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  • 1.
    Aare, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Evaluation of head response to ballistic helmet impacts, using FEM2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Aare, Magnus
    et al.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Evaluation of head response to ballistic helmet impacts using the finite element method2007In: International Journal of Impact Engineering, ISSN 0734-743X, E-ISSN 1879-3509, Vol. 34, no 3, 596-608 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Injuries to the head caused by ballistic impacts are not well understood. Ballistic helmets provide good protection, but still, injuries to both the skull and brain occur. Today there is a lack of relevant test procedure to evaluate the efficiency of a ballistic helmet. The purpose of this project was (1) to study how different helmet shell stiffness affects the load levels in the human head during an impact, and (2) to study how different impact angles affects the load levels in the human head. A detailed finite element (FE) model of the human head, in combination with an FE model of a ballistic helmet (the US Personal Armour System Ground Troops' (PASGT) geometry) was used. The head model has previously been validated against several impact tests on cadavers. The helmet model was validated against data from shooting tests. Focus was aimed on getting a realistic response of the coupling between the helmet and the head and not on modeling the helmet in detail. The studied data from the FE simulations were stress in the cranial bone, strain in the brain tissue, pressure in the brain, change in rotational velocity and translational and rotational acceleration. A parametric study was performed to see the influence of a variation in helmet shell stiffness on the outputs from the model. The effect of different impact angles was also studied. Dynamic helmet shell deflections larger than the initial distance between the shell and the skull should be avoided in order to protect the head from the most injurious threat levels. It is more likely that a fracture of the skull bone occurs if the inside of the helmet shell strikes the skull. Oblique ballistic impacts may in some cases cause higher strains in the brain tissue than pure radial ones.

  • 3.
    Aare, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Proposed global injury thresholds for oblique helmet impacts2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Aare, Magnus
    et al.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Injuries from motorcycle- and moped crashes in Sweden from 1987 to 1999.2003In: Injury control and safety promotion, ISSN 1566-0974, E-ISSN 1744-4985, Vol. 10, no 3, 131-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to study injuries from motorcycle and moped crashes in Sweden from 1987 to 1999. Databases at the National Board for Health and Welfare and codes from both ICD9 and ICD10 systems were used, including patterns of age, gender, E-code and type of injury. Length of hospital stay, type of injuries and trends over time was evaluated. To get a more detailed picture of the age distribution, type of vehicle used and number of killed, data from the Swedish National Road Administration were also used. In Sweden, 27,122 individuals received in-patient care due to motorcycle and moped injuries between 1987 and 1999. The motorcycle and moped injury rate was reduced in the second half of the studied period and so were the total days of treatment per year. Males had eight times the incidence of injuries compared to females. Riders under the age of 26 and in particular those at an age of 15 had the highest incidence rate. Head injuries were the most frequent diagnosis, followed by fractures to the lower limbs. Concussion was the most frequent head injury. Focal and diffuse brain injuries combined showed the same frequency as concussion. It is concluded that more preventative strategies must be presented before the injury rate can be reduced.

  • 5. Aberg, A. C.
    et al.
    Thorstensson, A.
    Tarassova, O.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Calculations of mechanisms for balance control during narrow and single-leg standing in fit older adults: A reliability study2011In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 34, no 3, 352-357 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For older people balance control in standing is critical for performance of activities of daily living without falling. The aims were to investigate reliability of quantification of the usage of the two balance mechanisms M(1) 'moving the centre of pressure' and M(2) 'Segment acceleration' and also to compare calculation methods based on a combination of kinetic (K) and kinematic (Km) data, (K-Km), or Km data only concerning M(2). For this purpose nine physically fit persons aged 70-78 years were tested in narrow and single-leg standing. Data were collected by a 7-camera motion capture system and two force plates. Repeated measure ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests were used to detect differences between the standing tasks. Reliability was estimated by ICCs, standard error of measurement including its 95% Cl, and minimal detectable change, whereas Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to investigate agreement between the two calculation methods. The results indicated that for the tasks investigated, M(1) and M(2) can be measured with acceptable inter- and intrasession reliability, and that both Km and K-Km based calculations may be useful for M(2), although Km data may give slightly lower values. The proportional M(1) :M(2) usage was approximately 9:1, in both anterio-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) directions for narrow standing, and about 2:1 in the AP and of 1:2 in the ML direction in single-leg standing, respectively. In conclusion, the tested measurements and calculations appear to constitute a reliable way of quantifying one important aspect of balance capacity in fit older people.

  • 6. Aberg, B
    et al.
    Koul, B L
    Liska, J
    Brodin, L A
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Landou, C
    Delayed left ventricular free wall rupture complicating coronary artery bypass surgery. A case report.1985In: Scandinavian journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery, ISSN 0036-5580, Vol. 19, no 3, 273-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rupture of the left ventricular free wall is a not uncommon life-threatening complication of acute myocardial infarction and after prosthetic mitral valve replacement. To our knowledge, no case of left ventricular rupture after coronary artery bypass surgery has been reported. A case is now described in which coronary artery bypass grafting was complicated by delayed rupture, which was successfully repaired. Different etiologic factors are discussed, but the cause considered most likely was trauma from elevation of and traction on the heart in exposure of its posterior aspect.

  • 7.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Anund, A.
    Fors, C.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Association of drivers’ sleepiness with heart rate variability: A pilot study with drivers on real roads2017In: EMBEC & NBC 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 65, 149-152 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vehicle crashes lead to huge economic and social consequences, and one non-negligible cause of accident is driver sleepiness. Driver sleepiness analysis based on the monitoring of vehicle acceleration, steering and deviation from the road or physiological and behavioral monitoring of the driver, e.g., monitoring of yawning, head pose, eye blinks and eye closures, electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromyogram and electrocardiogram (ECG), have been used as a part of sleepiness alert systems. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a potential method for monitoring of driver sleepiness. Despite previous positive reports from the use of HRV for sleepiness detection, results are often inconsistent between studies. In this work, we have re-evaluated the feasibility of using HRV for detecting drivers’ sleepiness during real road driving. A database consists of ECG measurements from 10 drivers, driving during morning, afternoon and night sessions on real road were used. Drivers have reported their average sleepiness level by using the Karolinska sleepiness scale once every five minutes. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the potential of HRV indexes to distinguish between alert, first signs of sleepiness and severe sleepiness states. The results suggest that individual subjects show different reactions to sleepiness, which produces an individual change in HRV indicators. The results motivate future work for more personalized approaches in sleepiness detection.

  • 8.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Berndtsson, Andreas
    Abtahi, Shirin
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Development and preliminary evaluation of an Android based heart rate variability biofeedback system2014In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, 3382-3385 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reduced Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is believed to be associated with several diseases such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). In these cases, HRV biofeedback may be a potential intervention method to increase HRV which in turn is beneficial to these patients. In this work, a real-time Android biofeedback application based on a Bluetooth enabled ECG and thoracic electrical bioimpedance (respiration) measurement device has been developed. The system performance and usability have been evaluated in a brief study with eight healthy volunteers. The result demonstrates real-time performance of system and positive effects of biofeedback training session by increased HRV and reduced heart rate. Further development of the application and training protocol is ongoing to investigate duration of training session to find an optimum length and interval of biofeedback sessions to use in potential interventions.

  • 9.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Patient Safety (Closed 20130701).
    Gyllensten, Illapha Cuba
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Software tool for analysis of breathing-related errors in transthoracic electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements2012In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 407, no 1, 012028- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) has been applied in a range of different applications and mainly using the frequency sweep-technique. Traditionally the tissue under study is considered to be timeinvariant and dynamic changes of tissue activity are ignored and instead treated as a noise source. This assumption has not been adequately tested and could have a negative impact and limit the accuracy for impedance monitoring systems. In order to successfully use frequency-sweeping EBIS for monitoring time-variant systems, it is paramount to study the effect of frequency-sweep delay on Cole Model-based analysis. In this work, we present a software tool that can be used to simulate the influence of respiration activity in frequency-sweep EBIS measurements of the human thorax and analyse the effects of the different error sources. Preliminary results indicate that the deviation on the EBIS measurement might be significant at any frequency, and especially in the impedance plane. Therefore the impact on Cole-model analysis might be different depending on method applied for Cole parameter estimation.

  • 10.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Ji, Guangchao
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Rodby, Kristian
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    A knitted garment using intarsia technique for Heart Rate Variability biofeedback: Evaluation of initial prototype2015In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE , 2015, Vol. 2015, 3121-3124 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback is a method based on paced breathing at specific rate called resonance frequency by giving online feedbacks from user respiration and its effect on HRV. Since the HRV is also influence by different factors like stress and emotions, stress related to an unfamiliar measurement device, cables and skin electrodes may cover the underling effect of such kind of intervention. Wearable systems are usually considered as intuitive solutions which are more familiar to the end-user and can help to improve usability and hence reducing the stress. In this work, a prototype of a knitted garment using intarsia technique is developed and evaluated. Results show the satisfactory level of quality for Electrocardiogram and thoracic electrical bioimpedance i.e. for respiration monitoring as a part of HRV biofeedback system. Using intarsia technique and conductive yarn for making the connection instead of cables will reduce the complexity of fabrication in textile production and hence reduce the final costs in a final commercial product. Further development of garment and Android application is ongoing and usability and efficiency of final prototype will be evaluated in detail.

  • 11.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Aslamy, Benjamin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Boujabir, Imaneh
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    An Affordable ECG and Respiration Monitoring System Based on Raspberry PI and ADAS1000: First Step towards Homecare Applications2015In: 16th Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering: 16. NBC & 10. MTD 2014 joint conferences. October 14-16, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden, Springer, 2015, 5-8 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homecare is a potential solution for problems associated with an aging population. This may involve several physiological measurements, and hence a flexible but affordable measurement device is needed. In this work, we have designed an ADAS1000-based four-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration monitoring system. It has been implemented using Raspberry PI as a platform for homecare applications. ADuM chips based on iCoupler technology have been used to achieve electrical isolation as required by IEC 60601 and IEC 60950 for patient safety. The result proved the potential of Raspberry PI for the design of a compact, affordable, and medically safe measurement device. Further work involves developing a more flexible software for collecting measurements from different devices (measuring, e.g., blood pressure, weight, impedance spectroscopy, blood glucose) through Bluetooth or user input and integrating them into a cloud-based homecare system.

  • 12.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Dizon, M
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Johansson, M
    KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering. Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Evaluating Atrial Fibrillation Detection Algorithm based on Heart Rate Variability analysis2015In: Medicinteknikdagarna, Uppsala: Svensk förening för medicinsk teknik och fysik , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy in time-variant systems: Is undersampling always a problem?2014In: Journal of Electrical Bioimpedance, ISSN 1891-5469, Vol. 5, no 1, 28-33 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) has been applied mainly by using the frequency-sweep technique, across a range of many different applications. Traditionally, the tissue under study is considered to be time-invariant and dynamic changes of tissue activity are ignored by treating the changes as a noise source. A new trend in EBIS is simultaneous electrical stimulation with several frequencies, through the application of a multi-sine, rectangular or other waveform. This method can provide measurements fast enough to sample dynamic changes of different tissues, such as cardiac muscle. This high sampling rate comes at a price of reduction in SNR and the increase in complexity of devices. Although the frequency-sweep technique is often inadequate for monitoring the dynamic changes in a variant system, it can be used successfully in applications focused on the time-invariant or slowly-variant part of a system. However, in order to successfully use frequency-sweep EBIS for monitoring time-variant systems, it is paramount to consider the effects of aliasing and especially the folding of higher frequencies, on the desired frequency e.g. DC level. This paper discusses sub-Nyquist sampling of thoracic EBIS measurements and its application in the case of monitoring pulmonary oedema. It is concluded that by considering aliasing, and with proper implementation of smoothing filters, as well as by using random sampling, frequency-sweep EBIS can be used for assessing time-invariant or slowly-variant properties of time-variant biological systems, even in the presence of aliasing. In general, undersampling is not always a problem, but does always require proper consideration.

  • 14.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Löfgren, Nils
    Elimination of ECG Artefacts in Foetal EEG Using Ensemble Average Subtraction and Wavelet Denoising Methods: A Simulation2014In: XIII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing 2013, Springer, 2014, 551-554 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological signals recorded from surface electrodes contain interference from other signals which are not desired and should be considered as noise. Heart activity is especially present in EEG and EMG recordings as a noise. In this work, two ECG elimination methods are implemented; ensemble average subtraction (EAS) and wavelet denoising methods. Comparison of these methods has been done by use of simulated signals achieved by adding ECG to neonates EEG. The result shows successful elimination of ECG artifacts by using both methods. In general EAS method which remove estimate of all ECG components from signal is more trustable but it is also harder for implementation due to sensitivity to noise. It is also concluded that EAS behaves like a high-pass filter while wavelet denoising method acts as low-pass filter and hence the choice of one method depends on application.

  • 15.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Snäll, Jonatan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Aslamy, Benjamin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Abtahi, Shirin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. University of Boras, Sweden.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Biosignal PI, an Affordable Open-Source ECG and Respiration Measurement System2014In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 15, no 1, 93-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioimedical pilot projects e.g., telemedicine, homecare, animal and human trials usually involve several physiological measurements. Technical development of these projects is time consuming and in particular costly. A versatile but affordable biosignal measurement platform can help to reduce time and risk while keeping the focus on the important goal and making an efficient use of resources. In this work, an affordable and open source platform for development of physiological signals is proposed. As a first step an 8–12 leads electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration monitoring system is developed. Chips based on iCoupler technology have been used to achieve electrical isolation as required by IEC 60601 for patient safety. The result shows the potential of this platform as a base for prototyping compact, affordable, and medically safe measurement systems. Further work involves both hardware and software development to develop modules. These modules may require development of front-ends for other biosignals or just collect data wirelessly from different devices e.g., blood pressure, weight, bioimpedance spectrum, blood glucose, e.g., through Bluetooth. All design and development documents, files and source codes will be available for non-commercial use through project website, BiosignalPI.org.

  • 16. Ahlstrom, L.
    et al.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hagberg, M.
    Ahlberg, K.
    Women with Neck Pain on Long-Term Sick Leave — Approaches Used in the Return to Work Process: A Qualitative Study2016In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, 1-14 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose There are difficulties in the process of return to work (RTW) from long-term sick leave, both in general and regarding sick leave because of neck pain in particular. Neck pain is difficult to assess, problematic to rehabilitate, and hard to cure; and it is not always easy to decide whether the pain is work-related. The outcome of RTW could be dependent upon individuals’ approaches, defensive or offensive behaviors, and choices related to their self-efficacy. The aim of this study was to identify approaches used in the RTW process among women with neck pain on long-term sick leave from human service organizations. Methods This is a qualitative descriptive study based on grounded theory. A Swedish cohort of 207 women with a history of long-term sick leave with neck pain from human service organizations answered open-ended written questions at 0, 6, and 12 months, and 6 years; and 16 women were interviewed. Results Individuals expressed their coping approaches in terms of fluctuating in work status over time: either as a strategy or as a consequence. Periods of sick leave were interwoven with periods of work. The women were either controlling the interaction or struggling in the interaction with stakeholders. Conclusions Return to work outcomes may be improved if the fluctuating work status over time is taken into account in the design of rehabilitation efforts for women with a history of long-term sick leave and with chronical musculoskeletal conditions.

  • 17.
    Ahlstrom, L
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Akademin.
    Hagberg, M
    Sahlgrenska Akademin.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Workplace Rehabilitation and Supportive Conditions at Work: A Prospective Study2013In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 23, no 2, 248-260 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To investigate the impact of rehabilitation measures on work ability and return to work (RTW), specifically the association between workplace rehabilitation/supportive conditions at work and work ability and RTW over time, among women on long-term sick leave. Methods Questionnaire data were collected (baseline, 6 and 12 months) from a cohort of women (n = 324). Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of work ability index (WAI), work ability score and working degree. These analyses were performed with different models; the explanatory variables for each model were workplace rehabilitation, supportive conditions at work and time. Results The individuals provided with workplace rehabilitation and supportive conditions (e.g. influence at work, possibilities for development, degree of freedom at work, meaning of work, quality of leadership, social support, sense of community and work satisfaction) had significantly increased WAI and work ability score over time. These individuals scored higher work ability compared to those individuals having workplace rehabilitation without supportive conditions, or neither. Additionally, among the individuals provided with workplace rehabilitation and supportive conditions, working degree increased significantly more over time compared to those individuals with no workplace rehabilitation and no supportive conditions. Conclusion The results highlight the importance of integrating workplace rehabilitation with supportive conditions at work in order to increase work ability and improve the RTW process for women on long-term sick leave.

  • 18. Ahmed, Mona
    et al.
    Cerroni, Barbara
    Razuvaev, Anton
    Härmark, Johan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Gustafsson, Bjorn
    Cellular Uptake of Plain and SPION-Modified Microbubbles for Potential Use in Molecular Imaging2017In: Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering, ISSN 1865-5025, E-ISSN 1865-5033, Vol. 10, no 6, 537-548 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both diagnostic ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) accuracy can be improved by using contrast enhancement. For US gas-filled microbubbles (MBs) or silica nanoparticles (SiNPs), and for MRI superparamagnetic or paramagnetic agents, contribute to this. However, interactions of MBs with the vascular wall and cells are not fully known for all contrast media. We studied the in vitro interactions between three types of non-targeted air-filled MBs with a polyvinyl-alcohol shell and murine macrophages or endothelial cells. The three MB types were plain MBs and two types that were labelled (internally and externally) with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for US/MRI bimodality. Cells were incubated with MBs and imaged by microscopy to evaluate uptake and adhesion. Interactions were quantified and the MB internalization was confirmed by fluorescence quenching of non-internalized MBs. Macrophages internalized each MB type within different time frames: plain MBs 6 h, externally labelled MBs 25 min and internally labelled MBs 2 h. An average of 0.14 externally labelled MBs per cell were internalized after 30 min and 1.34 after 2 h; which was 113% more MBs than the number of internalized internally labelled MBs. The macrophages engulfed these three differently modified new MBs at various rate, whereas endothelial cells did not engulf MBs. Polyvinyl-alcohol MBs are not taken up by endothelial cells. The MB uptake by macrophages is promoted by SPION labelling, in particular external such, which may be important for macrophage targeting.

  • 19. Ahmed, Zara
    et al.
    Benque, David
    Berezin, Sergey
    Dahl, Anna Caroline E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Fisher, Jasmin
    Hall, Benjamin A.
    Ishtiaq, Samin
    Nanavati, Jay
    Piterman, Nir
    Riechert, Maik
    Skoblov, Nikita
    Bringing LTL Model Checking to Biologists2017In: VMCAI 2017: Verification, Model Checking, and Abstract Interpretation / [ed] Bouajjani, A Monniaux, D, Springer, 2017, Vol. 10145, 1-13 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The BioModelAnalyzer (BMA) is a web based tool for the development of discrete models of biological systems. Through a graphical user interface, it allows rapid development of complex models of gene and protein interaction networks and stability analysis without requiring users to be proficient computer programmers. Whilst stability is a useful specification for testing many systems, testing temporal specifications in BMA presently requires the user to perform simulations. Here we describe the LTL module, which includes a graphical and natural language interfaces to testing LTL queries. The graphical interface allows for graphical construction of the queries and presents results visually in keeping with the current style of BMA. The Natural language interface complements the graphical interface by allowing a gentler introduction to formal logic and exposing educational resources.

  • 20. Aili, K.
    et al.
    Nyman, Teresia
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Hillert, L.
    Svartengren, M.
    Sleep disturbances predict future sickness absence among individuals with lower back or neck-shoulder pain: A 5-year prospective study2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 3, 315-323 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of sickness absence. Sleep disturbances are often co-occurring with pain, but the relationship between sleep and pain is complex. Little is known about the importance of self-reported sleep, when predicting sickness absence among persons with musculoskeletal pain. This study aims to study the association between self-reported sleep quality and sickness absence 5 years later, among individuals stratified by presence of lower back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP). Methods: The cohort (n = 2286) in this 5-year prospective study (using data from the MUSIC-Norrtälje study) was stratified by self-reported pain into three groups: no LBP or NSP, solely LBP or NSP, and oncurrent LBP and NSP. Odds ratios (ORs) for the effect of self-reported sleep disturbances at baseline on sickness absence (> 14 consecutive days), 5 years later, were calculated. Results: Within all three pain strata, individuals reporting the most sleep problems showed a significantly higher OR for all-cause sickness absence, 5 years later. The group with the most pronounced sleep problems within the concurrent LBP and NSP stratum had a significantly higher OR (OR 2.00; CI 1.09-3.67) also for long-term sickness absence (> 90days) 5 years later, compared to the group with the best sleep. Conclusions: Sleep disturbances predict sickness absence among individuals regardless of co-existing features of LBP and/or NSP. The clinical evaluation of patients should take possible sleep disturbances into account in the planning of treatments.

  • 21.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX, US.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A novel data-mining approach leveraging social media to monitor and respond to outcomes of diabetes drugs and treatment2013In: 2013 IEEE Point-of-Care Healthcare Technologies (PHT), New York: IEEE , 2013, 264-266 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data-mining method was developed to gauge the experiences of medical devices and drugs by patients with diabetes mellitus. Self-organizing maps were used to analyze forum posts numerically to better understand user opinion of medical devices and drugs. The end-result is a word list compilation that correlates certain positive and negative word cluster groups with medical drugs and devices. The implication of this novel data-mining method could open new avenues of research into rapid data collection, feedback, and analysis that would enable improved outcomes and solutions for public health.

  • 22.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A Novel Data-Mining Approach Leveraging Social Media to Monitor Consumer Opinion of Sitagliptin2015In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 19, no 1, 389-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data mining method was developed to gauge the experience of the drug Sitagliptin (trade name Januvia) by patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. To this goal, we devised a two-step analysis framework. Initial exploratory analysis using self-organizing maps was performed to determine structures based on user opinions among the forum posts. The results were a compilation of user's clusters and their correlated (positive or negative) opinion of the drug. Subsequent modeling using network analysis methods was used to determine influential users among the forum members. These findings can open new avenues of research into rapid data collection, feedback, and analysis that can enable improved outcomes and solutions for public health and important feedback for the manufacturer.

  • 23.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A novel data-mining platform leveraging social media to monitor outcomes of Januvia2013In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, 7484-7487 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data-mining method was developed to gauge the experiences of the diabetes mellitus drug Januvia. Self-organizing maps were used to analyze forum posts numerically to infer user opinion of drug Januvia. Graph theory was used to discover influential users. The result is a word list compilation correlating positive and negative word cluster groups and a web of influential users on Januvia. The implications could open new research avenues into rapid data collection, feedback, and analysis that would enable improved solutions for public health.

  • 24.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, A
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Network-Based Modeling and Intelligent Data Mining of Social Media for Improving Care2015In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 19, no 1, 210-218 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligently extracting knowledge from social media has recently attracted great interest from the Biomedical and Health Informatics community to simultaneously improve healthcare outcomes and reduce costs using consumer-generated opinion. We propose a two-step analysis framework that focuses on positive and negative sentiment, as well as the side effects of treatment, in users' forum posts, and identifies user communities (modules) and influential users for the purpose of ascertaining user opinion of cancer treatment. We used a self-organizing map to analyze word frequency data derived from users' forum posts. We then introduced a novel network-based approach for modeling users' forum interactions and employed a network partitioning method based on optimizing a stability quality measure. This allowed us to determine consumer opinion and identify influential users within the retrieved modules using information derived from both word-frequency data and network-based properties. Our approach can expand research into intelligently mining social media data for consumer opinion of various treatments to provide rapid, up-to-date information for the pharmaceutical industry, hospitals, and medical staff, on the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of future treatments.

  • 25.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A Novel-Data Mining Platform to Monitor the Outcomes of Erlontinib (Tarceva) using Social Media2014In: XIII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing 2013, Springer, 2014, 1394-1397 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data-mining method was developed to gauge the experiences of the oncology drug Tarceva. Self-organizing maps were used to analyze forum posts numerically to infer user opinion of drug Tarceva. The result is a word list compilation correlating positive and negative word cluster groups and a web of influential users on Tarceva. The implica-tions could open new research avenues into rapid data collec-tion, feedback, and analysis that would enable improved solu-tions for public health.

  • 26.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Assessing Antidepressants Using Intelligent Data Monitoring and Mining of Online Fora2016In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 20, no 4, 977-986 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression is a global health concern. Social networks allow the affected population to share their experiences. These experiences, when mined, extracted, and analyzed, can be converted into either warnings to recall drugs (dangerous side effects), or service improvement (interventions, treatment options) based on observations derived from user behavior in depression-related social networks. Our aim was to develop a weighted network model to represent user activity on social health networks. This enabled us to accurately represent user interactions by relying on the data's semantic content. Our three-step method uses the weighted network model to represent user's activity, and network clustering and module analysis to characterize user interactions and extract further knowledge from user's posts. The network's topological properties reflect user activity such as posts' general topic as well as timing, while weighted edges reflect the posts semantic content and similarities among posts. The result, a synthesis from word data frequency, statistical analysis of module content, and the modeled health network's properties, has allowed us to gain insight into consumer sentiment of antidepressants. This approach will allow all parties to participate in improving future health solutions of patients suffering from depression.

  • 27.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    University of Houston, Biomedical Engineering.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Mining Social Media Big Data for Health2015In: IEEE PulseArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in information technology (IT) and big data are affecting nearly every facet of the public and private sectors. Social media platforms are one example of such advances: its nature allows users to connect, collaborate, and debate on any topic with comparative ease. The result is a hefty volume of user-generated content that, if properly mined and analyzed, could help the public and private health care sectors improve the quality of their products and services while reducing costs. The users of these platforms are the key to these improvements, as their valuable feedback will help improve health solutions.

  • 28. Albrecht, Stefano V.
    et al.
    Beck, J. Christopher
    Buckeridge, David L.
    Botea, Adi
    Caragea, Cornelia
    Chi, Chi-hung
    Damoulas, Theodoros
    Dilkina, Bistra
    Eaton, Eric
    Fazli, Pooyan
    Ganzfried, Sam
    Giles, C. Lee
    Guillet, Sebastien
    Holte, Robert
    Hutter, Frank
    Koch, Thorsten
    Leonetti, Matteo
    Lindauer, Marius
    Machado, Marlos C.
    Malitsky, Yuri
    Marcus, Gary
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Rossi, Francesca
    Shaban-Nejad, Arash
    Thiebaux, Sylvie
    Veloso, Manuela
    Walsh, Toby
    Wang, Can
    Zhang, Jie
    Zheng, Yu
    Reports on the 2015 AAAI Workshop Series2015In: The AI Magazine, ISSN 0738-4602, Vol. 36, no 2, 90-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AAAI's 2015 Workshop Program was held Sunday and Monday, January 25-26, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Austin Hotel in Austin, Texas, USA. The AAAI-15 workshop program included 16 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. Most workshops were held on a single day. The titles of the workshops included Algorithm Configuration; Artificial Intelligence and Ethics; Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; Artificial Intelligence for Cities; Artificial Intelligence for Transportation: Advice, Inter-activity, and Actor Modeling; Beyond the Turing Test; Computational Sustainability; Computer Poker and Imperfect Information; Incentive and Trust in E-Communities; Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots; Learning for General Competency in Video Games; Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; Planning, Search, and Optimization; Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; Trajectory-Based Behaviour Analytics; and World Wide Web and Public Health Intelligence.

  • 29. Alkner, B.
    et al.
    Norrbrand, Lena
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Tesch, P.
    Neuromuscular adaptations following 90 days bed rest with or without resistance exercise.2016In: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, ISSN 2375-6322, Vol. 87, no 7, 610-617 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Almén, Lena
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Design Measures for Construction Site Safety2012In: The Conference of the Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:Since the 1st of January 2009, all Clients in Sweden are required to appoint a Health and Safety Coordinator for the design and planning phase of their building projects. Telephone interviews were carried out with the Coordinators of 42 building projects during 2010. They were asked to give examples of occupational hazards in the projects and to report how these were handled in the design and planning phase. Trauma risks as well as MSD-risks were identified in the design and planning phase. The hazards were mostly generally described and seldomly taken care of by design changes.

  • 31.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Health and safety coordinators in building projects2014In: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, ISSN 2044-124X, Vol. 4, no 3, 251-263 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – In order to reduce the number of injuries on construction sites, a European Directive prescribes that the clients shall appoint safety and health coordinators in their projects. The purpose of this paper is to find out who are appointed to be health and safety coordinators for the design and planning phase and what they do in order to prevent injuries on sites. Design/methodology/approach – Since the 1st of January 2009, there shall be a coordinator for the design and planning phase in Swedish construction projects. Telephone interviews were made with the coordinators in 42 Swedish building projects.

    Findings – The coordinators’ education and experiences varied widely, as well as their descriptions of their duties: no duties, administration and active injury prevention. The coordinators who were classified as most active had at least one additional leading role in the projects. Research limitations/implications – The study is qualitative for an increased understanding, not a statistical reflection of the coordinator population.

    Practical implications – The legislation needs to clarify whether the early conceptual phase of the project is included in the coordinator’s commission and whether she/he is supposed to participate in identifying, assessing and reducing risks through design changes. These clarifications will have an influence on when the coordinator should be appointed and what competence she/he needs. Originality/value – The study increases the understanding of how the health and safety coordinators of the planning and projecting phase of building projects perceive their mission and what factors, according to them, have an influence on what they do.

  • 32.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project2010In: On the Road to Vision Zero?: Construction, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (71) Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project. Lena Almén, Tore J Larsson, (School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden) Work related injuries and diseases are more frequent among construction workers than the labour market in average. Thus, there is a need of more preventive work during the design and planning phase. Two building projects, both productions of new apartment buildings with a design and construct contractor, were studied. Unsafe conditions were identified by workers and managers at the construction sites. The unsafe conditions were presented to the designers and planners. They were asked to describe the correlated decisions during the design and planning phase; when they were taken, why and by whom.

    Influence from outside the company was related to the clients, the town planning department, laws, a trade association and to the design of building products. The managers at the construction sites did not get any information, from the designers and planners, of what occupational risks there were in any of the projects. The routines for how to identify and handle hazards in the designing and planning phase were not sufficient. Furthermore, the designers explained, that they did not have enough competence in construction methods to be able to foresee occupational consequences at the construction sites when they designed rare constructions. The designers and planners did not follow up occupational risks at any of the construction sites. In order to get a safer working environment at construction sites, the top managers in the building companies need to define the acceptable safety level and put the safety issue on the agenda for all employees in the company, along with quality, costs and time schedule. Safety need to be communicated with those outside the company who have an influence on the working environment, and included in contracts with consultants, subcontractors and suppliers.

  • 33.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Health and Safety Coordinators´Potential to Prevent Injuries on Construction Sites2012In: Working on Safety, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of occupational disease and serious injury in the building and construction industry is high. The earlier in the construction process, the greater are the possibilities to reduce hazards.

    According to the Swedish legislation, Architects and Design Engineers shall, within the framework of their assignment, ensure that aspects of health and safety are considered during the construction of a building as well as in the use of the finished building.

    Since the 1st of January 2009, Clients (natural or legal persons for whom projects are carried out) in Sweden are obliged to appoint a Health and Safety Coordinator for the design and planning of the building. The Coordinators must have the educational skills and experience needed to perform their duties.

    The aim of this study was to find out what persons are appointed to be coordinators, how they perceive their duties and, potentially, what could facilitate the Health and Safety Coordinators’ activities and construction site safety.

    Telephone interviews were carried out with 40 Health and Safety Coordinators for the design and planning phase of 42 building projects during 2010.

    The Coordinators education and experiences varied to a large degree. Their description of duties also varied greatly, from no duties, to administrative duties, to active injury prevention.

    According to the Coordinators, the following factors had a positive influence on their possibilities to act for injury prevention:

    • The Coordinator is appointed early in the process
    • The Coordinator has authority in the project
    • The Client prioritizes occupational safety
    • There is knowledge of construction methods in the design team
  • 34.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Influence of the Designer on the Risk of Falling from Heights and of Exposure to Excessive Workloads on two Contruction Sites2012In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 16, no 1, 2-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workers on construction sites are exposed to an excessive risk of being injured at work. This study identifies occupational hazards on two construction sites – hazards that were related to the design of the building – and undertakes an analysis of the basis upon which related design decisions were made.Risks of falling from heights were related to the shape of the building. Risks related to an excessive workload were related to the weight of building products and possibilities to use equipment to avoid manual transports.The hazards were discussed at focus group meetings. During these meetings, the participants showed an increased understanding of safety issues in the project, each other's views and difficulties, and their own ability to facilitate acceptable risk levels for others.Some hazards were not foreseen during the design and planning phase. According to the architects, their knowledge about construction methods was not sufficient to predict hazards related to the shape of the building.Other hazards were foreseen, though considered to be primarily the contractor's responsibility. Consultants in the design and planning phase, on behalf of the client, were focused on quality, time schedule and economy, more than on occupational safety. There were building products on the market which were designed to fulfil functional regulatory requirements and requests from consumers, but not sufficient enough to ensure that they could be handled without exposure to an excessive workload. The demands and routines in the project did not ensure that project-specific hazard information was given to the contractor. 

  • 35.
    Alsmo, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Causes of Poor Air Quality in Swedish Schools2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This literature survey distinguishes between building and other factors influencing air quality. It does not identify building factors sufficient to account for occupant complaints. It concludes that buildings are often blamed for adverse health effects without sufficient grounds. The risk is there will be too much focusing on the wrong underlying problem when remedying so-called sick buildings. The study shows the importance of ensuring that factors independent of the school building, including the choices of environments and activities, are important for the indoor environment.

  • 36. Alsmo, Thomas
    et al.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Sick buildings or not: Indoor air quality and health problems in schools2007In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 16, no 6, 548-555 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor indoor air in schools has become a wide-spread problem with serious effects on occupant health. Resultant costs can be considerable at both local and national government levels. These include absenteeism and rehabilitation as well as building alterations and even demolition and rebuilding. This project aims to show factors contributing to health problems in Swedish schools. It includes a literature survey and particle measurements taken during various activities. Due to the fact that today there is no standard for indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools, in this project we used the outdoor air surrounding the building as an indicator. Results showed that indoor school environments had high airborne pollution levels, to a degree that probably causes health problems for many people. Regarding IAQ, this project shows the importance of taking into consideration choices in activities and furnishing of the building.

  • 37.
    Alvarez, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Fahlstedt, Madelen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Importance of neck muscle tonus in head kinematics during pedestrian accidents2013In: 2013 IRCOBI Conference Proceedings - International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury, 2013, 747-761 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unprotected pedestrians are an exposed group in the rural traffic and the most vulnerable human body region is the head which is the source of many fatal injuries. This study was performed to gain a better understanding of the influence that the neck muscle tonus has on head kinematics during pedestrian accidents. This was done using a detailed whole body FE model and a detailed FE vehicle model. To determine the influence of the muscle tonus a series of simulations were performed where the vehicle speed, pedestrian posture and muscle tonus were varied. Since the human reaction time for muscle activation is in the order of the collision time, the pedestrian was assumed to be prepared for the oncoming vehicle in order to augment the possible influence of muscle tonus. From the simulations performed, kinematic data such as head rotations, trajectory and velocities were extracted for the whole collision event, as well as velocity and accelerations at head impact. These results show that muscle tonus can influence the head rotation during a vehicle collision and therefore alter the head impact orientation. The level of influence on head rotation was in general lower than when altering the struck leg forward and backward, but in the same order of magnitude for some cases. The influence on head accelerations was higher due to muscle tonus than posture in all cases.

  • 38.
    Alvarez, Victor S
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Importance of Windscreen Modelling Approach for Head Injury Prediction2016In: 2016 IRCOBI Conference Proceedings - International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the capability of two modelling approaches in capturing  both accelerations and deformations from head impacts, and to evaluate the effect of modelling approach on  brain injury prediction. The first approach is a so‐called smeared technique, in which the properties of the two  glass  sheets and  the intermediate  polyvinyl  butyral  (PVB) are  combined and  divided into  two  coinciding  shell layers, of which one can fracture. The second approach consists of three shell layers, representing the glass and  PVB,  separated by  the  distance of  their  thickness, using a non‐local  failure criterion  to initiate  fracture in  the  glass.  The  two  modelling  approaches  are  compared  to  impact  experiments  of  flat  circular  windscreens,  measuring  deformations  and  accelerations  as  well  as  accelerations  from  impacts  against  full  vehicle  windscreens.  They  are  also  used  to  study  head‐to‐windscreen  impacts  using  a  detailed  Finite  Element  (FE)  model,  varying  velocity,  impact  direction  and  impact  point.  Only  the  non‐local  failure  model  is  able  to  adequately  capture  both  the accelerations and  deformations  of an  impactor. The FE  head model  simulations  also reveal that the choice of modelling approach has a large effect on the both localisation of the strain in the  brain and the characteristics of the strain‐time curve, with a difference in peak strain between 8% and 40%.  

  • 39. Ambort, D.
    et al.
    Johansson, M.E.V.
    Gustafsson, J. K.
    Nilsson, Harriet E.
    Ermund, A.
    Johansson, B.R.
    Koeck, Philip J. B.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology (Closed 20130701).
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology (Closed 20130701).
    Hansson, G.C.
    Calcium and pH-dependent packing and release of the gel-forming MUC2 mucin2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 15, 5645-5650 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MUC2, the major colonic mucin, forms large polymers by N-terminal trimerization and C-terminal dimerization. Although the assembly process for MUC2 is established, it is not known how MUC2 is packed in the regulated secretory granulae of the goblet cell. When the N-terminal VWD1-D2-D'D3 domains (MUC2-N) were expressed in a goblet-like cell line, the protein was stored together with full-length MUC2. By mimicking the pH and calcium conditions of the secretory pathway we analyzed purified MUC2-N by gel filtration, density gradient centrifugation, and transmission electron microscopy. At pH 7.4 the MUC2-N trimer eluted as a single peak by gel filtration. At pH 6.2 with Ca2+ it formed large aggregates that did not enter the gel filtration column but were made visible after density gradient centrifugation. Electron microscopy studies revealed that the aggregates were composed of rings also observed in secretory granulae of colon tissue sections. TheMUC2-N aggregates were dissolved by removing Ca2+ and raising pH. After release from goblet cells, the unfolded full-length MUC2 formed stratified layers. These findings suggest a model for mucin packing in the granulae and the mechanism for mucin release, unfolding, and expansion.

  • 40. Amon, M
    et al.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    Kounalakis, S
    Kölegård, Roger
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology (Closed 20130701).
    Simpson, L
    MacDonald, I
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology (Closed 20130701).
    Mekjavic, IB
    Effect of hypoxia on postprandial blood glucose and insulin response2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41. Anand, N.
    et al.
    Meijer, D.
    van Duin, J. H. R.
    Tavasszy, L.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Validation of an agent based model using a participatory simulation gaming approach: The case of city logistics2016In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, ISSN 0968-090X, E-ISSN 1879-2359, Vol. 71, 489-499 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agent-based modeling is used for simulating the actions and interactions of autonomous entities aiming to assessing their effects on the system as a whole. At an abstract level, an agent-based model (ABM) is a representation of the many simple agents and interactions among them. The decision making of the agents is based on the rules given to them. In an ABM, the model output is the result of internal decision-making and may differ with alteration in the decision path. On the contrary, with the set of rules embedded in agents, their behavior is modeled to take a ‘certain action’ in a ‘certain situation’. It suggests that the internal decision making behavior of agents is truly responsible for the model output and thus it cannot be ignored while validating ABMs. This research article focuses on the validating agents’ behavior by evaluating decision-making processes of agents. For this purpose, we propose a validation framework based on a participatory simulation game. Using this framework we engage a human player (i.e. a domain stakeholder) to allow us to collect information about choices and validate the behavior of an individual agent. A proof-of-concept game is developed for a city logistics ABM to test the framework.

  • 42.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Work environment, Lean and Agriculture2014In: PROCEEDINGS: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management & 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference: Volume I + II, IEA Press , 2014, 661-666 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become the predominant management concept in industry, but its effect on the work environment is debated. Lean has now reached farms and garden nurseries. This paper aims to identify consequences for the physical and psychosocial work environment when Lean was applied in micro-businesses in the agricultural sector. Observations, a questionnaire and interviews were used as methods. It was concluded that the psychosocial work environment became more structured and less stressful. The physical work environment was partly improved by less transportation on the farm. However, consideration of the physical work environment was insufficient.

  • 43. Andersson, Marlene
    et al.
    Jia, Qiupin
    Abella, Ana
    Lee, Xiau-Yeen
    Landreh, Michael
    Purhonen, Pasi
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Tenje, Maria
    Robinson, Carol V.
    Meng, Qing
    Plaza, Gustavo R.
    Johansson, Jan
    Rising, Anna
    Biomimetic spinning of artificial spider silk from a chimeric minispidroin2017In: Nature Chemical Biology, ISSN 1552-4450, E-ISSN 1552-4469, Vol. 13, no 3, 262-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we present a chimeric recombinant spider silk protein (spidroin) whose aqueous solubility equals that of native spider silk dope and a spinning device that is based solely on aqueous buffers, shear forces and lowered pH. The process recapitulates the complex molecular mechanisms that dictate native spider silk spinning and is highly efficient; spidroin from one liter of bacterial shake-flask culture is enough to spin a kilometer of the hitherto toughest as-spun artificial spider silk fiber.

  • 44. Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Björkholm, Peter
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Johannisson, Pontus
    Johnsson, Christer
    Stigwall, Johan
    Södermalm, Svante
    MEMS-based inertial navigation instrumentation for high-dynamic applications2009In: COMS 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45. Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Romu, Thobias
    Karlsson, Anette
    Norén, Bengt
    Forsgren, Mikael F
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Image Processing and Visualization. Linköping University.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Almer, Sven
    Lundberg, Peter
    Borga, Magnus
    Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water-fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities

    METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS: CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION: CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type.

  • 46. Andrade, Pedro Amarante
    et al.
    Wistbacka, Greta
    Larsson, Hans
    Sodersten, Maria
    Hammarberg, Britta
    Simberg, Susanna
    Svec, Jan G.
    Granqvist, Svante
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    The Flow and Pressure Relationships in Different Tubes Commonly Used for Semi-occluded Vocal Tract Exercises2016In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 30, no 1, 36-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This experimental study investigated the back pressure (Pback) versus flow (U) relationship for 10 different tubes commonly used for semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, that is, eight straws of different lengths and diameters, a resonance tube, and a silicone tube similar to a Lax Vox tube. All tubes were assessed with the free end in air. The resonance tube and silicone tube were further assessed with the free end under water at the depths from 1 to 7 cm in steps of 1 cm. The results showed that relative changes in the diameter of straws affect Pback considerably more compared with the same amount of relative change in length. Additionally, once tubes are submerged into water, Pback needs to overcome the pressure generated by the water depth before flow can start. Under this condition, only a small increase in Pback was observed as the flow was increased. Therefore, the wider tubes submerged into water produced an almost constant Pback determined by the water depth, whereas the thinner straws in air produced relatively large changes to Pback as flow was changed. These differences may be taken advantage of when customizing exercises for different users and diagnoses and optimizing the therapy outcome.

  • 47.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    The importance of healthcare managers’ organizational preconditions and support resources for their appraisal of planned change and its outcomes2017In: Journal of Hospital Administration, ISSN 1927-6990, E-ISSN 1927-7008, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Healthcare managers are expected to lead and manage planned organizational change intended to improve healthcare process quality. However, their complex working conditions offer limited decision control, and healthcare managers often feel ill prepared and inadequately supported to perform their duties. Healthcare managers have previously described their need for organizational support, but we lack knowledge of the preconditions and resources that help managers implement planned change.Methods: This prospective cohort study examined healthcare managers at three Swedish hospitals implementing lean production and two Swedish hospitals implementing their own improvement model. Questionnaire data from 2012, 2103, and 2014 were used in following up. We used t-tests and a linear mixed model design in analysing the data.Results: Healthcare managers who perceived strong support from managers, employees, colleagues, and the organization and managers with the longest managerial experience had the least negative appraisal of change. Managers who perceived strong support from employees, management, and the organizational structure perceived higher levels of healthcare process quality.Conclusions: Long managerial experience and strong support from managers, employees, and the organization are important formanagers’ appraisal of, work on, and successful implementation of planned change. Top management must therefore ensure that the healthcare managers have sufficient managerial experience and support before they delegate to them the responsibility to implement planned change.

  • 48.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health care managers' views on and approaches to implementing models for improving care processes2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To develop a deeper understanding of health-care managers' views on and approaches to the implementation of models for improving care processes. Background: In health care, there are difficulties in implementing models for improving care processes that have been decided on by upper management. Leadership approaches to this implementation can affect the outcome. Method: In-depth interviews with first- and second-line managers in Swedish hospitals were conducted and analysed using grounded theory. Results: 'Coaching for participation' emerged as a central theme for managers in handling top-down initiated process development. The vertical approach in this coaching addresses how managers attempt to sustain unit integrity through adapting and translating orders from top management. The horizontal approach in the coaching refers to managers' strategies for motivating and engaging their employees in implementation work. Conclusion and implications for nursing management: Implementation models for improving care processes require a coaching leadership built on close manager-employee interaction, mindfulness regarding the pace of change at the unit level, managers with the competence to share responsibility with their teams and engaged employees with the competence to share responsibility for improving the care processes, and organisational structures that support process-oriented work. Implications for nursing management are the importance of giving nurse managers knowledge of change management.

  • 49.
    Anthikat-Albert, Benedict D.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Yiallourou, Theresia I.
    Haba-Rubio, Jose
    Heinzer, Raphael
    Fonari, Eleonora
    Chevrey, Nicolas
    Santini, Francesco
    Stergiopulos, Nikolaos
    Martin, Bryn A.
    Continuous positive airway pressure impacts cerebral blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid motion: A phase contrast mri study2012In: Proceedings Of The ASME 2012 Summer Bioengineering Conference, Parts A and B, ASME Press, 2012, 569-570 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physiological impacts of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) are not yet fully understood. In this study we developed an MRI protocol to assess the impact of CPAP on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics in the upper cervical spine. MRI measurements were obtained on 14 healthy male subjects. The preliminary results indicated that the CSF pulsation decreased and venous outflow was altered with CPAP usage in comparison to the baseline values. Cerebral arterial flow was not impacted by CPAP usage. These findings support the hypothesis that the CSF system can act to dampen cerebral blood flow (CBF) pulsations.

  • 50.
    Antoni, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hed, Yvonne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordberg, Axel
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Nyström, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bifunctional Dendrimers: From Robust Synthesis and Accelerated One-Pot Postfunctionalization Strategy to Potential Applications2009In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 48, no 12, 2126-2130 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 1343
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