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  • 1.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project2010In: On the Road to Vision Zero?: Construction, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (71) Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project. Lena Almén, Tore J Larsson, (School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden) Work related injuries and diseases are more frequent among construction workers than the labour market in average. Thus, there is a need of more preventive work during the design and planning phase. Two building projects, both productions of new apartment buildings with a design and construct contractor, were studied. Unsafe conditions were identified by workers and managers at the construction sites. The unsafe conditions were presented to the designers and planners. They were asked to describe the correlated decisions during the design and planning phase; when they were taken, why and by whom.

    Influence from outside the company was related to the clients, the town planning department, laws, a trade association and to the design of building products. The managers at the construction sites did not get any information, from the designers and planners, of what occupational risks there were in any of the projects. The routines for how to identify and handle hazards in the designing and planning phase were not sufficient. Furthermore, the designers explained, that they did not have enough competence in construction methods to be able to foresee occupational consequences at the construction sites when they designed rare constructions. The designers and planners did not follow up occupational risks at any of the construction sites. In order to get a safer working environment at construction sites, the top managers in the building companies need to define the acceptable safety level and put the safety issue on the agenda for all employees in the company, along with quality, costs and time schedule. Safety need to be communicated with those outside the company who have an influence on the working environment, and included in contracts with consultants, subcontractors and suppliers.

  • 2.
    Ayas, Ebru
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Jörgen, Eklund
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Identifying trigger feeling factors2010In: International Conference on Kansei Engineeringand Emotional Research (KEER), Paris, France, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trigger mechanism design in power hand tools is of great importance for communicating with the operator and for providing feedback on operational functioning. Therefore, for a successful power hand tool design, knowledge about how the trigger mechanism feels is required.

    This study aims to define and investigate the design factors related with trigger tactile feeling for electrical right angled nutrunners. A Kansei Engineering (Affective Engineering) study has been conducted for a comparison between users´ (operators that work at an automotive assembly plant) and product developers´ (product development group of a power hand tool manufacturer) to find common and differing semantic expression dimensions for that. 124 Kansei words (descriptors) were collected from literature, interviews and workshops. These words were reduced to 52 by affinity analysis and evaluated by operators and product developers using semantic differential technique.

    From the operator group`s responses six factors (explain 87% of variation ) were extracted as, “professional performance”, “safety and tactile feeling”, “usability”, “smooth operation”, ”communication and durability”, “convenient and comfortable” to define trigger feeling. Correspondingly, five factors (explain 89% of variation) “robust and appealing”, “ergonomics and operator performance”, “controllability and predictability”, “creativity and modern” and“powerful” were distinguished for the product development group. Results showed that the start phase and especially quick start of trigger mechanism is more important to operators, while end feedback is more important to product developers. Soft start of the trigger is correlated with ergonomics, optimal, clear operation and performance for product developers while soft start together with end feedback are associated with well-built, convenient and safe trigger characteristics for operators. According to the results from average ratings the Kansei word “ergonomic” has been rated as the most important descriptor for trigger feeling together with “user-friendly”, “easy to use”, “long life time” and “comfortable” for both groups. By developing a questionnaire using the factors and variables identified; this questionnaire can be used to assess views of operators about trigger functioning and to know how do operators feel about new types of trigger mechanisms.

  • 3. Azar, J.C.
    et al.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Automated Tracking of the Carotid Artery in Ultrasound Image Sequences Using a Self Organizing Neural Network2010In: Proceedings of 20th International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR 2010), Istanbul, Turkey, Istanbul, Turkey, 2010, p. 2548-2551Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An automated method for the segmentation and tracking of moving vessel walls in 2D ultrasound image sequences is introduced. The method was tested on simulated and real ultrasound image sequences of the carotid artery. Tracking was achieved via a self organizing neural network known as Growing Neural Gas. This topology-preserving algorithm assigns a net of nodes connected by edges that distributes itself within the vessel walls and adapts to changes in topology with time. The movement of the nodes was analyzed to uncover the dynamics of the vessel wall. By this way, radial and longitudinal strain and strain rates have been estimated. Finally, wave intensity signals were computed from these measurements. The method proposed improves upon wave intensity wall analysis, WIWA, and opens up a possibility for easy and efficient analysis and diagnosis of vascular disease through noninvasive ultrasonic examination.

  • 4. Blogg, L
    et al.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Direct comparison of audio Doppler ultrasound scores and 2D ultrasound images of venous gas emboli.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Interaktiv forskning: Gemensamt kunskapande för allas nytta2010In: FALF2010: Arbetsliv i förändring, Malmö: FALF , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Utvärdering är ett mycket vanligt redskap för kontroll och uppföljning inom olika verksamheter, exempelvis projekt och program. Den traditionella ”summativa” utvärderingen har dock ett flertal brister, som gjort att intresset för formativa utvärderingar ökat. Ett exempel på dessa är de s.k. lärande utvärderingarna, men också forskning i olika former kan användas för att utvärdera projekt och program. I det offentliga programmet Produktionslyftet har det förekommit ett flertal utvärderingsformer, bl.a. två summativa måluppföljelseutvärderingar och ett interaktivt forskningsprojekt. I detta paper presenteras en fallstudie kring dessa utvärderingsformer, samt vilka interna respektive externa spridningseffekter (av programmets erfarenheter), samt också vilken form av utvecklingsstöd, som dessa har möjliggjort för Produktionslyftet. Resultaten pekar på att ett summativa utvärderingsprojekt kan användas för både intern spridning av erfarenheter och för att skapa utvecklingsstöd, förutsatt att halvtidsutvärderingar används. Detta kan också ett interaktivt forskningsprojekt bidra med, samt en lärande utvärdering, men det interaktiva forskningsprojektet tycks vara överlägset när det gäller extern spridning av resultaten från programmet – även om det också är den mest resurskrävande formen av utvärdering. Uttryckt på ett annat sätt, så skapar det interaktiva forskningsprojektet underlag för gemensam diskussion, reflektion och analys för programmet, samt gör också programmet/projektet mer transparent, genom extern spridning av gjorda erfarenheter.

  • 6.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Is Lean No Longer Mean?: A Study of the Consequences for Working Conditions in Companies Implementing Lean2010In: FALF2010: Arbetsliv i förändring, Malmö: FALF , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean is today becoming increasingly popular in Swedish manufacturing industry, and the concept has also started to spread to other sectors, such as administration, healthcare and the municipal sector. However, previous studies have suggested that Lean can become “mean”, creating working conditions that are bad for the employees. Conversely, other studies instead suggest that this has less to do with Lean, than with the implementation of Lean. Thus, this paper aims at studying the implementation of Lean in eight medium sized companies over a two year period, using qualitative and quantitative data. First, the results from the qualitative data suggest that these companies implementation of Lean is characterized by Lean coordinators, pilot projects and improvements groups, while the Lean tools mostly used are 5S, SMED, standardization and means to improve the production flow. Second, the perceived effects on working conditions, based on the quantitative data, suggest an improvement in the working environment, an increase in the work with safety and some degree of increase in stress for the workers. Consequently, the implementation structure of these companies does not indicate a “mean” production system, although the long term effects on working conditions cannot be determined, based on these data.

  • 7.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Lean Working Environments: An Empirical Study of 24 CompaniesImplementing Lean2010In: NES2010: Proactive Ergonomics: Implementation of ergonomics in planning of jobs, tasks, systems and environments., Stavanger, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the perceived effects on the working conditions in 24 medium sized manufacturing companies, approximately 1.5 year into their implementation of Lean. This is studied quantitatively based on four stakeholders’ perceptions (the workers, the managers, the production supervisors and the white-collar workers), based on three factors; changes in the working environment, work with safety for the personnel and level of stress. The results indicate that the physical work environments have improved and the workers and production supervisors report a slight increase in stress. Lastly, all groups report an increase in the work with safety for the personnel.

  • 8.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Harris, Matthew
    Phillips Research.
    Caffarel, Jeniffer
    Phillips Research.
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Hook Effect correction & resistance-based Cole fitting prior Cole model-based analysis: Experimental validation2010In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2010, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology , 2010, p. 6563-6566Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis of measurements of Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) is on the increase for performing non-invasive assessment of health status and monitoring of pathophysiological mechanisms. EBI measurements might contain measurements artefacts that must be carefully removed prior to any further analysis. Cole model-based analysis is often selected when analysing EBI data and might lead to miss-conclusion if it is applied on data contaminated with measurement artefacts. The recently proposed Correction Function to eliminate the influence of the Hook Effect from EBI data and the fitting to the real part of the Cole model to extract the Cole parameters have been validated on experimental measurements. The obtained results confirm the feasible experimental use of these promising pre-processing tools that might improve the outcome of EBI applications using Cole model-based analysis.

  • 9.
    Burmeister, Jens
    et al.
    University of Dresden, Germany.
    Lindh, Thomas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Contention-Based Wireless Sensor Networks: A case study for ambient assisted living2010In: Active Ageing, Smart Solutions, New Markets, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless personal area networks have emerged as an important communication infrastructure in areas such as at-home healthcare and home automation, independent living and assistive technology. Initiatives towards interoperability and standardization are taken by several players. Zigbee Alliance has launched a profile for “Zigbee wireless sensor applications for health, wellness and fitness” [1]. The Continua Health Alliance promotes “an interoperable personal healthcare ecosystem”. They have published “design guidelines for the telehealth ecosystem” including the interface to personal area network health devices and electronic health record devices ([2], [3]). These examples show that wireless personal area networks, including body sensor networks, are becoming more mature and are considered to be a realistic alternative as communication infrastructure for demanding services. However, to transmit vital sign parameters from ECGs, pulse-oximeters, EEGs etc in wireless networks is also a challenge, especially if multiple sensors compete for access. Contention-based access networks offer simplicity and utilization advantages, but the drawback is unpredictable performance due to loss of transmitted packets.

    We have used the SHIMMER wireless sensor platform developed at Intel [4] in the living lab at the Centre for Health and Building at KTH in a case study to identify and evaluate performance problems. The full-scale living lab consists of two apartments especially equipped with modern technique for healthcare at home and assisted living.

    Our paper focuses on continuous monitoring of the heart activity using a wireless ECG based on the wireless personal area network (WPAN) standard IEEE 802.15.4. Results from performance tests in the living lab will be presented e.g. influence of equipment such as micro wave ovens. Since contention-based wireless access has no guarantees for the quality of the delivered service it is interesting to determine to what extent the received ECG signal is sensitive to loss of information. We have recorded ECG signals as well as emulated packet loss in existing ECG records from official databases. The result of two cardiologists´ assessment of ECGs with different loss ratio levels and patterns will be reported in the paper. One interesting conclusion is that a diagnosis is fully possible for ECGs with packet loss ratio up to at least 5%. This project is part of research at the School of Technology and Health at KTH.

  • 10.
    Cloots, Rudy J.H.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    van Dommelen, JAW
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Geers, Marc
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Traumatic Brain Injury at Multiple Length Scales: Relating Diffuse Axonal Injury to Discrete Axonal Impairment2010In: 2010 INTERNATIONAL IRCOBI CONFERENCE ON THE BIOMECHANICS OF INJURY PROCEEDINGS, 2010, p. 119-130Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Improving running mechanics by use of interactive sonification2010In: Proceedings of the Interaction Sonification workshop (ISon) 2010 / [ed] Bresin, Roberto; Hermann, Thomas; Hunt, Andy, Stockholm, Sweden: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2010, p. 95-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Running technique has a large effect on running economy interms of consumed amount of oxygen. Changing the naturalrunning technique, though, is a difficult task. In this paper, a method based on sonification is presented, that will assist the runner in obtaining a more efficient running style. The system is based on an accelerometer sending data to a mobile phone.Thus the system is non-obtrusive and possible to use in theeveryday training. Specifically, the feedback given is based on the runner’s vertical displacement of the center of mass. As this is the main source of energy expenditure during running, it is conjectured that a reduced vertical displacement should improve running economy.

  • 12.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Ericsson, M.
    Larsson, Å.
    Lindholm, P.
    Investigation of a Halcyon RB80 semiclosed rebreather in connection with a diving accident2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, L.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, I.
    Comparison between mild dehydration and body temperature on decompression bubble formation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14. Granåsen, G.
    et al.
    Grönlund, C.
    Öhberg, F.
    Lindberg, Frida
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Karlsson, J. S.
    Comparison between ultrasonic muscle strain and electromyography during an isometric ramp contraction2010In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September 7 - 12, 2009, Munich, Germany, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, Vol. 25/4, p. 1565-1567Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore multi modal relationships between ultrasonic muscle strain and electromyography (EMG). Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) is technique which can be used to explore multivariate associations between sets of variables. Multi-channel EMG and a spatial differentiated Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI)-strain signal was compared from measurements on biceps brachii on eight subjects. A data analysis using CCA was then applied to obtain useful information of the relationship between signals.

  • 15.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Image Enhancement Combined with Reduction of X-Ray Dose During PCI-Operations2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Hjalmarson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Risk of Injury during home care work2010In: On the Road to Vision Zero?: Workers with high risk exposure, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Old peoples’ homes and bathrooms are sometimes also a workplace for nurses. Statistics show that the risk of injury and long‐term sick‐leave is high in this occupation. In a case study, 30 nurses from the Home Care Services of Haninge council, Sweden, performed different work tasks associated with assisting someone with their personal hygiene in the bathroom. The tests were performed in the full-scale laboratory of the CHB, in a bathroom equipped with a wall-mounted toilet, height‐ adjustable and equipped with support rails. The participating nurses were wearing a measurement system CUELA (‘computer-assisted recording and long-term analysis of musculoskeletal loads’) which together with video recordings made it possible to analyse the risk postures occuring. Postures including back flexion and rotation were regularly involved in the hygiene assisting tasks, but one specific sub-task indicated a high risk of traumatic overexertion or fall on the part of the care worker. The subtask when the nurse is assisting a person with balance or strength problems standing in front of the toilet, helping to pull up or down the trousers, combined a forward bending posture often more than 50º, while rotated with their balance affected, and, at the same time, with the person cared for in a position which highly affected his or hers stability. The typical assistive device applied to toilets are foldable armrests on one or both sides of the toilet, but it was found that for this sub‐task they affected the nurses’ posture in a negative way. A new and better solution for assistive technology in this particular task is needed.

  • 17. Keramidas, Michail E.
    et al.
    Kounalakis, S.
    Debevec, T.
    Norman, B.
    Gustafsson, T.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology (Closed 20130701).
    Mekjavic, I.
    The effect of acute normobaric hyperoxia on EPO concentration in healthy males2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of Anatomical Features and Modelling Strategies in Traumatic Brain Injury Prediction2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of Anatomical Features and Modelling Strategies in Traumatic Brain Injury Prediction2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Mathematical models used in TBI2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, head injuries causes about 78% of the deaths in motor vehicle accidents. The total annual rate of head injuries in Sweden over the last 14 years is also relatively constant. Thus, in spite of several national preventive strategies, there has not been an important impact on the total burden of head injury. Neurotrauma is the physical damage that results when the human skull and brain are suddenly subjected to intolerable levels of energy that is usually transmitted mechanically. Most of the research in the injury prevention area was initiated by the military aircraft industry in the sixties and seventies. Today the research is to a greater extent sponsored by the car manufacturing industry, partly as a result of the demands from the customers and the media. However, there is a long way to go before a complete understanding of the pathophysiological events following an accident is reached. This paper primarily focuses on summarizing current efforts, and to outline future strategies in human head injury modeling. Although the finite element (FE) modeling of the human head has been advancing over the past decades, it is still far from being able to explain all brain injury mechanisms and predict all types of impact injuries. However, using proper material characterization, correct boundary conditions and detailed geometric representation, a finite element model of the human head can provide us a powerful tool. A detailed and parameterized FE model of the adult human head is presented. It includes the scalp, skull, brain, meninges, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and eleven pairs of bridging veins. Separate representations of gray and white matter, and inclusion of the ventricles were also implemented. Non-linear and viscoelastic models are derived for the central nervous system (CNS) and meninges and the importance for injury prediction is outlined. The fluids were modelled using an Eulerian FE formulation, and constrains between fluids and solids were defined. Proposed injury measures for the CNS are also evaluated. Application of the FE head model to reconstructions of real head injury cases will also be discussed.

  • 21. Kremer, F.
    et al.
    Rabayah, M.
    Choi, H.F.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    D'hooge, Jan
    Spatial compounding for 2D strain estimation in the mouse heart: a pilot study2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimating cardiac strain in the mouse in the lateral direction usingspeckle tracking with adapted clinical equipment was shown to be challenging dueto the fast heart rate and the large speckle size relative to the wallthickness. Compounding axial motion estimates acquired from different insonationangles can potentially improve lateral strain estimates. Therefore, the aim ofthis study was to test the feasibility of this methodology in the murine heartbased on simulated data sets. A 3D kinematic model of a murine left ventriclewas simulated and filled randomly with scatterers. Ultrasound short-axis images(10mm 6mm) were obtained by assuming a linear array transducer. Beam steeringwas simulated at 3 different angles (22, 0, 22). Axial motion was estimated ineach data set by 1D cross-correlation. A dynamic programming approach wasintegrated in the motion estimation algorithm to avoid discontinuities. Axialcomponents were combined to reconstruct the in-plane motion vector. The 2Ddisplacement fields were subsequently accumulated over the whole cycle. Theprocedure was repeated for 10 different distributions of scatterers to acquire10 different RF data sets (5 for parameter tuning and 5 for comparing themethods). Radial and circumferential RMS strain errors calculated from theaccumulated motion fields were compared with those obtained with 2D speckletracking. Spatial compounding yielded significantly better radial (RMSE: 0.07370.0078 vs. 0.112 0.0094) as well as circumferential strain (RMSE: 0.102 0.0097vs. 0.281 0.054).

  • 22.
    Larsson, Matilda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Kremer, F.
    Claus, P.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    D'hooge, Jan
    A novel measure to express tracking quality in ultrasound block matching2010In: Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 2010, p. 1636-1639Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speckle de-correlation is a major problem in block matching based ultrasound methodologies as it limits the accuracy of the tracking result. It would be of benefit to have a quantitative measure expressing the local tracking quality as it would allow discarding unreliable motion estimates. We hypothesized that kernels showing sufficient gray scale pattern would more reliably track than kernels with more homogenous gray scale distributions. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis in-silico. Ultrasound B-mode sequences were simulated from a kinematic model of the carotid artery. Two-dimensional motion was estimated using block matching with the normalized cross-correlation function as similarity measure. For each kernel, two measures of tracking quality were stored: the normalized cross-correlation coefficient (Ccc) and a measure of the amount of edges inside the kernel detected using a canny filter and counted on a pixel-by-pixel basis. As such, a quality measure (Cedge) between 0 (no edges) and 1 (nothing but edges) was obtained. Axial and lateral strains were subsequently obtained by linear regression in regions of interest (ROIs) with best/worst mean tracking quality scores. The root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) was significantly lower in regions with low Ccc (worst ROI) compared to ROIs with high Ccc. However, more edges in the kernel did indeed result in better overall tracking (lower RMSE). Thus, the proposed edge-detection method showed to be a better tracking quality measure than the commonly used Ccc.

  • 23.
    Larsson, Matilda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Kremer, F.
    Kuznetsova, T.
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    D'hooge, J.
    In-vivo assessment of radial and longitudinal strain in the carotid artery using speckle tracking2010In: 2010 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium Proceedings, IEEE , 2010, p. 1328-1331Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasound-based algorithms are commonly used to assess mechanical properties of arterial walls in studies of arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis. Speckle tracking based techniques used for estimation of myocardial strain can be applied on vessels to estimate strain of the arterial wall. Previous elastography studies in vessels have mainly focused on radial strain measurements, whereas the longitudinal strain has been more or less ignored. However, recently we showed the feasibility of speckle tracking to assess longitudinal strain of the carotid artery in-silico. The aim of this study was to test this methodology in-vivo. Ultrasound images were obtained in seven healthy subjects with no known cardiovascular disease (39 ± 14 years old) and in seven patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), (69 ± 4 years old). Speckle tracking was performed on the envelope detected data using our previous developed algorithm. Radial and longitudinal strains were estimated throughout two cardiac cycles in a region of interest (ROI) positioned in the posterior vessel wall. The mean peak systolic radial and longitudinal strain values from the two heart cycles were compared between the groups using a student's t-test. The mean peak radial strain was -39.1 ± 15.1% for the healthy group and -20.4 ± 7.5% for the diseased group (p = 0.01), whereas the mean peak longitudinal strain was 4.8 ± 1.1% and 3.2 ± 1.6% (p = 0.05) for the healthy and diseased group, respectively. Both peak radial and longitudinal strain values were thus significantly reduced in the CAD patient group. This study shows the feasibility to estimate radial and longitudinal strain in-vivo using speckle tracking and indicates that the method can detect differences between groups of healthy and diseased (CAD) subjects.

  • 24.
    Li, Xiaogai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Ho, Johnson
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Three Dimensional Poroelastic Simulation of Brain Edema: Initial studies on intracranial pressure2010In: IFMBE Proceedings, 2010, 2010, p. 1478-1481Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain edema is one of the most common consequences of serious head injury because of the enhancement of water content and thus the increased brain volume. Once the brain compensation mechanisms have been exhausted, the intracranial pressure (ICP) will increase exponentially because the brain is enclosed in the rigid skull. Previous research suggests that the poroelastic theory provides a solution for studying the fluid flow in the brain. In this paper, poroelastic theory is used to study the intracranial pressure distribution due to traumatic brain edema by a detailed 3D finite element brain model.

  • 25.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Pineiro, Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Clinical Innovation Fellowship: an innovation / education initiative for medtech2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, highly based on collaboration betweenstakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. Key areas of development are; overallprinciples of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation process as educationand practice, needs in healthcare & medtech industry.This paper presents a Swedish initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, which is highly based oncollaboration between stakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. The goal of this post-graduate education in clinic-centered innovation is to contribute to the development of a regional medical device cluster, toeducate the health care and medical device innovators and leaders for the future and to develop technical and organizational tools and solutions for the participating clinics.A few years ago some individuals at the Center for Technology, Medicine and Health, CTMH, got in contact with theStanford Biodesign Innovation program. Since the need for collaboration across boundaries and silos had been identified there was almost an instant initiative to try this model in Sweden. A dedicated effort to get funding and buildingresearch capacity started in parallel. A joint project for designing and developing a Swedish variation of the programwas set up.The paper presents examples of an existing innovation research education program at Stanford University and thenthe Swedish initiative that starts in the fall of 2010. Then issues and key areas of interest that have been identified indevelopment of the Swedish initiative are presented.These are; overall principles of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation processas education and practive, and finally particular needs in Swedish health care and medical technology industry. Animportant difference between the programs at Stanford and Stockholm is the inclusion in the Swedish initiative of theorganizational issues faced by the clinics. These issues are exemplified with leadership and management theoriesidentifying health care as a technology intensive and safety critical socio-technical system. Finally these key areas of interest are then consolidated in designing the overall approach to the Swedish initiative and the curriculum in the fellowsspecialized training.The paper reports findings from an ongoing research project whose aim is to identify obstacles and success factorsfor initiating such an initiative within Swedish university and healthcare structures. The research project also aims toevaluate at least three cycles of the program.

  • 26.
    Lindberg, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Grönlund, C.
    Granåsen, G.
    Karlsson, J. S.
    Peolsson, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Tissue strain from Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI) during sub-maximal isotonic muscle contractions2010In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September 7 - 12, 2009, Munich, Germany: Vol. 25/4 Image Processing, Biosignal Processing, Modelling and Simulation, Biomechanics, Springer Publishing Company, 2010, Vol. 25/4, p. 1554-1556Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI) as a method to quantify the deformation of skeletal muscle tissue during contraction. The parameters used to describe tissue dynamics in this study were strain and strain rate, respectively. Eight subjects were evaluated performing submaximal isotonic contractions of biceps brachii before and after muscle fatigue.

  • 27.
    Marquez, Juan Carlos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Ferreira, Javier
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Buendia, Ruben
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Textile electrode straps for wrist-to-ankle bioimpedance measurements for Body Composition Analysis: Initial validation & experimental results2010In: 2010 ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY (EMBC), IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society , 2010, p. 6385-6388Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) is one of the non-invasive monitoring technologies that could benefit from the emerging textile based measurement systems. If reliable and reproducible EBI measurements could be done with textile electrodes, that would facilitate the utilization of EBI-based personalized healthcare monitoring applications. In this work the performance of a custom-made dry-textile electrode prototype is tested. Four-electrodes ankle-to-wrist EBI measurements have been taken on healthy subjects with the Impedimed spectrometer SFB7 in the frequency range 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The EBI spectroscopy measurements taken with dry electrodes were analyzed via the Cole and Body Composition Analysis (BCA) parameters, which were compared with EBI measurements obtained with standard electrolytic electrodes. The analysis of the obtained results indicate that even when dry textile electrodes may be used for EBI spectroscopy measurements, the measurements present remarkable differences that influence in the Cole parameter estimation process and in the final production of the BCA parameters. These initial results indicate that more research work must be done to in order to obtain a textile-based electrode that ensures reliable and reproducible EBI spectroscopy measurements.

  • 28. Marquez, Juan Carlos
    et al.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Välimäki, Elina
    University of Borås.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Comparison of dry-textile electrodes for electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile Electrodes have been widely studied for biopotentials recordings, specially for monitoring the cardiac activity. Commercially available applications, such as Adistar T-shirt and Textronics Cardioshirt, have proved a good performance for heart rate monitoring and are available worldwide. Textile technology can also be used for Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy measurements enabling home and personalized health monitoring applications however solid ground research about the measurement performance of the electrodes must be done prior to the development of any textile-enabled EBI application. In this work a comparison of the measurement performance of two different types of dry-textile electrodes and manufacturers has been performed against standardized RedDot 3M Ag/AgCl electrolytic electrodes. 4-Electrode, whole body, Ankle-to-Wrist EBI measurements have been taken with the Impedimed spectrometer SFB7 from healthy subjects in the frequency range of 3kHz to 500kHz. Measurements have been taken with dry electrodes at different times to study the influence of the interaction skin-electrode interface on the EBI measurements. The analysis of the obtained complex EBI spectra shows that the measurements performed with textile electrodes produce constant and reliable EBI spectra. Certain deviation can be observed at higher frequencies and the measurements obtained with Textronics and Ag/AgCl electrodes present a better resemblance. Textile technology, if successfully integrated it, may enable the performance of EBI measurements in new scenarios allowing the rising of novel wearable monitoring applications for home and personal care as well as car safety.

  • 29. Mekjavic, I.
    et al.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, L.
    Jaki Mekjavic, P.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Mild dehydration per se does not increase the risk of decompression sickness2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Lindh, Thomas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Measurement-based admission control in wireless sensor networks2010In: 2010 Eleventh International Conference on Mobile Data Management (MDM), IEEE , 2010, p. 426-431Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless sensor networks have today emerged as a feasible infrastructure for healthcare applications. This paper addresses the non-trivial performance problems in contentionbased wireless networks. We present a method for admission control in contention-based networks, implemented as a component of a performance management system. The test results show that admission control can improve the predictability and level of performance in wireless sensor networks. The system can be used as a tool for dimensioning and configuration as well as for real-time admission control. The often unpredictable dynamics in contention-based access networks means that continuous performance control is needed to maintain a desired quality of service.

  • 31.
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Lindh, Thomas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik (Closed 20130701).
    Measurement-Based Admission Control in Wireless Sensor Networks2010In: 2010 FOURTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS (SENSORCOMM), IEEE , 2010, p. 447-452Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless sensor networks have today emerged as a feasible infrastructure for healthcare applications. This paper addresses the non-trivial performance problems in contention-based wireless networks. We present a method for admission control in contention-based networks, implemented as a component of a performance management system. The test results show that admission control can improve the predictability and level of performance in wireless sensor networks. The system can be used as a tool for dimensioning and configuration as well as for real-time admission control. The often unpredictable dynamics in contention-based access networks means that continuous performance control is needed to maintain a desired quality of service.

  • 32. Schütte, Simon
    et al.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Rating scales in Kansei Engineering-modifications for an European context2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kansei or Affective Engineering is a relatively new research field in the West. Link ping University in Sweden has been pioneering research and application within Kansei Engineering since 1999. Several companies have cooperated in different Kansei studies, for example Toyota/BT, Volvo, Saab, Scania. In some of the early studies, there were difficulties to apply the methodology. Reasons for this included shortage of competence within affective design in European organizations, but also the fact that incitements for improvement of product design seemed to be lacking. One of the problems applying the methodology was that European participants in the studies did not accept to make a vast number of ratings during long time periods. Japanese researchers used 5-point semantic differential questionnaires and up to 300 rating-scales per participant and product. In order to overcome this problem, a modification of the rating scales was developed. Hence, data reduction methods such as factor analysis, affinity diagram and Pareto charts were tested and validated in order to reduce the number of Kansei words and product samples used, without compromising the validity of the result. This approach eventually resulted in the development of a universal Kansei Engineering Software (KESo) which reduces the time needed for each Kansei Engineering study. Another objective for our research has been to develop and validate methods for incomplete data collection, i.e. a prioritization of product attributes. Another result from the cooperation with industrial companies is that the companies strongly emphasised that product development studies need to be less time and resource consuming.

  • 33.
    Seoane, Fernando
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Buendia, Ruben
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Cole parameter estimation from electrical bioconductance spectroscopy measurements2010In: 2010 ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY (EMBC), IEEE Press, 2010, Vol. 2010, p. 3495-3498Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several applications of Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) make use of Cole parameters as base of their analysis, therefore Cole parameters estimation has become a very common practice within Multifrequency- and EBI spectroscopy. EBI measurements are very often contaminated with the influence of parasitic capacitances, which contributes to cause a hook-alike measurement artifact at high frequencies in the EBI obtained data. Such measurement artifacts might cause wrong estimations of the Cole parameters, contaminating the whole analysis process and leading to wrong conclusions. In this work, a new approach to estimate the Cole parameters from the real part of the admittance, i.e. the conductance, is presented and its performance is compared with the results produced with the traditional fitting of complex impedance to a depressed semi-circle. The obtained results prove that is feasible to obtain the full Cole equation from only the conductance data and also that the estimation process is safe from the influence capacitive leakage.

  • 34.
    Sturm, Dennis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Yousaf, Khurram
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Eriksson, Martin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    A Kayak Training System for Force Measurement on-water2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kayaking is a very competitive sport and represented in the Olympic context with two disciplines: slalom and flatwater. The main forces that propel the boat are paddle and foot stretcher force (Mann & Kearney, 1980). Anecdotal evidence collected from coaches involved in the research suggests varying theories on the best profile and synchronisation of paddle and foot stretcher force. It should be extremely helpful for athletes, coaches and researchers to measure these forces in real-time on-water with an unobtrusive, wireless sensor system such as is presented here. Thereby athletes are provided the possibility to perform their training with knowledge of performance (KP), which leads to superior training effects compared to knowledge of results (KR) only. The authors have not been able to identify any previous studies examining paddle and foot stretcher forces simultaneously although previous work has suggested doing so (Michael et al. 2009, Petrone et al., 1998).

  • 35.
    Sturm, Dennis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Yousaf, Khurram
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Eriksson, Martin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    A wireless, unobtrusive Kayak Sensor Network enabling Feedback Solutions2010In: 2010 International Conference on Body Sensor Networks, BSN 2010, 2010, p. 159-163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Canoeing is a very competitive sport involving a non-trivial pattern of motion. A group of athletes and coaches approached the authors for aid in quantifying what until today only is qualitative, personal and thereby subjective data. The objective of this work is to present a measurement tool that records paddle and foot stretcher force in a flatwater kayak training situation, i.e. when training on the water. The system facilitatesa wireless (Bluetooth) star network link with three sensor nodes and one central unit. Validation data was obtained from a kayak ergometer that is equipped with analysis software. The stroke power obtained from this ergometer system is compared to the force data measured by the presented wireless sensor nodes. We have not been able to find any similar systems that would provide better data for performance analysis.

  • 36.
    van Dommelen, JAW
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Cloots, Rudy J.H.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Hrapko, Matej
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Peters, G.W.M
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Nyberg, Tobias
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Geers, Marc
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Mechanics of Traumatic Brain Injury at Multiple Length Scales2010In: Proceedings of the 16th US National Congress on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, State College, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current numerical head models predict the response of the brain based on a geometrically homogeneous anatomical structure. However, these models often lack the detailed anatomy of the heterogeneous structures within the head and an accurate description of the constitutive response of the brain tissue. A nonlinear constitutive model for brain tissue has been developed and validated. The consequences of meso-level heterogeneities in the brain for the development of traumatic brain injury have been investigated, as well as the orientationdependent sensitivity of brain tissue to mechanical loads based on a cellular injury mechanism.

  • 37. Verrecchia, L
    et al.
    Brantberg, K
    Tribukait, Arne
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Partial labyrinthine injury in severe decompression illness: a vascular embolic explanation?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38. Verrecchia, L
    et al.
    Tribukait, Arne
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Brantberg, K
    Perifer övre segmental vestibulär pares vid svår dekompressionssjuka: finns vaskulär embolisk orsak?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Vogel, Kjerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Johan
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Ergonomic changes and their consequences in a Swedish meat cutting plant2010In: 44th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference: Proactive Ergonomics - implementation of ergonomics in planning of jobs, tasks, systems and environments, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rotation schemes reducing daily working time with knife to 6 hours were planned and implemented at a meat cutting plant in a participatory process. These changes were evaluated concerning results, the change process and consequences on organizational performance. A questionnaire to the meat cutters and interviews with the production leaders were conducted. The results support that the meat cutters experienced the changes positively and that a reduction in physical and mental fatigue was reached. Other experiences were mixed indicating that both work organizational characteristics and local history should be taken more into consideration. The organizational performance was not particularly affected.

  • 40.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Centrum för Genusvetenskap.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Udén, M
    Luleå Tekniska universitet.
    Supradisciplinary conversations on Security, Risk and Resilience around Dams in Sub Arctica2010In: International Commission for Large Dams International Symposium, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydropower is often promoted as an environmentally friendly and renewable energy resource. Yet, it is since long established that this energy source indeed has numerous negative environmental impacts, and the negative social impacts have been established by researchers in several cases. At the same time it is an ageing technology, within which aging dams are confronting climate change with the result that it is a carrier of number of threats against both human security and sustainable development.

    The paper forms the basis for a recently launched research project involving four scientific disciplines - history of science and technology; political science; gender, technology and organization and land and water resource management.  In the paper, the possibilities for a supradisciplinary approach to analyze the sociotechnical aspects of security, safety and risk in regard to large dams within Sub Arctica are discussed. Supradisciplinarity refers in this case to the involvement of both social and natural/technical sciences as well as the involvement of practitioners/constructors/dam owners etc and local inhabitants around the dams.

    In focus is the question on how the current narrow and technically oriented dam safety concept could or maybe should be broadened to include differing attitudes and values, from different perspectives depending on gender, ethnicity and situated knowledge.

    Empirical examples are drawn from on an ongoing study of the Lule River, the most hydroexploited river in Sweden, located within the Swedish part of Sapmi, within which local reindeer herders are being interviewed along with interviews with actors within the Swedish setting of dam safety. Departing from these empirical examples, attempts to identify the current understandings of the socio-technical constructions of dams, scientific perceptions of water flows and a changing climate within the framing of dam safety and discuss how can these understandings could be influenced by supradisciplinary conversations and exchange.

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