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  • 1.
    Aare, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Evaluation of head response to ballistic helmet impacts, using FEM2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Aare, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Proposed global injury thresholds for oblique helmet impacts2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Berndtsson, Andreas
    Abtahi, Shirin
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Development and preliminary evaluation of an Android based heart rate variability biofeedback system2014In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, p. 3382-3385Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reduced Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is believed to be associated with several diseases such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). In these cases, HRV biofeedback may be a potential intervention method to increase HRV which in turn is beneficial to these patients. In this work, a real-time Android biofeedback application based on a Bluetooth enabled ECG and thoracic electrical bioimpedance (respiration) measurement device has been developed. The system performance and usability have been evaluated in a brief study with eight healthy volunteers. The result demonstrates real-time performance of system and positive effects of biofeedback training session by increased HRV and reduced heart rate. Further development of the application and training protocol is ongoing to investigate duration of training session to find an optimum length and interval of biofeedback sessions to use in potential interventions.

  • 4. Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Diaz-Olivazrez, Jose A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Seoane, Fernando
    Teriö, Heikki
    Mediavilla Martinez, Cesar
    Aso, Santiago
    Tiemann, Christian
    Big Data & Wearable Sensors Ensuring Safety and Health @Work2017In: GLOBAL HEALTH 2017, The Sixth International Conference on Global Health Challenges, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    —Work-related injuries and disorders constitute a major burden and cost for employers, society in general and workers in particular. We@Work is a project that aims to develop an integrated solution for promoting and supporting a safe and healthy working life by combining wearable technologies, Big Data analytics, ergonomics, and information and communication technologies. The We@Work solution aims to support the worker and employer to ensure a healthy working life through pervasive monitoring for early warnings, prompt detection of capacity-loss and accurate risk assessments at workplace as well as self-management of a healthy working life. A multiservice platform will allow unobtrusive data collection at workplaces. Big Data analytics will provide real-time information useful to prevent work injuries and support healthy working life

  • 5.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Ji, Guangchao
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Rodby, Kristian
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    A knitted garment using intarsia technique for Heart Rate Variability biofeedback: Evaluation of initial prototype2015In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE , 2015, Vol. 2015, p. 3121-3124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback is a method based on paced breathing at specific rate called resonance frequency by giving online feedbacks from user respiration and its effect on HRV. Since the HRV is also influence by different factors like stress and emotions, stress related to an unfamiliar measurement device, cables and skin electrodes may cover the underling effect of such kind of intervention. Wearable systems are usually considered as intuitive solutions which are more familiar to the end-user and can help to improve usability and hence reducing the stress. In this work, a prototype of a knitted garment using intarsia technique is developed and evaluated. Results show the satisfactory level of quality for Electrocardiogram and thoracic electrical bioimpedance i.e. for respiration monitoring as a part of HRV biofeedback system. Using intarsia technique and conductive yarn for making the connection instead of cables will reduce the complexity of fabrication in textile production and hence reduce the final costs in a final commercial product. Further development of garment and Android application is ongoing and usability and efficiency of final prototype will be evaluated in detail.

  • 6.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Aslamy, Benjamin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Boujabir, Imaneh
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    An Affordable ECG and Respiration Monitoring System Based on Raspberry PI and ADAS1000: First Step towards Homecare Applications2015In: 16th Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering: 16. NBC & 10. MTD 2014 joint conferences. October 14-16, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden, Springer, 2015, p. 5-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homecare is a potential solution for problems associated with an aging population. This may involve several physiological measurements, and hence a flexible but affordable measurement device is needed. In this work, we have designed an ADAS1000-based four-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration monitoring system. It has been implemented using Raspberry PI as a platform for homecare applications. ADuM chips based on iCoupler technology have been used to achieve electrical isolation as required by IEC 60601 and IEC 60950 for patient safety. The result proved the potential of Raspberry PI for the design of a compact, affordable, and medically safe measurement device. Further work involves developing a more flexible software for collecting measurements from different devices (measuring, e.g., blood pressure, weight, impedance spectroscopy, blood glucose) through Bluetooth or user input and integrating them into a cloud-based homecare system.

  • 7.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Löfgren, Nils
    Elimination of ECG Artefacts in Foetal EEG Using Ensemble Average Subtraction and Wavelet Denoising Methods: A Simulation2014In: XIII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing 2013, Springer, 2014, p. 551-554Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological signals recorded from surface electrodes contain interference from other signals which are not desired and should be considered as noise. Heart activity is especially present in EEG and EMG recordings as a noise. In this work, two ECG elimination methods are implemented; ensemble average subtraction (EAS) and wavelet denoising methods. Comparison of these methods has been done by use of simulated signals achieved by adding ECG to neonates EEG. The result shows successful elimination of ECG artifacts by using both methods. In general EAS method which remove estimate of all ECG components from signal is more trustable but it is also harder for implementation due to sensitivity to noise. It is also concluded that EAS behaves like a high-pass filter while wavelet denoising method acts as low-pass filter and hence the choice of one method depends on application.

  • 8.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A novel data-mining platform leveraging social media to monitor outcomes of Januvia2013In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 7484-7487Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data-mining method was developed to gauge the experiences of the diabetes mellitus drug Januvia. Self-organizing maps were used to analyze forum posts numerically to infer user opinion of drug Januvia. Graph theory was used to discover influential users. The result is a word list compilation correlating positive and negative word cluster groups and a web of influential users on Januvia. The implications could open new research avenues into rapid data collection, feedback, and analysis that would enable improved solutions for public health.

  • 9.
    Almén, Lena
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Design Measures for Construction Site Safety2012In: The Conference of the Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:Since the 1st of January 2009, all Clients in Sweden are required to appoint a Health and Safety Coordinator for the design and planning phase of their building projects. Telephone interviews were carried out with the Coordinators of 42 building projects during 2010. They were asked to give examples of occupational hazards in the projects and to report how these were handled in the design and planning phase. Trauma risks as well as MSD-risks were identified in the design and planning phase. The hazards were mostly generally described and seldomly taken care of by design changes.

  • 10.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Health and Safety Coordinators´Potential to Prevent Injuries on Construction Sites2012In: Working on Safety, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of occupational disease and serious injury in the building and construction industry is high. The earlier in the construction process, the greater are the possibilities to reduce hazards.

    According to the Swedish legislation, Architects and Design Engineers shall, within the framework of their assignment, ensure that aspects of health and safety are considered during the construction of a building as well as in the use of the finished building.

    Since the 1st of January 2009, Clients (natural or legal persons for whom projects are carried out) in Sweden are obliged to appoint a Health and Safety Coordinator for the design and planning of the building. The Coordinators must have the educational skills and experience needed to perform their duties.

    The aim of this study was to find out what persons are appointed to be coordinators, how they perceive their duties and, potentially, what could facilitate the Health and Safety Coordinators’ activities and construction site safety.

    Telephone interviews were carried out with 40 Health and Safety Coordinators for the design and planning phase of 42 building projects during 2010.

    The Coordinators education and experiences varied to a large degree. Their description of duties also varied greatly, from no duties, to administrative duties, to active injury prevention.

    According to the Coordinators, the following factors had a positive influence on their possibilities to act for injury prevention:

    • The Coordinator is appointed early in the process
    • The Coordinator has authority in the project
    • The Client prioritizes occupational safety
    • There is knowledge of construction methods in the design team
  • 11.
    Alsmo, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Causes of Poor Air Quality in Swedish Schools2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This literature survey distinguishes between building and other factors influencing air quality. It does not identify building factors sufficient to account for occupant complaints. It concludes that buildings are often blamed for adverse health effects without sufficient grounds. The risk is there will be too much focusing on the wrong underlying problem when remedying so-called sick buildings. The study shows the importance of ensuring that factors independent of the school building, including the choices of environments and activities, are important for the indoor environment.

  • 12.
    Alvarez, Victor S
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Importance of Windscreen Modelling Approach for Head Injury Prediction2016In: 2016 IRCOBI Conference Proceedings - International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the capability of two modelling approaches in capturing  both accelerations and deformations from head impacts, and to evaluate the effect of modelling approach on  brain injury prediction. The first approach is a so‐called smeared technique, in which the properties of the two  glass  sheets and  the intermediate  polyvinyl  butyral  (PVB) are  combined and  divided into  two  coinciding  shell layers, of which one can fracture. The second approach consists of three shell layers, representing the glass and  PVB,  separated by  the  distance of  their  thickness, using a non‐local  failure criterion  to initiate  fracture in  the  glass.  The  two  modelling  approaches  are  compared  to  impact  experiments  of  flat  circular  windscreens,  measuring  deformations  and  accelerations  as  well  as  accelerations  from  impacts  against  full  vehicle  windscreens.  They  are  also  used  to  study  head‐to‐windscreen  impacts  using  a  detailed  Finite  Element  (FE)  model,  varying  velocity,  impact  direction  and  impact  point.  Only  the  non‐local  failure  model  is  able  to  adequately  capture  both  the accelerations and  deformations  of an  impactor. The FE  head model  simulations  also reveal that the choice of modelling approach has a large effect on the both localisation of the strain in the  brain and the characteristics of the strain‐time curve, with a difference in peak strain between 8% and 40%.  

  • 13.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Work environment, Lean and Agriculture2014In: PROCEEDINGS: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management & 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference: Volume I + II, IEA Press , 2014, p. 661-666Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become the predominant management concept in industry, but its effect on the work environment is debated. Lean has now reached farms and garden nurseries. This paper aims to identify consequences for the physical and psychosocial work environment when Lean was applied in micro-businesses in the agricultural sector. Observations, a questionnaire and interviews were used as methods. It was concluded that the psychosocial work environment became more structured and less stressful. The physical work environment was partly improved by less transportation on the farm. However, consideration of the physical work environment was insufficient.

  • 14. Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Björkholm, Peter
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Johannisson, Pontus
    Johnsson, Christer
    Stigwall, Johan
    Södermalm, Svante
    MEMS-based inertial navigation instrumentation for high-dynamic applications2009In: COMS 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Asplund, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    Inganäs, Olle
    Forchheimer, Robert
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Neural microcontacts with wire electrodes and woven logic2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Buendia, Ruben
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Cole Function and Conductance-Based Parasitic Capacitance Compensation for Cerebral Electrical Bioimpedance Measurements2012In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE, San Diego: IEEE press , 2012, p. 3368-3371Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most common measurement artifacts present in Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy measurements (EBIS) comes from the capacitive leakage effect resulting from parasitic stray capacitances. This artifact produces a deviation in the measured impedance spectrum that is most noticeable at higher frequencies. The artifact taints the spectroscopy measurement increasing the difficulty of producing reliable EBIS measurements at high frequencies. In this work, an approach for removing such capacitive influence from the spectral measurement is presented making use of a novel method to estimate the value of the parasitic capacitance equivalent that causes the measurement artifact. The proposed method has been tested and validated theoretically and experimentally and it gives a more accurate estimation of the value of the parasitic capacitance than the previous methods. Once a reliable value of parasitic capacitance has been estimated the capacitive influence can be easily compensated in the EBIS measured data. Thus enabling analysis of EBIS data at higher frequencies, i.e. in the range of 300-500 kHz like measurements intended for cerebral monitoring, where the characteristic frequency is remarkably higher than EBIS measurements i.e. within the range 30 to 50 kHz, intended for body composition assessment.

  • 17.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Electrical Bioimpedance cerebral monitoring. Preliminary results from measurements on stroke patients2012In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE , 2012, p. 126-129Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) is currently used in different tissue characterization applications. In this work we aim to use EBIS to study changes in electrical properties of the cerebral tissues after an incident of hemorrhage/ischemic stroke. To do so a case-control study was conducted using six controls and three stroke cases. The preliminary results of this study show that by using Cole-based analysis on EBIS measurements and analyzing the Cole parameters R0 and R∞, it is possible to detect changes on electrical properties of cerebral tissue after stroke. 

  • 18.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Study of the dynamics of transcephalic cerebral impedance data during cardio-vascular surgery2013In: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), Institute of Physics (IOP), 2013, Vol. 434, no 1, p. 012045-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postoperative neurological deficits are one of the risks associated with cardio vascular surgery, necessitating development of new techniques for cerebral monitoring. In this study an experimental observation regarding the dynamics of transcephalic Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was conducted to investigate the potential use of electrical Bioimpedance for cerebral monitoring in cardio vascular surgery. Tetrapolar transcephalic EBI measurements at single frequency of 50 kHz were recorded prior to and during cardio vascular surgery. The obtained results show that the transcephalic impedance decreases in both groups of patients as operation starts, however slight differences in these two groups were also observed with the cerebral impedance reduction in patients having no ECC being less common and not as pronounced as in the ECC group. Changes in the cerebral impedance were in agreement with changes of haematocrit and temperature. The origin of EBI changes is still unexplained however these results encourage us to continue investigating the application of electrical bioimpedance cerebral monitoring clinically.