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  • 1.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hilderman, Marie
    Bruchfeld, Annette
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Pro-inflammatory Blood Markers and Heart Rate Variability in Apnoea as a Reflection of Basal Vagal ToneManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in inflammatory response, which istightly regulated by the nervous system to avoid the damage caused by inflammation. There isevidence for a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that includes afferent and efferent vagalnerves that sense the inflammation and stimulate the anti-inflammatory response. Non-functionalanti-inflammatory response might lead to excessive and chronic inflammation e.g., rheumatoidarthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and poor outcome. Heart rate variability(HRV) has been proposed as a potential tool to monitor the level of anti-inflammatory activitythrough the monitoring of vagal activity. In this paper, the association of pro-inflammatorymarkers with HRV indices is evaluated. We used a database called “Heart Biomarker Evaluationin Apnea Treatment (HeartBEAT)” that consists of 6±2 hours of Electrocardiogram (ECG)recordings during nocturnal sleep from 318 patients at baseline and 301of them at 3 monthsfollow-up. HRV indices are calculated from ECG recordings of 5-360 minutes. The results showa statistically significant correlation between heart rate (HR) and pro-inflammatory cytokines,independent of duration of ECG analysis. HRV indices e.g., standard deviation of all RRintervals (SDNN) show an inverse relation to the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Longer ECGrecordings show a higher potential to reflect the level of anti-inflammatory response. In light oftheories for the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a combination of HR and HRV as areflection of basal vagal activity might be a potential prognostic tool for interventional guidance.

  • 2.
    Antoni, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hed, Yvonne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordberg, Axel
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    One-pot dendritic growth and post-functionalization of multifunctional dendrimers: Synthesis and application2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Atefi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Tomner, Jens
    Kostulas, Konstantinos
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Bonmassar, Giorgio
    Stroke Pathogenesis Alters Dielectric Properties of Brain Tissue Supporting Electrical Bioimpedance Technology as a tool for Cerebral MonitoringManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Guinery, Jane
    Production planning aligning customer requests with production capabilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Bosacus, I.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Johannsson, G.
    Ellegård, L.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Robust approach against capacitive coupling for the estimation of body fluids using clinical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurementsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Cheng, Kimberley
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology.
    Ivanova, Natalia
    Biomedicinskt centrum, Uppsala.
    Scheres, S.H.W
    Pavlov, Michael
    Biomedicinskt centrum.
    Carazo, J.M.
    Herbert, Heinz
    Ehrenberg, Måns
    Lindahl, Martin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Structural analysis of double translocated tmRNA on the 70S ribosome indicates flexibility of the tmRNA structure.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cheng, Kimberley
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology (Closed 20130701).
    Karlström, M
    Purhonen, P
    Ladenstein, R.
    Herbert, Hans
    Koeck, Philip J.B.
    Low resolution structure and apparent melting temperature of the chaperonin from Pyrococcus furiosusManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Colarieti-Tosti, Massimiliano
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Brooks, M. S. S.
    Eriksson, O.
    Approximate Molecular and Crystal Field Excitation Energies Derived from Density Functional TheoryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Danielsson, Christina
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Office Environment and Employee Satisfaction: The Impact of Office-type.Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Danielsson, Christina
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Three Approaches to Office Design; A Review of Environmental InfluencesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Eliasson, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Carl, Lind
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Nyman, Teresia
    Ergonomics Risk Assessment: Tool Use and ProcessesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Eliasson, Kristina
    et al.
    Arbets- och miljömedicin, Uppsala Universitet.
    Lind, Carl
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Nyman, Teresia
    Arbets- och miljömedicin, Akademiska Sjukhuset; Arbets- och miljömedicin, Uppsala Universitet.
    The use of specific observation-based risk-assessment tools among professional ergonomistsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several observation-based risk-assessment tools have been developed in recent decades. However, studies reporting their use, the context in which they are used, and reasons for using them are scarce. The aims of the present study were to investigate the knowledge and use of observation-based risk-assessment tools and their usability and to explore the processes of assignments that include assessment of physical exposures. A web-based questionnaire (n=70) was combined with semi-structured interviews (n=12). The survey showed a limited use of several widely spread tools e.g. the NIOSH lifting equation, RULA and OWAS. The interviews revealed that the ergonomists mainly performed risk assessments based on their own expertise. Assignments were often initiated reactively, after identification of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, and seldom evaluated. The type of OHS organization and its relation to the client company seems to affect the opportunities for ergonomists to work proactively with risk assessment.

  • 13.
    Elmlund, Dominika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology.
    Elmlund, Hans
    SIMPLE: an image processing system for ab initio 3D reconstruction in single-particleelectron microscopyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Fahlstedt, Madelen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Comparison of MADYMO and Finite Element Human Body Models in Pedestrian Accidents with the Focus on Head KinematicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Fahlstedt, Madelen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    The Protective Effect of Bicycle HelmetsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Modeling a demand constant volume ratio exhaust and a self-mixing constant oxygen injection semi-closed rebreatherManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Unmanned tests of two types of gas dosage techniques for semi-closed underwater rebreathing apparatuses were carried out with a metabolic simulator in a water filled pressure chamber. Tests were conducted over a wide range of tidal volumes (0.5-3 L), respiratory frequencies (5-25 min-1), and oxygen consumptions (0.5-4 L/min), as well as with changing chamber pressures from 100 kPa to 920 kPa. Two models were set up, one single compartment model and one model assuming multiple serial compartments. Both models seem to have about the same level of accuracy at predicting the inspired oxygen levels at pressure, but the surface tests seem to favor the serial compartments model.

  • 17.
    Glimskär, Bo
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Adoption of Ergonomic Innovations for Injury Prevention: Sonographer's scanning support deviceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of how people relate to the risk of occupational injury indicate that there is a tendency to underestimate the risk at work compared to other risks in society. Ultrasound examinations of the heart involve a static and very uncomfortable working posture for the sonographer. As a result many sonographers experience shoulder and neck pains which can result in long term sickness leaves.

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how a more radical ergonomic innovation, a remote controlled ultrasound robot for cardiac examinations, Medirob, has been adopted. The study was conducted by interviews with department heads and heads of clinics, responsible for the procurement of the equipment.

    The results of this study have shown that it is not maybe enough to solve an ergonomic problem with an innovation to get it accepted and used. To prevent injuries the intervention must also have other qualities, for example improved productivity.

  • 18. Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    Renström, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Lean Ledership: a Matter of DualismManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hedenstierna, Sofia
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Development of an active solid neck muscle FE model and its influence on neck injury predictionManuscript (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ho, Johnson
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    The influence of the falx and tentorium: A 3D computational study of impacts using detailed FE head modelsManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of the falx and tentorium on biomechanics of the head during impact was studied in the current study with finite element analysis. A study of such has not been done previously in 3D. Three detailed 3D finite element models were created based on images of a healthy person with a normal size head. Two of the models contained the addition of falx and tentorium with different material properties. The models were subjected to coronal and sagittal rotational impulses applied to the skull. The acceleration of the impulse was large enough to theoretically induce diffuse axonal injuries (DAI). Strain distributions in the brain of the different models were compared and the findings indicated that the falx induced large strain to the surrounding brain tissues, especially to the corpus callosum in coronal rotation. The tentorium seemed to constrain motion of the cerebellum while inducing large strain in the brain stem in both rotations. Lower strains in the different lobes while higher strains in the brain stem and corpus callosum which are the classical site for DAI, were found in the model with falx and tentorium. The result indicated the need of modeling dura mater with non-linear elastic material model, which otherwise would have been too stiff. The non-sliding interface of the protruding dura mater is suspected to induce too large strains in adjacent areas and needed to investigate further.

  • 21.
    Härmark, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Månsson, Cecilia
    Rasmussen, Morten
    Höjrup, Peter
    Al-Karadaghi, Salam
    Söderberg, Christopher G
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Emanuelsson, Cecilia
    Structural information on the oligomeric human molecular chaperone DNAJB6Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Karltun, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköpings Tekniska Högskola.
    Vogel, Kjerstin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Bergstrand, M.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Maintaining knife sharpness in industrial meat cutting: A matter of knife or meat cutter abilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Kothapalli, Satya V.V.N.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Diapartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Investigation of Polymer-Shelled Microbubble Motions in AcoustophoresisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to explore the trajectory motion of microsize (typically smaller than a redblood cell) encapsulated polymer-shelled gas bubbles propelled by radiation force in an acousticstanding-wave field and to compare the corresponding movements of solid polymer microbeads. Theexperimental setup consists of a microfluidic chip coupled to a piezoelectric crystal (PZT) with aresonance frequency of about 2.8 MHz. The microfluidic channel consists of a rectangular chamberwith a width, w, corresponding to one wavelength of the ultrasound standing wave. It creates one fullwave ultrasound of a standing-wave pattern with two pressure nodes at4w and43w and threeantinodes at 0,2w , and w. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the electrical potential over the PZT wasvaried between 1 and 10 volts. From Gor’kov’s potential equation, the acoustic contrast factor, Φ, forthe polymer-shelled microbubbles was calculated to about -60.7. Experimental results demonstratethat the polymer-shelled microbubbles are translated and accumulated at the pressure antinode planes.This trajectory motion of polymer-shelled microbubbles toward the pressure antinode plane is similarto what has been described for other acoustic contrast particles with a negative Φ. First, primaryradiation forces dragged the polymer-shelled microbubbles into proximity with each other at thepressure antinode planes. Then, secondary radiation forces caused them to aggregate at different spotsalong the channel. The relocation time for polymer-shelled microbubbles was 40 times shorter thanthat for polymer microbeads, and in contrast to polymer microbeads, the polymer-shelledmicrobubbles were actuated even at driving voltages (proportional to radiation forces) as low as 1 volt.In short, the polymer-shelled microbubbles demonstrate the behavior attributed to the negativeacoustic contrast factor particles and thus can be trapped at the antinode plane and thereby seperatedfrom solid particles, such as cells. This phenomenon could be utilized in exploring future applications,such as bioassay, bioaffinity, and cell interaction studies in vitro in a well-controlled environment.

  • 24.
    Kothapalli, Veeravenkata S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Oddo, L.
    Paradossi, G.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Assessment of the viscoelastic and oscillation properties of a nanoengineered-shelled multimodality contrast agentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kronander, Håkan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Fischer-Colbrie, W
    Hammar, N.
    Nowak, J.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Elmqvist, Håkan
    Analysis of ST/HR hysterisis improves long-term prognostic value of exercise ECG test.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Kuang, Qie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Purhonen, Pasi
    Ålander, Johan
    Svensson, Richard
    Hoogland, Veronika
    Winerdal, Jens
    Spahiu, Linda
    Ottosson-Wadlund, Astrid
    Armstrong, Richard
    Jegerschöld, Caroline
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Morgenstern, Ralf
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    A refined atomic model for microsomal glutathione transferase 1 from electron crystallographyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Microsomal glutathione transferase 1 (MGST1) is a detoxification enzyme belonging to the Membrane Associated Proteins in Eicosanoid and Glutathione Metabolism (MAPEG) superfamily. Here we have used electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals in order to determine an atomic model of rat MGST1 in a lipid environment. The 2D crystals were of the p6 two-sided plane group symmetry. For the refinement, information to 3.5 Å resolution from 225 electron diffraction patterns recorded from specimens at tilt angles up to 66° was used. The model comprises 123 of the 155 amino acid residues, two structured phospholipid molecules, two hydrocarbon chains, and one glutathione (GSH) molecule. Interactions between subunits form trimers centered on the crystallographic three-fold axes of the unit cell. The GSH substrate binds in an extended conformation at the interface between two subunits of the trimer. The location of GSH is supported by mutagenesis data in vitro.

  • 27.
    Lanner, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Investigation of the importance of the neck in oblique helmet testingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Larsson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Da Silva, Cristina
    Department of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Gunyeli, Elif
    Department of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Akebat Bin Ilami, Ali
    Department of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Department of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Winter, Reidar
    Department of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    The potential clinical value of contrast-enhanced echocardiography beyond current recommendationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Laya, Andrés
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Network-Centric Business Models for Health, Social Care and Wellbeing Solutions in the Internet of ThingsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this multiple case study we analyze solutions based on connected devices in the context of health, social care and wellbeing. Based on the consideration that a solution is a combination of services and products, we build on the notion that business models can be studied at a firm- and a network-level. These two levels are used to motivate the reasons why solutions emerging at the intersection of the healthcare and the ICT industries benefit from collaboration among different actors. We conclude that the firm- and the network-level development of business models provide alignment in the business network and are useful to establish the relation that technological component have with overall solutions. Our findings suggest that some component bring novelty in the final offer with affecting the ongoing operation, while other component aim at improving the internal working processes, with minimal effects on the final offer to end users. We discuss the benefits of a network-level perspective for each case.

  • 30.
    Lind, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SWEDEN.
    Rose, Linda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Development and evaluation of RAMP I: a practitioner tool for screening for musculoskeletal disorder risk factors in manual handlingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    RAMP I is a screening tool developed to support practitioners in screening for work-related musculoskeletal disorder risk factors related to manual handling. RAMP I, which is part of the RAMP tool, is based on research based studies combined with expert group judgments. More than 80 practitioners participated in the development of RAMP I. The tool constitutes of dichotomous assessment items grouped in seven categories. Acceptable reliability was found for a majority of the assessment items for 15 practitioners who were given 1h training. The usability evaluation points to RAMP I being usable for screening for musculoskeletal disorder risk factors, i.e., usable for assessing risks, usable as a decision base, has clear results, and the time needed for an assessment is acceptable. It is concluded that RAMP I is a valuable tool for practitioners.

  • 31.
    Lind, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SWEDEN.
    Rose, Linda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Development and evaluation of RAMP II: a practitioner’s tool for assessing musculoskeletal disorder risk factors in industrial manual handlingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Lindberg, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Inst. för Samhällsmedicin och Rehabilitering Sjukgymnastik, Umeå Univeristet.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Medicinsk Teknik - FoU, Umeå Univeristet.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment , Köpenhamn.
    Grönlund, Christer
    Medicinsk Teknik - FoU, Umeå Univeristet.
    Biceps brachii activity pattern during repetitive elbow flexions using ultrasound strain: effect of fatigueManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Törnkvist, Åsa
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Managerial Challenges in Creating Sustainable Development Work (Lean): An interactive case study from socio-technical perspectivesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - At present, healthcare organizations are facing both quality and financial challenges. Consequently, organizations in this sector have started to introduce Lean inspired production concepts in order to become more efficient and effective. The implementation of Lean in healthcare is not unproblematic, especially not within psychiatry, the context of which differs greatly from other sectors where it is more usual to see Lean implemented. The aim of this article is to identify managerial preconditions for the implementation of a sustainable Lean organization at a psychiatry division in a Swedish university hospital.

    Design/methodology/approach – An interactive case study approach was chosen with the purpose of gaining deeper knowledge and understanding of the first-line managers’ role during implementation of Lean. Focus group interviews together with 24 first-line managers were conducted. In the analysis, a socio-technical perspective was used due to the characteristics of the psychiatry healthcare context but also from a sustainability perspective. The empirical data from the focus group interviews were also complemented with a semi-structured interview with a key actor.

    Findings – Development work is context dependent and so is the implementation of Lean. This particular case study points out that clarity of the organizational structures within the Lean work, i.e. objectives and roles, affects the level of participation and consequently the sustainability of the Lean implementation. The empirical findings also show that a managerial lack of power and authority make it difficult for first-line managers (the majority being nurses) to prioritize engagement and time spent in Lean work.

    Originality/value – At present there are few studies on the implementation of Lean within the psychiatry healthcare sector and in a socio-technical context. In this article a model is presented, visualizing managerial preconditions for sustainable Lean in the context presented.

  • 34.
    Lundqvist, Joakim
    et al.
    Dept. of Molecular Biophysics, Lund University.
    Elmlund, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology.
    Kasperska, Dominika
    Division of Metabolic Diseases, Karolinska Institutet.
    Axelsson, Eva
    Dept. of Biochemistry, Lund University.
    Sirijovski, Nick
    Dept. of Biochemistry, Lund University.
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology.
    Willows, Robert
    Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University.
    Hansson, Mats
    Dept. of Biochemistry, Lund University.
    Lindahl, Martin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology.
    Al-Karadaghi, Salam
    Dept. of Molecular Biophysics, Lund University.
    Cryo-electron microscopy reveals an ATP-fueled and Integrin-I mediated conformational transition of the AAA+ activation complex in R. capsulatus Mg-chelataseManuscript (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Maksuti, Elira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Carlsson, Marcus
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Clinical Physiology, Lund, Sweden..
    Arheden, Håkan
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Clinical Physiology, Lund, Sweden..
    Kovács, Sándor J.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA..
    Broomé, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Ugander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hydraulic forces contribute to left ventricular diastolic filling2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Myocardial active relaxation and restoring forces are known determinants of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. We hypothesize the existence of an additional mechanism involved in LV filling, namely, a hydraulic force contributing to the longitudinal motion of the atrioventricular (AV) plane. A prerequisite for the presence of a net hydraulic force during diastole is that the atrial short-axis area (ASA) is smaller than the ventricular short-axis area (VSA). We aimed (a) to illustrate this mechanism in an analogous physical model, (b) to measure the ASA and VSA throughout the cardiac cycle in healthy volunteers using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, and (c) to calculate the magnitude of the hydraulic force. The physical model illustrated that the anatomical difference between ASA and VSA provides the basis for generating a hydraulic force during diastole. In volunteers, VSA was greater than ASA during 75-100% of diastole. The hydraulic force was the same order of magnitude as the peak driving force of LV (1-3N vs 5-10N). Hydraulic forces are a consequence of left heart anatomy and aid LV diastolic filling. These findings suggest that the relationship between ASA and VSA, and the resulting hydraulic forces, should be considered when characterizing diastolic function and dysfunction. 

  • 36.
    Manouras, Aristomenis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Nyktari, Evangelia
    Sahlén, Anders
    Winter, Reidar
    Vardas, Panagiotis
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    The value of E/Em ratio in the estimation of left ventricular filling pressures: impact of acute hemodynamic load reductionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Nilsson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Fryxell Westerberg, Annika
    Department Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borg, Jörgen
    Department Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wadell, Carl
    Bioservo Technologies AB, Kista, Sweden.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    A clinical study of a grip strengthening gloveManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Nilsson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Ingvast, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Wikander, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    The SEMGlove system for improving the grasping capabilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Nilsson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Nyberg, Tobias
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    An innovative electrophysiological device for rehabilitation of brain lesionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Nilsson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Nyberg, Tobias
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    EEG based control of a brain-computer interface for neuromuscular stimulationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Nordberg, Axel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Antoni, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Fibre reinforced Thiol-Ene patch fixation of bone fracturesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Nordberg, Axel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Evaluation of fiber reinforced adhesive fixation of vertebral fractures; an experimental and numerical studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Nordberg, Axel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Montañez, Maria I.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Ramakrishnan, Subashiyni
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Higly adhesive DOPA primers for fibre reinforced Thiol-Ene patch fixation of bone fractures.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Renström, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Niss, Camilla
    Senior managers’ perspectives on obstacles to Lean implementationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 45. Rutsdottir, Gudrun
    et al.
    Härmark, Johan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Weide, Yoran
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Ib Rasmussen, Morten
    Højrup, Peter
    Söderberg, Christopher
    Emanuelsson, Cecilia
    Structure model obtained by homology modelling and cryo-EM for the Hsp21 dodecamer and evaluation of the importance of oligomerization for chaperone activityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Rylander, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Bringing the “I” Back Into the Self: Body, Place and Emotion in Identity ConstructionManuscript (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Rylander, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Peppard, Joe
    What Really is a Knowledge-Intensive Firm? (Re)framing Research in the “Knowledge Economy"2005Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of a knowledge intensive firm (KIF) is seemingly an important category of organizations that is being increasingly studied. The underlying inference from the literature is that the KIF constitutes a category of organizations that is distinct and different from other organizational categories. The research reported in this paper explores how scholars are using the concept in their studies, analyzing how it is portrayed in the literature, and critiquing the implications that are drawn from these studies. As categories are important for ordering reality and in shaping meaning, the consequence of our analysis surfaces a number of problems that this research raises for the perpetuation of the knowledge economy rhetoric and its potential flaws. We suggests that what is needed is not a better definition of a KIF, but a better understanding of the classification systems and their underpinning assumptions that guide how we present research on knowledge in organizations.

  • 48.
    S. Alvarez, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Fahlstedt, Madelen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Pipkorn, Bengt
    Autoliv Research.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of Body and Head Angular Velocity on Brain Injury Prediction in Pedestrian AccidentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedestrian protection has historically not been prioritized in the vehicle safety development, but represents a large portion of the severe and deadly injuries in vehicle accidents. One of the most common severely injured body parts is the head and the focus of many researchers and safety system developers. The Finite Element (FE) method is an increasingly popular approach to better understand the injury biomechanics, but due to the large system needed to be solved in pedestrian simulations a common approach is to reduce the problem to a head only impact. In EuroNCAP rating an isolated head form is impacted towards different regions of the vehicle with only linear velocity components. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of removing the neck and body, as well as rotational velocity components on the brain injury prediction. A pedestrian full body human FE model was impacted against a generalized buck model to simulate pedestrian accidents involving windscreen impacts, at three velocities (30, 40 and 50 or 45 km/h), two pedestrian velocities (0 and 5 km/h) and two standard walking gaits. The head position was extracted from the pedestrian full body simulations at 1 ms before head impact. The isolated head was impacted with the vehicle model using either all velocity components from the full body simulations, or only the linear components. The results show that the body and neck can affect the brain injury prediction in windscreen impacts, reducing the strains by up to 49%. It was also shown that removing the rotational impact velocities, in general, further increased the strain, with up to 138%. However, several cases showed a reduction in brain strains for the head only simulations by up to 40%, and in other cases only very small difference down to 1% were seen, indicating a high sensitivity to impact conditions and highlighting the difficulty in generalizing the effect. It is however generally seen that the body is limiting the severity in impacts close to the windscreen center, and amplifying the severity of those close to the lower frame. It could also be seen that removing the angular velocity, in most cases, further increased the difference between the full body and head only simulations.

  • 49.
    S. Alvarez, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Effect of Pediatric Growth on Cervical Spine Injury Risk in Automotive CrashesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Finite element (FE) models are a powerful tool that can be used to understand injury mechanisms and develop better safety systems. This study aims to extend the understanding of pediatric spine biomechanics, where there is a paucity of studies available. A newly developed and continuously scalable FE model was validated and scaled to 1.5-, 3-, 6-, 10-, 14- and 18-year-old using a non-linear scaling technique, accounting for local topological changes. The oldest and youngest ages were also scaled using homogeneous geometric scaling. To study the effect of pediatric spinal growth on head kinematics and intervertebral disc strain, the models were exerted to 3.5 g acceleration pulse at the T1 vertebra to simulate frontal, rear and side impacts. It was shown that the head rotation decreases with age, but is over predicted when geometrically scaling down from 18- to 1.5-year-old and under predicted when geometrically scaling up from 1.5- to 18-year-old. The strain in the disc, however, showed a clear decrease with age in side impact and for the upper cervical spine in rear impact, indicating a higher susceptibility for neck injury at younger ages. In the frontal impact, no clear age dependence could be seen, suggesting a large contribution from changed facet joint angles, and lower levels of strain, suggesting a lower risk of injury. The results also highlight the benefit of rearward facing children in a seat limiting head lateral motion.

  • 50.
    Sturm, Dennis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Yousaf, Khurram
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Eriksson, Martin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Tornberg, Åsa B.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Validation of a novel wireless Force Measurement System for Kayak Paddle ShaftsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 54
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