Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ciosek Högström, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Lundgren, Henrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Wilken, Susanne
    Zavalis, Tommy G.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Jacobsson, Per
    Johansson, Patrik
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Impact of the flame retardant additive triphenyl phosphate (TPP) on the performance of graphite/LiFePO4 cells in high power applications2014In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 256, p. 430-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents an extensive characterization of a standard Li-ion battery (LiB) electrolyte containing different concentrations of the flame retardant triphenyl phosphate (TPP) in the context of high power applications. Electrolyte characterization shows only a minor decrease in the electrolyte flammability for low TPP concentrations. The addition of TPP to the electrolyte leads to increased viscosity and decreased conductivity. The solvation of the lithium ion charge carriers seem to be directly affected by the TPP addition as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and increased mass-transport resistivity. Graphite/LiFePO4 full cell tests show the energy efficiency to decrease with the addition of TPP. Specifically, diffusion resistivity is observed to be the main source of increased losses. Furthermore, TPP influences the interface chemistry on both the positive and the negative electrode. Higher concentrations of TPP lead to thicker interface layers on LiFePO4. Even though TPP is not electrochemically reduced on graphite, it does participate in SEI formation. TPP cannot be considered a suitable flame retardant for high power applications as there is only a minor impact of TPP on the flammability of the electrolyte for low concentrations of TPP, and a significant increase in polarization is observed for higher concentrations of TPP.

  • 2. Ciosek, K.
    et al.
    Killiches, S.
    Zavalis, Tommy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Johansson, P.
    Edström, K.
    Jacobsson, P.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Energy storage activities in the swedish hybrid vehicle centre2009In: 24th International Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium and Exhibition 2009, EVS 24, 2009, p. 2850-2854Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant efforts are put worldwide on developing new concepts for vehicle propulsion with the hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) being a prominent example. Hybrid technology is clearly a strategic future activity for automotive industries and in response to the rapid development in the area; the Swedish Hybrid Vehicle Centre (SHC) was formed in 2007 to join forces between Swedish industry and academia in the field. The centre emphasizes a holistic view to meet the environmental and societal needs with new technological solutions. The research within SHC is currently divided into three different themes where of we here describe the Energy Storage theme with emphasis on the activities carried out at the involved universities in the current main project areas: Cell Properties, Electrode Materials and Electrolyte Additives. Examples are given on how these projects attacks the problems at hand separately, but also how we create synergy effects between the projects. As an example cell modelling is performed given a specific chemistry and cycling scheme, the same parameters are used for electrochemical experiments which provide macroscopic data that are connected with molecular level actions in the electrodes, the electrolyte, and the interfaces. All this is done using our base-line chemistry and a subsequent route is to investigate the role of different additives to overcome the limitations that are observed.

  • 3. Ciosek, K.
    et al.
    Killiches, S.
    Zavalis, Tommy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Johansson, P.
    Edström, K.
    Jacobsson, P.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Energy storage activities in the Swedish hybrid vehicle centre2009In: World Electric Vehicle Journal, ISSN 2032-6653, E-ISSN 2032-6653, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant efforts are put worldwide on developing new concepts for vehicle propulsion with the hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) being a prominent example. Hybrid technology is clearly a strategic future activity for automotive industries and in response to the rapid development in the area; the Swedish Hybrid Vehicle Centre (SHC) was formed in 2007 to join forces between Swedish industry and academia in the field. The centre emphasizes a holistic view to meet the environmental and societal needs with new technological solutions. The research within SHC is currently divided into three different themes whereof we here describe the Energy Storage theme with emphasis on the activities carried out at the involved universities in the current main project areas: Cell Properties, Electrode Materials and Electrolyte Additives. Examples are given on how these projects attacks the problems at hand separately, but also how we create synergy effects between the projects. As an example cell modelling is performed given a specific chemistry and cycling scheme, the same parameters are used for electrochemical experiments which provide macroscopic data that are connected with molecular level actions in the electrodes, the electrolyte, and the interfaces. All this is done using our base-line chemistry and a subsequent route is to investigate the role of different additives to overcome the limitations that are observed.

  • 4.
    Hellqvist Kjell, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Zavalis, Tommy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Electrochemical characterization of lithium intercalation processes of PAN-based carbon fibers in a microelectrode system2013In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 160, no 9, p. A1473-A1481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A full electrochemical investigation of the lithium intercalation processes in a commercially available PAN-based carbon fiber, Toho Tenax IMS65 (unsized and sized) primarily intended to be used in structural lithium-ion batteries, has been performed. In order to extract the electrochemical properties, a specially designed microelectrode system consisting of a single fiber working electrode, lithium-foil counter electrode and well-characterized battery materials were utilized. The properties, for 5 to 100% state-of-charge (SOC), were mainly determined from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements by fitting of a physics-based model, and electronic conductivity examination. The study shows excellent mass transport and kinetic properties, especially at high SOCs for this specific carbon fiber compared to other negative electrode materials. Some electrochemical parameters vary depending on sizing, but are too small to affect the actual electrochemical performance. A strong SOC dependence is shown for most electrochemical properties, including the electronic conductivity.

  • 5.
    Hellqvist Kjell, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Zavalis, Tommy Georgios
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Characterization of Lithium Intercalation Processes of PAN-based Carbon Fibers in a Microelectrode SystemArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Klett, Matilda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Zavalis, Tommy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Hellqvist Kjell, Maria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Wreland Lindström, Rakel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Altered electrode degradation with temperature in LiFePO4/mesocarbon microbead graphite cells diagnosed with impedance spectroscopy2014In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 141, p. 173-181Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrode degradation in LiFePO4 / mesocarbon microbead graphite (MCMB) pouch cells aged at 55 °C by a synthetic hybrid drive cycle or storage is diagnosed and put into context with previous results of aging at 22 °C. The electrode degradation is evaluated by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measured separately on electrodes harvested from the cells, and by using a physics-based impedance model for aging evaluation. Additional capacity measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) are used in the evaluation. At 55 °C the LiFePO4 electrode shows increased particle/electronic conductor resistance, for both stored and cycled electrodes. This differs from results obtained at 22 °C, where the electrode suffered lowered porosity, particle fracture, and loss of active material. For graphite, only cycling gave a sustained effect on electrode performance at 55 °C due to lowered porosity and changes of surface properties, and to greater extent than at low temperature. Furthermore, increased current collector resistance also contributes to a large part of the pouch cell impedance when aged at increased temperatures. The result shows that increased temperature promotes different degradation on the electrode level, and is an important implication for high temperature accelerated aging. In light of the electrode observations, the correlation between full-cell and electrode impedances is discussed.

  • 7.
    Nyman, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Zavalis, Tommy Georgios
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Elger, Ragna
    Swerea.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    A New Methodology for Evaluating the High-Power Behavior of a Li-ion Battery Cell2010In: Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries, Electrochemical Society, 2010, no 36, p. 253-262Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The internal sources of polarization are calculated and investigated for a graphite (MAG-10) vertical bar 1.2 M LiPF6 in EC: EMC (3: 7 by weight) vertical bar LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 battery cell at SOC 40 and 80. A method is developed where the total polarization of the battery cell is split up into six polarizing subprocesses. The method involves two steps; the solving of an experimentally validated model that describes the dynamics of the battery cell during e. g. a hybrid pulse power characterization test and the use of the modeled cell's local potential, concentration profiles and local current density to calculate the internal losses. With this analysis the sources of polarization during an EUCAR test cycle are determined. The major factor limiting the performance is associated with the mass transport in the electrolyte.

  • 8.
    Nyman, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Zavalis, Tommy Georgios
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Elger, Ragna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Analysis of the Polarization in a Li-Ion Battery Cell by Numerical Simulations2010In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 157, no 11, p. A1236-A1246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experimentally validated model was developed to analyze the polarization of a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 vertical bar 1.2 M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC):ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7)vertical bar MAG-10 battery cell during a hybrid pulse power characterization (HPPC) cycle. The analysis was made with a method where the polarization was split up into parts associated with activation of the electrochemical reactions, mass transport of species in the electrolyte and in the solid phase, and inadequate contact between the materials in the electrodes. Each contribution to the polarization was quantified as a snapshot in time and as an average over the HPPC cycle. The polarization during a cycle according to EUCAR was analyzed in detail for state of charge (SOC) 40 and 80. It arose mainly due to the mass transport in the electrolyte, e. g., at SOC 40 it contributed to 43% of the total polarization. In an ISO (International Organization for Standardization)-energy cycle where the current loads are higher and applied for longer times than the EUCAR cycle, the mass transport by diffusion in the electrolyte and in the solid phase of the negative electrode became more significant. The presented method offers the possibility to find a battery cell's optimal operational condition and design.

  • 9.
    Zavalis, Tommy Georgios
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Mathematical Models for Investigation of Performance, Safety, and Aging in Lithium-Ion Batteries2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries have both the power and energy capabilities to be utilized in hybrid electric vehicles and other power demanding applications. However, there are obstacles primarily related to reliability in safety and lifetime. Additionally, there is still room for improvement in the battery performance.

    In this work, physics-based mathematical models have been successfully set-up and numerically solved to investigate performance, safety, and aging in lithium-ion battery systems. This modeling approach enabled a detailed analysis of the electrochemical processes related to these issues. As the models included many parameters and spatial resolution of several variables with time or frequency, strategies for investigation needed to be developed for most of the work. The accuracy of the investigation was consolidated by the utilization of parameters characterized from experimental work.

    The performance expressed in terms of polarization was determined for a power-optimized battery cell undergoing various operating conditions. A methodology that separated and quantified the contribution of each process to the polarization was set up, allowing the study of the contributions as a snapshot in time and as an average over a cycle. Mass transport in electrolyte was shown to be a crucial feature to improve especially if the battery is expected to undergo high current-loads for long periods of time.

    Safety-concerns when a battery cell is short-circuited were investigated for three types of short-circuit scenarios. All scenarios raised the temperature to the point where exothermic side reactions were initiated. The similarities between the scenarios in temperature increase were a result of the limiting current being reached. The differences, however small, were related to the placement of the short-circuit. Especially when the current collectors were not directly connected by the short circuit, an increased electronic resistance was observed which lowered both the generated current and heat.

    The aging of a battery cell was investigated by model analysis of electrodes harvested from fresh and aged cells. A methodology was used where a frequency-dependent model was fitted to three-electrode impedance experiments by tuning parameters associated to electrode degradation. For cycled cells, electrolyte decomposition products inhibiting the mass transport in the electrolyte and particle cracking in the positive electrode increased the impedance. A similar model was also set up for investigation of the lithium intercalation processes in PAN-based carbon fibers, showing it to have both good mass transport and kinetic capabilities.

  • 10.
    Zavalis, Tommy Georgios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Investigation of Short-Circuit Scenarios in a Lithium-Ion Battery Cell2012In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 159, no 6, p. A848-A859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A short-circuited lithium-ion battery cell is likely to generate sufficient heat to initiate exothermic side reactions causing thermal runaway. A 2D coupled electrochemical-thermal model was developed to investigate a prismatic LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 vertical bar LiPF6, EC/EMC (3:7)vertical bar MAG-10 battery cell that is short-circuited. Three short-circuit scenarios are investigated during the events from when short circuit occurs until exothermic side reactions initiate. The scenarios are an external short circuit, a nail penetration and an impurity-induced short circuit. The model is used to predict the temperature increase within the cell and to explain how the interrelation between the electrochemical processes and the thermal properties affects the increase. Important safety measures are also examined with the model. The simulation results highlight general short-circuit characteristics and critical distinctions between the scenarios. The mass transport of lithium ions in the electrolyte is found to be the most important general characteristic that determines the rate of the temperature increase. The electric resistance distinguishes the scenarios from each other. The rate of the temperature increase is dictated by the mass transport in the electrolyte even when large variations in available active material are made and it is shown to be difficult to slow down the rate by cooling.

  • 11.
    Zavalis, Tommy Georgios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Klett, Matilda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Kjell, Maria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Behm, Mårten
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Wreland Lindström, Rakel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Aging in Lithium-Ion Batteries: Experimental and Model Investigation of Harvested LiFePO4 and Mesocarbon Microbead Graphite Electrodes2013In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 110, p. 335-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates aging in LiFePO4/mesocarbon microbead graphite cells that have been subjected to either a synthetic hybrid drive cycle or calendar aging, at 22 C. The investigation involves detailed examination and comparison of harvested fresh and aged electrodes. The electrode properties are determined using a physics-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) model that is fitted to three-electrode EIS measurements, with input from measured electrode capacity and scanning electrode microscopy (SEM). Results from the model fitting provide a detailed insight to the electrode degradation and is put into context with the behavior of the full cell aging. It was established that calendar aging has negligible effect on cell impedance, while cycle aging increases the impedance mainly due to structural changes in the LiFePO4 porous electrode and electrolyte decomposition products on both electrodes. Further, full-cell capacity fade is mainly a consequence of cyclable lithium loss caused by electrolyte decomposition.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf