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  • 1. Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Diaz-Olivazrez, Jose A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Seoane, Fernando
    Teriö, Heikki
    Mediavilla Martinez, Cesar
    Aso, Santiago
    Tiemann, Christian
    Big Data & Wearable Sensors Ensuring Safety and Health @Work2017In: GLOBAL HEALTH 2017, The Sixth International Conference on Global Health Challenges, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    —Work-related injuries and disorders constitute a major burden and cost for employers, society in general and workers in particular. We@Work is a project that aims to develop an integrated solution for promoting and supporting a safe and healthy working life by combining wearable technologies, Big Data analytics, ergonomics, and information and communication technologies. The We@Work solution aims to support the worker and employer to ensure a healthy working life through pervasive monitoring for early warnings, prompt detection of capacity-loss and accurate risk assessments at workplace as well as self-management of a healthy working life. A multiservice platform will allow unobtrusive data collection at workplaces. Big Data analytics will provide real-time information useful to prevent work injuries and support healthy working life

  • 2.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean Projects and Sustainability in the Swedish Agricultural Sector2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Work environment, Lean and Agriculture2014In: PROCEEDINGS: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management & 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference: Volume I + II, IEA Press , 2014, p. 661-666Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become the predominant management concept in industry, but its effect on the work environment is debated. Lean has now reached farms and garden nurseries. This paper aims to identify consequences for the physical and psychosocial work environment when Lean was applied in micro-businesses in the agricultural sector. Observations, a questionnaire and interviews were used as methods. It was concluded that the psychosocial work environment became more structured and less stressful. The physical work environment was partly improved by less transportation on the farm. However, consideration of the physical work environment was insufficient.

  • 4.
    Aronsson, K
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Teär Fahnhjelm, K
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nylén, P
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Visual ergonomics and eye strain in eye careprofessionals2012In: NES2012 Proceedings: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth / [ed] Ann-Beth Antonsson, Göran M Hägg, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Eye care professionals spend many hours a day in darkness performing visually demanding tasks. A new eye hospital will be built in Stockholm 2018. The current lighting, logistics, and working conditions are analysed in a multidisciplinary project aiming to optimise settings in the new hospital. The main purpose of the present project was to study visual ergonomics and current eye strain in employees at an eye hospital. Ninety-six employees answered a validated questionnaire regarding their experiences of light, visual ergonomics and eye strain problems. Twenty-three radiologists and 14 paediatricians at a university hospital were used as comparison groups. Eye strain was common in all departments at the hospital but was significantly more common only among radiologists compared to paediatricians. Overall, women experienced significantly more eye strain than men.

  • 5.
    Ayas, Ebru
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Ishihara, Shigekazu
    An Analysis on Affective Design of Servicescapes2009In: Proceedings of 12 th QMOD and Toulon-Verona Conference on Quality and Service Sciences, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ekberg, K
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Gustavsson, M
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Lundqvist, D
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Reineholm, C
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Fagerlind, A-C
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Karlsson, N
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Leading and organising for health and productivity2012In: Book of Proceedings: Zürich 2012 10th Conference, European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix, Linköping University.
    Arbetsplatsnära FoU från olika synvinklar2016In: Book of Abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Future of ergonomics: A personal view2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Improvements, innovation and Lean2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become a dominating change concept in Sweden and in other countries. It has been discussed whether Lean is a support or an obstacle for improvement and innovation. The aim of this paper is to identify examples, opportunities and obstacles for improvement and innovation within the framework of Lean. Cases from 30 organizations have been analyzed. The empirical examples and also literature show that it is possible to work with Lean or Lean principles in a way that arenas of innovation and improvement are created, but that in other organizations this does not happen.

  • 10.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Interactive research: a strategy for ergonomics interventions2015In: Proceedings 19th Triennial Congress of the IEA, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for more ergonomics intervention studies. Reasons are that the knowledge about applications as well as methodology need to be developed (Karsh et al., 2001) It is difficult for ergonomics researchers to get access to organizations that perform interventions. One reason is that extensive resources are needed from the organizations. In order to ollaborate with the researchers, they need to see this collaboration as useful and that they get useful advice or knowledge that can be applied in their operations. Interactive research is a form of participatory research (Aagaard Nielsen and Svensson, 2006), that may offer a solution to the difficulties to perform ergonomics intervention research. Interactive research has been developed from Action research in order to avoid the weaknesses of Action research, such as: - the strong involvement of the researcher in the practical change process makes the change vulnerable in the long-term, - a focus rather on local understanding than in general knowledge creation, - high time and resource demands, - limited output in terms of theory development. Interactive research focuses more on the research and knowledge creation than on the development processes. The research is conducted in a partnership with the practitioners so that the researchers and practitioners together have defined research questions of high priority. Further, the planning of the study as well as the knowledge creation process takes place jointly together with the practitioners (Svensson et al., 2007). There is a clear division of responsibilities, where the interactive researcher is only responsible for the research, and the practitioners only responsible for the implementation of the operational changes and actions taken in the organization. One model for the principles of interactive research was proposed by Ellström et al. (1999), which clarifies the different roles of the practitioners and the researchers. The aim of this paper is to summarize experiences from the use of interactive research in five ergonomics intervention programs.

  • 11.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Sustainable development for ergonomics improvement projects2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Elg, M
    Eriksson, A
    Halling, Bengt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Halvarsson, A
    Kock, H
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andersson, K
    Håkansson, Malin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Langstrand, J
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Renström, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Svensson, L
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean and working conditions: a current position2013In: HELIX Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix Vinn Excellence Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Halvarsson, A
    Kock, Henrik
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix Vinn Excellence Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Sustainability and development of Lean implementations2014In: Human Factors in Organizational design and management - XI, 2014, p. 165-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean production has become a major change strategy in Swedish public organizations. The aim of this paper was to identify factors that support or counteract sustainability and development of Lean implementations in public organizations. In an interactive research project including interviews and questionnaires, seven public organizations were followed during a three year period. Some factors supported and other factors counteracted sustainability and development of Lean. In conclusion, lack of sustained change was to a  large extent due to replacement of the top managers in five of the organizations and introduction of another change philosophy, low political and managerial ownership and financial problems.

  • 14.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Halvarsson, Agneta
    Kock, Henrik
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Work environment in Swedish Lean implementations2014In: Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management - XI, 2014, p. -660Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean Production has spread from industry to the public sector and administration, and is now the dominating change concept in Sweden. The influence of Lean on the work environment has been debated. However, both positive and negative work environment consequences have been reported in different studies and in different contexts. The aim of this presentation is to describe consequences for the work environment following Lean implementations and to further knowledge about conditions that influence the work environment.

  • 15.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköpings Tekniska Högskola.
    Vogel, Kjerstin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Interactive research and HTO as an industry development model2014In: Human Factors in Organizational design and Management - Xi Nordiv Ergonomics Society Annual Conference, Copenhagen 2014 / [ed] Broberg, Fallentin, Hasle, Jensen, Kabel, Larsen, Weller, 2014, p. 337-342Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meat cutting has since long shown high frequencies of work-related disorders and injuries. The meat cutting industry initiated an interactive research project to assist the companies in creating a better work environment considering also the profitability. After an initial diagnosis, a broad strategy was formed and four mixed groups focusing personal development, technological developments, work organization and work environment started working. The results from these further initiated focused studies that were performed in close interaction with the industry. During the four year project a continuous reduction of usculoskeletal disorder problems in the industry and other substantial effects were observed.

  • 16.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Petersen, Jostein
    Elg, Mattias
    Bolling, Andreas
    Interactive research for production and work development2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive research performed as a collaborative approach in conjunction with organizations is considered a new and promising alternative to other research approaches. The purpose of this paper is to describe how interactive research could be used in the interaction between researchers and organizations when running projects to develop production systems and work performed in these systems. It also aims to identify advantages and disadvantages when applying interactive research. Two long term interactive research projects, organised in collaboration with the partnership of Helix Vinn Excellence Centre at Linköping University were performed and data were collected from documentation of interactive seminars, from notes and from interviews with key actors. Interactive research offers several advantages in comparison with traditional research approaches, foremost higher practitioner involvement and validation opportunities of the results. There are also several difficulties, foremost the need of extensive resources and competencies for the research. The overall experiences from participating practitioners were that they considered that the discussions had been useful, stimulating and interesting, and that the fast feedback from data collection was appreciated. One crucial issue is to what extent this interactive research approach may contribute to high quality research, or to what extent the pressure from the practitioners for actionable practical results will take over.

  • 17.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Lean: en möjlighet till effektivitet och innovation2012In: Lean och innovationsförmåga – hinder, möjligheter och kunskapsluckor, 2012, p. 53-59Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Work environment at state-of-the-art recycling centres2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling centres have a key role in the recycling branch. It is important that the waste is disposed in the right container to avoid pollution of the fraction. The layout of the facilities as well as the employees at the recycling centres are important to secure good sorting quality. There is a high frequency of injuries among the employees. The aim of the present study is to compare the work environment at the two new built recycling centres with improved layout, with other recycling centres in Sweden. The study population comprised all employees at 42 older recycling centres, totally 122 persons and 300 visitors, and 8 employees, and 41 visitors at two new built recycling centres. Questionnaires were used for data collection. More visitors at the two new recycling centres assessed it easy to find the right container for their waste and high quality of service compared to the first study. The employees at the new recycling centres assessed their physical tiredness lower, compared to employees at the older recycling centres. The employees had the highest risk for an injury was when picking up wrongly sorted waste and when packing manually in cages. There is still some need for improvement, especially concerning lifting and transfer equipment at the new recycling centres

  • 19.
    Glimme, S
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Törnquist, A L
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nylén, Per
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Teär Fahnerhjelm, K
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lighting and task analysis in an eye hospital.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting is crucial in visually demanding activities and essential for a good visual environment. Access to daylight is important for health, wellbeing, production, and patient safety. The purpose of the present project is to design innovative multifunction examination rooms for the planning of a new eye hospital. The specific aims of the current study were to evaluate existing lighting conditions in examination rooms, to identify the tasks undertaken by eye care professionals, and how they relate to lighting. Lighting conditions in three such rooms and task analyses of three ophthalmologists’ work are presented. The mean illumination levels and the equability of illumination were inadequate. Even if there was access to daylight through windows existed, this possibility was rarely used. Task analyses showed that a significant percentage of the time was devoted to examining the patients (44 %), reading and writing or prescribing drops (23%), in medical records. The lighting was adjusted several times between full and dim illumination during contact with patients. There is substantial potential to improve the lighting conditions.

  • 20. Halvarsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Svensson, L
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Kock, H
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean production: an institutional and organizational perspective on two national programs2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21. Karltun, Anette
    et al.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Interactive research promoting a systems perspective in improving the work situation of 15,000 postmen2008In: Proceedings of the Nordic Ergonomics Society Annual Conference NES 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22. Karltun, Anette
    et al.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    Lindbeck, Lars
    Developing a systems view of butchers' problematic work situation2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Karltun, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Karltun, Johan
    Dep. of Industrial Engineering and Management, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Berglund, Martina
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Linköping University, Sweden.
    HTO: a complementary ergonomics perspective2014In: Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management - XI, 2014, p. 355-360Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the broad field of ergonomics and human factors provides a strong potential in systems analysis, design and improvement, the focus risks being perceived unclear for different stakeholders. This paper addresses how focusing the interactions between Humans, Technology and Organization by using the HTO concept contributes to the understanding, communication and use of systems thinking inherent in the discipline of Ergonomics and Human Factors. The authors’ experiences illustrate how the use of the HTO concept in various industries and in academic teaching gives advantages regarding interactions, communicativeness, attractiveness, activity and pedagogical benefits.

  • 24.
    Lind, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Rose, Linda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    A practitioner model for assessing manual lifting and lowering operations: included in the RAMP tool2015In: The 19th Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently developed model intended to be used by practitioners and ergonomists in themanufacturing and logistics industry for assessment of physical ergonomic risks related to manuallifting and lowering operations is presented. The model is constructed using the revised NIOSH liftingequation (RNLE) as a basis, but it has been modified to enhance its usability, regarding (1)simplifications of the existing factors in the RNLE, (2) adding new factors and (3) a more conservativejudgment of lifts performed at low and high vertical heights. In addition, a survey regarding theusability of the new lifting model including twenty-two ergonomists/physiotherapists is presented,

  • 25. Pettersen, Jostein
    et al.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Elg, Mattias
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Witell, Lars
    Quality Management in Swedish industry: Concepts, practices and knowledge base2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26. Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Elg, Mattias
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Witell, Lars
    Quality Improvement activities in Swedish industry: Drivers, approaches and outcomes2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Rolfö, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Examining Office Type Preference2015In: Creating Sustainable Work-environments: Proceedings of NES2015 Nordic Ergonomics Society 47th Annual Conference 01 –04 November 2015, Lillehammer, Norway / [ed] Knut Inge Fostervold, Svein Åge Kjøs Johnsen, Leif Rydstedt, Reidulf G. Watten, Lysaker, 2015, p. A1-10-A1-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Office types and their environmental features influence performance and job satisfaction. Yet employees’ opinions are seldom considered when choosing office type. This paper suggests a method that investigates employees’ office type preferences and motives behind the preferences. The method proved to be quick and simple and provided a flow of current to preferred office type. A majority preferred the quiet cell office for its privacy while the open office was considered having a noisy and distracting environment and lack of privacy. These factors should be prioritized when planning work environments.  

  • 28.
    Rolfö, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eliasson, Kristina
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    An activity-based flex office: Planning processes and outcomes2017In: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists: 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management, Banff, Alberta, Canada, 2017, p. 330-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This longitudinal case study addresses activities used in the planning process of a new activity based flex office (A-FO), and addresses results after the relocation. The results show that several activities were used to involve employees in the planning process. Employee satisfaction and perceived performance were rated in more positive terms after the relocation than before. The company’s process can be considered as a good example of planning and design processes.

  • 29.
    Rose, Linda M
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Barman, Linda
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    RAMP -  A new tool for MSD risk management in manualhandling2017In: Conference Proceedings 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists  & 12th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management "Organizing for High Performance ": Organizing for High Performance, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summative Statement: In this conference contribution RAMP (Risk Assessment and Management tool for Manual Handling - Proactively) will be presented. It is developed for managing MSD risks in manual handling jobs. The presentation will include a demonstration of the digitalised tool and information about upcoming Massive Open Online Courses about it.

    Problem statement: Manual handling work is regarded as one of the main causes to increased risks of developing Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Several MSD risk assessment tools have been developed, but have been found to have insufficiencies in managing MSD risks in manual handling. The insufficiencies include that tools only assess certain body parts or certain types of work, are not freely accessible, assess exposure but not risks, and don´t support the whole risk management process. In 2009 there was a call from a global company, which had identified a need for a scientifically based, freely accessible, risk assessment and risk management tool. The tool should support systematic risk management of MSD risks in manual handling jobs and be able to be used by companies themselves. To meet this call the development of the RAMP tool (Risk Assessment and Management tool for Manual Handling – Proactively) was started. It has been developed in a research and development (R&D) project in close co-operation between researchers and practitioners at companies.

    Research Objective: The objective of this conference contribution is to present the results of a seven year long R&D project: to describe the RAMP tool and its development, present the digitalised version, share some experiences from its use, and inform about upcoming RAMP Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), aimed at educating and training users in the RAMP tool.

    Methodology: RAMP is scientifically based and was developed with a participative R&D methodology. The participating organisations as well as the methodology, including the base for the development, ranging from scientific publications and legislation to user testing and feed-back, will be described in the presentation.

    Results: The RAMP tool consists of four parts: RAMP I, RAMP II, The Results module and the Action module. At the conference, these will be presented and the digitalised version of RAMP will be demonstrated. In addition, information about three Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) about the RAMP tool which are being developed will be presented and user experiences from applying RAMP will be shared. In addition to the oral presentation a workshop on RAMP is planned to be held at the conference.

    Discussion: The discussion focuses on how methods like RAMP, which are freely accessible, can be spread after the R&D project is finished. Another question is how to secure updates in the future for methods which do not bring any profit for the developers/owners.

    Conclusions: It is concluded that RAMP, a scientifically based new tool for risk management of MSD risks in manual handling, is freely available via KTH’s homepage and that a MOOC-package for disseminating knowledge and training on how to use the tool will be accessible from the autumn 2017.

  • 30. Schütte, Simon
    et al.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Rating scales in Kansei Engineering-modifications for an European context2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kansei or Affective Engineering is a relatively new research field in the West. Link ping University in Sweden has been pioneering research and application within Kansei Engineering since 1999. Several companies have cooperated in different Kansei studies, for example Toyota/BT, Volvo, Saab, Scania. In some of the early studies, there were difficulties to apply the methodology. Reasons for this included shortage of competence within affective design in European organizations, but also the fact that incitements for improvement of product design seemed to be lacking. One of the problems applying the methodology was that European participants in the studies did not accept to make a vast number of ratings during long time periods. Japanese researchers used 5-point semantic differential questionnaires and up to 300 rating-scales per participant and product. In order to overcome this problem, a modification of the rating scales was developed. Hence, data reduction methods such as factor analysis, affinity diagram and Pareto charts were tested and validated in order to reduce the number of Kansei words and product samples used, without compromising the validity of the result. This approach eventually resulted in the development of a universal Kansei Engineering Software (KESo) which reduces the time needed for each Kansei Engineering study. Another objective for our research has been to develop and validate methods for incomplete data collection, i.e. a prioritization of product attributes. Another result from the cooperation with industrial companies is that the companies strongly emphasised that product development studies need to be less time and resource consuming.

  • 31. Schütte, Simon
    et al.
    Krus, Petter
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Integration of affective engineering in product development processes2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Vogel, Kjerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Johan
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Ergonomic changes and their consequences in a Swedish meat cutting plant2010In: 44th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference: Proactive Ergonomics - implementation of ergonomics in planning of jobs, tasks, systems and environments, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rotation schemes reducing daily working time with knife to 6 hours were planned and implemented at a meat cutting plant in a participatory process. These changes were evaluated concerning results, the change process and consequences on organizational performance. A questionnaire to the meat cutters and interviews with the production leaders were conducted. The results support that the meat cutters experienced the changes positively and that a reduction in physical and mental fatigue was reached. Other experiences were mixed indicating that both work organizational characteristics and local history should be taken more into consideration. The organizational performance was not particularly affected.

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