storage attenuation coefficient and the time area histogram of the catchment. The models further compared with a data-based modelling approach using a Transfer Function and the simulated streamflow is analysed to investigate similarities as well as to better understand possible extensions of the resulting unit hydrograph. A case study using 10-minute observed data from the 15 km(2) Lykorema catchment, Attica, Greece, highlights the potential of the GIS-based model to predict, at least, the dynamic characteristics of the runoff response in ungauged or poorly gauged catchments.

  • 38. Andersen, Jesper H.
    et al.
    Axe, Philip
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Backer, Hermanni
    Carstensen, Jacob
    Claussen, Ulrich
    Fleming-Lehtinen, Vivi
    Jarvinen, Marko
    Kaartokallio, Hermanni
    Knuuttila, Seppo
    Korpinen, Samuli
    Kubiliute, Aiste
    Laamanen, Maria
    Lysiak-Pastuszak, Elzbieta
    Martin, Georg
    Murray, Ciaran
    Mohlenberg, Flemming
    Nausch, Guenther
    Norkko, Alf
    Villnas, Anna
    Getting the measure of eutrophication in the Baltic Sea: towards improved assessment principles and methods2011In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 106, no 2, 137-156 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eutrophication status of the entire Baltic Sea is classified using a multi-metric indicator-based assessment tool. A total of 189 areas are assessed using indicators where information on reference conditions (RefCon), and acceptable deviation (AcDev) from reference condition could be combined with national monitoring data from the period 2001-2006. Most areas (176) are classified as 'affected by eutrophication' and only two open water areas and 11 coastal areas are classified as 'unaffected by eutrophication'. The classification is made by application of the recently developed HELCOM Eutrophication Assessment Tool (HEAT), which is described in this paper. The use of harmonized assessment principles and the HEAT tool allows for direct comparisons between different parts of the Baltic Sea despite variations in monitoring activities. The impaired status of 176 areas is directly related to nutrient enrichment and elevated loads from upstream catchments. Baltic Sea States have implemented nutrient management strategies since years which have reduced nutrient inputs. However, eutrophication is still a major problem for large parts of the Baltic Sea. The 2007 Baltic Sea Action Plan is projected to further reduce nutrient inputs aiming for a Baltic Sea unaffected by eutrophication by 2021.

  • 39. Andersen, Jesper H.
    et al.
    Murray, Ciaran
    Kaartokallio, Hermanni
    Axe, Philip
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Molvaer, Jarle
    A simple method for confidence rating of eutrophication status classifications2010In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 60, no 6, 919-924 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the development of a methodology for assessing confidence in ecological status classifications. The method presented here can be considered as a secondary assessment, supporting the primary assessment of eutrophication or ecological status. The confidence assessment is based on scoring the quality of the indicators on which the primary assessment is made. This represents a first step towards linking status classification with information regarding their accuracy and precision. Applied to an existing data set used for assessment of eutrophication status of the Baltic Sea (including the Kattegat and Danish Straits) we demonstrate that confidence in the assessment is Good or High in 149 out of 189 areas assessed (79%). Contrary to our expectations, assessments of the open parts of the Baltic Sea have a higher confidence than assessments of coastal waters. We also find that in open waters of the Baltic Sea, some biological indicators have a higher confidence than indicators representing physical-chemical conditions. In coastal waters, phytoplankton, submerged aquatic vegetation and indicators of physical-chemical conditions have a higher confidence than indicators of the quality of benthic invertebrate communities. Our analyses also show that the perceived weaknesses of eutrophication assessments are due more to Low confidence in reference conditions and acceptable deviations, rather than in the monitoring data. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 40. Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Ripszam, Matyas
    Rowe, Owen
    Wikner, Johan
    Haglund, Peter
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Tysklind, Mats
    Elmgren, Ragnar
    Projected future climate change and Baltic Sea ecosystem management2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, S345-S356 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is likely to have large effects on the Baltic Sea ecosystem. Simulations indicate 2-4 degrees C warming and 50-80 % decrease in ice cover by 2100. Precipitation may increase similar to 30 % in the north, causing increased land runoff of allochthonous organic matter (AOM) and organic pollutants and decreased salinity. Coupled physical-biogeochemical models indicate that, in the south, bottom-water anoxia may spread, reducing cod recruitment and increasing sediment phosphorus release, thus promoting cyanobacterial blooms. In the north, heterotrophic bacteria will be favored by AOM, while phytoplankton production may be reduced. Extra trophic levels in the food web may increase energy losses and consequently reduce fish production. Future management of the Baltic Sea must consider the effects of climate change on the ecosystem dynamics and functions, as well as the effects of anthropogenic nutrient and pollutant load. Monitoring should have a holistic approach, encompassing both autotrophic (phytoplankton) and heterotrophic (e.g., bacterial) processes.

  • 41.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Selstam, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hagström, Åke
    Vertical transport of lipid in seawater1993In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 98, no 1-2, 149-155 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipids in seawater act as solvents and transporters of lipophilic organic pollutants. To investigate a possible transport route of lipophilic pollutants, the vertical flux of lipid was quantified during an annual cycle in the northern Baltic Sea. The lipid content in both sedimenting material and different size fractions of seawater was analyzed. During the year, 8 g lipid m-2 sedimented out from the photic zone to the benthic system. The sedimentation of lipid accounted for 300 to 400 % of the average standing stock of pelagic lipid and was concentrated in the spring bloom period (April-June) when 70 % of the total lipid sedimentation occurred. About 30 % of the produced pelagic lipid settled out from the system. In seawater the lipid maximum occurred at the end of the spring bloom, shortly after nutrient depletion, indicating a stress response in the algae. Since lipid sedimentation is concentrated in the spring bloom, removal of lipophilic organic pollutants may be important during this period.

  • 42.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Pelagisk biologi2004In: Bottniska viken: årsrapport från den marina miljöövervakningen. 2003, Skydd av havsområden gagnar fisken, Hörnefors: Umeå marina forskningscentrum (UMF) , 2004, 11-13 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Andersson, Elinor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Starttillståndets inverkan på hydrologisk prognososäkerhet i HYPE-modellen2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Hydrological Forecast and Warning Service of The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) use meteorological ensemble forecasts as input in hydrological models. The hydrological ensemble forecasts take the uncertainty of future temperature and precipitation into account and serve as the basis of issued risks and warnings of high flows. Currently not considered is the uncertainty of the initial state, which consists of state variables in the model describing for instance soil water content and snow pack. This study assessed the impact of the initial state on forecasts in the hydrological model HYPE aiming to quantify the uncertainty and eventually enable more accurate forecasts.There were three aims of this study : 1) Evaluate a suggestion about how the initial state can be varied to give a good estimation of forecast uncertainty related to the hydrological initial state. 2) Examine the relationship between the spread of initial states and the hydrological forecast error. 3) Analyze the impact of seasons, catchment area, lake percentage, forest percentage and elevation on forecast uncertainty. A central hypothesis was that a smaller difference between the discharge of the initial state and the observed discharge results in more accurate forecasts. A restriction of the study was that the initial states only could be generated by disturbances of forcing data in before the forecast.Input data to the HYPE model were fifteen temperature and precipitation series, manipulated to generate an ensemble of different initial states. This ensemble was then used to make discharge forecasts with observed temperature and precipitation as forcing data. The study was performed on 76 catchments all over Sweden with data from the time period 1999-2008. Forecasts were made every day and the ensemble spread was evaluated 2, 4 and 10 days into the forecast. Autoregressive forecasts where the modelled discharge is corrected after the observed discharge were executed and evaluated as well. The results indicated a relationship between ensemble spread and forecast error, which implies that the spread can be used as a measure of the uncertainty of the initial state. The forecast error and ensemble spread correlated positively to forest percentage and negatively to catchment area, lake percentage and elevation. The same trend was detected between spread and catchment characteristics. The spread was biggest in winter and spring when normalization was made with mean discharge for the ten-year period and in spring and summer when normalization was done with mean discharge per month. The hypothesis that a smaller difference between the discharge of the initial state and the observed discharge results in more accurate forecasts was confirmed by the results. An implementation of an ensemble of different initial states in operational forecasts at SMHI’s Hydrological Forecast and Warning Service is suggested in order to further quantify the uncertainty of hydrological forecasts, and thereby improve the basis of judgment when issuing risks and warnings.

  • 44.
    Andersson, Helén
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eriksson Bram, Lena
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Hjerdt, Niclas
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Lindström, Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Löptien, Ulrike
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Strömqvist, Johan
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Översikt av beräkningsmodeller för bedömning av fiskodlingars näringsämnesbelastning på sjöar, vattendrag, magasin och kustvatten2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här rapporten är en kunskapssammanställning som utförts av SMHI på uppdrag av Havs- och Vattenmyndigheten. Den utgör inte något ställningstagande från Havs- och vattenmyndighetens sida. Rapporten försöker att sammanfatta den problematik som associeras med näringsämnesbelastningar från fiskodlingar i öppna kassar, vilka typer av beräkningar som kan behöva göras för att få en uppfattning om hur dessa kan påverka miljön samt några olika typer av modeller för detta ändamål.

    Fisk-, alg- och skaldjursodling är en växande industri runt om i världen som kan ge såväl näringsrik och hälsosam mat som arbetstillfällen. En nackdel med framförallt fiskodling i öppna kassar är att den kan innebära en påfrestning för vattenmiljön. De näringsämnen som ofta släpps ut från odlingen kan bidra till den övergödningsproblematik som redan finns i många sjöar och havsområden. Det är därför av största vikt att få en god uppskattning av den förväntade storleken på utsläppen förknippade med en öppen odling samt hur de kan tänkas förändra vattenkvaliteten på odlingsplatsen och dess närhet. Beräkningsmodeller kan vara till god hjälp vid bedömningen.

    Fiskar utsöndrar lösta näringsämnen och från odlingskassarna faller det också ut partikulärt organiskt material i form av fekalier och oätet foder. Storleken på näringsämneskällorna behöver beräknas och det finns modeller av olika komplexitet för att uppskatta detta. Storleken på det partikulära avfallet är viktigt dels för att det bidrarmed näringsämnen till vattnet och dels för att det kan ge upphov till ansamlingar av organiskt material på bottnen. När det organiska materialet bryts ner förbrukas syre och om ansamlingarna blir omfattande finns en risk för att det uppstår syrebrist vid bottnen. Om svavelväte bildas kan det orsaka skador på såväl den odlade fisken som det lokala ekosystemet. Odlingen kan också bidra till en försämrad vattenkvalitet i sin omgivning genom att tillgången av lösta näringsämnen blir större och därmed ge en ökad algproduktion. Den ökade algproduktionen skall i sin tur brytas ner och kan i förlängningen bidra till syrebristproblematiken.

    Det finns ett antal modeller som är specifikt utvecklade för fiskodlingar i öppna kassar och de tar i olika hög grad upp den beskrivna problematiken. Rapporten innehåller detaljerade genomgångar av några av modeller för att visa på styrkor och svagheter kring olika angreppsätt. Den innehåller också sammanfattningar av några vanligt förekommande modeller som använts internationellt vid bedömning av fiskodlingars miljöpåverkan. För att minska den negativa påverkan på vattenmiljön från har det också utvecklats recirkulerande system för odling. Rapporten tar inte upp belastning från den typen av fiskodlingar. Om utsläppen från ett sådant system är känt kan dock vattenkvalitetsmodeller användas för att se effekten av utsläpp från en punktkälla.

    Rapporten sammanfattar ett antal vattenkvalitetsmodeller för sjöar, vattendrag, kust och hav. En vattenkvalitetsmodell behöver inte nödvändigtvis vara utvecklad för att beskriva konsekvenser av fiskodlingar men bör kunna hantera frågeställningar som uppkommer vid bedömningar av övergödningsrisk vid utsläpp från en punktkälla. Den behöver därför kunna simulera parametrar såsom förändringen av näringsämneskoncentrationer, primärproduktion, siktdjup och syrgashalter på olika nivåer i vattenmassan. Modeller för den här typen av uppskattningar finns också i olika komplexitetsgrad och för olika skalor i tid och rum.

    Vid modellering är en god tillgång till observationer en förutsättning för pålitliga modellresultat och behövs såväl för att driva och kalibrera modellen som för validering av modellresultaten. Det är viktigt att tillgängliga data håller god kvalitet. En noggrann analys och beskrivning av den tillgängliga databasen hjälper därmed till att bedöma tillförlitligheten av modellsimuleringarna.

  • 45.
    Andersson, Jafet
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Arheimer, Berit
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Hjerdt, Niclas
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Combine and Share Essential Knowledge for Sustainable2016In: The Solutions Journal, ISSN 2154-0926, Vol. 7, no 3, 30-32 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Andersson, Jafet
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Arheimer, Berit
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Hjerdt, Niclas
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Combine and Share Essential Knowledge for Sustainable Water Management2016In: Solutions Journal, ISSN 2154-0896, E-ISSN 2154-0926, Vol. 7, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Andersson, Jafet
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Pechlivanidis, Ilias
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Gustafsson, David
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Arheimer, Berit
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Key factors for improving large-scale hydrological model performance2015In: European Water, ISSN 1792-085X, Vol. 49, 77-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Andersson, Jafet
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Zehnder, Alexander J. B.
    Wehrli, Bernhard
    Jewitt, Graham P. W.
    Abbaspour, Karim C.
    Yang, Hong
    Improving Crop Yield and Water Productivity by Ecological Sanitation and Water Harvesting in South Africa2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 9, 4341-4348 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study quantifies the potential effects of a set of technologies to address wafer and fertility constraints in rain. fed smallholder agriculture in South Africa, namely in situ water harvesting (WH), external WH, and ecological sanitation (Ecosan, fertilization with human urine); We Used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to model spatiotemporally differentiated effects on maize yield, river flow, evaporation, and transpiration. Ecosan Met some of the plant nitrogen demands, which significantly increased maize yields by 12% and transpiration by 2% on average across South Africa. In situ and external WH did not significantly affect the yield, transpiration or river flow on the South Africa scale. However, external WH. more than doubled the yields for specific seasons and locations. WH particularly increased the lowest yields. Significant, water and nutrient demands remained even with WH and Ecosan management. Additional fertility enhancements raised the yield levels but also the yield variability, whereas soil moisture enhancements improved the yield stability. Hence, coupled policies' addressing both constraints will likely be Most effective for improving food security.

  • 49.
    Andersson, Lars
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Trends in nutrient and oxygen concentrations in the Skagerrak-Kattegat1996In: Journal of Sea Research, ISSN 1385-1101, E-ISSN 1873-1414, Vol. 35, no 1-3, 63-71 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Skagerrak and Kattegat form a transition zone between the Baltic and the North Sea. Both areas are subject to increased nutrient loads. In this paper a non-parametric method is used to calculate the changes in nutrient and oxygen concentrations in the area. The period chosen was 1971 to 1990 and the parameters were dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus, silicate, total nitrogen and total phosphorus together with oxygen and oxygen saturation. Data have been sorted after salinity and the analyses have been carried out for different water masses and subareas. The results demonstrate that both surface and deep water in the Kattegat show increasing trends during winter for all nutrients except silicate. During summer there is an increase in total nitrogen and total phosphorus while silicate shows a decrease. In the Skagerrak the picture is more variable; in the eastern part, however, there is a clear increase for all inorganic nutrients during winter in the coastal water. Oxygen shows a declining trend in most areas.

  • 50.
    Andersson, Lars
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Rahm, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    THERMALLY DRIVEN CIRCULATION WITHIN AN EXPERIMENTAL ENCLOSURE1990In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 30, no 2, 111-129 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
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