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  • 1.
    Aagaard, Knut E.
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Lunsjö, Karl
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Frobell, Richard
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    No differences in histopathological degenerative changes found in acute, trauma-related rotator cuff tears compared with chronic, nontraumatic tears2022In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 2521-2527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Acute trauma-related rotator cuff tears are believed to have better healing potential than chronic tears due to less degenerative changes of the tendons. However, the histopathological condition of tendons from trauma-related tears is not well investigated. The purpose of this study was to explore specific histopathological features in tendons from acute trauma-related full-thickness rotator cuff tears and to compare them to findings in tendons from nontraumatic, chronic tears. Methods In a prospective cohort study, 62 previously asymptomatic patients [14 women, median age 61 years (range 42-75)] with trauma-related full-thickness rotator cuff tears were consecutively included. Arthroscopic repair was performed within 30 (median, IQR 25-37) days after the injury. During surgery, tissue biopsies were harvested from the supraspinatus tendons in 53 (86%) of the patients. In addition, similar biopsies were harvested from 10 patients undergoing surgery for chronic tears without history of trauma. All tissue samples were examined by a well-experienced pathologist under light microscope. Tendon degeneration was determined using the Bonar score whereas immunostaining was used for proliferation (Ki67), inflammation (CD45), apoptosis (p53) and haemosiderin staining to study traces of bleeding. Results The median (IQR) Bonar score for the acute trauma-related biopsies was 10.5 (7.5-14.5) compared to 11 (5-12.8) for the control group with no statistically significant difference between the groups. No statistically significant between-group difference was found for the inflammatory index whereas tendons from patients with trauma-related full-thickness rotator cuff tears had statistically significantly higher apoptosis [3.1 (0.5-8.9) vs. 0.1 (0-1.5), p = 0.003] and proliferation [4.0 (1.8-6.9) vs. 0.4 (0-2.0), p = 0.001) indices than those undergoing surgery for chronic tears. Positive haemosiderin staining was found in 34% of tissue samples from patients with trauma-related tears compared to 10% in the control group (n.s). Conclusion This study suggests that there is no difference with regard to degenerative changes between supraspinatus tendons harvested from patients with acute, trauma-related rotator cuff tears and patients with nontraumatic, chronic tears.

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  • 2.
    Aagaard, Knut E.
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lunsjo, Karl
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Frobell, Richard
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Factors associated with healing failure after early repair of acute, trauma-related rotator cuff tears2023In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 2074-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Healing failure after rotator cuff repair is a challenging problem. Acute, trauma-related tears are considered a separate entity and are often treated surgically. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with healing failure in previously asymp-tomatic patients with trauma-related rotator cuff tears treated with early arthroscopic repair. Methods: This study included 62 consecutively recruited patients (23% women; median age, 61 years; age range, 42-75 years) with acute symptoms in a previously asymptomatic shoulder and a magnetic resonance imaging-verified full-thickness rotator cuff tear after shoulder trauma. All patients were offered, and underwent, early arthroscopic repair, during which a biopsy specimen was har-vested from the supraspinatus tendon and analyzed for signs of degeneration. Of the patients, 57 (92%) completed 1-year follow-up and underwent assessment of repair integrity on magnetic resonance images according to the Sugaya classification. Risk factors for heal-ing failure were investigated using a causal-relation diagram where age, body mass index, tendon degeneration (Bonar score), diabetes mellitus, fatty infiltration (FI), sex, smoking, tear location regarding integrity of the rotator cable, and tear size (number of ruptured tendons and tendon retraction) were included and analyzed. Results: Healing failure at 1 year was identified in 37% of patients (n = 21). A high degree of FI of the supraspinatus muscle (P = .01), a tear location including disruption of rotator cable integrity (P = .01), and old age (P = .03) were associated with healing failure. Tendon degeneration as determined by histopathology was not associated with healing failure at 1-year follow-up (P = .63). Conclusion: Older age, increased FI of the supraspinatus muscle, and a tear including disruption of the rotator cable increased the risk of healing failure after early arthroscopic repair in patients with trauma-related full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Level of evidence: Level I; Prospective Cohort Design; Prognosis Study

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  • 3.
    Aahlin, Eirik K
    et al.
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    von Meyenfeldt, Maarten
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands; NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Dejong, Cornelius Hc
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands; NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fearon, Kenneth C
    Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK .
    Lobo, Dileep N
    Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, National Institute for Health Research, Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK .
    Demartines, Nicolas
    Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Revhaug, Arthur
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    Wigmore, Stephen J
    Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK .
    Lassen, Kristoffer
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    Functional recovery is considered the most important target: a survey of dedicated professionals2014In: Perioperative medicine, ISSN 2047-0525, Vol. 3, article id 3:5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to survey the relative importance of postoperative recovery targets and perioperative care items, as perceived by a large group of international dedicated professionals.

    Methods: A questionnaire with eight postoperative recovery targets and 13 perioperative care items was mailed to participants of the first international Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) congress and to authors of papers with a clear relevance to ERAS in abdominal surgery. The responders were divided into categories according to profession and region.

    Results: The recovery targets 'To be completely free of nausea', 'To be independently mobile' and 'To be able to eat and drink as soon as possible' received the highest score irrespective of the responder's profession or region of origin. Equally, the care items 'Optimizing fluid balance', 'Preoperative counselling' and 'Promoting early and scheduled mobilisation' received the highest score across all groups.

    Conclusions: Functional recovery, as in tolerance of food without nausea and regained mobility, was considered the most important target of recovery. There was a consistent uniformity in the way international dedicated professionals scored the relative importance of recovery targets and care items. The relative rating of the perioperative care items was not dependent on the strength of evidence supporting the items.

  • 4.
    Aanestad, Øystein
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Quantitative electromyographic studies of the perineal muscles in normal subjects and patients suffering from anal or urinary incontinence1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to characterize the interference pattern in perineal muscles in healthy subjects with the use of quantitative EMG techniques, to evaluate if prostatic surgery had any effect on the interference pattern and furthermore to examine the interference pattern in the perineal muscles in patients suffering from urinary or anal incontinence.

    The interference pattern in the perineal muscles was examined with a computerized analysis, the Turns and Amplitude (T/A) analysis, and the innervation pattern of the muscles was examined with single fiber electromyography measuring the fiber density. Reference values were collected from 30 normal subjects. The patient material consisted of 20 males subjected to transurethral prostatectomy (TUR-P), 10 males who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP), 20 patients suffering from anal incontinence and 24 women withurinary incontinence.

    T/A analysis of the interference pattern in the perineal muscles in normal subjects showed a significant increase in number of turns/sec and mean amplitude correlating to increasing force but no age-related changes.

    TUR-P and RRP did effect the innervation of the distal urethral sphincter muscle as shown by increased fiber density indicating a peripheral nerve lesion. T/A analysis did not shown any increased activation of the distal urethral sphincter as a compensation for the loss in bladder neck sphincter function but rather signs of decreasedcentral activation.

    Patients with idiopathic faecal incontinence showed signs of impaired innervation of the external anal sphincter muscle. A decreased interference pattern at maximal contraction indicated a reduced central activation of perineal muscles, in particular for patients with partial rupture of the external anal sphincter muscle. The reduced central activation could play a role for the aetiology of faecal incontinence.

    Patients with urinary stress incontinence also showed signs of impaired innervation of the external anal sphincter muscle as well as reduced interference pattern at maximal contraction and during continuous recording of the EMG activity during cystometry. A reduced central activation of the motor units was predicted as one factor involved in the aetiology.

  • 5.
    Abadie, V.
    et al.
    Hop Univ Necker, Paris, France..
    Bohorquez, D.
    Vall Hebron, Barcelona, Spain..
    Bulstrode, N. W.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Davies, Gareth
    Hakelius, Malin
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ong, J.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Mathijssen, I. M. J.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Matos, E.
    Santa Maria Hosp, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Mazzoleni, F.
    San Gerardo Hosp, Monza, Italy..
    van der Molen, A. Mink
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Muradin, M.
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Neovius, E.
    Karolinska Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Piacentile, K.
    San Bortolo Hosp Vicenza, Vicenza, Italy..
    Redondo, M.
    Hosp 12 Octobre, Madrid, Spain..
    Vuola, P.
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Wolvius, E. B.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Reinert, Siegmar
    Plast Operationen, Klin & Poliklin Mund Kiefer & Gesichtschirurg, Tubingen, Germany..
    Murray, Dylan
    Childrens Univ Hosp, Craniofacial Team, Temple St, Dublin, Ireland.;Karolinska Inst, Plast Surg & ENT, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Peterson, Petra
    Hens, Greet
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Neurowetenschappen, Leuven, Belgium..
    Schachner, P.
    Sivertsen, A.
    Irvine, W. F. E.
    Qualicura, Breda, Netherlands..
    Welling-van Overveld, L. F. J.
    Qualicura, Breda, Netherlands..
    van Breugel, M.
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    van Schalkwijk, K.
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Verhey, E.
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Khan, A.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Baillie, L.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Bishop, N.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Hillyar, C. R. T.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Koudstaal, M. J.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van de lande, L.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Nibber, A.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Panciewicz, N.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Ramjeeawan, A.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Sick Children, London, England..
    Bouter, A.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    El Ghoul, K.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Logjes, B.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van der Plas, P.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kats, J.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Weissbach, E.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van Veen-van der Hoek, M.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Bittermann, A. J. N.
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    van den Boogaard, M-JH.
    Coenraad, S.
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Dulfer, K.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Joosten, K.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Lachmeijer, A. M. A.
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Muradin, M. S. M.
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Peters, N. C. J.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pleumeekers, M.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    de Veye, H. Swanenburg
    Utrecht Med Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    European Guideline Robin Sequence An Initiative From the European Reference Network for Rare Craniofacial Anomalies and Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders (ERN-CRANIO)2024In: The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, ISSN 1049-2275, E-ISSN 1536-3732, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 279-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A European guideline on Robin Sequence was developed within the European Reference Network for rare and/ or complex craniofacial anomalies and ear, nose, and throat disorders. The guideline provides an overview of optimal care provisions for patients with Robin Sequence and recommendations for the improvement of care.

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  • 6.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Moati, Taha Ali
    General Surgery department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Aesthetic Outcome After Reconstruction of Complex SoftTissue Defects with Free Antero-Lateral Thigh Flap UsingSimple Equipment2015In: Journal of surgery, ISSN 2330-0914, Vol. 3, no 2-1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We aimed to assess the aesthetic outcome of surgical reconstruction by free ALT flap using binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses and a modified post- operative surveillance protocol. Methods: 16 patients were operated for free antero-lateral thigh flap to reconstruct complex soft tissue defects with a close clinical follow up protocol for post operative care depending on the attending personnel in the Plastic surgery unit, Suez Canal University hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. Aesthetic outcome was assessed using a questionnaire based on Posch et al. 2005, including the following items colour, contour, presence of hair, overall appearance and donor site scar. Results: The patients’ assessed aesthetic outcome was acceptable in majority of the cases; median score was 4 for all assessed items. Complete flap loss occurred in one case, other complications as arterial thrombosis and hematomas and infection were detected and managed accordingly with flap salvage in the 3 complicated cases. Conclusion: The result suggests that the proposed protocol is sufficient as an alternative. The aesthetic outcome assessed by the patient and the failure rate was in line with other studies.

  • 7. Abbas, Sascha
    et al.
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Peeters, Petra H
    Engel, Pierre
    Brustad, Magritt
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buijsse, Brian
    Adarakis, George
    Ouranos, Vassilis
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Suárez, Marcial Vicente Argüelles
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Wark, Petra A
    Riboli, Elio
    Dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2013In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 yr, 7760 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified among 319,985 women. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of vitamin D intake, HR and 95% CI were 1.07 (0.87-1.32) and 1.02 (0.90-1.16) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. The corresponding HR and 95% CIs for calcium intake were 0.98 (0.80-1.19) and 0.90 (0.79-1.02), respectively. For calcium intake in postmenopausal women, the test for trend was borderline statistically significant (P(trend) = 0.05). There was no significant interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake and cancer risk (P(interaction) = 0.57 and 0.22 in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively). In this large prospective cohort, we found no evidence for an association between dietary vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk.

  • 8.
    Abbott, T. E. F.
    et al.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Ahmad, T.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Phull, M. K.
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Fowler, A. J.
    Guys and St Thomass NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Hewson, R.
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Biccard, B. M.
    Univ Cape Town, South Africa.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Gillies, M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Pearse, R. M.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    The surgical safety checklist and patient outcomes after surgery: a prospective observational cohort study, systematic review and meta-analysis2018In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 120, no 1, p. 146-155Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The surgical safety checklist is widely used to improve the quality of perioperative care. However, clinicians continue to debate the clinical effectiveness of this tool. Methods: Prospective analysis of data from the International Surgical Outcomes Study (ISOS), an international observational study of elective in-patient surgery, accompanied by a systematic review and meta-analysis of published literature. The exposure was surgical safety checklist use. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and the secondary outcome was postoperative complications. In the ISOS cohort, a multivariable multi-level generalized linear model was used to test associations. To further contextualise these findings, we included the results from the ISOS cohort in a meta-analysis. Results are reported as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: We included 44 814 patients from 497 hospitals in 27 countries in the ISOS analysis. There were 40 245 (89.8%) patients exposed to the checklist, whilst 7508 (16.8%) sustained amp;gt;= 1 postoperative complications and 207 (0.5%) died before hospital discharge. Checklist exposure was associated with reduced mortality [odds ratio (OR) 0.49 (0.32-0.77); Pamp;lt;0.01], but no difference in complication rates [OR 1.02 (0.88-1.19); P = 0.75]. In a systematic review, we screened 3732 records and identified 11 eligible studies of 453 292 patients including the ISOS cohort. Checklist exposure was associated with both reduced postoperative mortality [OR 0.75 (0.62-0.92); Pamp;lt;0.01; I-2 = 87%] and reduced complication rates [OR 0.73 (0.61-0.88); Pamp;lt;0.01; I-2 = 89%). Conclusions: Patients exposed to a surgical safety checklist experience better postoperative outcomes, but this could simply reflect wider quality of care in hospitals where checklist use is routine.

  • 9.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Norblad, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Anorectal Function After Ileo-Rectal Anastomosis Is Better than Pelvic Pouch in Selected Ulcerative Colitis Patients2020In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, p. 250-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With a lifelong perspective, 12% of ulcerative colitis patients will need a colectomy. Further reconstruction via ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouch can be affected by patients' perspective of their quality of life after surgery.

    AIM: To assess the function and quality of life after restorative procedures with either ileo-rectal anastomosis or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in relation to the inflammatory activity on endoscopy and in biopsies.

    METHOD: A total of 143 UC patients operated with subtotal colectomy and ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouches between 1992 and 2006 at Linköping University Hospital were invited to participate. Those who completed the validated questionnaires (Öresland score, SF-36, Short Health Scale) were offered an endoscopic evaluation including multiple biopsies. Associations between anorectal function and quality of life with type of restorative procedure and severity of endoscopic and histopathologic grading of inflammation were evaluated.

    RESULTS: Some 77 (53.9%) eligible patients completed questionnaires, of these 68 (88.3%) underwent endoscopic evaluation after a median follow-up of 12.5 (range 3.5-19.4) years after restorative procedure. Patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better overall Öresland score: median = 3 (IQR 2-5) for ileo-rectal anastomosis (n = 38) and 10 (IQR 5-15) for pouch patients (n = 39) (p < 0.001). Anorectal function (Öresland score) and endoscopic findings (Baron-Ginsberg score) were positively correlated in pouch patients (tau: 0.28, p = 0.006).

    CONCLUSION: Patients operated with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better continence compared to pouches. Minor differences were noted regarding the quality of life. Ileo-rectal anastomosis is a valid option for properly selected ulcerative colitis patients if strict postoperative endoscopic surveillance is carried out.

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  • 10.
    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman
    et al.
    Department of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Abusabeib, Abdelrahman
    Department of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Farghaly, Hanan
    Department of Lab Medicine & Pathology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Tabeb, Abdelhakem A. M.
    Department of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Simultaneous occurrence of follicular and papillary thyroid carcinomas in same thyroid lobe: A case series of six patients from Qatar2020In: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports, E-ISSN 2210-2612, Vol. 73, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) are the first and second most common thyroid cancers comprising about 85% and 10% of all thyroid cancers. Simultaneous occurrence of medullary and papillary thyroid cancer has been reported with various presentations, but simultaneous occurrence of FTC in addition to PTC as differentiated cancers, is an unusual event that is rarely reported. Presentation of cases: We report our experience of six rare cases of synchronous coexistence of FTC and PTC with unique features. Case 1 is 31 old Egyptian female. Case 2 is a 61 year old Sudanese male. Case 3 is a 59 year old Sudanese male. Case 4 is a 56 years old Indian female. Case 5 is a 35 years old Filipina female. Case 6 is a 52 years old Qatari female. The six cases are special in their co-occurrence of two thyroid carcinoma, consisting of histologic features of follicular thyroid carcinomas, and classical papillary thyroid carcinoma, possibly the first case series of simultaneous occurrence of these two types of thyroid cancer in the Middle East and North Africa Region. Conclusions: We present rare cases of concurrent FTC and PTC. These six cases add more data highlighting the coincidental simultaneous coexistence of FTC and PTC. Endocrinologists and pathologists should be aware of and vigilant to this variety. © 2020 The Author(s)

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  • 11. Abdelhalim, Mohamed A.
    et al.
    Tenorio, Emanuel R.
    Oderich, Gustavo S.
    Haulon, Stephan
    Warren, Gasper
    Adam, Donald
    Claridge, Martin
    Butt, Talha
    Abisi, Said
    Dias, Nuno V.
    Kölbel, Tilo
    Gallitto, Enrico
    Gargiulo, Mauro
    Gkoutzios, Panos
    Panuccio, Giuseppe
    Kuzniar, Marek
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Mees, Barend M.
    Schurink, Geert W.
    Sonesson, Björn
    Spath, Paolo
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Schanzer, Andres
    Beck, Adam W.
    Schneider, Darren B.
    Timaran, Carlos H.
    Eagleton, Matthew
    Farber, Mark A.
    Modarai, Bijan
    Multicenter trans-Atlantic experience with fenestrated-branched endovascular aortic repair of chronic post-dissection thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms2023In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0741-5214, E-ISSN 1097-6809, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 854-862.e1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This multicenter international study aimed to describe outcomes of fenestrated-branched endovascular aortic repairs (FB-EVAR) in a cohort of patients treated for chronic post-dissection thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (PD-TAAAs).

    METHODS: We reviewed the clinical data of all consecutive patients treated by FB-EVAR for repair of extent I to III PD-TAAAs in 16 centers from the United States and Europe (2008-2021). Data were extracted from institutional prospectively maintained databases and electronic patient records. All patients received off-the-shelf or patient-specific manufactured fenestrated-branched stent grafts. Endpoints were any cause mortality and major adverse events at 30 days, technical success, target artery (TA) patency, freedom from TA instability, minor (endovascular with <12 Fr sheath) and major (open or ≥12 Fr sheath) secondary interventions, patient survival, and freedom from aortic-related mortality (ARM).

    RESULTS: A total of 246 patients (76% male; median age, 67 years [interquartile range, 61-73 years]) were treated for extent I (7%), extent II (55%), and extent III (35%) PD-TAAAs by FB-EVAR. The median aneurysm diameter was 65 mm (interquartile range, 59-73 mm). Eighteen patients (7%) were octogenarians, 212 (86%) were American Society of Anesthesiologists class ≥3, and 21 (9%) presented with contained ruptured or symptomatic aneurysms. There were 917 renal-mesenteric vessels targeted by 581 fenestrations (63%) and 336 directional branches (37%), with a mean of 3.7 vessels per patient. Technical success was 96%. Mortality and rate of major adverse events at 30 days was 3% and 28%, including disabling complications such as new onset dialysis in 1%, major stroke in 1%, and permanent paraplegia in 2%. Mean follow-up was 24 months. Kaplan-Meier (KM) estimated patient survival at 3 and 5 years was 79% ± 6% and 65% ± 10%. KM estimated freedom from ARM was 95% ± 3% and 93% ± 5% at the same intervals. Unplanned secondary interventions were needed in 94 patients (38%), including minor procedures in 64 (25%) and major procedures in 30 (12%). There was one conversion to open surgical repair (<1%). KM estimated freedom from any secondary intervention was 44% ± 9% at 5 years. KM estimated primary and secondary TA patency were 93% ± 2% and 96% ± 1% at 5 years, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: FB-EVAR for chronic PD-TAAAs was associated with high technical success and a low rate of mortality (3%) and disabling complications at 30 days. Although the procedure is effective in the prevention of ARM, patient survival was low at 5 years (65%), likely due to the significant comorbidities in this cohort of patients. Freedom from secondary interventions at 5 years was 44%, although most procedures were minor. The significant rate of reinterventions highlights the need for continued patient surveillance.

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  • 12.
    Abdelmalek, George
    et al.
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    Mina, George Ehab
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    Pant, Krittika
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    Zheng, Zheshi
    Department of Statistics, Rutgers University, NJ, Piscataway, United States.
    Mahajan, Jasmine
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    Srinivasan, Nivetha
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    Gupta, Shivani
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    Shafei, Jasmine
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    Levidy, Michael F.
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    McGrath, Aleksandra M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Department of Hand Surgery, Norrland’s University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Chu, Alice
    Division of Pediatric Orthopedics, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, NJ, Newark, United States.
    Intercostal nerve transfer for biceps reinnervation in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: a preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis for individual patient data systematic review using individualized fusion and comparison to supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting2024In: Journal of Children's Orthopaedics, ISSN 1863-2521, E-ISSN 1863-2548, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 54-63Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to search existing literature on nerve reconstruction surgery in patients with obstetric brachial plexus palsy to determine whether treatment with supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting produced better elbow flexion outcomes compared to intercostal nerve transfer.

    Methods: This study was a systematic review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis for Individual Patient Data guidelines. A systematic search was conducted using multiple databases. An ordinal regression model was used to analyze the effect of using supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting or intercostal nerve on elbow flexion with the two scores measured: elbow flexion Medical Research Council scores and Toronto active movements scale scores for elbow flexion.

    Results: A final patient database from 6 published articles consisted of 83 supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting patients (73 patients with Medical Research Council and 10 patients with Toronto score) and 7 published articles which consisted of 131 intercostal nerve patients (84 patients with Medical Research Council and 47 patients with Toronto scores). Patients who underwent supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting presented with an average Medical Research Council score of 3.9 ± 0.72 and an average Toronto score of 6.2 ± 2.2. Patients who underwent intercostal nerve transfer presented with an average Medical Research Council score of 3.9 ± 0.71 and an average Toronto score of 6.4 ± 1.2. There was no statistical difference between supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting and intercostal nerve transfer when utilizing Medical Research Council elbow flexion scores (ordinal regression: 0.3821, standard error: 0.4590, p = 0.2551) or Toronto Active Movement Scale score for elbow flexion (ordinal regression: 0.7154, standard error: 0.8487, p = 0.2188).

    Conclusion: Regardless of surgical intervention utilized (supraclavicular exploration and nerve grafting or intercostal nerve transfers), patients had excellent outcomes for elbow flexion following obstetric brachial plexus palsy when utilizing Medical Research Council or Toronto scores for elbow flexion. The difference between these scores was not statistically significant.

    Type of study/Level of evidence: Therapeutic Study: Investigating the Result of Treatment/level III.

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  • 13.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

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  • 14.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nettelblad, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Versatility of the Extensor Digitorum Brevis Muscle Flap in Lower Limb Reconstruction2018In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e2071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reconstruction of complex defects in the lower leg is a challenge. Although microvascular free tissue transfer is a popular technique, experience and available resources limit its use. Furthermore, free tissue transfer is not always required in the reconstruction of small lower leg defects, as many of them can be reconstructed with local alternatives such as an extensor digitorum brevis flap (EDB). Our aim was to describe our experience of the last 20 years with the EDB as a local muscle flap to cover small complex lower leg defects to establish its clinical feasibility and to document its associated complications. Methods: All adult patients who were operated with EDB flap reconstruction of the lower limb during 1997–2017 at the Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, were included in this retrospective study. Results: Of 64 patients operated, only 7 had total flap failure, and the rate of complete success was 73% (47/64). Most of the skin defects were associated with fractures or complications thereof and were located in the ankle region, the dorsum of the foot, and the distal third of tibia or even the proximal tibia. Defects in the malleolar region and coexisting cardiovascular condition were factors associated with flap loss (either partial or total). Conclusion: The pedicled EDB-flap has, in our hands, proved to be a versatile and safe reconstructive option in the reconstruction of small defects in the lower leg and foot. Long-time follow-up is, however, recommended. 

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  • 15.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Turesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Needle Fasciotomy or Collagenase Injection in the Treatment of Dupuytren’s Contracture: A Retrospective Study2020In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 8, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dupuytren’s contracture is common among older people in Sweden. Previous studies comparing the treatment with an injection of collagenase with percutaneous needle fasciotomy found no differences. Methods: We retrospectively compared the degree of improvement in the deficit in extension of the joints in 2 groups of patients who had been treated with collagenase (71 fingers) or needle fasciotomy (109 fingers) before and 1 year after treatment. We compared the improvement of the extension deficit among the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joints before and after the intervention; additionally, the level of improvement was classified into 3 levels (mild = 0° to 29°; moderate = 30° to 60°; considerable = 61° and more). Results: The degree of improvement of extension in the MCP joints was 11° greater in the collagenase group (P = 0.001). The number of patients who had an improvement of >60° (considerable) in extension was greater in the collagenase group (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Collagenase was more effective than needle fasciotomy in treating extension deficits of the MCP joints in Dupuytren’s contracture in this retrospective analysis. Further prospective studies are required to confirm the finding.

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  • 16.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Moghazy, Amr
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2016In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1878-0539, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 1121-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distal half leg complex wounds are usually a formidable problem that necessitates either local or free flap coverage. The aim of this study was to compare cost billing charges in free Gracilis flap (fGF) and local fasciocutaneous perforator flap (lFPF) in reconstructing complex soft tissue leg and foot defects. Patients and methods: Thirty consecutive adult (amp;gt; 15-year-old) patients with soft tissue defects in the leg and/or foot requiring tissue coverage with a flap in the period between 2012 and 2015 were randomly assigned (block randomization) to either an fGF or lFPF procedure. The outcome measures addressed were total billed charges costs, perioperative billed charges cost, partial or complete flap loss, length of hospital stay, inpatient postsurgical care duration, complications, operating time and number of operative scrub staff. Results: One patient suffered from complete flap loss in each group. Reconstruction with lFPF showed total lower billed charges costs by 62% (2509 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001) and perioperative billed charges cost by 54% (779 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001), and shorter total hospital stay (36.5 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), inpatient postsurgical care duration (6.4 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), operating time (4.3 h; p amp;lt; 0.001) and fewer scrub staff (2.2 persons; p amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that neither flap is totally superior to the other; the choice should instead be based on the outcome sought and logistics. lFPF requires lower billed charges cost and resource use and saves operative time and personnel and reduces length of hospital stay. Our approach changed towards using perforator flaps in medium-sized defects, keeping the free flap option for larger defects. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Response to comments on: A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2017In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1878-0539, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1307-1308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Evaluation of Male Breast Glandular Liposculpturing, Response on Commentary2019In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 548-549Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Male Breast Glandular Liposculpturing, Response on Commentary2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1709-1710Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 20.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Male Breast Glandular Liposculpture Challenges2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 1437-1437Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Surg Dept, Plast Surg Unit, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 1222-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

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  • 22.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ellabban, Mohamed A.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pros and Cons of Early and Late Skin Grafting in Children with Burns: Evaluation of Common Concepts2022In: European Burn Journal, E-ISSN 2673-1991, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background: There is no consensus regarding the timing of surgery in children with smaller burn size, specifically in deep dermal burns. Delayed surgery has risks in terms of infection and delayed wound healing. Early surgery also risks the removal of potentially viable tissue. Our aim was to investigate the effect of the timing of surgical intervention on the size of the area operated on and the time to wound healing. Methods: A retrospective analysis for all children (<18 years) with burn size <20% body surface area (BSA%) during 2009–2020 who were operated on with a split-thickness skin graft. The patients were grouped by the timing of the first skin graft operation: early = operated on within 14 days of injury; delayed = operated on more than two weeks after injury. Results: A total of 84 patients were included in the study, 43 who had an early operation and 41 who had a delayed operation. There were no differences between the groups regarding burn size, or whether the burns were superficial or deep. The mean duration of healing time was seven days longer in the group with delayed operation (p = 0.001). The area operated on was somewhat larger (not significantly so) in the group who had early operation. Nine children had two skin graft operations, eight in the early group and one in the delayed group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The patients who were operated on early had the advantage of a shorter healing time, but there was a higher rate of complementary operations and a tendency towards a larger burn excision.

  • 23.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Ellabban, Mohamed A.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Pros and Cons of Early and Late Skin Grafting in Children with Burns—Evaluation of Common Concepts2022In: European Burn Journal, E-ISSN 2673-1991, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is no consensus regarding the timing of surgery in children with smallerburn size, specifically in deep dermal burns. Delayed surgery has risks in terms of infection anddelayed wound healing. Early surgery also risks the removal of potentially viable tissue. Our aim wasto investigate the effect of the timing of surgical intervention on the size of the area operated on andthe time to wound healing. Methods: A retrospective analysis for all children (<18 years) with burnsize <20% body surface area (BSA%) during 2009–2020 who were operated on with a split-thicknessskin graft. The patients were grouped by the timing of the first skin graft operation: early = operatedon within 14 days of injury; delayed = operated on more than two weeks after injury. Results: A totalof 84 patients were included in the study, 43 who had an early operation and 41 who had a delayedoperation. There were no differences between the groups regarding burn size, or whether the burnswere superficial or deep. The mean duration of healing time was seven days longer in the group withdelayed operation (p = 0.001). The area operated on was somewhat larger (not significantly so) in thegroup who had early operation. Nine children had two skin graft operations, eight in the early groupand one in the delayed group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The patients who were operated on early hadthe advantage of a shorter healing time, but there was a higher rate of complementary operationsand a tendency towards a larger burn excision.

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  • 24.
    Abdulcadir, Jasmine
    et al.
    Outpatient Clinic for Women with FGM/C, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals.
    Abdulcadir, Omar
    Referral Centre for Preventing and Curing Female Genital Mutilation, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Caillet, Martin
    Outpatient Clinic for Women with FGM/C, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals.
    Catania, Lucrezia
    Referral Centre for Preventing and Curing Female Genital Mutilation, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Cuzin, Béatrice
    Division of Urology and Transplantation, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Foldès, Pierre
    Institute of Reproductive Health, Saint Germain en Laye, Paris, France.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista
    Refugee Women's Health Clinic, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maricopa Integrated Health System.
    Nour, Nawal
    Global Ob/Gyn and African Women's Health Center, Ambulatory Obstetrics, Office for Multicultural Careers, Division of Global Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
    Ouedraogo, Charlemagne
    University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo of Ouagadougou, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    Warren, Nicole
    Department of Community Public Health Nursing, John Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Wylomanski, Sophie
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France.
    Clitoral Surgery After Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting2017In: Aesthetic surgery journal, ISSN 1090-820X, E-ISSN 1527-330X, Vol. 37, no 9, p. NP113-NP115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Abdulrazzaq, Sama
    et al.
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Elhag, Wahiba
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Mohammad, Amjad Salah
    Departments of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Sargsyan, Davit
    Department of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    Bashah, Moataz
    Department of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    Is Revisional Gastric Bypass as Effective as Primary Gastric Bypass for Weight Loss and Improvement of Comorbidities?2020In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 30, p. 1219-1229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Revisional gastric bypass (R-RYGB) surgery is utilized for the management of inadequate weight loss or weight regain observed after some cases of bariatric surgeries. Data on the mid-term effectiveness of primary gastric bypass (P-RYGB) compared to R-RYGB (e.g., post sleeve gastrectomy or gastric banding) are controversial. Methods: Retrospective chart review of all patients who received P-RYGB and R-RYGB (January 2011 - June 2015) at our center. One hundred and twenty patients who underwent P-RYGB and 34 R-RYGB who completed 18 months follow-up were included. We compared the effectiveness of P-RYGB with R-RYGB by assessing four anthropometric, two glycemic, and four lipid parameters, as well as the control of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), hypertension and dyslipidemia in terms of remission, improvement, persistence, relapse and de novo. The current study also assessed mortality and complications rates. Results: There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of patients who received P-RYGB with those who received R-RYGB in terms of age, gender and preoperative BMI. However, at 18 months: a) Patients who received P-RYGB had lower mean weight (P = 0.001) and BMI (P <0.001), reflected by a higher mean delta BMI (P = 0.02), TWL%(P <0.0001) and EWL%(P < 0.0001); b) No differences were observed between the two patients groups in terms of glycemic parameters, lipid profiles, and control of T2DM, hypertension, and dyslipidemia; and, c) No deaths were reported among both patients groups, and complication rates were comparable. Conclusion: Although R-RYGB effectively addressed inadequate weight loss, weight regain and recurrence of comorbidities after restrictive bariatric surgery, R-RYGB resulted in inferior weight loss compared to P-RYGB. There were no significant differences between the two procedures in terms of their clinical control of T2DM, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Both procedures exhibited comparable complication rates. 

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  • 26.
    Abdul-Sattar Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Jancke, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Skoglund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Stapled versus robot-sewn ileo-ileal anastomosis during robot-assisted radical cystectomy: a review of outcomes in urinary bladder cancer patients2021In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 41-45Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundWhereas the literature has demonstrated an acceptable safety profile of stapled anastomoses when compared to the hand-sewn alternative in open surgery, the choice of intestinal anastomosis using sutures or staples remains inadequately investigated in robotic surgery. The purpose of this study was to compare the surgical outcomes of both anastomotic techniques in robotic-assisted radical cystectomy.MethodsA retrospective analysis of patients with urinary bladder cancer undergoing cystectomy with urinary diversion and with ileo-ileal intestinal anastomosis at a single tertiary centre (2012–2018) was undertaken. The robotic operating time, hospital stay and GI complications were compared between the robotic-sewn (RS) and stapled anastomosis (SA) groups. The only difference between the groups was the anastomosis technique; the other technical steps during the operation were the same. Primary outcomes were GI complications; the secondary outcome was robotic operation time.ResultsThere were 155 patients, of which 112 (73%) were male. The median age was 71 years old. A surgical stapling device was used to create 66 (43%) separate anastomoses, while a robot-sewn method was employed in 89 (57%) anastomoses. There were no statistically significant differences in primary and secondary outcomes between RS and SA.ConclusionsCompared to stapled anastomosis, a robot-sewn ileo-ileal anastomosis may serve as an alternative and cost-saving approach. 

  • 27.
    Aboelnaga, Ahmed
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Salah, Omar
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Microbial cellulose dressing compared with silver sulphadiazine for the treatment of partial thickness burns: A prospective, randomised, clinical trial2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1982-1988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The current treatment for partial thickness burns at the trial site is silver sulphadiazine, as it minimises bacterial colonisation of wounds. Its deleterious effect on wound healing, together with the need for repeated, often painful, procedures, has brought about the search for a better treatment. Microbial cellulose has shown promising results that avoid these disadvantages. The aim of this study was therefore to compare microbial cellulose with silver sulphadiazine as a dressing for partial thickness burns.

    Method

    All patients who presented with partial thickness (superficial and deep dermal) burns from October 2014 to October 2016 were screened for this randomised clinical trial. Twenty patients were included in each group: the cellulose group was treated with microbial cellulose sheets and the control group with silver sulphadiazine cream 10 mg/g. The wound was evaluated every third day. Pain was assessed using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale during and after each procedure. Other variables recorded were age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), clinical signs of infection, time for epithelialisation and hospital stay. Linear multivariable regression was used to analyse the significance of differences between the treatment groups by adjusting for the size and depth of the burn, and the patient’s age.

    Results

    Median TBSA% was 9% (IQR 5.5–12.5). The median number of dressing changes was 1 (IQR 1–2) in the cellulose group, which was lower than that in the control group (median 9.5, IQR 6–16) (p < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with microbial cellulose spent 6.3 (95% CI 0.2–12.5) fewer days in hospital (p = 0.04), had a mean score that was 3.4 (95% CI 2.5–4.3) points lower during wound care (p < 0.001), and 2.2 (95% CI 1.6–2.7) afterwards (p < 0.001). Epithelialisation was quicker, but not significantly so.

    Conclusion

    These results suggest that the microbial cellulose dressing is a better first choice for treatment of partial thickness burns than silver sulphadiazine cream. Fewer dressings of the wound were done and, combined with the low pain scores, this is good for both the patients and the health care system. The differences in randomisation of the area of burns is, however, a concern that needs to be included in the interpretation of the results.

  • 28. Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Brodmann, Marianne
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Czerny, Martin
    De Carlo, Marco
    Naylor, A Ross
    Roffi, Marco
    Tendera, Michal
    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Document Reviewers,
    Widimsky, Petr
    Kolh, Philippe
    Dick, Florian
    de Ceniga, Melina Vega
    Piepoli, Massimo Francesco
    Sievert, Horst
    Sulzenko, Jakub
    Esc Committee For Practice Guidelines Cpg,
    Windecker, Stephan
    Aboyans, Victor
    Agewall, Stefan
    Barbato, Emanuele
    Bueno, Héctor
    Coca, Antonio
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Coman, Ioan Mircea
    Dean, Veronica
    Delgado, Victoria
    Fitzsimons, Donna
    Gaemperli, Oliver
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Iung, Bernard
    Jüni, Peter
    Katus, Hugo A
    Knuuti, Juhani
    Lancellotti, Patrizio
    Leclercq, Christophe
    McDonagh, Theresa
    Piepoli, Massimo Francesco
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Richter, Dimitrios J
    Roffi, Marco
    Shlyakhto, Evgeny
    Simpson, Iain A
    Zamorano, Jose Luis
    Questions and Answers on Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Diseases: A Companion Document of the 2017 ESC Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases, in collaboration with the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS).2018In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 457-464, article id S1078-5884(17)30516-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Bartelink, Marie-Louise
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Brodmann, Marianne
    Cohner, Tina
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Czerny, Martin
    De Carlo, Marco
    Debus, Sebastian
    Espinola-Klein, Christine
    Kahan, Thomas
    Kownator, Serge
    Mazzolai, Lucia
    Naylor, Ross
    Roffi, Marco
    Röther, Joachim
    Sprynger, Muriel
    Tendera, Michal
    Tepe, Gunnar
    Venermo, Maarit
    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos
    Desormais, Ileana
    [2017 ESC Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases, in collaboration with the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS)]2017In: Kardiologia polska, ISSN 0022-9032, E-ISSN 1897-4279, Vol. 75, no 11, p. 1065-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Bartelink, Marie-Louise E L
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Brodmann, Marianne
    Cohnert, Tina
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Czerny, Martin
    De Carlo, Marco
    Debusa, Sebastian
    Espinola-Klein, Christine
    Kahan, Thomas
    Kownator, Serge
    Mazzolai, Lucia
    Naylora, A Ross
    Roffi, Marco
    Rotherb, Joachim
    Sprynger, Muriel
    Tendera, Michal
    Tepe, Gunnar
    Venermoa, Maarit
    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos
    Desormais, Ileana
    2017 ESC Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Diseases, in collaboration with the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS).2018In: Revista espanola de cardiologia (English ed.), ISSN 1885-5857, Vol. 71, no 2, article id 111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Postprandial Normoglycemic Hypokalemia-an Overlooked Complication to Gastric Bypass Surgery?2021In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 3369-3371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity is one of the major health problems of the world, and one of the most common surgical treatments is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. This can however lead to problems with postprandial hypoglycemia, but sometimes, the meal test does not render any signs of hypoglycemia. Here, 3 cases are presented with postprandial normoglycemic hypokalemia.

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  • 32.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Response to Postprandial Hyperinsulinemic Normoglycemic Hypokalemic Response After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery2022In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 2468-2468Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Abrahamsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Åberg, Anna-Maja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Blind, Per Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Outcome of microdialysis sampling on liver surface and parenchyma2016In: Journal of Surgical Research, ISSN 0022-4804, E-ISSN 1095-8673, Vol. 200, no 2, p. 480-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To investigate whether surface microdialysis (μD) sampling in probes covered by a plastic film, as compared to noncovered and to intraparenchymatous probes, would increase the technique's sensitivity for pathophysiologic events occurring in a liver ischemia-reperfusion model. Placement of μD probes in the parenchyma of an organ, as is conventionally done, may cause adverse effects, e.g., bleeding, possibly influencing outcome.

    Methods: A transient ischemia-reperfusion model of the liver was used in six anesthetized normoventilated pigs. μD probes were placed in the parenchyma and on the liver surface. Surface probes were either left uncovered or were covered by plastic film.

    Results: Lactate and glucose levels were significantly higher in plastic film covered probes than in uncovered surface probes throughout the ischemic period. Glycerol levels were significantly higher in plastic film covered probes than in uncovered surface probes at 30 and 45 min into ischemia.

    Conclusions: Covering the μD probe increases the sensibility of the μD–technique in monitoring an ischemic insult and reperfusion in the liver. These findings confirm that the principle of surface μD works, possibly replacing need of intraparenchymatous placement of μD probes. Surface μD seemingly allows, noninvasively from an organ's surface, via the extracellular compartment, assessment of intracellular metabolic events. The finding that covered surface μD probes allows detection of local metabolic changes earlier than do intraparenchymatous probes, merit further investigation focusing on μD probe design.

  • 34. Abreu, Phillipe
    et al.
    Ivanics, Tommy
    Jiang, Keruo
    Chen, Kui
    E. Hansen, Bettina
    Sapisochin, Gonzalo
    Ghanekar, Anand
    Novel biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma: high tumoral PLK-4 expression is associated with better prognosis in patients without microvascular invasion2021In: HPB, ISSN 1365-182X, E-ISSN 1477-2574Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Malakuti, Iman
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Ajan, Aida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Surgical Management of Granular Cell Tumor of the Orbit: Case Report and Literature Review2019In: The Open Dentistry Journal, E-ISSN 1874-2106, Vol. 13, p. 33-40Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Granular Cell Tumors (GCTs) of the orbit are rare-entity soft-tissue tumors, and few reports have been published in the literature. The treatment of the choice is total excision. Early diagnosis prior to surgery is valuable for the distinction of malignant from benign tumor.

    Case presentation: We report a case of a 55-year-old woman with a solitary slow-growing mass in the right orbit with the involvement of the rectus inferior muscle, and present a review of the recent literature. The lesion had a diameter of 1 cm and was noticed 2 years before the examination. Excisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of GCT. The tumor was resected through a retroseptal transconjunctival approach. The final histological examination revealed findings characteristic of GCT, including positive reaction for protein S-100, SOX10, and calcitonin and negative reaction for desmin, myogenin, Smooth Muscle Antigen (SMA), Melan-A, and HMB-45. There were no signs of malignancy in this sample. Disturbance of motility was not noted by the patient after surgery.

    Conclusion: GCT should be included in the differential diagnosis of intraorbital lesions, particularly those that involve the orbit muscles. A biopsy is recommended before surgical resection, to exclude malignancy and prevent radical resection.

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  • 36.
    Abuhasanein, Suleiman
    et al.
    Univ Goteborg, Sweden; NU Hosp Grp, Sweden; Univ Goteborg, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Kjolhede, Henrik
    Univ Goteborg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Shortened time to diagnosis for patients suspected of urinary bladder cancer managed in a standardized care pathway was associated with an improvement in tumour characteristics2024In: BJUI COMPASS, ISSN 2688-4526, Vol. 5, p. 261-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To evaluate whether the implementation of standardized care pathway (SCP) for patients with suspected urinary bladder cancer (UBC) was associated with changes in tumour characteristics. Additionally, the study aims to explore whether there was a shift in the selection of patients prioritized for immediate evaluation regarding suspicion of UBC.Materials and Methods The study included all patients diagnosed with UBC in the NU Hospital Group between 2010 and 2019. To evaluate changes associated with SCP, patients were divided into two diagnostic time periods, either before (2010-2015) or during (2016-2019) the implementation of the SCP. To evaluate which patients were prioritized for prompt evaluation within 13 days, logistic regression analysis was performed on all patients before and during SCP.Results Median time to transurethral resection of the tumour in urinary bladder (TURBT) decreased from 29 days (interquartile range [IQR] 16-48) before SCP to 12 days (IQR 8-19) during SCP (p &lt; 0.001) with a clear break from 2016. The proportion of cT2 + tumours decreased during SCP from 26% to 20% (p = 0.035). In addition, tumours detected during SCP were smaller (p = 0.023), but with more multiple lesions (p = 0.055) and G3 tumours (p = 0.007). During SCP, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups of patients with TURBT within or after 13 days. In contrast, before SCP, a majority of the patients treated within 13 days had advanced tumours and were admitted from the emergency ward.Conclusions The implementation of an SCP for suspected UBC was associated with improved tumour characteristics. Interestingly, during SCP, there were no substantial differences in patients' or tumours' characteristics among those who underwent TURBT within or after 13 days. This indicates that the 13-day timeframe for TURBT might be prolonged, especially in less urgent cases in order to facilitate a prioritization of more severe cases with treatable disease.

  • 37. Abul-Kasim, Kasim
    et al.
    Backman, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Björkman, Anders
    Dahlin, Lars B
    Advanced radiological work-up as an adjunct to decision in early reconstructive surgery in brachial plexus injuries2010In: Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury, E-ISSN 1749-7221, Vol. 5, p. 14-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    As neurophysiologic tests may not reveal the extent of brachial plexus injury at the early stage, the role of early radiological work-up has become increasingly important. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concordance between the radiological and clinical findings with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injuries.

    Methods

    Seven consecutive male patients (median age 33; range 15-61) with brachial plexus injuries, caused by motor cycle accidents in 5/7 patients, who underwent extensive radiological work-up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography myelography (CT-M) or both were included in this retrospective study. A total of 34 spinal nerve roots were evaluated by neuroradiologists at two different occasions. The degree of agreement between the radiological findings of every individual nerve root and the intraoperative findings was estimated by calculation of kappa coefficient (К-value). Using the operative findings as a gold standard, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the clinical findings and the radiological findings were estimated.

    Results

    The diagnostic accuracy of radiological findings was 88% compared with 65% for the clinical findings. The concordance between the radiological findings and the intraoperative findings was substantial (К = 0.76) compared with only fair (К = 0.34) for the clinical findings. There were two false positive and two false negative radiological findings (sensitivity and PPV of 0.90; specificity and NPV of 0.87).

    Conclusions

    The advanced optimized radiological work-up used showed high reliability and substantial agreement with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injury.

  • 38.
    Abusabeib, Abdelrahman
    et al.
    Department of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Bhat, Harun
    Weill Cornell Medicine in Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Al Hassan, Mohamed S.
    Department of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman
    Department of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Right ectopic paraesophageal parathyroid adenoma with refractory hypercalcemia in pregnancy: A case report and review of the literature2020In: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports, E-ISSN 2210-2612, Vol. 77, p. 229-234Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Ectopic parathyroid adenoma is rare during pregnancy but poses multiple challenges in treatment. It presents as primary hyperparathyroidism which leads to symptoms and complications of hypercalcemia in both the mother and fetus. Presentation of case: A 38-year-old Sudanese female presented with diffuse bone pain and polyuria. Laboratory investigations revealed elevated serum calcium and parathyroid hormone. Ultrasound of the neck did not show any abnormal lesion, however 99mTc-sestamibi scan showed a right sided parathyroid adenoma, and an earlier CT scan showed the adenoma to be in an ectopic paraesophageal position. Focused surgical neck exploration was done, and the ectopic parathyroid adenoma was excised. Discussion: Preoperative localization of the ectopic parathyroid adenoma allows for a focused surgical procedure. Ultrasound is the safest during pregnancy, but 99mTc-sestamibi and CT scan may be necessary if ultrasound or initial bilateral neck exploration do not detect any adenoma. Mild elevations in maternal serum calcium can have detrimental effects on the fetus which suggests that a surgical approach may be necessary in the majority of cases. Conclusions: Ectopic parathyroid adenoma is rare during pregnancy and is detrimental to both the mother and fetus. Preoperative localization allows for a focused surgery which is a definitive treatment and can safely be performed during the 2nd trimester of pregnancy. 

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  • 39.
    Abusabeib, Abdelrahman
    et al.
    Department of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar ; College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Al Hassan, Mohamed S.
    Department of General Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Petkar, Mahir
    Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Mohamed, Sugad
    Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    First case of huge classic papillary thyroid cancer rupturing spontaneously leading to ischemic necrosis, perforation and inflammation of overlying skin: Case report and review of the literature2021In: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports, E-ISSN 2210-2612, Vol. 85, article id 106136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is the commonest form of well-differentiated endocrine carcinoma. It is categorized into indolent and aggressive, where the indolent subtypes (classic, follicular) rarely demonstrate aggressive behavior. We present a classic PTC presenting with a rapidly growing huge anterior neck mass that subsequently spontaneously ruptured subcutaneously resulting in ischemia, necrosis, and perforation of overlying skin leading to inflammation. Presentation of case: A 37-year-old female with no comorbidities presented to our emergency department with a neck swelling of 2 years duration that rapidly enlarged one week prior to presentation. Though the mass initially appeared of inflammatory nature, the tumor was a PTC, and she underwent total thyroidectomy with selective right side neck dissection and debridement of necrotic skin. The gross specimen revealed a fragmented non-intact right thyroid lobe mass causing pressure ischemia, necrosis and perforation of the skin. Histopathology showed a 9 × 9 × 5 cm classic PTC staged as pT3b N1b. Postoperative course was uneventful, she was discharged by the eighth postoperative day, and then she received a high dose of radioactive iodine ablation (RAI). Discussion: Classic PTC is usually of a smaller size and a relatively benign course compared to other PTC subtypes and thyroid cancers. It is indolent with favorable prognosis. Although it is associated with increased risk of lymph node metastases at the time of diagnosis, it is slow growing with high survival rates approaching 95%. Conclusion: Despite that classic PTC progresses slowly, it should still be suspected in neck swellings presenting with rapid and aggressive behavior. Prompt and systematic assessment is required with surgical intervention and radioactive iodine ablation therapy. 

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  • 40.
    Abusabeib, Alyaa
    et al.
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Alobaidan, Jassim
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Elhag, Wahiba
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    First Case Report of Fulminant Hepatitis After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Associated with Concomitant Maximal Therapeutic Dose of Acetaminophen Use, Protein Calorie Malnutrition, and Vitamins A and D, Selenium, and Glutathione Deficiencies2021In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 899-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasingly being linked to obesity. Although laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is effective for weight loss that can ultimately resolve NAFLD, an initial transient deterioration of liver functions could be observed during the first few months post-operatively, after which a subsequent improvement of the liver functions might occur. Rapid weight loss, nutritional deficiencies, and protein malnutrition can all contribute to hepatic dysfunction and can affect the metabolism of medications such as acetaminophen leading to more insult to a compromised liver. We report acute liver failure after LSG associated with protein calorie malnutrition, multiple nutritional deficiencies in addition to concomitant use of therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine, and replacement of deficient multivitamins and trace elements resulted in significant improvement in liver functions. 

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  • 41.
    Abusabeib, Alyaa
    et al.
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Elhag, Wahiba
    Department of Bariatric Surgery/Bariatric Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    First Case Report of Acquired Copper Deficiency Following Revisional Single Anastomosis Duodeno-Ileal Bypass with Sleeve Gastrectomy (SADI-S) Leading to Severe Pancytopenia with Refractory Anemia2020In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 5131-5134Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 42. Achouiti, A.
    et al.
    Vogl, T.
    Urban, Constantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Hommes, T. J.
    van Zoelen, M. A.
    Florquin, S.
    Roth, J.
    van 't Veer, C.
    de Vos, A. F.
    van der Poll, T.
    Myeloid related protein (mrp) 8/14 contributes to an antibacterial host response against klebsiella (k.) pneumoniae2012In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 37, no S1, p. 56-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Acosta, Rafael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Rozen, Warren M.
    Whitaker, Iain S.
    Banking of the DIEP Flap: A "Previously Described New Technique" Reply2010In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 126, no 4, p. 1407-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Acosta, Rafael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Rozen, Warren M.
    Whitaker, Iain S.
    Probing Questions on Implantable Probes Reply2010In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 1790-1791Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Acosta, S.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Vasc Ctr, Malmo, Sweden..
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Negative-pressure wound therapy for prevention and treatment of surgical-site infections after vascular surgery2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 2, p. E75-E84Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIndications for negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in vascular surgical patients are expanding. The aim of this review was to outline the evidence for NPWT on open and closed wounds. MethodsA PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library search from 2007 to June 2016 was performed combining the medical subject headings terms wound infection', abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)', fasciotomy', vascular surgery' and NPWT' or VAC'. ResultsNPWT of open infected groin wounds was associated with shorter duration of wound healing by 47 days, and was more cost-effective than alginate dressings in one RCT. In one RCT and six observational studies, NPWT-related major bleeding and graft preservation rates were 0-10 and 83-100 per cent respectively. One retrospective comparative study showed greater wound size reduction per day, fewer dressing changes, quicker wound closure and shorter hospital stay with NPWT compared with gauze dressings for lower leg fasciotomy. NPWT and mesh-mediated fascial traction after AAA repair and open abdomen was associated with high primary fascial closure rates (96-100 per cent) and low risk of graft infection (0-7 per cent). One retrospective comparative study showed a significant reduction in surgical-site infection, from 30 per cent with standard wound care to 6 per cent with closed incisional NPWT. ConclusionNPWT has a central role in open and infected wounds after vascular surgery; the results of prophylactic care of closed incisions are promising.

  • 46.
    Acosta, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    On Acute Thrombo-Embolic Occlusion of the Superior Mesenteric Artery2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) with intestinal infarction is a lethal disease, difficult to diagnose in time, with unknown incidence and cause-specific mortality. The aim of this thesis was to characterize the disease and to develop diagnostic methods.

    Two laboratory studies were conducted on patients with suspected acute SMA occlusion. A pilot-study showed that the fibrinolytic marker D-dimer was elevated in six patients with the disease. In the subsequent study including 101 patients, D-dimer was the only elevated coagulation marker in nine patients with the disease. In a prospective study 24 patients (median age 84 years) were identified, of whom four were diagnosed at autopsy, despite an autopsy-rate of 10%. One-fourth were initially nursed in non-surgical wards. Length of the intestinal infarction was a predictor for death. An analysis of patients from the three studies showed that D-Dimer was elevated in all 16 tested patients with the disease.

    Sixty patients with acute SMA occlusion underwent intestinal revascularisation and were registered in the Swedish Vascular Registry (SWEDVASC). One-year survival-rate was 40%. Previous vascular surgery was a negative risk-factor.

    A population-based study was conducted in Malmö, based on an autopsy-rate of 87%. Among 270 patients with the disease, 2/3 were diagnosed only at autopsy and 1/2 were managed in non-surgical wards. The incidence was 8.6 per 100000 person years. The age-standardized incidence increased exponentially without gender differences. The diagnosis was the cause of death in 1.2% among octogenarians and beyond. Thrombotic occlusions were located proximally within the SMA and associated with extensive intestinal infarctions. Synchronous embolism, often multiple, occurred in 2/3 of the patients with embolic occlusions.

    Conclusions: A normal D-dimer at presentation most likely excludes the diagnosis. Acute SMA occlusion was more frequent than previously estimated from clinical series. The patients were often nursed in non-surgical wards.

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  • 47. Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Acute and Chronic Mesenteric Vascular Disease2017In: Vascular Surgery:: Principles and Practice / [ed] Wilson SE; Jimenez JC; Veith FJ; Naylor AR; Buckels JAC, CRC Press, 2017, 4, p. 603-617Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48. Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Petersson, Ulf
    Vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction for open abdomen therapy: a systematic review2017In: Anaesthesiology intensive therapy, ISSN 1731-2515, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 139-145Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to review the literature on vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) in open abdomen therapy. It was designed as systematic review of observational studies.

    METHODS: A Pub Med, EMBASE and Cochrane search from 2007/01-2016/07 was performed combining the Medical Subject Headings "vacuum", "mesh-mediated fascial traction", "temporary abdominal closure", "delayed abdominal closure", "open abdomen", "abdominal compartment syndrome", "negative pressure wound therapy" or "vacuum assisted wound closure".

    RESULTS: Eleven original studies were found including patients numbering from 7 to 111. Six studies were prospective and five were retrospective. Nine studies were on mixed surgical (n = 9), vascular (n = 6) and trauma (n = 6) patients, while two were exclusively on vascular patients. The primary fascial closure rate per protocol varied from 80-100%. The time to closure of the open abdomen varied between 9-32 days. The entero-atmospheric fistula rate varied from 0-10.0%. The in-hospital survival rate varied from 57-100%. In the largest prospective study, the incisional hernia rate among survivors at 63 months of median follow-up was 54% (27/50), and 16 (33%) repairs out of 48 incisional hernias were performed throughout the study period. The study patients reported lower short form health survey (SF-36) scores than the mean reference population, mainly dependent on the prevalence of major co-morbidities. There was no difference in SF-36 scores or a modified ventral hernia pain questionnaire (VHPQ) at 5 years of follow up between those with versus those without incisional hernias.

    CONCLUSIONS: A high primary fascial closure rate can be achieved with the vacuum-assisted wound closure and meshmediated fascial traction technique in elderly, mainly non-trauma patients, in need of prolonged open abdomen therapy.

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  • 49. Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Seternes, Arne
    Venermo, Maarit
    Vikatmaa, Leena
    Sörelius, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Svensson, Mats
    Djavani, Khatereh
    Department of Surgery, Gävle Hospital, Gävle, Sweden.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Open Abdomen Therapy with Vacuum and Mesh Mediated Fascial Traction After Aortic Repair: an International Multicentre Study2017In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 697-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    Open abdomen therapy may be necessary to prevent or treat abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). The aim of the study was to analyse the primary delayed fascial closure (PDFC) rate and complications after open abdomen therapy with vacuum and mesh mediated fascial traction (VACM) after aortic repair and to compare outcomes between those treated with open abdomen after primary versus secondary operation.

    METHODS:

    This was a retrospective cohort, multicentre study in Sweden, Finland, and Norway, including consecutive patients treated with open abdomen and VACM after aortic repair at six vascular centres in 2006-2015. The primary endpoint was PDFC rate.

    RESULTS:

    Among 191 patients, 155 were men. The median age was 71 years (IQR 66-76). Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) occurred in 69.1%. Endovascular/hybrid and open repairs were performed in 49 and 142 patients, respectively. The indications for open abdomen were inability to close the abdomen (62%) at primary operation and ACS (80%) at secondary operation. Duration of open abdomen was 11 days (IQR 7-16) in 157 patients alive at open abdomen termination. The PDFC rate was 91.8%. Open abdomen initiated at primary (N=103), compared with secondary operation (N=88), was associated with less severe initial open abdomen status (p=.006), less intestinal ischaemia (p=.002), shorter duration of open abdomen (p=.007), and less renal replacement therapy (RRT, p<.001). In hospital mortality was 39.3%, and after entero-atmospheric fistula (N=9) was 88.9%. Seven developed graft infection within 6 months, 1 year mortality was 28.6%. Intestinal ischaemia (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.55-8.91), RRT (OR 3.62, 95% CI 1.72-7.65), and age (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.06-1.12), were independent factors associated with in hospital mortality, but not open abdomen initiated at primary versus secondary operation.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    VACM was associated with a high PDFC rate after prolonged open abdomen therapy following aortic repair. Patient outcomes seemed better when open abdomen was initiated at primary, compared with secondary operation but a selection effect is possible.

  • 50.
    Adalberth, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Total knee arthroplasty: Alternative aspects on fixation, design and postoperative treatment2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Total knee arthroplasty as a treatment of severe gonarthrosis has become a great success, but tibial component loosening is still a major reason for failure. When total knee arthroplasty was introduced, only all-polyethylene (AP) tibial components were available. Based on mostly theoretical data, AP components were more or less abandoned during the 1980:ies in favor of metal-backed (MB) tibial components. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether insufficient fixation would result, using an all-polyethylene tibial component instead of a more costly metal-backed prosthesis. Further, to compare different antibiotic loaded bone cements, and to investigate whether post- operative drainage is beneficial in total knee arthroplasty. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) was used to obtain accurate and standardized evaluations facilitating comparison between prosthetic designs.

    Magnitude and pattern of migration of a moderately conforming AP tibial component was analyzed in 22 patients. Migration was on par with a more conforming previously used frequently, AP component, indicating a favorable prognosis regarding future aseptic loosening. Another 34 arthroplasties with a flat on flat (non-conforming) articulating geometry were randomized to an AP or MB cemented tibial component. There were no differences in migration between the groups. None of the AP implants displayed any continuous migration between 1 and 2 years postoperative. In a similar randomized series of 38 arthroplasties with a semiconstrained articulation, fixation measured with RSA was not inferior for AP implants compared with MB. Both studies indicate a good long-term prognosis using an AP component. A new antibiotic loaded bone cement was prospectively randomized against a more commonly used bone cement in a series of 51 arthroplasties. Neither fixation of the tibial component nor the radiographic and clinical results differed between the cements, indicating a good prognosis for the new cement. Postoperative drainage of knee arthroplasty is widely used. 90 patients were prospectively randomized into three groups: no drain, ordinary drain system and a retransfusable drain system. Postoperative drainage in knee arthroplasty has no adverse clinical consequences but seems not to be necessary.

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