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  • 1.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    University of Houston, Biomedical Engineering.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Mining Social Media Big Data for Health2015In: IEEE PulseArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in information technology (IT) and big data are affecting nearly every facet of the public and private sectors. Social media platforms are one example of such advances: its nature allows users to connect, collaborate, and debate on any topic with comparative ease. The result is a hefty volume of user-generated content that, if properly mined and analyzed, could help the public and private health care sectors improve the quality of their products and services while reducing costs. The users of these platforms are the key to these improvements, as their valuable feedback will help improve health solutions.

  • 2.
    Asplund, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Nyberg, Tobias
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Electroactive polymers for neural interfaces2010In: Polymer chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, Vol. 1, no 9, p. 1374-1391Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of electroactive conjugated polymers, for the purpose of recording and eliciting signals in the neural systems in humans, can be used to fashion the interfaces between the two signalling systems of electronics and neural systems. The design of desirable chemical, mechanical and electrical properties in the electroactive polymer electrodes, and the means of integration of these into biological systems, are here reviewed.

  • 3. Blogg, S. Lesley
    et al.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Møllerløkken, Andreas
    Brubakk, Alf O.
    Ultrasound detection of vascular decompression bubbles: the influence of new technology and considerations on bubble load2014In: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine, ISSN 1833-3516, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 35-44Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Diving often causes the formation of 'silent' bubbles upon decompression. If the bubble load is high, then the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and the number of bubbles that could cross to the arterial circulation via a pulmonary shunt or patent foramen ovale increase. Bubbles can be monitored aurally, with Doppler ultrasound, or visually, with two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound imaging. Doppler grades and imaging grades can be compared with good agreement. Early 2D imaging units did not provide such comprehensive observations as Doppler, but advances in technology have allowed development of improved, portable, relatively inexpensive units. Most now employ harmonic technology; it was suggested that this could allow previously undetectable bubbles to be observed. Methods: This paper provides a review of current methods of bubble measurement and how new technology may be changing our perceptions of the potential relationship of these measurements to decompression illness. Secondly, 69 paired ultrasound images were made using conventional 2D ultrasound imaging and harmonic imaging. Images were graded on the Eftedal-Brubakk (EB) scale and the percentage agreement of the images calculated. The distribution of mismatched grades was analysed. Results: Fifty-four of the 69 paired images had matching grades. There was no significant difference in the distribution of high or low EB grades for the mismatched pairs. Conclusions: Given the good level of agreement between pairs observed, it seems unlikely that harmonic technology is responsible for any perceived increase in observed bubble loads, but it is probable that our increasing use of 2D ultrasound to assess dive profiles is changing our perception of 'normal' venous and arterial bubble loads. Methods to accurately investigate the load and size of bubbles developed will be helpful in the future in determining DCS risk.

  • 4.
    Eiken, Ola
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavic, Igor B.
    Kölegård, Roger
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Blood pressure regulation V: in vivo mechanical properties of precapillary vessels as affected by long-term pressure loading and unloading2014In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 499-509Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies are reviewed, concerning the in vivo wall stiffness of arteries and arterioles in healthy humans, and how these properties adapt to iterative increments or sustained reductions in local intravascular pressure. A novel technique was used, by which arterial and arteriolar stiffness were determined as changes in arterial diameter and flow, respectively, during graded increments in distending pressure in the blood vessels of an arm or a leg. Pressure-induced increases in diameter and flow were smaller in the lower leg than in the arm, indicating greater stiffness in the arteries/arterioles of the leg. A 5-wk period of intermittent intravascular pressure elevations in one arm reduced pressure distension and pressure-induced flow in the brachial artery by about 50%. Conversely, prolonged reduction of arterial/arteriolar pressure in the lower body by 5 wks of sustained horizontal bedrest, induced three-fold increases of the pressure-distension and pressure-flow responses in a tibial artery. Thus, the wall stiffness of arteries and arterioles are plastic properties that readily adapt to changes in the prevailing local intravascular pressure. The discussion concerns mechanisms underlying changes in local arterial/arteriolar stiffness as well as whether stiffness is altered by changes in myogenic tone and/or wall structure. As regards implications, regulation of local arterial/arteriolar stiffness may facilitate control of arterial pressure in erect posture and conditions of exaggerated intravascular pressure gradients. That increased intravascular pressure leads to increased arteriolar wall stiffness also supports the notion that local pressure loading may constitute a prime mover in the development of vascular changes in hypertension.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Orvik, Arne
    Strandmark, Margaretha
    Nordsteien, Anita
    Torp, Steffen
    Management and Leadership Approaches to Health Promotion and Sustainable Workplaces: A Scoping Review2017In: Societies, ISSN 1090-9389, E-ISSN 2075-4698, Vol. 7, no 2, article id 14Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whole-system approaches linking workplace health promotion to the development of a sustainable working life have been advocated. The aim of this scoping review was to map out if and how whole-system approaches to workplace health promotion with a focus on management, leadership, and economic efficiency have been used in Nordic health promotion research. In addition, we wanted to investigate, in depth, if and how management and/or leadership approaches related to sustainable workplaces are addressed. Eighty-three articles were included in an analysis of the studies' aims and content, research design, and country. For a further in-depth qualitative content analysis we excluded 63 articles in which management and/or leadership were only one of several factors studied. In the in-depth analysis of the 20 remaining studies, four main categories connected to sustainable workplaces emerged: studies including a whole system understanding; studies examining success factors for the implementation of workplace health promotion; studies using sustainability for framing the study; and studies highlighting health risks with an explicit economic focus. Aspects of sustainability were, in most articles, only included for framing the importance of the studies, and only few studies addressed aspects of sustainable workplaces from the perspective of a whole-system approach. Implications from this scoping review are that future Nordic workplace health promotion research needs to integrate health promotion and economic efficiency to a greater extent, in order to contribute to societal effectiveness and sustainability.

  • 6. Hagerman, I.
    et al.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering. Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Huddinge, Sweden.
    Dahlström, U. L. F.
    Ekman, I.
    Willenheimer, R.
    Boman, K.
    Diastolisk hjärtsvikt - Symtom och etiologi2007In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 104, no 34, p. 2345-2347Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hebert, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Structural Biotechnology.
    Jegerschold, Caroline
    The structure of membrane associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism as determined by electron crystallography2007In: Current opinion in structural biology, ISSN 0959-440X, E-ISSN 1879-033X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 396-404Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG) are involved in biosynthesis of arachidonic-derived mediators of pain, fever, and inflammation as well as in biotransformation and detoxification of electrophilic substances. Structure determination of microsomal glutathione transferase 1 using electron crystallography has provided the first atomic model of an MAPEG member. The homotrimer consists of three repeats of a four-helix transmembrane bundle with the largest extramembranous domain connecting the first and second helix and with a short proline rich loop on the same side between helices three and four. Residues of importance for intramolecular or intermolecular contacts as well as for stabilizing the active site have been identified and the results can be applied for interpreting structure-function relationship for similar MAPEG members.

  • 8.
    Holden, Richard J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Lean Thinking in Emergency Departments: A Critical Review2011In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0196-0644, E-ISSN 1097-6760, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 265-278Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emergency departments (EDs) face problems with crowding, delays, cost containment, and patient safety. To address these and other problems, EDs increasingly implement an approach called Lean thinking. This study critically reviewed 18 articles describing the implementation of Lean in 15 EDs in the United States, Australia, and Canada. An analytic framework based on human factors engineering and occupational research generated 6 core questions about the effects of Lean on ED work structures and processes, patient care, and employees, as well as the factors on which Lean's success is contingent. The review revealed numerous ED process changes, often involving separate patient streams, accompanied by structural changes such as new technologies, communication systems, staffing changes, and the reorganization of physical space. Patient care usually improved after implementation of Lean, with many EDs reporting decreases in length of stay, waiting times, and proportion of patients leaving the ED without being seen. Few null or negative patient care effects were reported, and studies typically did not report patient quality or safety outcomes beyond patient satisfaction. The effects of Lean on employees were rarely discussed or measured systematically, but there were some indications of positive effects on employees and organizational culture. Success factors included employee involvement, management support, and preparedness for change. Despite some methodological, practical, and theoretic concerns, Lean appears to offer significant improvement opportunities. Many questions remain about Lean's effects on patient health and employees and how Lean can be best implemented in health care.

  • 9.
    Kuang, Qie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Purhonen, Pasi
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Structure of potassium channels2015In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences (CMLS), ISSN 1420-682X, E-ISSN 1420-9071, Vol. 17, no 19, p. 3677-3693Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Potassium channels ubiquitously exist in nearly all kingdoms of life and perform diverse but important functions. Since the first atomic structure of a prokaryotic potassium channel (KcsA, a channel from Streptomyces lividans) was determined, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of potassium channels and channels conducting other ions. In this review, we discuss the structure of various kinds of potassium channels, including the potassium channel with the pore-forming domain only (KcsA), voltage-gated, inwardly rectifying, tandem pore domain, and ligand-gated ones. The general properties shared by all potassium channels are introduced first, followed by specific features in each class. Our purpose is to help readers to grasp the basic concepts, to be familiar with the property of the different domains, and to understand the structure and function of the potassium channels better.

  • 10.
    Kuang, Qie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Purhonen, Pasi
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Two-Dimensional Crystallization Procedure, from Protein Expression to Sample Preparation2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 693869Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane proteins play important roles for living cells. Structural studies of membrane proteins provide deeper understanding of their mechanisms and further aid in drug design. As compared to other methods, electron microscopy is uniquely suitable for analysis of a broad range of specimens, from small proteins to large complexes. Of various electron microscopic methods, electron crystallography is particularly well-suited to study membrane proteins which are reconstituted into two-dimensional crystals in lipid environments. In this review, we discuss the steps and parameters for obtaining large and well-ordered twodimensional crystals. A general description of the principle in each step is provided since this information can also be applied to other biochemical and biophysical methods. The examples are taken from our own studies and published results with related proteins. Our purpose is to give readers a more general idea of electron crystallography and to share our experiences in obtaining suitable crystals for data collection.

  • 11. McIntosh, Andrew Stuart
    et al.
    Andersen, Thor Einar
    Bahr, Roald
    Greenwald, Richard
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Turner, Michael
    Varese, Massimo
    McCrory, Paul
    Sports helmets now and in the future2011In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 45, no 16, p. 1258-1265Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper reports on a symposium on sports helmets and presents a synthesis of information and opinion from a range of presenters and disciplines. A review of the literature shows that helmets play an important role in head injury prevention and control. Helmets have been shown to be very efficacious and effective in a range of sports and in preventing specific head injury risks, especially moderate to severe head injury. The symposium emphasised the importance of helmet standards and the need for further development. There are calls for helmets that address the needs of competitive (elite) athletes separate to helmets for recreational athletes. Deficiencies in the evidence base for head injury risks and helmet efficacy and effectiveness were identified in some sports. Issues in designing helmets that are suitable to prevent severe head injuries and concussion were discussed and explained from biomechanical and engineering perspectives. The need to evaluate helmet performance in oblique impacts and incorporate this into standards was covered in a number of presentations. There are emerging opportunities with in-helmet technology to improve impact performance or to measure impact exposure. In-helmet technology as it matures may provide critical information on the severity of the impact, the location of the injured athlete, for example, snowboarder, and assist in the retrieval and immediate, as well as the long-term medical management of the athlete. It was identified that athletes, families and sports organisations can benefit from access to information on helmet performance. The importance of selecting the appropriate-sized helmet and ensuring that the helmet and visor were adjusted and restrained optimally was emphasised. The translation pathway from the science to new and better helmets is the development of appropriate helmet standards and the requirement for only helmets to be used that are certified to those standards.

  • 12. Stenberg, U.
    et al.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management. Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Ruland, Cornelia
    Living Close to a Person With Cancer: A Review of the International Literature and Implications for Social Work Practice2014In: Journal of gerontological social work, ISSN 0163-4372, E-ISSN 1540-4048, Vol. 57, no 6-7, p. 531-555Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To help family caregivers (FCs), social workers need to understand the complexity of FC's experiences and challenges. For this systematic review, several relevant, multidisciplinary electronic databases were searched. Of 1,643 titles identified, 108 articles met the inclusion criteria and are included in this review. Various experiences, symptoms, and burden related to caregiving responsibilities are described and discussed. The understanding evolving from this study about the FC's own health risk, caregiver burden, and experiences over time can enhance a social worker's awareness of an FC's challenging situation and the potential impact this has on the FC's ability to provide care to the patient.

1 - 12 of 12
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