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  • 1.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project2010In: On the Road to Vision Zero?: Construction, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (71) Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project. Lena Almén, Tore J Larsson, (School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden) Work related injuries and diseases are more frequent among construction workers than the labour market in average. Thus, there is a need of more preventive work during the design and planning phase. Two building projects, both productions of new apartment buildings with a design and construct contractor, were studied. Unsafe conditions were identified by workers and managers at the construction sites. The unsafe conditions were presented to the designers and planners. They were asked to describe the correlated decisions during the design and planning phase; when they were taken, why and by whom.

    Influence from outside the company was related to the clients, the town planning department, laws, a trade association and to the design of building products. The managers at the construction sites did not get any information, from the designers and planners, of what occupational risks there were in any of the projects. The routines for how to identify and handle hazards in the designing and planning phase were not sufficient. Furthermore, the designers explained, that they did not have enough competence in construction methods to be able to foresee occupational consequences at the construction sites when they designed rare constructions. The designers and planners did not follow up occupational risks at any of the construction sites. In order to get a safer working environment at construction sites, the top managers in the building companies need to define the acceptable safety level and put the safety issue on the agenda for all employees in the company, along with quality, costs and time schedule. Safety need to be communicated with those outside the company who have an influence on the working environment, and included in contracts with consultants, subcontractors and suppliers.

  • 2.
    Glimskär, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Adoption of Ergonomic Innovations in the Construction Industry2012In: Working on Safety, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Computer-aided risk assessment: Claims data as expert system support for industrial safety management2001In: Safety In Action Conference: Invited paper / [ed] Safety Institute of Australia Ltd, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Decision Support for Risk Analysis in Small Enterprises2006In: 3rd International Conference Workingonsafety, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Occupational Trauma: Measurement, intervention and control1999In: Work Life 2000 Conference: Invited paper, Springer , 1999, p. 164-182Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Pulverization of Risk - Privatization of Trauma2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Safety Management - Technology and health: Invited keynote lecture2004In: Health and Safety at Public Works, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Systematic Injury Prevention in Traditional Process Monitoring Work2004In: Occupational Risk Prevention / [ed] Mondelo,P, Mattila,M, Karwowski, W, Hale, A (Eds), 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Systematic Safety Management: the challenge of development2002In: The 68th International conference on the prevention of occupational accidents: Invited keynote lecture, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The logistics of distributed aged care in a local Swedish community2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to map the pattern of care contacts between +65 year olds with multiple medical diagnoses living at home and their formal and informal care and service providers, 62 persons in the local council of Haninge agreed to keep a diary of all their health related contact events for a period of 6 months. The participants were visited once a fortnight and their diary inputs were recorded. The data was collected during 2011, 2012 and 2013. 20 000 contact events and 28 000 activities were recorded over 10620 participant days. Background variables like marital status, type of dwelling, type of medical problems were  related to patterns of contact with health care staff, transport services, type of care services provided, importance of family and informal care providers. The result is a fairly detailed description of the logistics requirements in a system of distributed aged care with high accessibility and retained independence.

  • 11.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Politics of Risk2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The subculture of care and care-related infections: Invited paper to Occupational Risk Prevention Conference 20142014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, 10% of all hospitalised patients acquire a care-related infection; between 25 - 35000 patients annually are severely injured due to medical mistakes and between 3000 and 4000 die from erroneous procedures or acquired infections. In a study of the risk of care-related infections in an institution of special accommodation for the aged, journal data and participant observation showed a low level of infection risk, but the risk levels varied significantly between wards and the understanding of hygiene routines varied between staff. It is suggested that hygiene routines be taught as a technical professional skill for physicians, nurses and nursing aides alike.

  • 13.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Swedish Example2001In: : Invited paper / [ed] Victorian WorkCover Corporation, Melbourne, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    To target prevention and support the management of occupational risk: Invited Keynote Lecture2005In: Bold Perspectives, Shared Objectives, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    The prevention of occupationally related trauma and disease requires reliable measurement systems in order to target the relevant exposures and injury problems and prioritise resources. Social and workers' compensation insurance data, with exposure, coverage, accident process, medical severity and other outcome information, represents the most credible basis for decisions on preventative action.

    The registration and measurement system for occupational trauma and disease, based on the ACC New Zealand paradigm, has been developed by the Swedish Labour Market Insurances, and is also the basis for the new EU occupational injury registration system

    Some different target areas for occupational injury prevention, and examples of successful intervention activities, are reported from Swedish and Australian systems.

    To support the industrial management of safety requires good and industry-relevant measurement systems for occupational risk and the consequences of occupational trauma and disease. The development of such specific recording and measurement systems in Swedish branches of industry is based on union-employer consensus about occupational risk and a joint approach to safety management. Aggregate statistical information is of limited use for applied prevention; the accident and injury data must be more specific and detailed in order to be turned into credible decision support systems (DSS).

    Some different examples of industry-based safety management and decision support systems from Sweden are presented.

    Results from a study on the relation between best-of-sector industrial safety management and shareholder value on the ASX are also presented.

    1

  • 15.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Aminoff, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Mridha, Mannan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A consumers´testing approach to the usability of medical technology: Insulin pumps and CGM systems2014In: Advances in Safety Management and Human Factors, 2014, p. 117-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five different insulin pumps and three systems for continuous glucose monitoring were subjected to usability tests at the School of Technology and Health. Each pump was trialed and rated by 30 respondents; 20 students with no experience of diabetes and 10 diabetic pump users. Each of the CGM systems was trialed and rated by 10 non-diabetic students. All participating students were enrolled in Medical Technology (Royal Institute of Technology) or Occupational Therapy (Karolinska Institute). The technical performance of pumps and CGM systems was tested independently. The respondents handled the insulin container, the oftware, the buttons, the screen and the manual through five scenario-based tasks. The trials and the accompanying attitude items were based on the ISO definition of usability. Efficiency was measured as the proportion of respondents succeeding to perform the tasks in less than 15 minutes, combined with the average time to do so. Effectiveness was the quotient of success frequency over average performance time. Satisfaction was the average distribution on the attitude items related to software, screen, buttons and manual. All products were ranked against each other within each separate test and the rank scores accumulated. There  were significant differences in the scoring of the individual insulin pumps and CGM systems.

  • 16.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Inclusive Design Instead of Assistive Technology in Housing2008In: Proceedings of the 4th Cambridge Workshop on Universal Access and Assistive Technology / [ed] Clarkson, PJ et al ( Eds), 2008, p. 107-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The growing number of inhabitants in need of care and rehabilitation is a common problem in most industrialised countries. More medical conditions can be treated, but often at increasing costs. Care and housing are often interlinked and more interest is being paid to the possibility of offering care to elderly in their own homes. It is not only technology and care that matter; an equally important issue is how well the dwellings are adapted to care, both from a spatial perspective and in supporting new technology. It is a relatively widespread opinion that ICT (Information and Communication Technology) has the potential to support the resources of the caring professions without reducing the quality of the care itself. The complexity of relatively simple technology in use with Home Care and Telemedicine is often underestimated; there are many obstacles.

    In order to conduct applied research about assistive technologies and ergonomics when an apartment is also a work place for professionals giving care and assistance to people in their own home, the University has decided to construct a full scale laboratory in the form of two complete, self-contained and fully equipped apartments. The laboratory will be used to study and develop new technologies and work processes in the home. In different zones such as the kitchen, the bedroom, the living room, the hallway, the cloakroom and the bathroom, there will be different research projects implemented. Subjects and professional care staff will be invited to participate in the studies.

     In different zones there will be different research project implemented:

     In the bathroom we will develop design for assistive work respectively design for independent intimate hygiene. The Japanese toilet style which include cleaning and drying system will be tested.

    In the bedroom we are planning a lightning system for light close to the floor as a guide when one goes up in the night time.

    In the kitchen we will investigate how to create good lighting and storage conditions while preventing old people from falling when trying to replace a bulb or climb to high cupboards.

    In the kitchen new approaches to deal with fire risk and the stove and oven will be studied.

    In one project we have planned to study how the access to the apartment can be dealt with in ways that support the elderly person with memory problems and the healthcare provider.

     

    By using a full scale laboratory where tenants and caring professionals as well as facilities managers are included, all aspects of the apartment can be scrutinized. Instead of assistive technologies the goal is to develop and test solutions based on the concept of inclusive design.

     

  • 17.
    Rose, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    District Veterinaries Working Environment in and around the Car2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A survey and a field study were carried out to study the Swedish District Veterinarians (DV’s) working environment (WE) in the car. The results show that 47% have physical problems that they connect to the work in the car. All 12 DV’s participating in the field study suffered from pain and spent 2-4 hours a day in their car. Several very unfavourable postures in manual material handling situations and computer work, leading to high strain and increased injury risks, were identified,. It is concluded that improvements would decrease long-term injury risks. Suggestions for design criteria for improving the WE are presented.

1 - 17 of 17
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