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  • 1.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Consumption of entrepreneurs, consumption of entrepreneurship: Bloggers, influencers and socialites in a post-feminist economy2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the wake of the neoliberal turn, discourses on the ‘the women entrepreneur’ who starts up and manages her own company, has been stretched to include ‘the entrepreneurial women’, who affirms already achieved gender equality and thus find feminist activism less necessary to pursue (McRobbie, 2004; Gill, 2007). Entrepreneurship emphasis onindividualism, choice, and empowerment offers women postfeminist subject positions (Lewis, 2014). Wo/men’s independence has turned into an entrepreneurial class achievement (Gill, 2014), which is attained through consumption and a critical gaze on the self (Tasker & Negra, 2007). It has been reported that women’s magazines have dropped feminist content and nowadays offer women space for both self-revaluation and self-actualization (McRobbie, 2004, 2009, 2011, HolmerNadesan& Trethewey, 2000; Bröckling, 2010) Boundaries become blurred, including the male/female division, whilst the autonomous male subject of liberal polity (‘the economic man’) is turned into an invisible template (Hekman2004).  

    In this paper, we study this emerging terrain by turning to popular bloggers’ sites asking what kind of subject positions that are promoted. Our empirical data consist of blog posts, podcasts, social media interactions and interviews with a number of professional Swedish bloggers/influencers/entrepreneurs, both male and female. 

    What is common for all these entrepreneurs is that they have built up thriving and multi-faceted businesses around their personas – centering on a constant sharing of their personal lives in combination with positioning themselves as socialites and experts on matters such as fashion, interior decoration, media trends, travel – and entrepreneurship. The base – usually a blog site or a weekly podcast – has been expanded by all sorts of other activities; e.g., book publishing, TV shows, stage performances, beauty products, clothing lines and magazines.

    Feminism is an integrated part of all this, but in a ‘girlpower-ish’ sense where women can be independent and successful by their own making. In one sense, their subject positioning signifies a departure from the ethos of usefulness and discipline of classic neoliberalism (cfBerglund et al, 2017); they are to be admired because of their consumption, they are to be consumed themselves as signifiers of effectiveness, success, style and family happiness. But they are also avid promoters of classic entrepreneurial virtues; their lifestyles are within reach if you work hard, consume the right products and services, care for your career and your family at the same time. It is subject positions void of structural aspects of society (such as class), void of political conflict and void of problematisationof consumption in relation to sustainability issues.

    Our empirical examples are clearly related to recent claims that the neoliberal turn have unearthed the entrepreneurial “active, freely choosing, self-reinventing subject of postfeminism”(Gill and Scharff, 2011, p. 7). This subject may however take different shapes whereby it is more suitable to talk about how entrepreneurship discourses underpin a reconfiguration of femininity, thus offering women a variety of ‘outfits’. What these subjects share, except expecting undisputed economic freedom, is the wish (or need) to continuously self-actualise and transform, take responsibility, exercise (often conflicting) choices, in a world without radical or upsetting politics (Lewis et al, 2017). The entrepreneurial subject of neoliberalism and the self-fashioning postfeminist subject breed each other.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet, Stockholm Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Fostering the enterprising self: Gendered notions of entrepreneurship in Swedish school education2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Responsibilising the next generation: Fostering the enterprising self through de-mobilising gender2017In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 892-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, our interest is in what subjectivities are fostered among schoolchildren through the recent introduction of entrepreneurship initiatives in primary and secondary school. The educational terrain is but one example where entrepreneurship has been discursively transformed during recent decades from the notion of starting businesses into a general approach to life itself in the advancement of neoliberal societies. The inherently elitist and excluding position of the entrepreneurial subject is now offered to all and sundry. While entrepreneurship pedagogy is explicitly intended to be gender neutral and inclusive of all such identities traditionally suppressed in the entrepreneurship discourse, we ask what kind of enterprising selves are mobilised and de-mobilised here. Second, in what way are these seemingly ‘gender-neutral’ enterprising selves gendered? Our analysis of three recent and dominating entrepreneurial initiatives in the Swedish school system emphasises the need for activation, performativity and responsibility. The analysis also shows that gender is indeed silenced in these initiatives but is at the same time productive through being subtly present in the promotion of a ‘neo-masculine’, active, technology-oriented and responsible subject. Entrepreneurship is presented as being equally available for all and something everyone should aspire to, yet the initiatives still sustain the suppression and marginalisation of women and femininities. The initiatives specifically promote a responsible and adaptive masculine subject position while notions of rebellious entrepreneurship and non-entrepreneurial domestic positions are mobilised out of the picture.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Re-theorising projectified selves in social media: Prosumption, postfeminism and class-as-achievement2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Ekman Rising, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management. Sevenday.
    Instrumentalisation of academic work: Creeping, myopic and individualising processes and their consequences2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    ’Doing leadership’: Ledarskap som sociala interaktionsprocesser2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Gendered recognition practices and the perpetuation of vulnerability: A study in Swedish universities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current critical research on work life in the higher education sector, analyses often revolve around neoliberal managerialism as contrasted to traditional professional academic values (cf. Henkel, 1997; Deem, 2004; Ekman et al, 2017). Academics are both faced with expectations to uphold the integrity of academic values in their research and teaching, whilst at the same time performing and ’careering’ in accordance with managerialist reforms (Clarke & Knights, 2015).

    Knights & Clarke (2014) analyse insecurity as a central aspect of identity in academics, conceptualizing academic life as a ‘bittersweet symphony’ populated by imposters (self- doubt and low self-esteem despite adequate performance), aspirants (under-recognised in relation to their inner sense of excellence) and existentialists (questioning the meaning of work and maintaining a sense of anxiety over their contributions to wider society). Another example is provided by Bristow et al (2017) who identify how early career-academics within CMS play on three narratives – diplomatic, combative and idealistic – by which they both resist and reproduce the ethos of business school neoliberalism in which they are embedded. Academics’ identity construction thus in different ways tend to position them as vulnerable selves (Cicmil et al, 2016), that is, as existentially exposed to the risks associated with projectified careers, macho-style management and a high degree of self-responsibility (Loveday, 2018).

    In addition, a number of earlier studies has also pointed out the highly gendered nature of how academic work is organized, how recruitment and promotion processes unfold etc. (cf. (cf. Hush, 2001; Mählck, 2003; van den Brink & Benschop, 2012).

    In this study we will focus on recognition practices (how recognition repeatedly tend to happen or not happen in local/cultural contexts, and thus also become the expectation on what may happen in future interactions) and their consequences for identity construction

    1

    and sense of vulnerability thus seem central to advance the above insights. Recognition practices thus involve not only what and whom is recognized or not for something, but also in what settings certain practices are legitimate or not, and how they are publicly displayed in social interaction.

    We suggest that

    • recognition practices are an important yet under-researched aspect of academic

      identity construction processes

    • recognition practices are gendered, i.e. we perform gender in our ways of

      - conferring and receiving recognition,- constructing what recognition may mean in different local/cultural contexts, - constructing when it is to be conferred/received or not,- constructing how it is appropriately played out how in social interaction.

    • recognition practices tend to sustain vulnerability among academics, but in different ways for men and women.

  • 8.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Fragmented meritocratisation: On mobilisation and demobilisation of gender in higher education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Universities need leadership, academics need management: discursive tensions and voids in the deregulation of Swedish higher education legislation2018In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 299-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inthisarticle,wediscusshow‘managerialist’and‘leaderist’discourses(O’Reillyand Reed Public Administration 88:960–978, 2010; Organization Studies 32:1079–1101, 2011) are drawn upon in the context of the deregulation of Swedish higher education. As of 2011, there has been new legislation that frames Swedish universities as ‘autonomous’ and transfers most of the regulative responsibilities from the government level to university vice-chancellors. The aim of this article is to inquire into how tensions within and between managerialist and leaderist discourse are handled in the promotion of New Public Management reforms and the conse- quences thereof in terms of how leadership in the higher education sector is constructed. We analyse how these discourses are employed in the core documents leading up to the 2010 Riksdag decision to enact most of the proposed deregulations, and the subsequent evaluation undertaken by the social democratic government that took over in 2014. Based in this analysis, we suggest that the texts indeed draw upon notions of leadership and leaders as necessary for Swedish universities to survive and thrive in the future, but that the envisaged practise of this ‘strong leadership’ can either be characterised as a discursive void or described in terms of de- personalised, instrumental managerial surveillance and control. 

  • 10.
    Ekman Rising, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Omgiven av instrumentalister: Har det akademiska medborgarskapet gått förlorat?2020In: Ledning och (sned-)styrning i högskolan / [ed] Mats Alvesson, Stefan Sveningsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna text diskuterar vi tendensen mot en ökad instrumentalism i ledning och utövning av akademisk verksamhet i det svenska högskolesystemet. Med instrumentalism avses en inställning till akademiskt arbete som bygger på individualism, konkurrens, prestationsmätning, kortsiktigt nyttoskapande och formell regelstyrning. Instrumentalismen är en konsekvens av de ökade ambitionerna att styra och effektivisera högskolan, men riskerar – om den får gå för långt – att i stället erodera högskolans kapacitet att leverera det som önskas. Den instrumentella styrningen är sällan sammanhållen eller långsiktig, och den driver fram en akademisk kultur där de anställda fokuserar på sina individuella karriärer och på att på papperet leverera mot diverse prestationsmått. Den bidrar också till en ledningskultur där regelverk, mätsystem och detaljstyrning står i fokus snarare än gemensamt ansvarstagande, kvalitetsutveckling och byggande av tillitsfulla arbetsmiljöer som stödjer kunskapsintensivt arbete. I förlängningen hotas inte bara kvaliteten utan även det akademiska arbetets attraktivitet och högskolans roll som särpräglad samhällsinstitution. Vi föreslår ett alternativt förhållningssätt – akademiskt medborgarskap – och ger exempel på hur akademins chefer kan arbeta med att stödja detta i vardagsarbetet, i termer av relationsdrivande, ansvarsdrivande och kvalitetsdrivande ledarskap.

  • 11.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    Hogdson, Damian
    Alliance Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Making Projects Critical 9: Call for Papers2018Other (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå School of Business & Economics, Dept of Business Administration, Umeå University, SE-901 87 UMEÅ, SWEDEN.
    Packendorff, Johann
    Umeå School of Business & Economics, Dept of Business Administration, Umeå University, SE-901 87 UMEÅ, SWEDEN.
    A Project-based View of Entrepreneurship: Serial Entrepreneurs and Collective Action2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One important concern of the ongoing debates within entrepreneurship research is the tendency of operationalising entrepreneurship as enterprise start-ups. However, some researchers have noted that entrepreneurship and enterprise start-up are not always connected - entrepreneurial acts do not always result in a formal enterprise and not all enterprises are the result of an innovative entrepreneurial act. Moreover, the individual entrepreneur is usually identified from a single start-up, which means that serial entrepreneurship and/or other entrepreneurial acts in their life paths are neglected. If an enterprise start-up is an entrepreneurial act or not should be regarded as context-dependent; to start a traditional enterprise in an established and legitimate industry should not be regarded as ”entrepreneurial” as starting an innovative one in a context characterised by scepticism and hostility.

     

    In addition, there is also a tendency in society to organise innovative processes in terms of projects rather than as enterprises, and there are also research results indicating that some individuals handle enterprise start-ups as a sequence of projects in which the entrepreneur goes on to new start-ups when the enterprise has been established on the market. To summarise, there are several reasons for analysing both entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial acts in terms of project-based work. The aim of the paper is thus to discuss and argue for a project-based view of entrepreneurship, which means that the ongoing entrepreneurial acts of the individual is studied in terms of time-limited courses of action.

     

    Our analysis of a number of narratives from individuals working in creative projects (theatres and musicals, regional development and independent schools) shows that their entrepreneurship is most evident both in terms of idea generation and project organising, and that a lot of non-standardised project work is in fact entrepreneurial acts according to most definitions. These individuals also tended towards serial entrepreneurship, where projects, endeavours in private life, community work and also enterprise start-ups were mixed over time. In order to further our understanding of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship, it seems most important to study series of entrepreneurial acts in the life path of an individual rather than each act as a single event. An additional conclusion from these empirical data is that these entrepreneurial acts cannot always be ascribed single individuals only. To realise innovative ideas, it is often necessary that several individuals are involved in terms of teams or social networks. To put forward an creative and/or innovative idea should in itself be regarded as an entrepreneurial act (speaking is also an act), but to transform it into successful action teamwork is required where issues concerning practical implementation, organising, marketing etc must also be subject to entrepreneurial thinking and action.

     

    From this, we conclude that entrepreneurship should be studied in terms of serial projects in the life course of individuals. In order to understand this process we argue that qualitative studies, of narrative character, are necessary. By such an approach, the concept of entrepreneurship is extended from enterprise start-up as an empirical phenomenon to the individual and collective creative and innovative acts that individuals and groups of individuals perform during their lives in different dimensions, forms and societal sectors.

  • 13.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Business Creation, Box 6501, 113 83 STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Entrepreneurship inside and outside community: On the promises and problems of deviating2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to contribute to a developed understanding of the phenomenon of entrepreneurship as deviating from its local cultural context. This is done through the analysis of an in-depth case study made from a social constructionist perspective. Entrepreneurial individuals and collectives define themselves - and are defined by others - in relation to general expectations on what an entrepreneur is and how he or she should behave, and we therefore claim that the entrepreneurial process is about identifying, challenging and breaking institutionalized patterns, to temporarily de-socialize from society rather than socialize into it.

    In this paper, we present an in-depth study of the Hultsfred rock festival in Sweden and how the actors behind the festival has initiated a number of entrepreneurial processes over the years. The study is based on recurrent interviews, participant observation and documentation. In the interviews with the (inter)actors in the Hultsfred organisation, a number of narrative themes on the relation between the entrepreneurial processes and the context emerged. One such theme was the image of rock music and rock culture as rebellious and different as compared to the local culture of sports. Another theme was the massive lack of local understanding for the special characteristics of the music industry, this due to the traditional industrial structure of the region. The relation between the RockCity people and their context has also been characterised by an ongoing debate on the relation between culture and commercial business (cf also Mort et al, 2003), which has also led to severe internal conflicts. It appeared that when met by scepticism on the local arena, RockCity instead focused on networking and collaboration on other arenas; regionally, nationally and internationally. Still, they all share a basic desire to make Hultsfred a better and more prosperous place to live, which represents an aim to contribute and be respected, to be seen as an important and relevant part of community development.

  • 14.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Leadership work among senior faculty in Swedish universities: Reinforcing administrative control, redefining collegiality2019In: Proceedings of the 18th International Studying Leadership Conference: Putting Leadership in its Place, Bristol: University of the West of England , 2019, p. 62-64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we analyse department-level collective leadership work processes in Swedish universities. Drawing upon a notion of leadership work as co-constructed by many organisational actors in interaction (Bolden et al, 2009; Crevani et al, 2010; Denis et al, 2012; Endres & Weibler, 2017), we show how leadership work among senior faculty increasingly:

    • Becomes concerned with administrative/regulative issues. Our respondents describe how meetings, tasks distributed to ad hoc teams, committee work etc., become increasingly time-consuming and mandatory to partake in. This leadership work also becomes increasingly focussed on receiving and handling administrative issues referred to them by central university bodies, or on the formulation and implementation of internal regulations.

    • Revolves around short-term solutions to eternal problems. Many of the structural issues in the university sector – e.g. under-funding, research-based meritocracy despite heavy teaching loads, expectations on both basic research and societal impact – are acknowledged and subject to continuous attention at department level. However, they are usually translated into short-term problems to be resolved in one or two years, resulting in simplistic ’quick fixes’ and projects whose time horizons usually tend to coincide with national budgetary periods or terms of office for senior managers. Moreover, these quick fixes and projects are rarely coordinated with each other, which from time to time results in ’project overload’ and goal conflicts.

    • Becomes concerned with systems for surveillance and control. Most handling of administrative and regulative issues tend to revolve around the perceived need to make academics report their work contents, performance and whereabouts in more detail, and to prescribe how various work tasks shall be carried out and how decision- making shall happen. Leadership work rarely deals with notions of trust, professional freedom or work satisfaction, but rather with constructing academics as in constant need for further surveillance and control.

    • Builds on shaming and blaming of individuals and groups. Following the focus on surveillance and control, the onus is always on the individual academic to live up to all sorts of expectations and adjust to new regulations and change projects. Very few, if any, are seen as delivering upon all these expectations – instead, the shaming and blaming of individual academics and groups for failing to achieve this or that tend to be part and parcel of everyday management. In the end, virtually everyone can be seen as problematic in one way or the other and in equal dire need for further regulation, surveillance and control. The social worth of successes (top-cited publications, major grants) are passing, while the burden of alleged failures linger.

    This discussion is based in a qualitative study of senior lecturers employed at business administration departments at four different Swedish universities (n=45). Most of them are involved in leadership work at their respective workplaces, either through formal roles such as head of department, director of undergraduate studies, etc., or through informal involvement in task groups, inquiries, committees and boards. The study was originally undertaken to investigate performance-based funding systems (PBFS) and their impact on academic professional identity construction processes. Leadership work appeared to be central for our understanding of these processes, in the sense that the daily practicing of PBFS’ involves construction of organisational direction, issues, spaces of action etc (Crevani, 2018).

    The consequence of the above leadership work processes is that leadership work becomes increasingly irrelevant to daily teaching and research activities and at the same time increasingly time-consuming and central for involved senior faculty. The growing centrality of this particular form of leadership work in the daily life of faculty is self-reinforcing, both due to the content of work (which constantly calls for further decisions, adjustments and remedies) and to growing expectations on senior faculty to perform precisely this sort ’organizational responsibility’ and ’collegiality’ instead of withdrawing into their own teaching and research. Not only are formal managers in the ’chain of command’ pursuing this kind of leadership work, it is also colonising and redefining notions of collegiality and citizenship amongst senior faculty in general. This research builds upon, and adds to earlier similar studies on leadership work in Academia (Macfarlane, 2005; By et al, 2008; Bolden et al, 2009; Clarke & Knights, 2015; Crevani et al, 2015; Kallio et al, 2016; Bristow et al, 2017; Chatelain-Ponroy et al, 2018; Ekman et al, 2018; Spence, 2019; Svedberg Helgesson & Sjögren, 2019).

  • 15.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Project leadership as a research field: Antecedents, current research and a critique2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of project-based organizing is a widespread phenomenon in contemporary economy and society. While the actual leadership task – leading a temporary task force towards the successful delivery of a complex goal – is in many ways an instance of general team leadership, the professionalization of Project Management has resulted in the build-up of specialized knowledge bases derived from theoretical and empirical inquiry into settings labeled as ‘projects’. Based on this reasoning, this paper reviews the knowledge base on project leadership as it is expressed in international scholarly literature. We start by tracing the historical developments back to the roots of the Project Management field, and continue by reviewing the current research trends. Extant research is problematized in terms of individualism, theoretical foundation and empirical basis.

  • 16.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Projects as a mode of justification: On the discursive fabric of projectification2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lokatt, Erika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Hagander, Louise
    Karolinska Institutet.
    An interprofessional perspective on healthcare work: physicians and nurses co-constructing identities and spaces of action2019In: Journal of Management and Organization, ISSN 1833-3672, E-ISSN 1839-3527, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we develop a theoretical perspective of how professional identities in multi-professional organisational settings are co-constructed in daily interactions. The research reported here is located in a healthcare context where overlapping knowledge bases, unclear divisions of responsibilities, and an increased managerialist emphasis on teamwork make interprofessional boundaries in healthcare opera- tions more complex and blurred than ever. We thereby build on a research tradition that recognises the healthcare sector as a negotiated order, specifically studying how professional identities are invoked, constructed, and re-constructed in everyday work interactions. The perspective is employed in an analysis of qualitative data from interviews and participant observation at a large Swedish hospital, in which we find three main processes in the construction of space of action: hierarchical, inclusive, and pseudo-inclu- sive. In most of the interactions, existing inter-professional divides and power relations are sustained, pre- venting developments towards integrated interprofessional teamwork.

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