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  • 1.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean Projects and Sustainability in the Swedish Agricultural Sector2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    An interactive Internet tool supporting risk management in SMEs: The Chemical Guide (KemiGuiden)2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Improving work environment in small enterprises: The need for a holistic perspective and adaptation to small enterprise reality2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Nyman, Teresia
    KI, Institutionen för folkhälsovetenskap.
    Education for Occupational health service professionals in different countries2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Schmidt, L
    Swedish Occupational Health Services and Small Enterprises: How does it work?2005In: OHS2005 Conference Proceedings: SJWEH Supplements 2005; no 1, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Aronsson, K
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Teär Fahnhjelm, K
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nylén, P
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Visual ergonomics and eye strain in eye careprofessionals2012In: NES2012 Proceedings: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth / [ed] Ann-Beth Antonsson, Göran M Hägg, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Eye care professionals spend many hours a day in darkness performing visually demanding tasks. A new eye hospital will be built in Stockholm 2018. The current lighting, logistics, and working conditions are analysed in a multidisciplinary project aiming to optimise settings in the new hospital. The main purpose of the present project was to study visual ergonomics and current eye strain in employees at an eye hospital. Ninety-six employees answered a validated questionnaire regarding their experiences of light, visual ergonomics and eye strain problems. Twenty-three radiologists and 14 paediatricians at a university hospital were used as comparison groups. Eye strain was common in all departments at the hospital but was significantly more common only among radiologists compared to paediatricians. Overall, women experienced significantly more eye strain than men.

  • 7.
    Bergholm, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Larsolle, A.
    Acquiring instantaneous multispectral imagery using a single image sensor with multiple filter mosaic2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Ekberg, K
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Gustavsson, M
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Lundqvist, D
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Reineholm, C
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Fagerlind, A-C
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Karlsson, N
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Leading and organising for health and productivity2012In: Book of Proceedings: Zürich 2012 10th Conference, European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Improvements, innovation and Lean2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become a dominating change concept in Sweden and in other countries. It has been discussed whether Lean is a support or an obstacle for improvement and innovation. The aim of this paper is to identify examples, opportunities and obstacles for improvement and innovation within the framework of Lean. Cases from 30 organizations have been analyzed. The empirical examples and also literature show that it is possible to work with Lean or Lean principles in a way that arenas of innovation and improvement are created, but that in other organizations this does not happen.

  • 10.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Lean: en möjlighet till effektivitet och innovation2012In: Lean och innovationsförmåga – hinder, möjligheter och kunskapsluckor, 2012, p. 53-59Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Glimme, S
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Törnquist, A L
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nylén, Per
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Teär Fahnerhjelm, K
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lighting and task analysis in an eye hospital.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting is crucial in visually demanding activities and essential for a good visual environment. Access to daylight is important for health, wellbeing, production, and patient safety. The purpose of the present project is to design innovative multifunction examination rooms for the planning of a new eye hospital. The specific aims of the current study were to evaluate existing lighting conditions in examination rooms, to identify the tasks undertaken by eye care professionals, and how they relate to lighting. Lighting conditions in three such rooms and task analyses of three ophthalmologists’ work are presented. The mean illumination levels and the equability of illumination were inadequate. Even if there was access to daylight through windows existed, this possibility was rarely used. Task analyses showed that a significant percentage of the time was devoted to examining the patients (44 %), reading and writing or prescribing drops (23%), in medical records. The lighting was adjusted several times between full and dim illumination during contact with patients. There is substantial potential to improve the lighting conditions.

  • 12.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Image Enhancement And Reduction Of Radiation Dose For Panoramic Dental X-Ray Imaging2013In: Swedish Medical Engineering Conference 2013, Medicinteknikdagarna 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    1.  Background Reducing the X-ray dose too much produces images with low quality; Noisy, blurred, faded, under exposed. The approach used in this work aims at enhancing image quality by using advanced  automatic image processing algorithms.

    2.  Purpose To minimize X-ray dose exposure during panoramic dental X-ray imaging, in addition to automatically enhancing the acquired X-ray images to achieve high quality images that can be viewed using ordinary monitors.

    3.  Method An automatic, adaptive image enhancement algorithm was developed and implemented on multi-core CPU as well as GPU to achieve real time performance.

    4.  ResultsThe method was tested on panoramic dental X-ray images acquired with varying radiation dose. The results were promising and indicated the possibility of obtaining diagnostically usable images using a reduced dose by 50%. A group of ten dentists and specialists evaluated the resulted images. Figure (1) shows a comparison between an enhanced panoramic dental X-ray acquired with reduced dose by 50% and an original (unprocessed) panoramic dental X-ray acquired with a standard dose.

    5.  Discussion and conclusionsThis study shows the possibility to achieve a number of goals that can lead to better patient safety and better healthcare in general, such as:Minimized X-ray dose to the patient, which can lead to reduced risk of physical damage (e.g. cancer) and psycological consequences (e.g. stress).Better image quality which can lead to better, faster and more accurate and confident diagnostic.The resulted enhanced images can be automatically produced without any noticeable waiting time and viewed using any ordinary monitor (LCD/LED TV or computer screens) without any need for any expensive/exclusive high-dynamic-range displays.

  • 13.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Image Enhancement Combined with Reduction of X-Ray Dose During PCI-Operations2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Bergholm, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Camera-spectrometer for instantaneous multi- and hyperspectral imaging2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Bergholm, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Camera-spectrometer for multi- and hyperspectral imaging2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Moustafa, A.N.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Temperaturvariationsanalys för hudcancerscreening, Poster, Barncancerfondens tredje konferens2013In: Barncancerfondens tredje konferens: Medicinsk Teknik för Barn med Cancer, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här studien visar att det är möjligt att detektera tydliga temperaturskillnader mellan cancervävnad och frisk vävnad. Detta kan vara ett resultat av både angiogenes (processen som leder till nybildning av blodkärl från de minsta befintliga blodkärl) och ökad ämnesomsättning hos cancerceller (medan cancertumörer formas) jämfört med friska normala celler, som ändrar och ökar intensiteten av den termiska IR-strålningen inom cancervävnads områden. Temperaturförändringarna detekterades genom mätningar av termisk IR-strålning inom våglängdsområdet 8-14 μm. Intensiva experiment utfördes på möss med hudcancer. Cancerområdet hade i genomsitt 0.3 – 0.5 °C högre temperatur än de friska grannområdena. Både kvalitativa och kvantitativa statistiska metoder användes för att analysera dessa mätningar. Analysresultaten verifierar användbarheten av att mäta termisk IR-strålning för att kunna detektera hudcancerområden.

  • 17.
    Hjalmarson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Risk of Injury during home care work2010In: On the Road to Vision Zero?: Workers with high risk exposure, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Old peoples’ homes and bathrooms are sometimes also a workplace for nurses. Statistics show that the risk of injury and long‐term sick‐leave is high in this occupation. In a case study, 30 nurses from the Home Care Services of Haninge council, Sweden, performed different work tasks associated with assisting someone with their personal hygiene in the bathroom. The tests were performed in the full-scale laboratory of the CHB, in a bathroom equipped with a wall-mounted toilet, height‐ adjustable and equipped with support rails. The participating nurses were wearing a measurement system CUELA (‘computer-assisted recording and long-term analysis of musculoskeletal loads’) which together with video recordings made it possible to analyse the risk postures occuring. Postures including back flexion and rotation were regularly involved in the hygiene assisting tasks, but one specific sub-task indicated a high risk of traumatic overexertion or fall on the part of the care worker. The subtask when the nurse is assisting a person with balance or strength problems standing in front of the toilet, helping to pull up or down the trousers, combined a forward bending posture often more than 50º, while rotated with their balance affected, and, at the same time, with the person cared for in a position which highly affected his or hers stability. The typical assistive device applied to toilets are foldable armrests on one or both sides of the toilet, but it was found that for this sub‐task they affected the nurses’ posture in a negative way. A new and better solution for assistive technology in this particular task is needed.

  • 18.
    Ho, Johnson
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Investigation of the Dynamic Response Contribution of Vasculature in a 3D Finite Element Head Model2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19. Karltun, Anette
    et al.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Interactive research promoting a systems perspective in improving the work situation of 15,000 postmen2008In: Proceedings of the Nordic Ergonomics Society Annual Conference NES 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20. Karltun, Anette
    et al.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    Lindbeck, Lars
    Developing a systems view of butchers' problematic work situation2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Biomechanics of sports head injury and helmet design2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Cycle helmets2011In: IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury & Illness in Sports: Sports helmets now and in the future, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Förståelse för biomekaniken bakom traumatiska skallskador genom finit element modellering av det mänskliga huvudet2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Förståelsen för biomekaniken bakom traumatiska skallskador genom finit elementmodelleing av det mänskliga huvudet2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of Anatomical Features and Modelling Strategies in Traumatic Brain Injury Prediction2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of Anatomical Features and Modelling Strategies in Traumatic Brain Injury Prediction2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Mathematical models used in TBI2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, head injuries causes about 78% of the deaths in motor vehicle accidents. The total annual rate of head injuries in Sweden over the last 14 years is also relatively constant. Thus, in spite of several national preventive strategies, there has not been an important impact on the total burden of head injury. Neurotrauma is the physical damage that results when the human skull and brain are suddenly subjected to intolerable levels of energy that is usually transmitted mechanically. Most of the research in the injury prevention area was initiated by the military aircraft industry in the sixties and seventies. Today the research is to a greater extent sponsored by the car manufacturing industry, partly as a result of the demands from the customers and the media. However, there is a long way to go before a complete understanding of the pathophysiological events following an accident is reached. This paper primarily focuses on summarizing current efforts, and to outline future strategies in human head injury modeling. Although the finite element (FE) modeling of the human head has been advancing over the past decades, it is still far from being able to explain all brain injury mechanisms and predict all types of impact injuries. However, using proper material characterization, correct boundary conditions and detailed geometric representation, a finite element model of the human head can provide us a powerful tool. A detailed and parameterized FE model of the adult human head is presented. It includes the scalp, skull, brain, meninges, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and eleven pairs of bridging veins. Separate representations of gray and white matter, and inclusion of the ventricles were also implemented. Non-linear and viscoelastic models are derived for the central nervous system (CNS) and meninges and the importance for injury prediction is outlined. The fluids were modelled using an Eulerian FE formulation, and constrains between fluids and solids were defined. Proposed injury measures for the CNS are also evaluated. Application of the FE head model to reconstructions of real head injury cases will also be discussed.

  • 28.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Ny diagnostisk bildmetod för analys av händelseförloppet2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    The biomechanics of ‘real’ head protection: New thoughts on preventing TBI2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Kleiven, Svein
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Johnson, Ho
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Sandler, Håkan
    Rättsmedicinalverket, Uppsala universitet.
    Finite Element Methodology and infant skull fracture: accident or abuse ?2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Larsson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Winter, Reidar
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    A novel technique to visualize target specific polymeric contrast agents2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Larsson, Matilda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Verbrugghe, Peter
    KU Leuven.
    Smoljkić, Marija
    KU Leuven.
    Heyde, Brecht
    KU Leuven.
    Famaey, Nele
    KU Leuven.
    Herijgers, Paul
    KU Leuven.
    D'hooge, Jan
    KU Leuven.
    Assessment of longitudinal strain in the Carotid artery wall using ultrasound-based Speckle tracking - validation in a sheep model2013In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Ultrasonics symposium, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of strain in the longitudinal direction of the arterial wall has been suggested to improve the evaluation of arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis. Recently, we showed the feasibility of ultrasound speckle tracking to assess carotid longitudinal strain in-silico and in-vitro. However, validation in the more challenging in-vivo setting is still lacking. The aim of this study was to validate longitudinal strain assessment in the common carotid artery (CCA) in an animal setup. The left CCAs of five sheep were exposed during Isoflurane anesthesia and sonomicrometry crystals were sutured onto the artery wall to obtain reference longitudinal strain. Ultrasound long-axis images were recorded at baseline and hypertension (Phenylephrine) and an in-house speckle tracking algorithm was applied to estimate longitudinal strain. The estimated strain curves varied cyclically throughout the cardiac cycles, showing a lengthening of the arterial segment in systole. A significant correlation between peak systolic estimated and reference strain was found (r=0.95, p < 0.001). The results indicate the feasibility of arterial longitudinal strain assessment in-vivo using ultrasound speckle tracking.

  • 33.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Pineiro, Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Clinical Innovation Fellowship: an innovation / education initiative for medtech2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, highly based on collaboration betweenstakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. Key areas of development are; overallprinciples of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation process as educationand practice, needs in healthcare & medtech industry.This paper presents a Swedish initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, which is highly based oncollaboration between stakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. The goal of this post-graduate education in clinic-centered innovation is to contribute to the development of a regional medical device cluster, toeducate the health care and medical device innovators and leaders for the future and to develop technical and organizational tools and solutions for the participating clinics.A few years ago some individuals at the Center for Technology, Medicine and Health, CTMH, got in contact with theStanford Biodesign Innovation program. Since the need for collaboration across boundaries and silos had been identified there was almost an instant initiative to try this model in Sweden. A dedicated effort to get funding and buildingresearch capacity started in parallel. A joint project for designing and developing a Swedish variation of the programwas set up.The paper presents examples of an existing innovation research education program at Stanford University and thenthe Swedish initiative that starts in the fall of 2010. Then issues and key areas of interest that have been identified indevelopment of the Swedish initiative are presented.These are; overall principles of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation processas education and practive, and finally particular needs in Swedish health care and medical technology industry. Animportant difference between the programs at Stanford and Stockholm is the inclusion in the Swedish initiative of theorganizational issues faced by the clinics. These issues are exemplified with leadership and management theoriesidentifying health care as a technology intensive and safety critical socio-technical system. Finally these key areas of interest are then consolidated in designing the overall approach to the Swedish initiative and the curriculum in the fellowsspecialized training.The paper reports findings from an ongoing research project whose aim is to identify obstacles and success factorsfor initiating such an initiative within Swedish university and healthcare structures. The research project also aims toevaluate at least three cycles of the program.

  • 34.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Digitala larmsystemets möjligheter och hinder2014In: Samverkan för Hälsa, Vård och Omsorg, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Comfort temperatures and operative temperatures in an office with different heating methods2006In: Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings Conference: Vol. 2: Indoor Climate, 2006, Vol. 2, p. 47-52Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Energy savings and thermal comfort with ventilation radiators: a dynamic heating and ventilation system2007In: Proceedings of Clima 2007 WellBeing Indoors, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies indicate that a high ventilation rate with fresh air supply directly from outdoors gives better thermal comfort conditions, less SBS (Sick Building Syndrome) symptoms and increased work productivity. The drawbacks with a high ventilation rate in natural or exhaust ventilated buildings are normally increased energy use for heating and cold air draught. Such problems may be minimized with ventilation radiators, radiators where cold ventilation air is brought directly from outdoors through a wall channel into the radiator where it is heated before entering the room.

    This paper discusses advantages with ventilation radiators in comparison to those of traditional heating systems. Focus has been on energy aspects and thermal comfort. The main conclusions are that ventilation radiators may give a stable and uniform thermal indoor climate. The high thermal gradient between cold ventilation air and the radiator surface inside the ventilation channel also makes the ventilation radiator more efficient than other systems. A method to vary indoor climate on a daily basis according to where people stay is proposed for additional energy savings with ventilation radiators. The deductions were based on results from CFD simulations in a well validated office model.

  • 37.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Thermal comfort with low temperature heating2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Rose, Linda M.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Ergonomics and its Consequences for Businesses2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As ergonomists, for many of us, a driving force is to improve work environments to “do good”:  to reduce risks for injury and human suffering, improve working conditions and support human well-being. This motivation is in accordance with the first of the two objectives of ergonomics as in the IEA definition – ‘…to optimize human well-being and overall system performance”. However, ‘doing good’ in this sense can be difficult. A challenging task we face as ergonomists is to motivate work site improvements within a business environment that is focused on the second objective of ergonomics, overall system performance. Thus, the art of ergonomics lies in balancing the two – in addressing individual wellbeing as well as the broader goals of system performance. As part of this balancing act, displaying financial impacts of ergonomics plays an important role and is therefore the focus of this key-note.

    In all business activity decision makers have to choose between different investment options. For investments that can improve ergonomics, the full economic benefits are often difficult to quantify. Such benefits are associated with reduced costs related to non-optimal work environment. Visible costs, such as direct costs for absenteeism, are quite easily measured while hidden costs, related to business key parameters, such as productivity and quality issues, are often complex, contextually dependent and difficult to estimate. However, these issues are vital for organizations and such costs, which directly affect the company’s competitiveness, are often many times greater than the visible costs.  If decision makers only are aware of the direct financial impact of investments they may prioritize solutions that are not optimal neither for organizational performance and business results nor for the work environment and health of the employees. In extreme cases this can jeopardize the company’s future.

    So, what is needed for informed decision-making?  First, awareness that ergonomics also influences core business parameters and organizational performance is needed. Second, there is a need for user-friendly assessment tools to estimate the financial effects associated with workplace ergonomics. In the presentation a survey of existing assessment tools and methods is presented. Reasons why these tools aren’t more widely used are discussed.

    There is an increased call from companies for assessment tools that companies can use in their operational management to motivate and carry out ergonomic improvements. This is partly due to the need to form business cases to motivate investments. There is also an increased awareness from company management, who recognize that improved working environments also lead to other positive effects for the company. Increasingly managers seek knowledge for informed decision making, for example when prioritizing between work environment improvements and strategic corporate decisions.  The assessment tools can be used i) proactively in the design of production systems, which leads to advantages for the staff as well as for the company’s performance, ii) reactively to evaluate different scenarios to reduce work environment, productivity and quality problems and iii) strategically for promoting the company.

    So, what actions are needed to improve these assessment tools, increase their use of and make them a natural part in the company operational processes? In this presentation some research and development suggestions are given. These involve tool as well as organizational and process development.

    In summary, working towards improved tools and their usage in striving towards the twofold ergonomics objective involves many challenges, but strengthens the possibilities to be successful in “doing good”, for individuals and organizations, as well as for societies.

  • 39.
    Seoane, Fernando
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Ferreira, Javier
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Marquez, Juan Carlos
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås.
    Conductive Polymer Films as Textrodes for Biopotential Sensing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: After several years of progresses in textile technology and wearable measurement instrumentation, applications of wearable textile-electronics systems are arising providing a stable background for commercial applications. So far, the available commercial solutions are centered on fitness applications and mostly based in the acquisition of heart rate through Textile Electrodes (Textrodes) based on metallic threads or on conductive rubber compounds. Methods and Materials: In this work a novel material approach is presented to produce Textrodes for acquisition of Electrocardiographic (ECG) signals using a conductive polypropylene (PP1386 from Premix, Finland) polymer material. The polymer was film extruded into thin films, and used as such in the Textrode. Conductive Polymer Films (CPF) have been used to produce Textrodes, and its measurement performance has been compared with the ECG signals obtained with commercial Textrode fabrics and conventional Ag/AgCl electrodes. In order to set up the same measurement conditions, a chest strap tailored to host the testing electrodes has been used. Results: The close resemblance of the ECG acquired with the textile fabric electrodes, the Ag/AgCl electrodes and the PP1386 CPF electrodes suggest that the Polymer Electrodes PP1386 are a feasible alternative to the current textile fabrics that use silver thread as conductive material and also to conductive rubber material. Discussion & Conclusion: The availability of the Conductive Polymer Electrode PP1386 in a film form allows the manufacturing of electrodes by conventional textile processes, like lamination or sewing, therefore facilitating the transition from lab prototyping to industrial manufacturing. Replacing the traditional silver thread as conductive element in the fabrication of Textrodes will definitely reduce the material cost per Textrode. Biocompatibility issues and manufacturability issues must be addressed but the exhibited functional performance is showing encouraging results.

  • 40.
    Seoane, Fernando
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Rempfer, Markus
    University of Borås.
    Marquez, Juan Carlos
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Textile-enabled Instrumentation for Impedance Cardiographic Signals2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Dammed: Security, Risk and Resilience in Dams in Sub Arctica2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Focus Kallak-Gállok, Julevädno-Lule älv2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Från Alta till Gállok (Kallak): Perspektiv på urfolk, motstånd, rättigheter och mänsklig säkerhet i Arktis-Sameland2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Gruvor i Lule älv: Visioner och visualiseringar för hållbara framtider i Lule älvdal Jokkmokk2013Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 44 of 44
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