Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Eneroth-Grimfors, E
    et al.
    Westgren, M
    Ericson, Mats
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Ihrman-Sandahl, C
    Lindblad, L E
    Autonomic cardiovascular control in normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancy.1994In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 73, no 9, p. 680-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pre-eclampsia is regarded as a primary placental disorder, in which defect placentation causes endothelial and cardiovascular disturbances. Evidence of disturbed neural cardiovascular control in this condition has been suggested, as well as in other hypertensive diseases. The purpose of the present study was to non-invasively evaluate the sympathovagal balance during normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancy.

    METHODS: In twelve healthy pregnant women, thirteen pre-eclamptic women and ten nonpregnant controls, heart rate, blood pressure and breathing movements were registered and recorded on a tape recorder for off-line analysis. Variability in heart rate, blood pressure and breathing movements were computed by an autoregressive spectral analysis algorithm. Heart rate variability was quantitated as the area under the spectral curve, and Student's t-test was performed on logarithmic values.

    RESULTS: Heart rate variability contained two major components in power, a low frequency peak predominantly attributed to sympathetic tone, and a high frequency peak reflecting vagal tone. Women with pre-eclampsia were characterized by a significantly reduced high frequency peak compared to healthy pregnant (p = 0.03) and non-pregnant (p = 0.02) women. In the low frequency band there were no significant differences in power between the groups. Blood pressure variability did not differ between the groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present results indicate that pre-eclampsia is associated with decreased vagal control of the heart. Furthermore, the results indicate that pregnancy per se does not change sympatho-vagal balance.

  • 2. Fernström, E
    et al.
    Ericson, Mats O
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Malker, H
    Electromyographic activity during typewriter and keyboard use.1994In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 477-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how ergonomic design influences neck-and-shoulder muscle strain, through keyboard assessment. Muscular activity was measured electromyographically (EMG) from six muscles in the forearm and shoulders of eight experienced typists using each of five different types of keyboard: one mechanical, one electromechanical, and one electronic typewriter; one personal computer/word processor (PC-XT) keyboard; and one angled at 20 degrees in the horizontal plane. The impact on muscular activity of using a palmrest was also studied. The mechanical typewriter induced a higher strain in the forearm and finger muscles than did the modern typewriters and keyboards. These induced no different strain on the neck-and-shoulder muscles, except for the right shoulder muscle, which was more active with the electronic typewriter than with the other machines. Using a palmrest did not decrease the strain on the muscles investigated. Use of the 'angled' PC-XT keyboard did not influence the measured muscular load on the forearm and finger muscles compared to typing on an ordinary PC-XT keyboard, but decreased the extensor muscular strain compared to the electronic typewriter.

  • 3. Milerad, E
    et al.
    Ericson, Mats O
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Effects of precision and force demands, grip diameter, and arm support during manual work: an electromyographic study.1994In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 255-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Musculoskeletal disorders in the neck, shoulder, and arm are common in some occupational groups, and have been ascribed to high precision demands and sustained static load in the neck-shoulder region. In order to evaluate the influence of precision and force demands in manual work related to arm support, instrument grip size, the muscular activity in neck, shoulder, and arm muscles was recorded by electromyography. This EMG and perceived exertion were estimated during a simulated work situation where 12 subjects followed a rotating track, using a handheld dental instrument. Normalized mean EMG amplitude levels (% reference maximal contraction) were calculated. The analysis of variance of the results showed that (a) the precision factor affected significantly the muscular load of the two dominant muscles with postural stabilization function (extensor carpi radialis and infraspinatus); (b) the force factor itself had no specific influence on the muscular load of the investigated muscles; (c) arm support, but not hand support, was of significant importance for the load of three dominant shoulder muscles (trapezius, supraspinatus, and anterior deltoid); and (d) the two different hand grip diameters did not change the activity of any muscle investigated.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf