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  • 101.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Elg, M
    Eriksson, A
    Halling, Bengt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Halvarsson, A
    Kock, H
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andersson, K
    Håkansson, Malin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Langstrand, J
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Renström, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Svensson, L
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean and working conditions: a current position2013In: HELIX Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix Vinn Excellence Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Halvarsson, A
    Kock, Henrik
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix Vinn Excellence Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Sustainability and development of Lean implementations2014In: Human Factors in Organizational design and management - XI, 2014, 165-169 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean production has become a major change strategy in Swedish public organizations. The aim of this paper was to identify factors that support or counteract sustainability and development of Lean implementations in public organizations. In an interactive research project including interviews and questionnaires, seven public organizations were followed during a three year period. Some factors supported and other factors counteracted sustainability and development of Lean. In conclusion, lack of sustained change was to a  large extent due to replacement of the top managers in five of the organizations and introduction of another change philosophy, low political and managerial ownership and financial problems.

  • 103.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Halvarsson, Agneta
    Kock, Henrik
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Work environment in Swedish Lean implementations2014In: Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management - XI, 2014, -660 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean Production has spread from industry to the public sector and administration, and is now the dominating change concept in Sweden. The influence of Lean on the work environment has been debated. However, both positive and negative work environment consequences have been reported in different studies and in different contexts. The aim of this presentation is to describe consequences for the work environment following Lean implementations and to further knowledge about conditions that influence the work environment.

  • 104.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköpings Tekniska Högskola.
    Vogel, Kjerstin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Interactive research and HTO as an industry development model2014In: Human Factors in Organizational design and Management - Xi Nordiv Ergonomics Society Annual Conference, Copenhagen 2014 / [ed] Broberg, Fallentin, Hasle, Jensen, Kabel, Larsen, Weller, 2014, 337-342 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meat cutting has since long shown high frequencies of work-related disorders and injuries. The meat cutting industry initiated an interactive research project to assist the companies in creating a better work environment considering also the profitability. After an initial diagnosis, a broad strategy was formed and four mixed groups focusing personal development, technological developments, work organization and work environment started working. The results from these further initiated focused studies that were performed in close interaction with the industry. During the four year project a continuous reduction of usculoskeletal disorder problems in the industry and other substantial effects were observed.

  • 105.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Petersen, Jostein
    Elg, Mattias
    Bolling, Andreas
    Interactive research for production and work development2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive research performed as a collaborative approach in conjunction with organizations is considered a new and promising alternative to other research approaches. The purpose of this paper is to describe how interactive research could be used in the interaction between researchers and organizations when running projects to develop production systems and work performed in these systems. It also aims to identify advantages and disadvantages when applying interactive research. Two long term interactive research projects, organised in collaboration with the partnership of Helix Vinn Excellence Centre at Linköping University were performed and data were collected from documentation of interactive seminars, from notes and from interviews with key actors. Interactive research offers several advantages in comparison with traditional research approaches, foremost higher practitioner involvement and validation opportunities of the results. There are also several difficulties, foremost the need of extensive resources and competencies for the research. The overall experiences from participating practitioners were that they considered that the discussions had been useful, stimulating and interesting, and that the fast feedback from data collection was appreciated. One crucial issue is to what extent this interactive research approach may contribute to high quality research, or to what extent the pressure from the practitioners for actionable practical results will take over.

  • 106.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Lean: en möjlighet till effektivitet och innovation2012In: Lean och innovationsförmåga – hinder, möjligheter och kunskapsluckor, 2012, 53-59 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Cook, Richard
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Expressions of resilience are dependent on investments in systemic degrees of freedom: A case from specialized in-home care2014In: 3rd Nordic Conference on Research in Patient Safety and Quality in Healthcare, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Ödegård, Synnöve
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Patients Safety in cancer care from a systems perspective2012In: : The 2nd Nordic Conference in Patient Safety and Healthcare, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Eliasson, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lind, Carl
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Nyman, Teresia
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. IMM Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Facilitators for the implementation of ergonomic interventions2015In: The 47th International the Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference: Creating Sustainable work-environments / [ed] Fostervild, K.I., Johnsen, S.Å., Rydstedt, L., Watten, R.G., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ergonomic interventions have often been studied with focus on the client company in which the intervention has been implemented and not from the perspective of the Occupational Health Service (OHS) company providing the expertise knowledge. The aim of the study was to explore factors within OHS companies which facilitate ergonomic interventions. Semi-structured interviews with twelve ergonomists employed at eight different OHS-companies in Sweden, were performed. Five main facilitators were identified as important for ergonomic interventions; having close relationships with the client, clients’ awareness of the wide-ranging competence of the ergonomist, utilization of standardized methods, specialization/industry knowledge and internal knowledge sharing.

  • 110. Emri, M.
    et al.
    Opposits, G.
    Kis, S. A.
    Trón, L.
    Veres, P.
    Pányik, Á.
    Valastyán, I.
    Imrek, J.
    Moinar, J.
    Novák, D.
    Kerek, Andras
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Balkay, L.
    Software development framework supporting multimodal tomographic imaging2007In: 2006 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record, IEEE , 2007, 1857-1859 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineers specialized in multimodal tomography regularly face a wide scale of programming tasks requiring an integrated software system to ensure cost efficiency. Accordingly, a software development framework has been worked out comprising libraries for cluster-based data acquisition, image reconstruction, management of data files and complex multimodal volumetric visualization. This framework enabled us to develop complex software for our miniPET project [1]. This software contains a graphical application integrating data acquisition, cluster monitoring, event sorting, image reconstruction, interactive image processing tools for advanced multimodal visualization. It also contains utilities to solve these tasks without graphical user interface. The components of our acquisition program can run on embedded Linux systems making new ways to develop any other types of data acquisition software that uses embedded Linux systems. A versatile development framework is developed containing specific libraries and special file formats that support multimodal tomography. This framework was successfully used to elaborate our complex miniPET software.

  • 111.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Work environment at state-of-the-art recycling centres2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling centres have a key role in the recycling branch. It is important that the waste is disposed in the right container to avoid pollution of the fraction. The layout of the facilities as well as the employees at the recycling centres are important to secure good sorting quality. There is a high frequency of injuries among the employees. The aim of the present study is to compare the work environment at the two new built recycling centres with improved layout, with other recycling centres in Sweden. The study population comprised all employees at 42 older recycling centres, totally 122 persons and 300 visitors, and 8 employees, and 41 visitors at two new built recycling centres. Questionnaires were used for data collection. More visitors at the two new recycling centres assessed it easy to find the right container for their waste and high quality of service compared to the first study. The employees at the new recycling centres assessed their physical tiredness lower, compared to employees at the older recycling centres. The employees had the highest risk for an injury was when picking up wrongly sorted waste and when packing manually in cages. There is still some need for improvement, especially concerning lifting and transfer equipment at the new recycling centres

  • 112.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Motivations and strategies for why and how to implement the organizational concept lean – a case study of a Swedish hospital2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyze motivations and strategies of a Swedish hospital for why and how to implement lean. A case study, including interviews with key actors, observations and document analysis, was performed. Lean was in the studied hospital viewed as tools to deal with suggestions from employees on how to improve the delivery of care. Process leaders employed for a limited time were responsible for implementing lean in the different units. The hospitals future choices of implementation strategies, including training of managers, can be seen ascritical for motivating unit-level managers to sustain lean over time.

  • 113.
    Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Improving running mechanics by use of interactive sonification2010In: Proceedings of the Interaction Sonification workshop (ISon) 2010 / [ed] Bresin, Roberto; Hermann, Thomas; Hunt, Andy, Stockholm, Sweden: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2010, 95-98 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Running technique has a large effect on running economy interms of consumed amount of oxygen. Changing the naturalrunning technique, though, is a difficult task. In this paper, a method based on sonification is presented, that will assist the runner in obtaining a more efficient running style. The system is based on an accelerometer sending data to a mobile phone.Thus the system is non-obtrusive and possible to use in theeveryday training. Specifically, the feedback given is based on the runner’s vertical displacement of the center of mass. As this is the main source of energy expenditure during running, it is conjectured that a reduced vertical displacement should improve running economy.

  • 114.
    Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Sturm, Dennis
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Gullstrand, Lennart
    Swedish Sports Confederation.
    Wireless Vertical Displacement Measurement during Running using an Accelerometer and a Mobile Phone2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in the usability of a wireless accelerometer linked to a mobile phone via Bluetooth radio for measuring vertical displacement in running athletes. Five experienced runners were monitored during lactate threshold testing at three to five different velocities. Accelerometer data was received, processed and stored on the phone to be compared to simultaneous position transducer (ground truth) recordings after data collection. A paired t-test and statistical analysis show no significant differences in the reliability of the recordings. While further investigations are encouraged, the accelerometer and algorithm (running in J2ME on the mobile phone) proof as aflexible, easy-to-use tool for out-of-the-lab monitoring and to provide real-time feedback for running technique experiments.

  • 115.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Waldenström, A
    Adverse Events In Healthcare: How do we take into account the experience for safer care?2014In: Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology and Imaging, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Waldenström, Anders
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Olyckor och tillbud inom vården: Erfarenheter för en säkrare vård2014In: MTD, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I oktober 2010 en patient dog vid enheten för hjärtintensivvård vid Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset i Stockholm. StatensHaverikommission (SHK) beslutade att för första gången någonsin att utreda en negativ händelse som inträffade inom vården.

  • 117.
    Fahlstedt, Madelen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Baeck, Katrien
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Biomechanics Section, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Vander Sloten, Jos
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Biomechanics Section, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
    Goffin, Jan
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Biomechanics Section, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
    Depreitere, Bart
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Biomechanics Section, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of impact velocity and angle in a detailed reconstruction of a bicycle accident2012In: 2012 IRCOBI Conference Proceedings - International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury, 2012, 787-799 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bicycle accidents have become the most common cause of serious injury in the traffic during the last couple of years in Sweden. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the input variables, initial velocity and head orientation, of a bicycle accident reconstruction on the strain levels in the brain using a detailed FE head model. The accident involved a non-helmeted 68 year old male who sustained a linear skull fracture, contusions, acute subdural hematoma, and small bleeding at the swelling (subarachnoid blood). The orientation of the head just before impact was determined from the swelling appearing in the computer tomography (CT) scans. The head model used in this study was developed at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. The stress in the cranial bone, first principal strain in the brain tissue and acceleration were determined. The model was able to predict a strain pattern that correlated well with the medical images from the victim. The variation study showed that the tangential velocity had a large effect on the strain levels in the studied case. The strain pattern indicated larger areas of high strain with increased tangential velocity especially at the more superior sections.

  • 118.
    Fahlstedt, Madelen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Importance of the Bicycle Helmet Design and Material for the Outcome in Bicycle Accidents2014In: Proceedings, International Cycling Safety Conference 2014, Chalmers , 2014, 1-14 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden the most common traffic group that needs to be hospitalized due to injury is cyclists where head injuries are the most common severe injuries. According to current standards, the performance of a helmet is only tested against radial impact which is not commonly seen in real accidents. Some studies about helmet design have been published but those helmets have been tested for only a few loading conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use finite element models to evaluate the effect of the helmet’s design on the head in some more loading conditions.

    A detailed head model was used to evaluate three different helmet designs as well as non-helmet situations. The first helmet (Baseline Helmet) was an ordinary helmet available on the market. The two other helmet designs were a modification of the Baseline helmet with either a lower density of the EPS liner (Helmet 1) or a sliding layer between the scalp and the EPS liner (Helmet 2). Four different impact locations combined with four different impact directions were tested.

    The study showed that using a helmet can reduce the peak linear acceleration (85%), peak angular acceleration (87%), peak angular velocity (77%) and peak strain in the brain tissue (77%). The reduction of the strain level was dependent on the loading conditions. Moreover, in thirteen of the sixteen loading conditions Helmet 2 gave lowest peak strain.

    The alteration of the helmet design showed that more can be done to improve the protective effect of the helmet. This study highlighted the need of a modification of current helmet standard test which can lead to helmets with even better protective properties as well as some challenges in implementing new test standards.

  • 119.
    Fahlstedt, Madelen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    S. Alvarez, Victor
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of the Body and Neck on Head Kinematics and Brain Injury Risk in Bicycle Accident Situations2016In: IRCOBI Conference Proceedings - International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury, International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury , 2016, 459-478 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies about the influence of the neck on head kinematics and brain injuries have shown different results. Today bicycle helmets are certified with only a headform in radial experiments but could be improved with oblique impacts. Then the question is how the helmet's performance will be affected by the neck and the rest of the body. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use finite element simulations to investigate the influence of the body on head kinematics and injury prediction in single bicycleaccident situations with and without a helmet. The THUMS-KTH model was used to study the difference between head only and full body. In total, a simulation matrix of 120 simulations was compared by altering initial impact posture, head protection, and muscle activation. The results show that the body in impacts against a hard surface can change the amplitudes and curve shapes of the kinematics and brain tissue strain. The study found an average ratio between head only and full body for peak brain tissue strain to be 1.04 (SD 0.11), for peak linear acceleration 1.06 (SD 0.04), for peak angular acceleration 1.08 (SD 0.09) and for peak angular velocity 1.05 (SD 0.13).

  • 120.
    Faridi, M. A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ramachandraiah, H.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Iranmanesh, I. S.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Microbubble assisted cell sorting by acoustophoresis2016In: 20th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2016, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society , 2016, 1677-1678 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer shelled gas microbubbles (MBs) are used to sort cells in a microfluidic chip under acoustic standing waves (SW). When particles are subjected to SW based on their acoustic contrast factor (ACF) they migrate to nodes (positive contrast factor particles; PACP) or antinodes (negative acoustic contrast particles; NACP)[1]. We have bounded functionalized MBs with cells such that, they can be selectively migrated to antinodes under SW and sorted from unbounded cell both in no flow and flow conditions. Here we demonstrate acoustic mediated microbubble tagged cell sorting with 75% efficiency.

  • 121.
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Natural light lighting qualities for the design of future spaces development of a methodology2011In: 27TH SESSION OF THE CIE, VOL. 1, PTS 1 AND 2, C I E CENTRAL BUREAU , 2011, 482-487 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper wants to contribute to the development of a novel methodology in which daylight and artificial light are combined in the definition of the user's experience of architectural space. This experience is based upon the three systems that are triggered by light, visual, biological and perceptual/psychological. Natural Light is an attempt to deal with the issue of quality in spaces under a human perspective. This paper resumes the theoretical question that is leading a PhD research work, the result of a workshop developed in the city of Stockholm and the practical and methodological applications that will follow.

  • 122. Ferreira, J.
    et al.
    Seoane, Fernando
    School of Engineering, University of Borås, Borås 501 90, Sweden .
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Portable bioimpedance monitor evaluation for continuous impedance measurements: Towards wearable plethysmography applications2013In: Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS, 2013, 559-562 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personalised Health Systems (PHS) that could benefit the life quality of the patients as well as decreasing the health care costs for society among other factors are arisen. The purpose of this paper is to study the capabilities of the System-on-Chip Impedance Network Analyser AD5933 performing high speed single frequency continuous bioimpedance measurements. From a theoretical analysis, the minimum continuous impedance estimation time was determined, and the AD5933 with a custom 4-Electrode Analog Front-End (AFE) was used to experimentally determine the maximum continuous impedance estimation frequency as well as the system impedance estimation error when measuring a 2R1C electrical circuit model. Transthoracic Electrical Bioimpedance (TEB) measurements in a healthy subject were obtained using 3M gel electrodes in a tetrapolar lateral spot electrode configuration. The obtained TEB raw signal was filtered in MATLAB to obtain the respiration and cardiogenic signals, and from the cardiogenic signal the impedance derivative signal (dZ/dt) was also calculated. The results have shown that the maximum continuous impedance estimation rate was approximately 550 measurements per second with a magnitude estimation error below 1% on 2R1C-parallel bridge measurements. The displayed respiration and cardiac signals exhibited good performance, and they could be used to obtain valuable information in some plethysmography monitoring applications. The obtained results suggest that the AD5933-based monitor could be used for the implementation of a portable and wearable Bioimpedance plethysmograph that could be used in applications such as Impedance Cardiography. These results combined with the research done in functional garments and textile electrodes might enable the implementation of PHS applications in a relatively short time from now.

  • 123.
    Ferreira, Javier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    AD5933-based electrical bioimpedance spectrometer: Towards textile-enabled applications2011In: Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS, 2011, Vol. 2011, 3282-3285 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances on System-On-Chip and Textile technology allows the development of Textile-enabled measurement instrumentation. Textile Electrodes (Textrodes) have been proven reliable for performing Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) measurements, and the availability of a integrated circuit impedance spectrometer, the AD5933, has allowed the implementation of small size EBIS spectrometers. In this work an AD5933-based spectrometer has been implemented, and its performance on 2R1C circuits and for tetrapolar total right side EBIS measurements has been compared against the commercially available spectrometer SFB7. The study has been focused on the working upper frequency range and the estimation of the Cole parameters required for assessment of body fluid distribution: R(0) and R(∞). The results indicate that AD5933-based spectrometer implemented in this work can perform accurate impedance measurements well above the upper limits recommended in the datasheet. The AD5933-EBIS presents a good performance compared with the SFB7 on the 2R1C circuit and the total right side measurements, showing a smaller error in the resistance spectrum and small deviation error in the reactance when measuring over 270 kHz. The comparison on the Cole parameters estimation obtained with the SFB7 and the AD5933-based spectrometer exhibit a difference below 1% for the estimation of R(0) and R(∞). Consequently the overall measurement performance shown by the implemented AD5933-based spectrometer suggests its feasible use for EBIS measurements using dry Textrodes. This is of special relevance for the proliferation of EBI-based personalized health monitoring systems for patients that require to monitor the distribution of body fluids, like in dialysis.

  • 124.
    Ferreira, Javier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Álvarez, L.
    Buendía, R.
    Ayllón, D.
    Llerena, C.
    Gil-Pita, R.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Bioimpedance-based wearable measurement instrumentation for studying the autonomic nerve system response to stressful working conditions2013In: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), 2013, Vol. 434, no 1, 012015- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The assessment of mental stress on workers under hard and stressful conditions is critical to identify which workers are not ready to undertake a mission that might put in risk their own life and the life of others. The ATREC project aims to enable Real Time Assessment of Mental Stress of the Spanish Armed Forces during military activities. Integrating sensors with garments and using wearable measurement devices, the following physiological measurements were recorded: heart and respiration rate, skin galvanic response as well as peripheral temperature. The measuring garments are the following: a sensorized glove, an upper-arm strap and a repositionable textrode chest strap system with 6 textrodes. The implemented textile-enabled instrumentation contains: one skin galvanometer, two temperature sensors, for skin and environmental, and an Impedance Cardiographer/Pneumographer containing a 1 channel ECG amplifier to record cardiogenic biopotentials. The implemented wearable systems operated accordingly to the specifications and are ready to be used for the mental stress experiments that will be executed in the coming phases of the project in healthy volunteers.

  • 125.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Ericsson, M.
    Larsson, Å.
    Lindholm, P.
    Investigation of a Halcyon RB80 semiclosed rebreather in connection with a diving accident2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Linden, J.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Evaluating a simplified purge procedure for oxygen/nitrox switch rebreathers2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 127. Garcia-Molina, G.
    et al.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lagares-Lemos, M.
    Automated NREM sleep staging using the Electro-oculogram: A pilot study2012In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE , 2012, 2255-2258 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automatic sleep staging from convenient and unobtrusive sensors has received considerable attention lately because this can enable a large range of potential applications in the clinical and consumer fields. In this paper the focus is on achieving non-REM (NREM) sleep staging from ocular electrodes. From these signals, specific patterns related to sleep such as slow eye movements, K-complexes, eye blinks, and spectral features are estimated. Although such patterns are characteristic of the Electroencephalogram, they can also be visible to a lesser extent on signals from ocular electrodes. Automatic sleep staging was implemented using two approaches: i) based on a state-machine and ii) using a neural network. The first one relied on the recommendations of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and the second one used a multilayer perceptron which was trained on manually sleep-staged data. Results were obtained on the data of five volunteers who participated in a nap experiment. Manual sleep staging of this data, performed by an expert, was used as reference. Five stages were considered, namely wake with eyes open, wake with eyes closed, and sleep stages N1, N2, and N3. The results were characterized in terms of confusion matrices from which the Cohen's κ coefficients were estimated. The values of κ for both the state-machine and neural-network based automatic sleep staging approaches were 0.79 and 0.59 respectively. Thus, the state-machine based approach shows a very good agreement with manual staging of sleep-data.

  • 128. Gasparrini, S.
    et al.
    Cippitelli, E.
    Gambi, E.
    Spinsante, S.
    Wåhslén, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Lindh, Thomas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Proposal and experimental evaluation of fall detection solution based on wearable and depth data fusion2016In: ICT Innovations 2015: Emerging Technologies For Better Living, Springer, 2016, Vol. 399, 99-108 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fall injury issues represent a serious problem for elderly in our society. These people want to live in their home as long as possible and technology can improve their security and independence. In this work we study the joint use of a camera based system and wearable devices, in the so called data fusion approach, to design a fall detection solution. The synchronization issues between the heterogeneous data provided by the devices are properly treated, and three different fall detection algorithms are implemented. Experimental results are also provided, to compare the proposed solutions.

  • 129.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Application of ultrasound techniques in diving research: Use of bubble detection to develop trimix tables for Swedish mine-clearance divers and evaluating trimix decompressions2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Problems with introducing the new USN air diving tables for the Swedish Navy.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Bergh, Ulf
    Metoder för effektivare utprovning av dekompressionstabeller för dykning2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, L
    Effect of gas switch on decompression from trimix dives2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Blogg, L
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Jaki Mekjavic, P
    Mekjavic, IB
    Comparison of venous bubbles and tear film bubbles after decompression during a five week 6° head-down tilt bed rest2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, L.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, I.
    Comparison between mild dehydration and body temperature on decompression bubble formation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, L.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Bubble recordings after nitrox dives with a semi-closed demand controlled rebreather2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, SL
    Effekt av gasbyte på dekompressionshastighet efter korta trimix dykningar2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, SL
    Douglas, J
    Kvarnström, A
    Oscarsson, N
    Rosén, A
    Påverkar oxygenandning direkt efter dykning bubbelförekomst?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 138. Gharehbaghi, A.
    et al.
    Ask, P.
    Nylander, E.
    Janerot-Sjoberg, Birgitta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekman, I.
    Lindén, M.
    Babic, A.
    A hybrid model for diagnosing sever aortic stenosis in asymptomatic patients using phonocardiogram2015In: IFMBE Proceedings, Springer, 2015, 1006-1009 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a screening algorithm for severe aortic stenosis (AS), based on a processing method for phonocardiographic (PCG) signal. The processing method employs a hybrid model, constituted of a hidden Markov model and support vector machine. The method benefits from a preprocessing phase for an enhanced learning. The performance of the method is statistically evaluated using PCG signals recorded from 50 individuals who were referred to the echocardiography lab at Linköping University hospital. All the individuals were diagnosed as having a degree of AS, from mild to severe, according to the echocardiographic measurements. The patient group consists of 26 individuals with severe AS, and the rest of the 24 patients comprise the control group. Performance of the method is statistically evaluated using repeated random sub sampling. Results showed a 95% confidence interval of (80.5%-82.8%) /(77.8%- 80.8%) for the accuracy/sensitivity, exhibiting an acceptable performance to be used as decision support system in the primary healthcare center.

  • 139.
    Giordano, Chiara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Development of a 3-year-old child FE head model, continuously scalable from 1.5-to 6-year-old2016In: 2016 IRCOBI Conference Proceedings - International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury, International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury , 2016, 288-302 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study summarised efforts in developing a 3-year-old FE head model, continuously scalable in the range 1.5-to 6-year-old. The FE models were transformed into one another using nonlinear scaling driven by control points corresponding to anthropometric dimensions. Procedures to mimic age-specific structural changes occurring during the paediatric development were implemented by means of transition of elements. The performances of the head models were verified on drop and compressive tests available from the literature. A stable and experimentally well-correlated family of FE models in the range 1.5-to 6-year-old was created.

  • 140.
    Glimme, S
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Törnquist, A L
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nylén, Per
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Teär Fahnerhjelm, K
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lighting and task analysis in an eye hospital.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting is crucial in visually demanding activities and essential for a good visual environment. Access to daylight is important for health, wellbeing, production, and patient safety. The purpose of the present project is to design innovative multifunction examination rooms for the planning of a new eye hospital. The specific aims of the current study were to evaluate existing lighting conditions in examination rooms, to identify the tasks undertaken by eye care professionals, and how they relate to lighting. Lighting conditions in three such rooms and task analyses of three ophthalmologists’ work are presented. The mean illumination levels and the equability of illumination were inadequate. Even if there was access to daylight through windows existed, this possibility was rarely used. Task analyses showed that a significant percentage of the time was devoted to examining the patients (44 %), reading and writing or prescribing drops (23%), in medical records. The lighting was adjusted several times between full and dim illumination during contact with patients. There is substantial potential to improve the lighting conditions.

  • 141.
    Glimskär, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Hjalmarson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    A Test of a Walker Equipped with a Lifting Device2013In: AAATE Conference 2013, 2013, 3-9 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have shown that about a third of all persons over 65 years who live at home fall at least once a year. Development of a lifting device that can help people raise themselves up entirely on their own, or with minimal assistance, would be a revolutionary step for the individual as compared with the lifting devices in use today. A prototype has been developed and the prototype has been tested to verify the approach. Studies have been conducted with nursing staff in a nursing home to find out the conditions for how a walker equipped with a lifting beam could facilitate the work. For caregivers dealing frequently with people who fall, this assistive device can contribute to decreasing occupational injuries.

  • 142.
    Glimskär, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Adoption of Ergonomic Innovations in the Construction Industry2012In: Working on Safety, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Granroth, Marko
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Health and productivity in commercial buildings: thermal and hygienic aspects2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Granroth, Marko
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Ventilation Strategy to improve health and productivity conditions2006In: HB - Heal. Build.: Creating Heal. Indoor Environ. People, Proc., 2006, 421-424 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper was mainly based on a literature review and focused on control of emissions and on thermal comfort conditions in office buildings. The ultimate goal was to identify optimal conditions for both human health and work productivity in office room environments. Good indoor air quality (IAQ) was to be achieved at low emission rates and correct indoor air temperature. Different ventilation and air conditioning strategies were evaluated and compared. Both energy and environmental aspects were considered. Analyses were made for emission rates of various indoor sources such as outdoor pollution, construction materials, furnishings, office-equipment and consumer products.

  • 145.
    Granroth, Marko
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Ventilation Strategy to Improve Health and Productivity in Swedish Offices2006In: Healthy Buildings, 4-8 June, Lisbon, Portugal, 2006: Vol IV, Finland: International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ) , 2006, 421-424 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper was mainly based on a literature review and focused on control of emissions and on thermal comfort conditions in office buildings. The ultimate goal was to identify optimal conditions for both human health and work productivity in office room environments. Good indoor air quality (IAQ) was to be achieved at low emission rates and correct indoor air temperature. Different ventilation and air conditioning strategies were evaluated and compared. Both energy and environmental aspects were considered. Analyses were made for emission rates of various indoor sources such as outdoor pollution, construction materials, furnishings, office-equipment and consumer products. 

  • 146. Granåsen, G.
    et al.
    Grönlund, C.
    Öhberg, F.
    Lindberg, Frida
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Karlsson, J. S.
    Comparison between ultrasonic muscle strain and electromyography during an isometric ramp contraction2010In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September 7 - 12, 2009, Munich, Germany, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, Vol. 25/4, 1565-1567 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore multi modal relationships between ultrasonic muscle strain and electromyography (EMG). Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) is technique which can be used to explore multivariate associations between sets of variables. Multi-channel EMG and a spatial differentiated Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI)-strain signal was compared from measurements on biceps brachii on eight subjects. A data analysis using CCA was then applied to obtain useful information of the relationship between signals.

  • 147.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Three modality contrast imaging using multi-functionalized microballoons2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vivo multimodality imaging is a fast growing field in medical research and, although the achievements at clinical level of this diagnostic method are recent, it is already one of the most promising approaches in the diagnosis of diseases in many research addressed medical centres. At present in this area, the USA plays the protagonist role as a result of the amount of resources engaged in the arena in the last decade. Both government and private companies agree, when considering the potential of this approach, that it is one of the foremost medical advancements as it will lead to early diagnosis of diseases with high impact on the societies of western countries. Multimodality imaging is currently viewed as a simple and powerful integration of two or more imaging methods (e.g. PET-CT). 3MICRON is an ambitious project which gathers some of the most advanced European medical and technical institutions together to address the design of new strategies in diagnostics, and to push the potential of medical imaging beyond the state-of-the-art. The multimodality approaches are supported by a class of next-generation micro/nanodevices called microballoons. These subsystems are able to implement the function of an ultrasound contrast agent with other imaging methods (SPECT, MRI). In the future, they may act as a minimally invasive drug delivery method and hyperthermia device. In 3MICRON, this multi-functional device will be tested in vitro and in vivo in order to assess bioclearance and cytoxicity effects toward high impact diseases, e.g. cardiovascular and inflammation pathologies. Finally, selected types of microballoons will undergo pre-clinical screening for a consolidated assessment of the “bench-to-bed” pathway for these new microdevices.

  • 148.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brismar, Torkel B.
    CLINTEC, Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata.
    On comparison between polymer- and phospholipid-shelled microbubbles for contrast-enhanced ultrasound measurements of capillary microcirculation.2011In: Proceedings of the 34th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics / [ed] Rolf J. Korneliussen, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of contrast-enhanced ultrasound research has developed beyond visualizing the blood circulation to new areas such as perfusion and molecular imaging, drug and gene therapy. This work compares the application of polymer- and phospholipid-shelled ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) employed for characterization of the capillary microcirculation. To quantify microcirculation destruction/replenishment technique with varied time intervals between destructive and monitoring pulses is used. The dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude of backscattered wave versus pulse interval is fitted with an exponential function of the time y=A(1-exp(-βt)) , where A represents capillary volume and the time constant β represents velocity of the flow. Working under assumption that backscattered signal is linearly proportional to the microbubble concentration, for both types of the UCAs it is observed that capillary volume, A, is in linearly relationship with the concentration, and the flow velocity, β, remain unchanged. Using 500 µm diameter microtube as a vessel phantom a delay of about 0.25 s in evaluation of the perfusion characteristics is found for the phospholipid-shelled UCA, while polymer-shelled UCA provide response immediately. In conclusion, these results suggest that the novel polymer-shelled microbubbles have a potential to be used for perfusion evaluation.

  • 149.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Diapartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata.
    Assessment of ultrasound-induced fracture of polymer-shelled ultrasound contrast agents using superharmonic technique2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasound imaging techniques can be greatly improved by the use of ultrasound contrast agents. Knowledge of the peak negative pressure at which contrast agents fracture is paramount for the imaging application as well as for local drug delivery. Gasholdning microbubbles encapsulated into biocompatible poly vinyl alcohol shells are of particular interest for their enhanced shelf life and demonstratedchemical versatility. A gas core allows microbubbles to efficiently scatter ultrasound waves. In vitro ultrasound tests showed a sufficient enhancement of the backscattered power (25±1 dB), comparable to the soft tissue attenuation coefficients (0.8±0.04 dB/cm MHz) and phase velocities (1519±2 m/s). At temperature values between 24 and 37 °C the monotonic increase of the attenuation and phase velocity with frequency indicates that thick-shelled microbubbles do not resonate in a typical medical ultrasound frequency range of 1-15 MHz. In fact, they work as an amplifier of the incident acoustic wave. The novel approach based on detection of superharmonics (3f and 4f) is proposed for assessment of the fracture pressure threshold, Pthr. In vitro tests suggests that fatigue, i.e. accumulation of damage within the shell, is the major physical mechanism responsible for the fracturing process. It has been observed that there is a decrease of Pthr from 1.15±0.09 MPa to 0.9±0.05 MPa when the number of cycles in the pulse, N, increases from 6 to 12. It is worth noting that the reported pressure values are within clinically approved safety limits. The main conclusion to be drawn from our study is that superharmonic approach appears to be more sensitive in Pthr assessment than traditional second harmonic imaging. This claim is supported also by images acquired with a commercially available system, where contrast pulse sequencing technique, specific to third harmonic, is required for visualization of thick-shelled microbubbles.

  • 150.
    Grönkvist, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Bergsten, Eddie
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Loss of pressure in the anti-G system at high G-loads2011Conference paper (Refereed)
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