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  • 1.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Visualization of Peripheral Pain Generating Processes and Inflammation in Musculoskeletal Tissue using [11C]-D-deprenyl PET2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    An objective visualization and quantification of pain-generating processes in the periphery would alter pain diagnosis and represent an important paradigm shift in pain research. Positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [11C]-D-deprenyl has shown an elevated uptake in painful inflammatory arthritis and whiplash-associated disorder. However, D-Deprenyl’s molecular binding target and uptake mechanism in inflammation and musculoskeletal injuries are still unknown. The present thesis aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms of D-deprenyl binding and uptake and to verify whether pain-associated sites and inflammation in acute musculoskeletal injury could be visualized, objectively quantified and followed over time with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET-computed tomography (PET/CT).

    To identify the D-deprenyl binding target, a high-throughput analysis and competitive radioligand binding studies were performed. D-deprenyl inhibited monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) activity by 55%, MAO-B activity by 99% and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by 70%, which identified these enzymes as higher-affinity targets. Furthermore, radioligand receptor binding assays pointed favorably towards the concept of MAO-B as the primary target. To investigate the biochemical characteristics of the binding site, we used radioligand binding assays to assess differences in the binding profile in inflamed human synovial membranes exhibiting varying levels of inflammation. D-deprenyl bound to a single, saturable population of membrane-bound protein in synovial membrane homogenates and the level of inflammation correlated with an increase in D-deprenyl binding affinity.

    To verify whether D-deprenyl can visualize pain-generating processes, patients with musculoskeletal injuries were investigated and followed-up with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT. In the study of eight patients with ankle sprain, the molecular aspects of inflammation and tissue injury could be visualized, objectively quantified and followed over time with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT. The pain coexisted with increased [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake. In the study of 16 whiplash patients, an altered [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake in the cervical bone structures and facet joints was associated with subjective pain levels and self-rated disability.

    To further evaluate D-Deprenyl’s usefulness as a marker of inflammation, three PET tracers were compared in an animal PET/CT study. Preliminary findings showed that [11C]-D-deprenyl had an almost identical uptake pattern when compared with [11C]-L-deprenyl. The two deprenyl enantiomers showed no signs of specific binding or trapping and therefore may not be useful to study further in models of inflammatory pain, surgical pain, or both.

    This thesis demonstrates that D-deprenyl visualizes painful inflammation in musculoskeletal injuries and that the probable underlying mechanism of [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake is binding to MAO.

  • 2.
    Abad-Gurumeta, A.
    et al.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Hosp Univ la Paz, Madrid, Spain.
    Ripolles-Melchor, J.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Casans-Frances, R.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Hosp Clin Univ Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Espinosa, A.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Martinez-Hurtado, E.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Fernandez-Perez, C.
    Dept Consultant Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Ramirez, J. M.
    Dept Colorectal Surg, Univ Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Lopez-Timoneda, F.
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Dept Anaesthesia, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Calvo-Vecino, J. M.
    Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Dept Anaesthesia, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    A systematic review of sugammadex vs neostigmine for reversal of neuromuscular blockade2015Inngår i: Anaesthesia, ISSN 0003-2409, E-ISSN 1365-2044, Vol. 70, nr 12, s. 1441-1452Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We reviewed systematically sugammadex vs neostigmine for reversing neuromuscular blockade. We included 17 randomised controlled trials with 1553 participants. Sugammadex reduced all signs of residual postoperative paralysis, relative risk (95% CI) 0.46 (0.29-0.71), p=0.0004 and minor respiratory events, relative risk (95% CI) 0.51 (0.32-0.80), p=0.0034. There was no difference in critical respiratory events, relative risk (95% CI) 0.13 (0.02-1.06), p=0.06. Sugammadex reduced drug-related side-effects, relative risk (95% CI) 0.72 (0.54-0.95), p=0.02. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative nausea or the rate of postoperative vomiting, relative risk (95% CI) 0.94 (0.79-1.13), p=0.53, and 0.87 (0.65-1.17), p=0.36 respectively.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Hand- och plastikkirurgiska kliniken US.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Hand- och plastikkirurgiska kliniken US.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Hand- och plastikkirurgiska kliniken US.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Hand- och plastikkirurgiska kliniken US.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018Inngår i: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, s. 1-9Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Pernilla
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Methodological aspects on microdialysis sampling and measurements2010Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:     The microdialysis (MD) technique is widely spread and used both experi­mentally and in clinical practice. The MD technique allows continuous collection of small molecules such as glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol. Samples are often analysed using the CMA 600 analyser, an enzymatic and colorimetric analyser.  Data evaluating the performance of the CMA 600 analysis system and associated sample han­dling are sparse. The aim of this work was to identify sources of variability related to han­dling of microdialysis samples and sources of error associated with use of the CMA 600 analyser. Further, to develop and compare different application techniques of the micro­dialysis probes both within an organ and on the surface of an organ.

     Material and Methods:  Papers I and II are mainly in vitro studies with the exception of the No Net Flux calibration method in paper I where a pig model (n=7) was used to exam­ine the true concen­tration of glucose and urea in subcutaneous tissue. Flow rate, sampling time, vial and caps material and performance of the analyser device (CMA 600) were examined. In papers III and IV normoventilated anaesthetised pigs (n=33) were used. In paper III, heart ischemia was used as intervention to compare microdialysis measurements in the myocardium with corresponding measurements on the heart surface. In paper IV, microdialysis measurements in the liver parenchyma were compared with measurements on the liver surface in associa­tion with induced liver ischemia. All animal studies were approved by the Animal Experi­mental Ethics Committee at Umeå University Sweden.

    Results:  In paper I we succeeded to measure true concentrations of glucose (4.4 mmol/L) and Urea (4.1 mmol/L) in subcutaneous tissue. Paper II showed that for a batch analyse of 24 samples it is preferred to store microdialysis samples in glass vials with crimp caps. For reliable results, samples should be centrifuged before analysis. Paper III showed a new application area for microdialysis sampling from the heart, i.e. surface sampling. The sur­face probe and myocardial probe (in the myocardium) showed a similar pattern for glucose, lactate and glycerol during baseline, short ischemic and long ischemic interventions. In paper IV, a similar pattern was observed as in paper III, i.e. data obtained from the probe on the liver surface showed no differences compared with data from the probe in liver paren­chyma for glucose, lactate and glycerol concentrations during baseline, ischemic and reperfusion interven­tions.

    Conclusion:  The MD technique is adequate for local metabolic monitoring, but requires methodological considerations before starting a new experimental serie. It is important to consider factors such as flow rate, sampling time and handling of samples in association with the analysis device chosen. The main finding in this thesis is that analyses of glucose, lactate and glycerol in samples from the heart surface and liver surface reflect concentra­tions sampled from the myocardium and liver parenchyma, respectively.

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    An assessment of calibration and performance of the microdialysis system2005Inngår i: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, ISSN 0731-7085, E-ISSN 1873-264X, Vol. 39, nr 3-4, s. 730-734Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve the reliability of microdialysis measurements of tissue concentrations of metabolic substances, this study was designed to test both the performance and the internal validity of the microdialysis methods in the hands of our research group. The stability of the CMA 600 analyser was tested with a known glucose solution in 72 standard microvials and in 48 plastic vials. To evaluate if variation in sampling time makes any difference in sample concentration (recovery), sampling times of 10, 20 and 30 min were compared in vitro with a constant flow rate of 1 microl/min. For testing of sampling times at different flow rates, an in vitro study was performed in which a constant sample volume of 10 microl was obtained. With the no net flux method, the actual concentration of glucose and urea in subcutaneous tissue was measured. The CMA 600 glucose analysis function was accurate and stable with a coefficient of variability (CV) of 0.2-0.55%. There was no difference in recovery for the CMA 60 catheter for glucose when sampling times were varied. Higher flow rates resulted in decreased recovery. Subcutaneous tissue concentrations of glucose and urea were 4.4 mmol/l and 4.1 mmol/l, respectively. To conclude, this work describes an internal validation of our use of the microdialysis system by calibration of vials and catheters. Internal validation is necessary in order to be certain of adequate sampling times, flow rates and sampling volumes. With this in mind, the microdialysis technique is useful and appropriate for in vivo studies on tissue metabolism.

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Åberg, Anna-Maja
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Blind, Per-Jonas
    Kirurgi, Skåne Universitets sjukhus, Lund.
    Comparison between outcome of  surface and intraparenchymatous sampling using microdialysis in an experimental liver ischemia modelManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. We recently have shown that samples from MD probes placed on the surface of the heart reflect metabolic events in the myocardium. This new interesting observation challenges us to consider whether surface application of MD applies to other parenchymatous organs and their surfaces.

    Material and methods.  In thirteen anesthetized pigs transient liver ischemia was achieved by occlusion of arterial and venous inflow to the liver. Two probes on liver surface, and two in parenchyma were perfused with a flow rate of 1 µL/min (n=13). An identical set up was used for probes with a flow rate of 2 µL/min (n=9). Samples were collected for every 15 minute period during 60 minutes of baseline, 45 minutes of ischemia and 60 minutes of reperfusion. Lactate, glucose, pyruvate and glycerol were analysed in MD samples. We focused on relative changes in the present paper.

    Results. There was a strong agreement in relative lactate and glucose levels between probes placed on liver surface and parenchyma. No significant differences in relative changes of lactate and glucose levels were seen between samples from surface probes and probes in liver parenchyma during equilibration, baseline, ischemia or reperfusion with a flow rate of 1 µL/min.

    Conclusion. MD sampling applied on the liver surface is a new application area for the MD technique, and may be used to monitor liver metabolism both during physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  • 7.
    Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Vascular Center, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Block, Tomas
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Steinarr
    Vascular Center, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Resch, Timothy
    Vascular Center, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Björck, Martin
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Clinical Chemistry, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Diagnostic pitfalls at admission in patients with acute superior mesenteric artery occlusion2012Inngår i: Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0736-4679, E-ISSN 1090-1280, Vol. 42, nr 6, s. 635-641Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion leads to acute intestinal ischemia and is associated with high mortality. Early diagnosis is often missed, and confounding factors leading to diagnostic delays need to be highlighted.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify potential diagnostic laboratory pitfalls at admission in patients with acute SMA occlusion.

    METHODS: Fifty-five patients with acute SMA occlusion were identified from the in-hospital register during a 4-year period, 2005-2009.

    RESULTS: The median age was 76 years; 78% were women. The occlusion was embolic in 53% and thrombotic in 47% of patients. At admission, troponin I was above the clinical decision level (> 0.06 μg/L) for acute ischemic myocardial injury in 9/19 (47%) patients with embolic occlusion. Elevated pancreas amylase and normal plasma lactate were found in 12/45 and 13/27, respectively. A troponin I (TnI) above the clinical decision level was associated with a high frequency of referrals from the general surgeon to a specialist in internal medicine (p = 0.011) or a cardiologist (p = 0.024). The diagnosis was established after computed tomography angiography in 98% of the patients. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 33%. Attempting intestinal revascularization (n = 43; p < 0.001), with a 95% frequency rate of completion control of the vascular procedure, was associated with a higher survival rate, whereas referral to the cardiologist was associated with a higher mortality rate (p = 0.018).

    CONCLUSION: Elevated TnI was common in acute SMA occlusion, and referral to the cardiologist was found to be associated with adverse outcome. Elevated pancreas amylase and normal plasma lactate values are also potential pitfalls at admission in patients with acute SMA occlusion.

  • 8.
    Ahlstrand, Rebecca
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Effects of anasthesia on esophageal sphincters2011Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The esophageal sphincters constitute the anatomical protection against pulmonary aspiration. The aim of this thesis was to study the esophageal sphincters and how they are affected by different components of emergency anesthesia using high-resolution solid-state manometry.

    The effect of propofol (0.3 mg/kg) was studied in young and elderly volunteers. Propofol can be given as an anxiolytic agent for manometric studies of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) without affecting the results. However, propofol is not recommended for studies of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES).

    The effects of cricoid pressure (CP) and peripheral pain were studied in awake volunteers, with and without remifentanil infusion (5 ng/ml). Pain did not affect pressure in the LES, but CP or remifentanil induced a significant decrease in LES pressure. However, neither CP nor remifentanil affected the barrier pressure (LES-intra gastric pressure). When CP was applied during ongoing remifentanil infusion, no further decrease in LES pressure was measured. CP induced high pressures in the area of the UES independent of remifentanil infusion, indicating that CP is effective in preventing gastroesophageal regurgitation.

    Barrier pressure was also studied in anesthetized patients after rocuronium (0.6 mg/kg) administration and no decrease was measured. In addition, alfentanil (20 μ/kg) added during anesthesia induction with propofol did not decrease the barrier pressure.

    In conclusion, CP seems to be effective in preventing regurgitation and does not affect barrier pressure. Muscle relaxation with rocuronium does not risk gastro-esophageal integrity. In addition, opioids can be integrated, even during emergency anethesia, without increasing the risk for pulmonary aspiration.

  • 9.
    Ahlstrand, Rebecca
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Thörn, Sven-Egron
    Dahlkvist, Anette
    Wattvil, Magnus
    Integrity of the esophagogastric junction during propofol induction with and without remifentanil: a double-blind,randomized, crossover study in volunteersManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Practice varies regarding the use of opioids during rapid sequence induction. Controversy exists as to whether opioids may increase the risk of pulmonary aspiration by decreasing the barrier pressure (lower oesophageal sphincter pressure – intragastric pressure).

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of adding alfentanil during anaesthesia induction with propofol with respect to the barrier pressure in the oesophagogastric junction.

    Participants and Setting: Seventeen healthy volunteers (11 males and 6 females) participated in a double-blind, randomised, crossover trial at the University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden.

    Interventions and outcome measures: The volunteers were anaesthetised on two different occasions, randomly assigned to receive either alfentanil 20 g kg ˉ1 or an equivalent amount of saline, administered intravenously, one minute before induction with propofol 2 mg kg ˉ1. One minute after propofol administration, a cricoid pressure of 30N was applied. The primary outcome was the difference in the change in barrier pressure between the alfentanil and the placebo occasion one minute after propofol administration. The secondary outcomes were differences in the changes in barrier pressure one minute after alfentanil or placebo administration and during ongoing cricoid pressure application.

    Results: There were no statistically significant differences in barrier pressure, at any time point, between anaesthesia induction with alfentanil and propofol compared with induction with placebo and propofol. The barrier pressure never decreased to less than 2.4 mmHg in any volunteer.

    Conclusion: Our study showed no increased risk regarding the integrity of the gastrooesophageal junction when alfentanil is added during an induction with propofol in volunteers. This supports the practice of adding opioids as adjuvants during rapid sequence induction.

  • 10.
    Ahlstrand, Rebecca
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin. Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Savilampi, Johanna
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Thörn, Sven-Egron
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wattwil, Magnus
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effects of cricoid pressure and remifentanil on the esophageal sphincters using high-resolution solid-state manometry2011Inngår i: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 55, nr 2, s. 209-215Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cricoid pressure has been shown to decrease the pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), increasing the risk of aspiration. Whether this reaction is due to pain associated with the application of cricoid pressure has not been studied. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of cricoid pressure with those of peripheral pain on pressures in the LES, and to study whether remifentanil influences these effects. Data from the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) are also described.

    METHODS: Continuous solid-state manometry was performed in 14 healthy volunteers. Initially, the effect of remifentanil (target-controlled infusion with a plasma target concentration of 5.0 ng/ml) was studied, and thereafter, the effects of cricoid pressure and peripheral pain stimulation (cold stimulation). Finally, these two interventions were repeated under ongoing remifentanil infusion.

    RESULTS: Remifentanil decreased the LES pressure significantly [ΔP-6.5 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) -1.7 to -11.2]. Cricoid pressure application decreased the LES pressure significantly (ΔP-3.7 mmHg, 95% CI -1.4 to 6.1), whereas peripheral pain did not (ΔP 1.2 mmHg, 95% CI -3.5 to 1.1). Under ongoing remifentanil infusion, no cricoid pressure-induced LES relaxation was observed. Cricoid pressure induced high pressures in the area of the UES, 215.7 (±91.2) mmHg without remifentanil vs. 219.4 (±74.2) mmHg with remifentanil.

    CONCLUSIONS: Remifentanil as well as cricoid pressure per se induced decreases in LES pressure. However, cricoid pressure-induced changes of the barrier pressure were not significant whether induced with or without an infusion of remifentanil.

  • 11.
    Ahlstrand, Rebecca
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Thörn, Sven-Egron
    Wattvil, Magnus
    High resolution solid-state manometry of the effect of rocuronium on esophagogastric junction integrityManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is partly dependent on striated muscles derived from the crural portion of the diaphragm. The effect of neuromuscular blockade on the integrity of the esophagogastric junction is not well studied. We conducted a prospective interventional study to determine the effect of rocuronium on the pressure in the LES and the barrier pressure (LES pressure – intra gastric pressure). We also studied the effect of positive pressure ventilation on the barrier pressure after neuromuscular blockade with rocuronium.

    Methods: Fourteen patients classified as ASA I or II (aged 18-75 years) who presented for elective surgery (11 cholecystectomy, 3 inguinal hernia) participated in the study. Esophageal manometry was performed after anesthetization with propofol, fentanyl and sevoflurane. After the insertion of a laryngeal mask airway, the patients breathed spontaneously for one minute. Rocuronium was administrated and the patients observed during the onset of apnea and during one minute of apnea and complete neuromuscular blockade. Volume controlled positive pressure ventilation followed.

    Results: Muscle relaxation with rocuronium showed no significant changes in barrier pressure comparing the pressure immediately before rocuronium administration with the pressure obtained at the time point of 0% TOF. Conversion to positive pressure ventilation did not change the barrier pressure with inspiration or expiration. The greatest decrease in barrier pressure was measured after inducing anesthesia when comparing pressures during inspiration (P< 0.01)

  • 12.
    Ahlström, Katarina
    et al.
    Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Biber, Björn
    Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Åberg, Anna-Maja
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Abrahamsson, Pernilla
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Department of Medical Chemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Kardiologi.
    Haney, Michael F.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Exogenous carbon monoxide does not affect cell membrane energy availability assessed by sarcolemmal calcium fluxes during myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion in the pig2011Inngår i: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 28, nr 5, s. 356-362Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon monoxide is thought to be cytoprotective and may hold therapeutic promise for mitigating ischaemic injury. The purpose of this study was to test low-dose carbon monoxide for protective effects in a porcine model of acute myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion.In acute open-thorax experiments in anaesthetised pigs, pretreatment with low-dose carbon monoxide (5% increase in carboxyhaemoglobin) was conducted for 120 min before localised ischaemia (45 min) and reperfusion (60 min) was performed using a coronary snare. Metabolic and injury markers were collected by microdialysis sampling in the ventricular wall. Recovery of radio-marked calcium delivered locally by microperfusate was measured to assess carbon monoxide treatment effects during ischaemia/reperfusion on the intracellular calcium pool.Coronary occlusion and ischaemia/reperfusion were analysed for 16 animals (eight in each group). Changes in glucose, lactate and pyruvate from the ischaemic area were observed during ischaemia and reperfusion interventions, though there was no difference between carbon monoxide-treated and control groups during ischaemia or reperfusion. Similar results were observed for glycerol and microdialysate Ca recovery.These findings show that a relatively low and clinically relevant dose of carbon monoxide did not seem to provide acute protection as indicated by metabolic, energy-related and injury markers in a porcine myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion experimental model. We conclude that protective effects of carbon monoxide related to ischaemia/reperfusion either require higher doses of carbon monoxide or occur later after reperfusion than the immediate time frame studied here. More study is needed to characterise the mechanism and time frame of carbon monoxide-related cytoprotection.

  • 13.
    Akca, Ozan
    et al.
    Univ Louisville, Dept Anesthesiol & Perioperat Med, Neurosci ICU, Louisville, KY 40292 USA..
    Ball, Lorenzo
    Univ Genoa, IRCCS AOU San Martino IST, Dept Surg Sci & Integrated Diagnost, Genoa, Italy..
    Belda, F. Javier
    Univ Valencia, Hosp Clin Univ, Dept Anesthesiol & Crit Care, Valencia, Spain..
    Biro, Peter
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Inst Anesthesiol, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Cortegiani, Andrea
    Univ Palermo, Policlin Paolo Giaccone, Sect Anesthesia Analgesia Intens Care & Emergency, Dept Biopathol & Med Biotechnol DIBIMED, Palermo, Italy..
    Eden, Arieh
    Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Anesthesiol Crit Care & Pain Med, Haifa, Israel..
    Ferrando, Carlos
    Univ Valencia, Hosp Clin Univ, Dept Anesthesiol & Crit Care, Valencia, Spain..
    Gattinoni, Luciano
    Gottingen Univ, Dept Anesthesiol Emergency & Intens Care Med, Gottingen, Germany..
    Goldik, Zeev
    Gregoretti, Cesare
    Univ Palermo, Policlin Paolo Giaccone, Sect Anesthesia Analgesia Intens Care & Emergency, Dept Biopathol & Med Biotechnol DIBIMED, Palermo, Italy..
    Hachenberg, Thomas
    Otto von Guericke Univ, Dept Anaesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Magdeburg, Germany..
    Hedenstierna, Göran
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk fysiologi.
    Hopf, Harriet W.
    Univ Utah, Dept Anesthesiol, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    Hunt, Thomas K.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Div Gen Surg, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Pelosi, Paolo
    Univ Genoa, IRCCS AOU San Martino IST, Dept Surg Sci & Integrated Diagnost, Genoa, Italy..
    Qadan, Motaz
    Harvard Univ, Dept Surg, Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Sessler, Daniel I.
    Cleveland Clin, Inst Anesthesiol, Dept Outcomes Res, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Soro, Marina
    Univ Valencia, Hosp Clin Univ, Dept Anesthesiol & Crit Care, Valencia, Spain..
    Sentürk, Mert
    Istanbul Univ, Istanbul Sch Med, Dept Anaesthesiol & Reanimat, Istanbul, Turkey..
    WHO Needs High FIO2?2017Inngår i: TURKISH JOURNAL OF ANAESTHESIOLOGY AND REANIMATION, ISSN 2149-0937, Vol. 45, nr 4, s. 181-192Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    World Health Organization and the United States Center for Disease Control have recently recommended the use of 0.8 FIO2 in all adult surgical patients undergoing general anaesthesia, to prevent surgical site infections. This recommendation has arisen several discussions: As a matter of fact, there are numerous studies with different results about the effect of FIO2 on surgical site infection. Moreover, the clinical effects of FIO2 are not limited to infection control. We asked some prominent authors about their comments regarding the recent recommendations

  • 14.
    Akerlund, Emma
    et al.
    Inst för Experimentell och Klinisk medicin, Linköping.
    Huss, Fredrik R M
    Inst för Experimentell och Klinisk medicin, Linköping.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Inst för Experimentell och Klinisk medicin, Linköping.
    Burns in Sweden: an analysis of 24,538 cases during the period 1987-2004.2007Inngår i: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 33, nr 1, s. 31-6Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Burn care is always progressing, but there is little epidemiological information giving a clear picture of the current number of treated burns in Sweden. This study was conducted to provide an update of patients admitted to hospital with burns in Sweden. Data were obtained for all patients who were admitted to hospitals with a primary or secondary diagnosis of burns (ICD-9/10 codes) from 1 January 1987 to 31 December 2004; 24,538 patients were found. Most of the patients were male (69%), giving a male:female ratio of 2.23:1. Children in the age-group 0-4 years old predominated, and accounted for 27% of the study material. The median length of stay was 3 days. Throughout the period 740 patients (3%) died of their burns. Significant reductions in mortality, incidence, and length of stay were seen during the study, which correlates well with other studies. However, most of the reductions were in the younger age-groups. Men accounted for the improved mortality, as female mortality did not change significantly. We think that the improvement in results among patients admitted to hospital after burns is a combination of preventive measures, improved treatment protocols, and an expanding strategy by which burned patients are treated as outpatients.

  • 15.
    Al Dabbagh, Z.
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, K. Å.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stiller, C. O.
    Department of Medicine, Clinical Pharmacology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Faculty of Medical Sciences, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Weiss, R. J.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term pattern of opioid prescriptions after femoral shaft fractures2016Inngår i: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 60, nr 5, s. 634-641Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of opioids in non-cancer-related pain following skeletal trauma is controversial due to the presumed risk of dose escalation and dependence. We therefore examined the pattern of opioid prescriptions, that is, those actually dispensed, in patients with femoral shaft fractures.

    Methods: We analysed data from the Swedish National Hospital Discharge Register and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register between 2005 and 2008.

    Results: We identified 1471 patients with isolated femoral shaft fractures. The median age was 75 (16-102) years and 56% were female. In this cohort, 891 patients (61%) received dispensed opioid prescriptions during a median follow-up of 20 months (interquartile range 11-32). In the age- and sex-matched comparison cohort (7339 individuals) without fracture, 25% had opioid prescriptions dispensed during the same period. The proportions of patients receiving opioid analgesics at 6 and 12 months after the fracture were 45% (95% CI 42-49) and 36% (32-39), respectively. The median daily morphine equivalent dose (MED) was between 15 and 17 mg 1-12 months post-fracture. After 3 months, less than 5% used prescription doses higher than 20 mg MED per day. Older age (≥ 70 compared with < 70 years) was a significant predictor of earlier discontinuation of opioid use (Hazard ratio [HR] 1.9).

    Conclusion: A notable proportion of patients continued to receive dispensed prescriptions for opioids for over 6 months (45%) and more than a third of them (36%) continued treatment for at least 12 months. However, the risk of dose escalation seems to be small in opioid-naïve patients.

  • 16.
    Al Dabbagh, Zewar
    et al.
    Dept Mol Med & Surg, Sect Orthopaed & Sports Med, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Karl-Åke
    Dept Mol Med & Surg, Sect Orthopaed & Sports Med, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stiller, Carl-Olav
    Dept Med, Clin Pharmacol Unit, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, University College London (UCL), London, England .
    Weiss, Rudiger J.
    Dept Mol Med & Surg, Sect Orthopaed & Sports Med, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.